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The Youngbloods — Darkness, Darkness
Album: Elephant Mountain
Avg rating:
7.3

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1699









Released: 1969
Length: 3:44
Plays (last 30 days): 2
Darkness, Darkness
Be my pillow
Take my hand
And let me sleep
In the coolness of your shadow
In the silence of your deep

Darkness, Darkness
Hide my yearning
For the things I cannot be
Keep my mind from constant turning
Toward the things I cannot see now
Things I cannot see now
Things I cannot see

Darkness, darkness,
Long and lonesome,
Ease the day that brings me pain.
I have felt the edge of sadness,
I have known the depth of fear.
Darkness, darkness, be my blanket,
Cover me with the endless night,
Take away, take away the pain of knowing,
Fill the emptiness of right now,
Emptiness of right now, now, now
Emptiness of ri-ight now.

Darkness, darkness, be my pillow,
Take my hand, and let me sleep.
In the coolness of your shadow,
In the silence, the silence of your deep.
Darkness, darkness, be my blanket,
Cover me with the endless night,
Take away, take away the pain of knowing
Fill the emptiness of right now,
Emptiness of right now now now
Emptiness of right....
Oh yeah Oh yeah
Emptiness, emptiness
Oh yeah
Comments (193)add comment
Great song but got played to death on commercial radio
 Liam_Metaluna wrote:
One of my favorite albums after getting out of the military when Nixon brought us home from Southeast Asia. I saw him when he was the first act to play the Gorge at George in Washington state. Got some nice memories and photos. Then I learned one of those in my graduation class was an agent for him. We all got CDs at a class reunion!
 
Wow....great memories on several counts!  I saw my first concert at the Gorge (in 1995) and if you haven't been there recently it's still pretty cool if not a bit too commercialized now (such is life, eh?) though that first ever concert had to be AWESOME.....thanks for the stories....Long Live RP!!
One of my favorite albums after getting out of the military when Nixon brought us home from Southeast Asia. I saw him when he was the first act to play the Gorge at George in Washington state. Got some nice memories and photos. Then I learned one of those in my graduation class was an agent for him. We all got CDs at a class reunion!
Like the song, but not appropriate for "Mellow Mix" 
Can't hear this one too often. Thanks RP
 easmann wrote:

Yes, you are right, that (brief) guitar solo is signature sixties, I stand corrected. The rest of the song though I think sounds fresh. 
I'm unfortunately not a fan of the Keys' reinterpretation of that fuzz-tone guitar sound by the way. I feel they a. overuse it and b. overdo it. Just sounds like an oversized kazoo to me.

Peace. 
 
I agree about the BKs unfortunate kazoo sound.  The acoustic on this sounds good and "fresh" as you said.  
Sounds similar to Country Joe and the Fish (and that's no bad thing {#Roflol})

rated it lower until I saw the year. ouch
got to hear the band several times in Berkeley in the sixties. Banana's guitar cadenzas were miles higher than the record, but I still love it. Another local band was Country Joe and the Fish, who now sound charming but dated, this song hasn't aged a bit

easmann wrote:

Sounds fresh, like it could have been released within the last few years. 
 
I am 17 again.  Thanks for bringing back these classics and I will look for the Robert Plant cover suggested by another RP listener.
 lizardking wrote:
I've recently purchased this album on vinyl, and boy it's a freaking AWESOME album!  I did not know that Charlie Daniels produced it.  Elephant mountain has officially crept into my top 50 albums of all time.  Thanks BillG for playing the first track from this excellent album...and Long Live RP!!
 
I still have my original vinyl from when it was first released, and though I have played it many times, I've managed to take good enough care of it that it still sounds great. It's in my top 5 or 10, all time. The flow of the sides is so sweet, which is a big part of why I love it so much. Even though the tracks hold up just fine on their own, the album as a whole is something else. I saw Jesse perform solo in a tiny venue (maybe 25 people) in Eugene, Oregon, in '71 or so, and he introduced Ride the Wind as his "ethereal grease song", about riding his motorcycle around where he lived (with the cover's view of Elephant Mountain, a bit east of Point Reyes Station, in Marin County, just north of San Francisco). I know the roads around there pretty well, and have seen the mountain many times, though I no such knowledge when I saw him at the above-mentioned venue. When I did become familiar with that area, I very often contemplated (or played on CD) this album. There are a number of cues to the area, and they are spot on.
I've recently purchased this album on vinyl, and boy it's a freaking AWESOME album!  I did not know that Charlie Daniels produced it.  Elephant mountain has officially crept into my top 50 albums of all time.  Thanks BillG for playing the first track from this excellent album...and Long Live RP!!
That guitar sound gives me chills...


