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The Byrds — Mr. Tambourine Man
Album: Younger Than Yesterday
Avg rating:
7.7

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1254









Released: 1967
Length: 2:27
Plays (last 30 days): 0
Hey, Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
I'm not sleepy and there ain't no place I'm goin' to
Hey, Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning, I'll come followin' you

Take me for a trip upon your magic swirlin' ship
All my senses have been stripped
And my hands can't feel to grip
And my toes too numb to step
Wait only for my boot heels to be wanderin'

I'm ready to go anywhere, I'm ready for to fade
Unto my own parade
Cast your dancing spell my way
I promise to go under it

Hey, Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
I'm not sleepy and there ain't no place I'm goin' to
Hey, Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I'll come followin' you
Comments (106)add comment

 
whitenoyse wrote:
UltraNurd wrote:
Hey! Mister... Mister... Tamboriiiiine Man!!!
C'mon! Please play the Shatner cover!
 

This is beautiful. I'll bet Dylan gnawed his fingertips off after hearing this.

I did not know that 

The Shat


covered this. Must check it out. 

Ohmigod, Bill Shatner: this is really, hysterically bad. Sweet Jesus of Nazareth. 


IMO, this song,, like All Along the Watchtower, took Dylan's beauty and power and reoriented rock and roll.  If you don't like Dylan, it's worth understanding that he had a big hand in making rock and roll what it is.  Not sure he deserved the Nobel, but I am sure he is right at the top of rock and roll.
"Don't Worry Baby" was the same band, done in the same 2/4 time....just with the Beach Boys and different lyrics. Give it a listen. 
 Turn it up man!!

Image result for is that freedom rock gifW
cover on Bob Dylan has no sense )  
 Grammarcop wrote:
I've never understood the appeal of this version. 

 
The Rickenbacker 12 string for starters. 
Call it nostalgia but I {#Hearteyes} listening to this....the imagery is superb!  .....that magic swirling ship...
Nice and trippy tuneful. A guy is going to get his dope and take the day off.  Dylan the subversive, Byrds the popsters. At 11 years old way back when, I didn't know what I was listening to. Still, it's a terrific song. Both versions. 
TY The Byrds and RP   to me this is  8 -Most Excellent
I've never understood the appeal of this version. 
"Hey Mr PSDman
Turn this song off for me,
It's dippy and I've heard it bout a zillion times..."
Everything coasts toward nostalgia, the rain, the view of trees, green and dripping,   herons waddling down the street, and, of course, the '60s music.
 vanmas wrote:
Like Bob's better....

 
He's no Bill Shatner. {#Wink}
Very nice!
 zepher wrote:
That is a great hat.  Goes with the mustache, sideburns and long hair.
 
And he was still on his first liver!
Like Bob's better....
Amazing songwriting and McQuinn's guitar....Heavenly yes....
Heaven.
 michaelgmitchell wrote:
I have a hat like that.

 
That is a great hat.  Goes with the mustache, sideburns and long hair.



Is that Freedom Rock man?  Turn it up man.




You can play me a song, Monsieur Tambourine man, but it better not be Dylan wafting it, like an idiot trying to get the last peanut out of the bottom of the jar.
 Lazarus wrote:

This is an incredibly beautiful cover...
 

 
{#Clap}......... most definitely
I first heard this on KYES radio, Roseburg, Oregon, riding in my dad's red Pontiac station wagon. I reached over and cranked it up and the tunes flowed from the speaker on the metal dashboard. God, I loved that bass then, and I still do. Great memories with this song.

This is an incredibly beautiful cover...
 
"Roger McGuinn had a 12 string guitar. It was like nothing I'd ever heard "
I like this version better because of...........that Rickenbacker!! {#Daisy}
I love both this version and the Dylan version equally and how they are so different from each other.  My take on Dylan's version is the disillusionment of someone coming down from a bad trip.  In the Byrds' version, the guy is getting high for the first time and everything is breathtakingly beautiful.
Bizarre and great segue from Natalie Merchant's Nursery Rhyme of Innocence and Experience - makes this version work, as it has the same sense of quasi-nursery rhyme delivery amplified by the great harmonies. And, of course, the whole Blake-Dylan thing...
THE MASTRES OF JINGLE JANG  MY FAVOURITES!!
classic
A nice change of pace.  Funny to see old picture of David Crosby on the cover.  
:(   deal-breaker

what's going on?! 12 yucky songs in a row.

Definately!! lol

 
More_Cowbell wrote:
We need a tambourine solo here!
 


I have a hat like that.
Will always lurve this song!{#Bananajam}
Always liked their interpretations of Dylan's songs.  I actually met Roger McGuinn once.  Good guy.
We need a tambourine solo here!
 iscoot4peace wrote:
The standard by which many bands to folllow measured themselves...Tom Petty has made a wonderful career with a Rickenbaker guitar and a very similar singing style to Roger McGuin's.  Not to suggest he is any less talented.  It's just passing the musical baton.

9.
 
