[ ]   [ ]   [ ]                        [ ]      [ ]   [ ]
Jethro Tull — Skating Away (on the Thin Ice of the New Day)
Album: War Child
Avg rating:
7.5

Your rating:
Total ratings: 3008









Released: 1974
Length: 3:21
Plays (last 30 days): 2
Meanwhile back in the year One
when you belonged to no one
You didn't stand a chance son,
if your pants were undone.
`Cause you were bred for humanity and sold to society
One day you'll wake up in the Present Day
A million generations removed from expectations
Of being who you really want to be.

Skating away
Skating away
Skating away on the thin ice of the New Day.

So as you push off from the shore,
Won't you turn your head once more
and make your peace with everyone?
For those who choose to stay,
Will live just one more day
To do the things they should have done.
And as you cross the wilderness,
spinning in your emptiness:
You feel you have to pray.
Looking for a sign
That the Universal Mind
has written you into the Passion Play.

Skating away
on the thin ice of the New Day.

And as you cross the circle line,
the ice-wall creaks behind
You're a rabbit on the run.
And the silver splinters fly in the corner of your eye
Shining in the setting sun.
Well, do you ever get the feeling that the story's
Too damn real and in the present tense?
Or that everybody's on the stage, and it seems like
You're the only person sitting in the audience?

Skating away
on the thin ice of the New Day.
Comments (330)add comment
 whaleboneman wrote:
If everyone could ban just one artist...what would we listen to?

The local college radio station (WREK-FM) has a similar concept in one of their station I.D. recordings: "Listening to ALL the birds in the forest."
Love the Bursting Out version too
Little discussed fact: Jethro Tull's 1969 release of Stand Up was full of good songs such as "We Used to Know." It was very popular when the Eagles performed it as a commentary on the entertainment business in "Hotel California." It was also popular when French artist Francis Cabril released "La Corrida", a commentary on bull-fighting from the bull's perspective.

Musicians have voted. The tune stands up. 10

Edit: For Americans, the French practice bloodless bull-fighting in certain provinces, at least for public spectacle. It involves snatching something akin to a rose from between the horns of a young bull. However, there is no escaping its bloody legacy.
Love this Is it just me, but (and Iā€™ve never noticed it before), there is something about the phrasing and key that overlaps Thick As A Brick?
Ah. Living vicariously via Bruce Cockburn.
I've seen Ian twice and always, always, listen anytime I hear the Tull. Can't say as much for most bands. My wife, who is not particularly a rockNroller, loved both concerts and cranks it up on the stereo. 
 dublanica wrote:

One of the most original, unique and wonderful groups to come out of the 60's!
Severely under-appreciated.  I sat in the 7th row at Madison Square Garden in NYC for the "Aqualung" tour.  Did not ever get any better than Jethro Tull!



We saw that show at Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto - so brilliant.  Also the Thick As A Brick Tour.
Some would say timeless .. perhaps it is timely.
I love this, and it makes me want to hear, celebrate, and cerebrate Thick As A Brick... Bravo, RP, and rock on, Jethro Tull!
 greiffenstein wrote:

Tull were some deep deep thinkers.  Consider the final lines of this song, 
"Well, do you ever get the feeling...that everybody's on the stage and it seems like, You're the only person sitting in the audience?"
I think JT predicted modern social media obsession
That's certainly how I feel on a daily basis



Those lines always struck me as very insightful or predictive as you've stated...especially for as long ago as they were written...
Brilliance comes in many forms...
 passsion8 wrote:

I was walking back to my car in Tarrytown NY last summer with a bag of mexican takeout, when I passed the Tarrytown Music Hall. I could barely hear a flute being played coming from within. I paused and recognised this tune. Out of sheer curiousity why anyone would be playing this, I ventured in. The doors were unlocked as it was around 5:30 in the afternoon and no one was around to query my entry. As I enterred the darkened hall, I noticed a beret wearing man on stage moving a mic stand and tugging on some wires. There was an overstuffed couch behind him and a few oriental rugs on the floor. Thinking I heard a bootleg copy of Tull on the PA, I was about to leave when I noticed the man on stage had a flute in his hands. I paused quietly and watched as he once again played a quick rendition of "Skating Away" and then some bizarre riff to end with. A,"That's good" came over the PA, confirming what I imagined to be the sound man accepting the volume level. I stated quite assuredly,"No, that's timeless." Ian shielded his eyes to see me and replied,"Cheers, mate", or something similar and then followed with,"Did I pass the audition?" To my dismay, the concert that evening was sold out, but I got a 14 second private mini show to stoke the fires of memory lane. My wife still thinks I dreamt it.