        




 ecojot wrote:

Robert Plant did a great cover of this also

 

I'm fond of the version by the band Solas which appeared in 2002 - one of the first songs I heard on this new-fangled Radio Paradise.
 easmann wrote:

Yes, you are right, that (brief) guitar solo is signature sixties, I stand corrected. The rest of the song though I think sounds fresh. 
I'm unfortunately not a fan of the Keys' reinterpretation of that fuzz-tone guitar sound by the way. I feel they a. overuse it and b. overdo it. Just sounds like an oversized kazoo to me.
Peace. 
 
I know what you mean about the song; it's a traditional folk progression - which makes it kind of eternal, and there are still plenty of artists playing similar things today.  I agree about the "kazoo-like" quality of some of The Black Keys stuff too - that's a good description of it.
 lizardking wrote:
Is that a giant Elephant turd in the foreground of the album cover?  I don't remember this record from my dad's collection, so I don't know if that album cover gave any other clues. 

 
{#Roflol}  Looks to me like a pile of guts. {#Ask}
 easmann wrote:
Sounds fresh, like it could have been released within the last few years. 

 
Proclivities wrote:
Well, maybe if The Black Keys had released it.  Otherwise, it sounds over forty years old to me, still sounds good though.
 
Yes, you are right, that (brief) guitar solo is signature sixties, I stand corrected. The rest of the song though I think sounds fresh. 
I'm unfortunately not a fan of the Keys' reinterpretation of that fuzz-tone guitar sound by the way. I feel they a. overuse it and b. overdo it. Just sounds like an oversized kazoo to me.
Peace. 
Is that a giant Elephant turd in the foreground of the album cover?  I don't remember this record from my dad's collection, so I don't know if that album cover gave any other clues. 
 ddog wrote:
Nice fuzz tone guitar solo!  {#Jump}

 
To me, that fuzz tone screams 1960's.  Love it:)

 ecojot wrote:

Robert Plant did a great cover of this also

 
Agreed. Plant's version is haunting.
 easmann wrote:
Sounds fresh, like it could have been released within the last few years. 

 
Well, maybe if The Black Keys had released it.  Otherwise, it sounds over forty years old to me, still sounds good though.
The Youngbloods 1968.JPG

What an amazing set:

The Barr Brothers, Jeff Talmadge, Chris Smither and wonderful Jesse Colin Young and the Youngbloods with his classic Darkness, Darkness.  Having a great Friday here, thank you!


This leaves all the covers wanting. The best.
The best eve. Whenever I hear this Ivan transported
 easmann wrote:
Sounds fresh, like it could have been released within the last few years. 

 
Agreed ! i would never have guess it is from the late 60's. Wow ! 
Sounds fresh, like it could have been released within the last few years. 
Nice fuzz tone guitar solo!  {#Jump}
Love it. Starts slow gets heavy psychedelic.  Groovey
All time top 50 tunes{#Propeller}  Never heard of lp until bill played this. 
Youngbloods getting a lot of play the last few months
this one still sounds good
 
Where did this come from, and why had I not heard of it??

Outstanding. 
First concert I ever went to in 1972 at the University of Washington's Hec Edmundson pavilion in Seattle. Still rocks.

Saw a lot of good concerts there including Pink Floyd.
I would not have guessed this was from 1967. It has '60s elements but the production sounds much more modern.
darkkk
Hints of QMS in here, anybody?  
 wabx_air_ace wrote:
check out mott the hooples version

 
Robert Plant did a great cover of this also
Not familiar with this tune.  Sounds contemporary.
Heavens ! the pitch as YB sings ''darkness darkness'' is sure-enough rich.
Wunderschoen.  But I'd really like to hear Richie Havens excellent cover again. 
Guitar morphs into extreme syncopated swing rhythm right at the the end of the instrumental break...
Now, what had been just a pleasant cerebral concept pulls you in and down into the vortex, and becomes The occupying force of both body and soul...  All you can do is just go with the flow.  Pure rock.  Pure genius!
 {#Sunny} How could it not be a solid ten?


check out mott the hooples version
I like Jesse Colin Young a lot!
Yes, one of the all time greats; the whole album soars.
One of the best songs ever.
Wow.  I'd only heard the Solas cover of this before.  No idea it went all the way back to the Youngbloods.  Love the original too.
Magical
 Loved that song all my adult lifecapandjudy wrote:

Agreed on that. Those three guys really hit it out of the park with Elephant Mountain. Every song is solid.