he could have given you a free AllAreas pass... nice memory anyway.
great selection of music 
Tull were some deep deep thinkers.  Consider the final lines of this song, 
"Well, do you ever get the feeling...that everybody's on the stage and it seems like, You're the only person sitting in the audience?"
I think JT predicted modern social media obsession
That's certainly how I feel on a daily basis
 jasonv wrote:

If I could personally ban one artist from RP, it'd be Jethro Tull. So happy for PSD, and am happy for the rest of you enjoying JT :-).



If everyone could ban just one artist...what would we listen to?
 paulhelenb100449 wrote:
 
 
"Doesn't age well" ?

I was thinking just the opposite..   First heard this when a friend included it on a mix tape for me, around 1990. I assumed it was from one of JT's late 80s albums.  Quite surprised to see this was actually from `74!
More Tull-especially older Tull. This Was, Stand UP, Benefit.
Hall of Fame soon - one can hope!
 SandraTrebbne wrote:

The memory is 'golden' and that is all that matters. Thanks for sharing! Magical.
 

 SandraTrebbne wrote:
Such a beautiful experience. Thank you for sharing. The human experience seems to be the only glue that's holding us together at this time and I truly appreciate it now. Bless you for taking the time to share it here. It is truly magical and all part of the purpose of this platform that our friends have provided here. Purely golden and appreciated. Thank you.

 

 passsion8 wrote:
I was walking back to my car in Tarrytown NY last summer with a bag of mexican takeout, when I passed the Tarrytown Music Hall. I could barely hear a flute being played coming from within. I paused and recognised this tune. Out of sheer curiousity why anyone would be playing this, I ventured in. The doors were unlocked as it was around 5:30 in the afternoon and no one was around to query my entry. As I enterred the darkened hall, I noticed a beret wearing man on stage moving a mic stand and tugging on some wires. There was an overstuffed couch behind him and a few oriental rugs on the floor. Thinking I heard a bootleg copy of Tull on the PA, I was about to leave when I noticed the man on stage had a flute in his hands. I paused quietly and watched as he once again played a quick rendition of "Skating Away" and then some bizarre riff to end with. A,"That's good" came over the PA, confirming what I imagined to be the sound man accepting the volume level. I stated quite assuredly,"No, that's timeless." Ian shielded his eyes to see me and replied,"Cheers, mate", or something similar and then followed with,"Did I pass the audition?" To my dismay, the concert that evening was sold out, but I got a 14 second private mini show to stoke the fires of memory lane. My wife still thinks I dreamt it.
 

 tutor_turtle wrote:
For those of us who came of age during the 'Tull' years.. great memories indeed.
I have just read a lot of  fans' memories and am transported myself. The fact that we do remember at this point is grand! And I even remember who Tutor Turtle was...
Please please no more Jethro Tull....it just doesn't age well
 expatlar wrote:

'Hobbit-rock'? I don't know what that is, but I raised my rating of the song from a 7 to a 9 just to be more un-like you. 
 

I was dating a much younger woman, must be about 15 years ago now. Jethro Tull was huge part of my youth and when he came to Ft. Lauderdale FL. I bough two tickets and took her. I was floored by how good and tight the band still was and brought back all the memories growing up with me and my buddies sitting in my room passing around the album cover and maybe a joint or two. Then I looked over at her next to me bored as hell, it brought me back to reality in a hurry. So I decided to not to look over in more and enjoy the concert in my own distant world.
Her and I didn't last much longer after that. But the new and old memories that the Tull band brought to me that night will stay with me forever.
What an odd reflection this brings up in me (now). 

I first heard this little "ditty" back in 1974.  I must have been about....19 at the time.  I loved all things Tull back then.

And now at this point in my life I'm hearing it again.  And after an absence of some time, too.