 

 mcdonna wrote:
one of my all-time favorite albums

 
Agreed on that. Those three guys really hit it out of the park with Elephant Mountain. Every song is solid.
Love how it ends with that full-on SCREAMIN' GUITAR JAM!  Thanks, RP!
 hayduke2 wrote:
Mmmmmm
Weller - great, then Strawbs - very groovy, now Youngbloods - excellent!  Thank you!
 

 
Same great trio today! Love Weller, and both the Strawbs and Youngbloods were a new discovery for me.
Great, great tune.


Thanks Bill!
one of my all-time favorite albums
Bill...you are supercool
Okay, listening to this with headphones on is giving me goosebumps, which automatically makes it rate at least a 9.  So 8 > 9.
..i woulda thought this was released in the mid-90s (except for the 60s
  gee-tahr stuff)..{#Daisy} 
Well, we're going backward in time, aren't we? Track's still pretty "fresh", actually.
 bytejunkie55 wrote:
for all you negative posters...
i would like to see any of today's bands music still being played 42 years later and still sound excellent.
 
If some people were posting negative comments about this tune, one could assume that those folks don't believe this song sounds "excellent", regardless of when it was recorded.  You'd have to wait 42 years to find out about today's artists.
 fredriley wrote:
Yeesh! That's some Barnet* on the guy on the left. It's so thick and lush that there must have been a small rainforest in it. Combing it of a morning must have been a Herculean, not to say Sysyphean, task.

Barnet Heir = hair
 
Barnet Fair, surely.

I've spent thirty years thinking the Mott version was the original. The shame.
Mmmmmm
Weller - great, then Strawbs - very groovy, now Youngbloods - excellent!  Thank you!
 
Likey—part of the set that made my Xmas Eve day good.
 fredriley wrote:
Yeesh! That's some Barnet* on the guy on the left. It's so thick and lush that there must have been a small rainforest in it. Combing it of a morning must have been a Herculean, not to say Sysyphean, task.

Barnet Heir = hair
 
That's the inestimable Lowell Levinger. See post bumped below.
 WonderLizard wrote:

Picked this off Richard and Mimi Farina's web site. I have no idea how old the information is.

Banana is most famous as the guitarist of The Youngbloods, an eclectic folk-rock band of the late sixties to early seventies. He also had his own band, Banana and the Bunch, both before and after the Youngbloods. He was in charge of the record company, Racoon, which produced the Youngbloods' later albums and albums by Michael Hurley, High Country, and Kenny Gill. The Banana and the Bunch album, Mid-Mountain-Ranch (Racoon #13, 1972), is an overlooked classic that is worth hunting for, and features Banana on guitar, bass, banjo, mandolin, piano, and vocals. A close cousin to that album is Joe Bauer's all-instrumental Moonset (Racoon #3).

Today Banana plays with several different bands— The Michael Barclay Blues Band, The Barry Melton Band, and Joe New and the Walking Wonders. He also sells vintage musical instruments at vintageinstruments.com

<Bump>


Saw them at Listner Auditorium, a long time ago and in a galaxy far away.
Yeesh! That's some Barnet* on the guy on the left. It's so thick and lush that there must have been a small rainforest in it. Combing it of a morning must have been a Herculean, not to say Sysyphean, task.

Barnet Heir = hair
The magic of 1969 shines here
One of my earliest musical memories. This was the first song I fell in love with. I was age three. There began a lifelong love affair with music.
 gypsyman wrote:

I was looking for this to post. I had it on original vinyl. You beat me to it!  Too bad its so hard to find, like the single "Ridgetop"

 
I hunted for a LONG time to find some early JCY - I have it on CD, but I just got a new computer, so I have to regain all my programs. Once I do, I'll try to upload "Ridgetop" and maybe one or two of JCY's other things... No promises here, but it would really be nice to hear some of Jesse's solo work...