I feel like I'm looking back thru a long, very long, tube at my younger self.  Not in a bad way mind you.  Just.....odd. 

How else to explain that the person I am now seems to be dancing with the person I was then.  All in one-way glass fashion with that younger self who's totally oblivious to me, his older self. 

So strange.  So grand. 

Makes me wonder if some future self is doing the same thing to me, now?  The world of the Quantum writ large. 

All that you are, the entire arch of your life, sometimes it collapses into one moment.  Call it a transition point.  

Listening to this tune is one such moment for me.  Is it for (some of) you?

(And no I'm not smokin' anything funny....if you can't tell I don't find I need any assistance from that sort of thing these days.  My mind can go there all by its lonesome.  Heh)

Highlow
American Net'Zen
Wonderful, haven't heard this gem in years, ..."8"!
no more
For those of us who came of age during the 'Tull' years.. great memories indeed.
 passsion8 wrote:
I was walking back to my car in Tarrytown NY last summer with a bag of mexican takeout, when I passed the Tarrytown Music Hall. I could barely hear a flute being played coming from within. I paused and recognised this tune. Out of sheer curiousity why anyone would be playing this, I ventured in. The doors were unlocked as it was around 5:30 in the afternoon and no one was around to query my entry. As I enterred the darkened hall, I noticed a beret wearing man on stage moving a mic stand and tugging on some wires. There was an overstuffed couch behind him and a few oriental rugs on the floor. Thinking I heard a bootleg copy of Tull on the PA, I was about to leave when I noticed the man on stage had a flute in his hands. I paused quietly and watched as he once again played a quick rendition of "Skating Away" and then some bizarre riff to end with. A,"That's good" came over the PA, confirming what I imagined to be the sound man accepting the volume level. I stated quite assuredly,"No, that's timeless." Ian shielded his eyes to see me and replied,"Cheers, mate", or something similar and then followed with,"Did I pass the audition?" To my dismay, the concert that evening was sold out, but I got a 14 second private mini show to stoke the fires of memory lane. My wife still thinks I dreamt it.
 
I had a similar experience, although not so up close and personal, when the Stones toured last. Their show in the nearby Georgia Tech football stadium was long ago sold out, so I wasn't going to that. But at some point in the afternoon, I walked my dog out back of the house to a green common space that forms a weird kinda bowl, physically and acoustically. As TI's (former) rap studio is nearby, we used to get a lot of strong audio, and the assorted gunfire/shooting/murder, in the bowl-green that way until the city cracked down on all that kinda thing. But that day Jagger's universally-recognizable voice floated right into the green, followed by "Some Girls" clear as a bell during the Stones' sound check at the stadium a few miles away. And then a couple of other instantly-recognized hits followed. So yeah, a private mini show. Still makes me grin, thinking about it. 
 lindaurq wrote:

particularly apt today
 
I would say the best line is "...everybody's on the stage and you're the only person sitting in the audience".
Martin Barre, one of the most underrated rock guitarists there is.
I never got  too deep into Jethro but the album cover is so very cool and yes the words are interestingšŸ˜¬
 talexb wrote:
This song has one of my favourite lyric lines ever -- "Skating away on the thin ice of a new day." Whether that relates to a trip, a relationship, a job, or just feeling fragile on a particular day. Brilliant.
 
particularly apt today
My nickname (one of them) in High School was "Thin Ice".  I loved Tull, had a great T-shirt much over worn.  High School is an "unstable time"!  Ha!  Thanks RP for playing all this great stuff all the time!    Happy 20th anniversary!
This song has one of my favourite lyric lines ever -- "Skating away on the thin ice of a new day." Whether that relates to a trip, a relationship, a job, or just feeling fragile on a particular day. Brilliant.
My Wife has agreed to play Skating Away on the Thin Ice of the New Day at my memorial.
 westslope wrote:
All this great music and Anderson would rather farm salmon....  
 
Ageing changes one's priorities.  Perhaps he now gets more joy from his salmon than from his flute.  Besides, "all this great music" hasn't been deleted ....
They can form a group.  The Knights who say "NAY"Because this is a solid 9, imho.

 
konakid wrote:
Love, Love, Love this song and the mood it creates for me. All you nay sayers just go and say NAY!!!  {#Jump}
 

One of the most original, unique and wonderful groups to come out of the 60's!
Severely under-appreciated.  I sat in the 7th row at Madison Square Garden in NYC for the "Aqualung" tour.  Did not ever get any better than Jethro Tull!
Love, Love, Love this song and the mood it creates for me. All you nay sayers just go and say NAY!!!  {#Jump}
 patrick_larson wrote:
NO! NO!
 
A swift PSD will do the trick, no need for a tantrum Pat
NO! NO!
 passsion8 wrote:
I was walking back to my car in Tarrytown NY last summer with a bag of mexican takeout, when I passed the Tarrytown Music Hall. I could barely hear a flute being played coming from within. I paused and recognised this tune. Out of sheer curiousity why anyone would be playing this, I ventured in. The doors were unlocked as it was around 5:30 in the afternoon and no one was around to query my entry. As I enterred the darkened hall, I noticed a beret wearing man on stage moving a mic stand and tugging on some wires. There was an overstuffed couch behind him and a few oriental rugs on the floor. Thinking I heard a bootleg copy of Tull on the PA, I was about to leave when I noticed the man on stage had a flute in his hands. I paused quietly and watched as he once again played a quick rendition of "Skating Away" and then some bizarre riff to end with. A,"That's good" came over the PA, confirming what I imagined to be the sound man accepting the volume level. I stated quite assuredly,"No, that's timeless." Ian shielded his eyes to see me and replied,"Cheers, mate", or something similar and then followed with,"Did I pass the audition?" To my dismay, the concert that evening was sold out, but I got a 14 second private mini show to stoke the fires of memory lane. My wife still thinks I dreamt it.
 

That's a cool story.  I used to live in North Tarrytown  (now known as Sleepy Hollow) many years ago; there wasn't much to that music hall back then; in fact I think it was boarded from the late '70s until the early '80s.
 Ag3nt0rang3 wrote:
Ugh. Hobbit-rock. I'll pass, thanks.

 
Hobbits whoop ass with a limb and have good music taste
 Ag3nt0rang3 wrote:
Ugh. Hobbit-rock. I'll pass, thanks.

 
Agree. I love so much prog including PFM and Gentle Giant, but Tull has never been a pleasant experience for me. YMMV, which is OK.
I love this song. But the MP3 you're playing sounds pretty awful.
My favorite Jethro Tull song.
Saw Ian on his "Jethro Tull" the rock opera tour. Poor guy really has little vocal ability left. He used guest singer pre recorded videos for several songs. Still his flute playing is exciting and sounded good. Plus, he can still hold "The pose".
All things considered it was a good show, but it wouldn't have killed him to bring a few singers and do it all live. The West coast shows were completely or close to sold out. 
All this great music and Anderson would rather farm salmon....  
 Ag3nt0rang3 wrote:
Ugh. Hobbit-rock. I'll pass, thanks.

 
Hehe. The longer I listen to this, the truer your assessment becomes. 
 fitmartin wrote:
Ian is a crazy talented artist!

thanks Bill!

{#Bananajam}

 
And what's more important than the talent by itself: he had the guts to work it out into something unique....
 Ag3nt0rang3 wrote:
Ugh. Hobbit-rock. I'll pass, thanks.

 
Hobbits are quite fun to party with, especially when a wizard and some dwarves show up. {#Curtain}
 Ag3nt0rang3 wrote:
Ugh. Hobbit-rock. I'll pass, thanks.

 
'Hobbit-rock'? I don't know what that is, but I raised my rating of the song from a 7 to a 9 just to be more un-like you. 
Ugh. Hobbit-rock. I'll pass, thanks.
Builds and then everybody kicks in. Love it
classic!!!
Ian wrote some real beauties
Wow! Flashback to my high school days. 
An apt way to describe one who is battling depression or similar in a positive manner (I know someone who is). You never know when you might "come a cropper" despite your best intentions.
Good tune too.
 mread wrote:
Album cover with image inverted (colorwise):