I wouldn't have remembered this song from oh so long ago if it weren't a frequent choice here on RP. This song is timeless - sounds like it could have come out yesterday. So glad I am reminded of it so I can add it to my collection. Thanks, Bill and Rebecca.
 WonderLizard wrote:

We'll disagree on whether this one ages well. IMHO, it has aged marvelously. And that's not the original album art. This is:



 
I was looking for this to post. I had it on original vinyl. You beat me to it!  Too bad its so hard to find, like the single "Ridgetop"

Too scratchy.{#Yell}
 Jelani wrote:
This gets a nine just for the wicked guitar sound.
 

Agreed.
 bytejunkie55 wrote:
for all you negative posters...
i would like to see any of today's bands music still being played 42 years later and still sound excellent.
 

You know, that's an interesting thought. I quickly put together a top 5 that might fit the bill( and granted this isn't what i think everybody would agree upon, just musing a bit) here goes: Paul Weller (especially Wake Up The Nation) et al. , Charlie Musselwhite, The Eels, Built to Spill, and The Tragically Hip.
Sorry haters, this is still killer stuff
for all you negative posters...
i would like to see any of today's bands music still being played 42 years later and still sound excellent.
More Jesse !!!
Youngbloods - Darkness, Darkness
Strawbs - Witchwood
Paul Weller - Wild Wood

What a cool set! Only on Radio Paradise. {#Music}
 jinxjinxie wrote:
boring
 
...AND ... You are too young to appreciate it also.

 whtahtefcuk wrote:
Not to good?   Kinda Sucks!
 
You are too young to appreciate them.

Bill,
Nice segue from Calexico's "Two Silver Trees"...which features similar melodic structures, etc.
Haven't heard the Youngbloods in years. Nice to see them here.
Cheers,
Tim
I want to rate this an 11, no a 12!
These guys were terrific.
This gets a nine just for the wicked guitar sound.
Not to good?   Kinda Sucks!
 Cynaera wrote:
Okay - now, let's hear some Jesse Colin-Young. "Ridgetop" would be great.  His later stuff shows his age and diminishing voice, but still, lots of great music from this guy. {#Sunny}
 
Bringing this up.  I'd upload some of JCY's work if I could make it fit...

Very nice! Great set this morning!!
Okay - now, let's hear some Jesse Colin-Young. "Ridgetop" would be great.  His later stuff shows his age and diminishing voice, but still, lots of great music from this guy. {#Sunny}
Changed my day for the good :).
Chills down my back—this hits all my buttons at once!
i liked hearing the classic psychedelic guitar; i don't know about the vocals yet...
Banana has a new gig: https://www.grandpabanana.com/ 

and a new CD:

https://www.cdbaby.com/cd/grandpabanana

 Alpine wrote:
Ageless.  I've just been propelled back in time 35 years to age 17.  Thank You.
 

Me, too, but I was 17 when it first came out in 1969!
Ageless.  I've just been propelled back in time 35 years to age 17.  Thank You.
 auburntigerrich wrote:
Yikes... this one just doesn't age well.  Piercing... and don't get me started on that album art...
 
We'll disagree on whether this one ages well. IMHO, it has aged marvelously. And that's not the original album art. This is:



boring
 jackie0 wrote:

As the quintessential ode to darkness (or in this case, loss of consciousness), this beats all the romantic poets by a long shot.
I had the supreme good fortune to be around Inverness the summer of '70 and to hear some of their practice sessions. 
The soaring music and lyrics of this song now inhabit my being on a cellular level, going beyond memory or circumstance.
"....Darkness, darkness, be my blanket, cover me with the endless night...."

 
{#Notworthy} So well put.

An all-time favorite of mine from way back.

 jackie0 wrote:

As the quintessential ode to darkness (or in this case, loss of consciousness), this beats all the romantic poets by a long shot.
I had the supreme good fortune to be around Inverness the summer of '70 and to hear some of their practice sessions. 
The soaring music and lyrics of this song now inhabit my being on a cellular level, going beyond memory or circumstance.
"....Darkness, darkness, be my blanket, cover me with the endless night...."
 
{#Cool}  {#Meditate}

As the quintessential ode to darkness (or in this case, loss of consciousness), this beats all the romantic poets by a long shot.
I had the supreme good fortune to be around Inverness the summer of '70 and to hear some of their practice sessions. 
The soaring music and lyrics of this song now inhabit my being on a cellular level, going beyond memory or circumstance.
"....Darkness, darkness, be my blanket, cover me with the endless night...."