Album cover image, colors inverted

 
definate improvement, with the city in negative view it matches the title of the album better
What a wonderful tune - one of my all-time favorites
Thankyou RP for making life soooooooo much sweeter! You too Ian Anderson..
.{#Heartkiss}
Always listen to this at Christmas time.
 ScottishWillie wrote:

English? I think not. Ian Anderson is Scottish. Born in Dunfermline grew up in Edinburgh



 
Stepped in it, din 'e?
Album cover with image inverted (colorwise):

Album cover image, colors inverted


 gjeeg wrote:
Anderson's overflowing genius and energy and productivity in the 70's captivated a good portion of my youth. Enthralled, was I.
Chased them everywhere live. Met the band once. Mad, tripped out, creative shows were orgasmic affairs. All lost to history. Never captured for posterity. Unlike the dreary, worthless bands of today so well documented in high def, but worthless.

 
WELL STATED!
 oldfart48 wrote:
Tull, always welcome.... thanks Bill.......{#Sunny}

 
I concur!
Sad to hear of Glen Cornick's passing.  Met him once when he played in a band called Wild Turkey at gig in Glasgow. A really nice and genuine bloke.  As a major contributor to early Tull's good work, and Anderson's creativity, he is fondly remembered.  Martin Barre must be a mellow and very peaceful guy to be able to cope with Anderson's enigmatic and occasional blast-offs.  No other Tull members have stayed the course !!
 hempmandan wrote:
Best rock band to ever rock the flute!!! Truly English...
 

English? I think not. Ian Anderson is Scottish. Born in Dunfermline grew up in Edinburgh


Anderson's overflowing genius and energy and productivity in the 70's captivated a good portion of my youth. Enthralled, was I.
Chased them everywhere live. Met the band once. Mad, tripped out, creative shows were orgasmic affairs. All lost to history. Never captured for posterity. Unlike the dreary, worthless bands of today so well documented in high def, but worthless.
 Webfoot wrote:

Fortunately a fairly short list.

 
Add one-legged flautist and the list shrinks considerably.
Music from high school days that made you think. @skating away...in the North
 passsion8 wrote:

My girlfriend does too. You must be under 50 years old. Guess you had to live through it.
Stunning stuff before the "Songs From The Wood album. Meh thereafter. Best albums from "This Was" through "Passion Play."
Dig around those tracks and come into the fold! 

 
It has little to do with age.  Being born before 1965 does not make one automatically like this song; I know that for a fact.
 hempmandan wrote:
Best rock band to ever rock the flute!!! Truly English...
 
 
Fortunately a fairly short list.
Love the earlier version from the Chateau d'Herouville sessions.
 jasonv wrote:
If I could personally ban one artist from RP, it'd be Jethro Tull. So happy for PSD, and am happy for the rest of you enjoying JT :-).

 
My girlfriend does too. You must be under 50 years old. Guess you had to live through it.
Stunning stuff before the "Songs From The Wood album. Meh thereafter. Best albums from "This Was" through "Passion Play."
Dig around those tracks and come into the fold! 
Love early Tull! And later Tull , and ANY Tull
Best rock band to ever rock the flute!!! Truly English...
 
Tull at their best, me thinks.
Ian is a crazy talented artist!

thanks Bill!

{#Bananajam}
 Lazarus wrote:

Everybody in my alien space craft loves this song...

A Visit With Ian Anderson – Yes, That Ian Anderson! 

 
Thanks for the link to the interview. 

Looking foward to to seeing him in concert this week.  
 Lazarus wrote:
I am making song comments...  I am not poaching...

I am proud of bringing narcissism to a whole nude level...  love this song...
 
Everybody in my alien space craft loves this song...

A Visit With Ian Anderson – Yes, That Ian Anderson! 
 Dinges,_the_Dude wrote:
Glenn Cornick, one of the founders of JT, died last Friday august 29th at the age of 67 in Hilo (Hawaii)...

 
This is very sad - I always liked Cornick's style best of all the Tull bassists - there was always this great counterpoint between him and Martin Barre's guitar playing.

one of my very favorite songs ever
{#Sunny}{#Sunny}
Glenn Cornick, one of the founders of JT, died last Friday august 29th at the age of 67 in Hilo (Hawaii)...
Blow your nose, Ian - you sound like you've got adenoids. Still, loads must have loved the sound back in the day, as yer man Anderson retired to a big spread on the Isle of Skye on the proceeds of JT sales. Never could bear them myself, though the cover to Thick as a Brick was very funny.
If I could personally ban one artist from RP, it'd be Jethro Tull. So happy for PSD, and am happy for the rest of you enjoying JT :-).
The masterpiece. 10.
Better than a woman {#Wink}
YES, YES, YES, MORE, MORE, MORE............ian just kicks ass.
Fantastic.
Pure Poetry
Absolutely great! More, please!
It blows...make it stop!
Absolutely wonderful!  {#Bounce}
Oh, how appropriate for us in Northern New York today given that everything is coated with 1/2" of ice or more.
This track is an out-take of the originally "A Passion Play", an album which was released on venyl (33 rpm) when CDs didn´t exist. It was one "Song" nearly 45 minutes long which spans over both sides of the Album.
Like "Thick As A Brick" - the "predecessor".
Worshiped them. Followed them all over in the 70's.
Met them (Martin and Barriemore) in a hotel hallway once, stalking them.
Had spoken to Ian on the hotel phone.
Those were the days.
Tons of genius and virtuosity.
Nothing remotely like this today.
Real talent, beautiful music with awesome lyrics. Unique sound. More Tull please? Maybe something from Heavy Horses? One Brown Mouse?
Solid 9.

Hey Bill, play "Mother Goose" please!!
Tull, always welcome.... thanks Bill.......{#Sunny}
 
Kokoloco53 wrote:
Ian Anderson, what a unique rock sound he created with this band. Saw him live once. Why I don't own more of his music on CD is beyond me, though I've got almost all of his material on 33 1/3 LP.  Today's rockers just don't come close to the quality of musicianship that many of these old artists did. One of the big reasons for that is that kids today aren't studying how to play pianos, trumpets, guitars, etc in the very demanding classical music genre that requires at least an hour a day to even start to begin mastering. And one of Jethro Tull's most interesting works, is the album Passion Play, which can be fully enjoyed only by listening start to finish like a symphony.

 
Agree completely!
 
B  R  I  L  L  I  A  N  T
Ian Anderson, what a unique rock sound he created with this band. Saw him live once. Why I don't own more of his music on CD is beyond me, though I've got almost all of his material on 33 1/3 LP.  Today's rockers just don't come close to the quality of musicianship that many of these old artists did. One of the big reasons for that is that kids today aren't studying how to play pianos, trumpets, guitars, etc in the very demanding classical music genre that requires at least an hour a day to even start to begin mastering. And one of Jethro Tull's most interesting works, is the album Passion Play, which can be fully enjoyed only by listening start to finish like a symphony.
Love the distorted guitar over the chorus. The entire construction of this track is superb. Benefit and Stand Up are my two favs. 
 {#Yell} not nearly enough tull, more please.{#Dancingbanana}
 Poacher wrote:

You are now replying to yourself? You bring narcissism to a whole new level.
 

I am making song comments...  I am not poaching...

I am proud of bringing narcissism to a whole nude level...  love this song...
 
 Lazarus wrote:
big stud Romeo Tuma wrote:
brilliant song from a truly great great great album...  it is the first song on the second side of the album War Child, released in 1974...  love it...

 
Time flies when we're having fun...  everybody in my church loves this song...
 
 
You are now replying to yourself? You bring narcissism to a whole new level.
big stud Romeo Tuma wrote:


brilliant song from a truly great great great album...  it is the first song on the second side of the album War Child, released in 1974...  love it...

 
 
Time flies when we're having fun...  everybody in my church loves this song...
 
 Orodrigues wrote:
Best JT song... Reminds my years in college, discovering a new world of sounds, sensations, feelings and hopes. And I remember Manuel, a classmate that knew everything about JT and had almost all its albuns and I recorded almost all of them in cassete tapes. "Skating away" was a passion at first hearing, and since then (40 years ago) I always stop everything to listen this song, wherever I am. And I remember college, friends and lovers, all together walking on the thin ice of a new life, full of dreams.