"These amps go to 11!"  Not 12.

I'm not sure the guy with the 'fro is mod enough!

Neil
Can I make this a twelve?  Please?
Oh, Thank you, thank you, thank you. Have loved this song since day one. Right on! 


  "68" Seattle, and again in "69"  This was a great concert band. I always believed that Bananas
was the fire in the engine of the Youngblood's,and Jessie was sort of a John Denver on acid,  but
in "74" The Jessie Colin Young  Band  opened for Loggins and Messina and just 'blew that arena away." 
I to give this song an 11. I used to carry this album around so I could turn others on to "The Youngbloods"
juss one-er-full music.
 

 



 EssexTex wrote:
The "Freak bro's" favorite band
 
The Fabulous Furry Freak bros?
I did not know that.

The "Freak bro's" favorite band
Terrific song that holds up well.  Jesse had a great voice too.
 RParadise wrote:

I respectfully disagree. This version, the original, builds from a haunting tone to one of real pain. I think the Solas version drains all of the pain out of this song, which diminishes it.
 
I would have to agree. This is pain with all the messy parts left on, like crying tends to be.

And just as cathartic.


 WonderLizard wrote:

Picked this off Richard and Mimi Farina's web site. I have no idea how old the information is.

Banana is most famous as the guitarist of The Youngbloods, an eclectic folk-rock band of the late sixties to early seventies. He also had his own band, Banana and the Bunch, both before and after the Youngbloods. He was in charge of the record company, Racoon, which produced the Youngbloods' later albums and albums by Michael Hurley, High Country, and Kenny Gill. The Banana and the Bunch album, Mid-Mountain-Ranch (Racoon #13, 1972), is an overlooked classic that is worth hunting for, and features Banana on guitar, bass, banjo, mandolin, piano, and vocals. A close cousin to that album is Joe Bauer's all-instrumental Moonset (Racoon #3).

Today Banana plays with several different bands— The Michael Barclay Blues Band, The Barry Melton Band, and Joe New and the Walking Wonders. He also sells vintage musical instruments at vintageinstruments.com


Thanks.  It's nice to get your question answered.

Except . . . now I wonder what ever happened to Richard and Mimi Farina.

Takes me 'way back to the Psychedelic Supermarket in Boston's Kenmore Square before anybody knew.  Sitting on folding chairs about 15 feet away from the band.
1969
 smehan55 wrote:
Good song ... I like the Robert Plant version a lot more FWIW, IMHO. 
 

Love it!
Great Stuff.... I don't hear it so much as feel it.
MOST EXCELLENT
Great comment - I wonder if our friends at RP might not slip in a few of these great older soul songs - anthems to grow up by.  WonderLizard wrote:

Picked this off Richard and Mimi Farina's web site. I have no idea how old the information is.

Banana is most famous as the guitarist of The Youngbloods, an eclectic folk-rock band of the late sixties to early seventies. He also had his own band, Banana and the Bunch, both before and after the Youngbloods. He was in charge of the record company, Racoon, which produced the Youngbloods' later albums and albums by Michael Hurley, High Country, and Kenny Gill. The Banana and the Bunch album, Mid-Mountain-Ranch (Racoon #13, 1972), is an overlooked classic that is worth hunting for, and features Banana on guitar, bass, banjo, mandolin, piano, and vocals. A close cousin to that album is Joe Bauer's all-instrumental Moonset (Racoon #3).

Today Banana plays with several different bands— The Michael Barclay Blues Band, The Barry Melton Band, and Joe New and the Walking Wonders. He also sells vintage musical instruments at vintageinstruments.com


 

 



 


International Survival Gathering 1980 Black Hills South Dakota.

Jesse and his wife serenaded us to sleep singing beautiful songs about love and peace. Why we were there was made obvious by the juxtaposed bombers from the SAC base buzzing us day and night.
A week of workshops and education put on by the Ranchers, Indians, Miners and others trying to stop the local uranium development that was wrecking the HiIls.
In Russell Means' talk he spoke of how Custer got his 'sensitivity training' at the Little Bighorn. LOL!!!!

Nothing has changed. We're still sheep. 

Cool!  Didn't realize that the YoungBloods did the original.