 

same story, swap "Manuel" for "Jon" and "40" for "25".

well said 
Hurls me back to my teens.... ah...
Best JT song... Reminds my years in college, discovering a new world of sounds, sensations, feelings and hopes. And I remember Manuel, a classmate that knew everything about JT and had almost all its albuns and I recorded almost all of them in cassete tapes. "Skating away" was a passion at first hearing, and since then (40 years ago) I always stop everything to listen this song, wherever I am. And I remember college, friends and lovers, all together walking on the thin ice of a new life, full of dreams.

I forgot to rate this song?  Great holy smoking doggies!!  Big 10!!

Everybody in my church loves this song...
 
ahh, the 70's thanks  R.P.
personally  'thick as a brick'  and  'skating away'  just completely define jethro tull. absolutely my favorite stuff of theirs. say what u will about aqualung and passion play, this was the quintessential tull
 maryte wrote:
Well, now I feel obliged to tell my "Tull Tale". Back in the late 80s, I lived in San Antonio and, aside from Rush, we really only got heavy metal/hard rock shows. The closest Tull was getting that year was DFW, so my (now ex) husband and I decided to make the trek. It was very cold for November and our truck didn't have heat, so we bundled up in long black wool stormtrooper coats and ventured north. I can't say the show was exceptional, mainly because the venue was inappropriate for Tull's music (the Fairgrounds). But after the show, we hung around the parking lot, hoping against hope for an opportunity to snag an autograph. We were already in our truck (still trying to keep warm) when an entourage emerged from backstage. A van followed by a limo followed by a smaller car accelerated through the parking lot. So we joined the hunt, dashing through Dallas like madbrains. We followed them all the way to the Hotel Crescent Court. We almost got out, with autographable materials in hand, when I noticed the silhouettes of two passengers still in the van. The other vehicles, it turns out, were not part of the group, but other autograph seekers as well (even the guy driving the limo). While that group mobbed the band as they emerged from van, I suggested we just sit tight, because Ian Anderson was still in the van. The van took off and we gave chase (at least as much chase as a 1970 pickup truck can give). At one point on the highway, just as the van exited, we noticed a police car entered the highway. We were concerned that the van driver might have used a radio (no cell phones then) to report a beat-up truck following them, so instead of following the van, we waited until the next exit (of course, we were being unnecessarily paranoid). We circled back around in a more industrial neighborhood of Dallas and noticed the van was parked in a Denny's parking lot. My travelling companion had to pee like a racehorse, so he went into the Denny's to use their facilities. When he came out, he was motioning for me to get out of the truck. I was gathering my stuff when the van driver called out to us. He was very nice and confirmed that yes, indeed, that was Ian Anderson and his road manager, and did I need a Sharpie for the autograph? So we walk into Denny's, program and Sharpie in hand, in long black coats and see Ian and his manager sitting at the counter, eating soup and water. I really didn't want to disturb his meal, but by this time, they saw us and motioned for us to come over (I'm sure the Tull program in my trembling hands was a giveaway). I was struck dumb, couldn't utter a word, but the conversation around me is engraved in my brain. Ian: We're you at the show tonight? Me: (nods dumbly) Traveling Companion: Yes, it was great! Road Manager (with German accent): You look like you were at the theatre in those coats! Ian: Would you like me to sign that? Me: (nods dumbly, handing the program & Sharpie to him) TC: If you're interested, we'd be honoured to buy you a Pilsner Urquell at a nice pub nearby when you're through with your meal. (I knew PU to be IA's favourite beer at that time) Ian: Thank you, but whilst I appreciate the offer of the Urquell (pronouncing it "UR-kl"), in about an hour, I expect to be asleep, dreaming of large black pussies. Me: (croaks) Thank you! And so we took our leave. And for those of you less familiar, his colourful parting comment was a specific reference to his farm, which was chock-a-block with cats, mostly black (and large, I presume), used to keep the rodent population down and for company too, I'm sure. He would be dreaming of home.
 
Good story.
not everything from jethro tull did survive the passage of time intact very godd. imho, most of their early "hits" sounds terribly dated nowadays (thinking of Aqualung, Locomotive Breath et al...)
Skating Away is an example of the opposite. i do not remember having been impressed by this one when it came out. now it´s a strong candidate in a "best songs of jethro tull"- competition...