Totally. As a child of the 70s I credit Petty with opening my ears to the wonderfulness that is the McGuinns.

 peter_james_bond wrote:
First Massive Attack and then The Byrds!!! I have now officially achieved a state of Nirvana! Bill is the new Budda! First we must bow {#Notworthy}  then we must carry him through town on our shoulders to mark his unprecedented victory of quality music over the mundane nature of modern life.
 
Well put, my friend.

 Otomi wrote:

Did you ever get picked up by the driver of a magic swirling ship?

I got picked up by a baloon pilot on a summer day in 1974, on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. (Well, the baloon was folded up in the back of the panel truck he was driving, but I thought it was a pretty cool ride.)
 
No balloons but I did manage to hitch a few rides on private planes in South America.

Sublime.
Fantastic!            {#Cool}
The standard by which many bands to folllow measured themselves...Tom Petty has made a wonderful career with a Rickenbaker guitar and a very similar singing style to Roger McGuin's.  Not to suggest he is any less talented.  It's just passing the musical baton.

9.
old and yet so fresh
 1wolfy wrote:
My daughter loves it
 
cool! how old is she? it would be awesome if she was like 6 and liked it!{#Roflol}

 westslope wrote:
I used to hum and sing this song while hitching on the side of the road for hours or days at a time.  British Columbia, South America, Africa.
 
Did you ever get picked up by the driver of a magic swirling ship?

I got picked up by a balloon pilot on a summer day in 1974, on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. (Well, the balloon was folded up in the back of the panel truck he was driving, but I thought it was a pretty cool ride.)
I used to hum and sing this song while hitching on the side of the road for hours or days at a time.  British Columbia, South America, Africa.
First Massive Attack and then The Byrds!!! I have now officially achieved a state of Nirvana! Bill is the new Budda! First we must bow {#Notworthy}  then we must carry him through town on our shoulders to mark his unprecedented victory of quality music over the mundane nature of modern life.
Anthem status. Just as nice or better than Bob's version. And this warrior-cowboy loves Bob.
The AM Byrds version. Gotta have Dylan.
Zep wrote:
You Klingon bastard, you killed my song!
punkbot wrote:
Shatner's version is a suicide note put to music. Sadly, he didn't have the guts to follow thru and dot dot dot he lives on whilst countless others die a little inside every time they see him attempt to act. Jingle jangle my arse.
You Klingon bastard, you killed my song!
Yeay! :) Thank you Mr. Dj! :)
:bounce: :biggrin: :drummer: :bananajam: :bananasplit: :lol: :propeller: :good-vibes: :arrowl: My daughter loves it
"aint" def. has it's place in language
ndad47 wrote:
i am surprised that this song gets played.. it is constantly still out there. i dont know the attraction. the lyrics are quaint at best. The Byrds did better and Dylan did better.
Don't forget William Shatner.
i am surprised that this song gets played.. it is constantly still out there. i dont know the attraction. the lyrics are quaint at best. The Byrds did better and Dylan did better.
Boring !!
Can't go wrong with this one. Crowded House performed with Roger McGuinn back in 1988 or 1989 and they released an extended single CD called Byrdhouse, which was basically CH backing Roger. Classic if you can find it.
slowhand wrote:
When this song came out the entire planet smiled when they heard it...I'm still smiling!
Here's mine, :biggrin: :cheesygrin: :biggrin: :jump: :jump: :biggrin:
gekkosan wrote:
Agreed. Dylan's compositions are brilliant. His singing is awful. Most covers of Dylans songs sound a lot better than his own versions.
The sound dylan has is the complete package-the final product. You can't really say "the songs are great-but his singing--geez" Dylan is the whole thing. His singing is part of the atmosphere which he created in his music.
dpjag wrote:
I'm afraid I find Dylan less refined than either Shiraz or Coke. He's more like corn mash - he needs some distillation and aging before I can swallow him.
Agreed. Dylan's compositions are brilliant. His singing is awful. Most covers of Dylans songs sound a lot better than his own versions.
Paul_in_Australia wrote:
Music for people who aren't old enough to drink alcohol- or who cant tell a cabsav from a pinot noir.
Hey, my first exposure to this song was the Chipmunks' version, so this version was a big step up!
ArbiterOfGoodTaste wrote:
...and this from someone who lists 'spelling and punctuation' amongst their interests. Obviously, words are not a passion then?
Paul_in_Australia wrote:
Why have the Byrd's syrupy Coca Cola when we can savour Dylan's deep and complex shiraz? Music for people who aren't old enough to drink alcohol- or who cant tell a cabsav from a pinot noir.
bitterdave wrote:
If you can get your hands on Golden Throats, it has Shatner's Mr. Tambourine man (with a frightening Bill screaming "Hey, Mr. Tambourine man" at the top of his lungs over and over to end the tune) in addition to Leonard Nimoy's "If I had a Hammer" and "Proud Mary". Truly scary stuff that makes American Idol look, well, legitimate.
Buy it off Amazon. (click here)
ulibcn wrote:
Pretty much agree. Besides, Byrds always sounded the same
McGuinns voice gets old like immediately. He's a talented guy, he even made a instructional DVD on making demos on a laptop a couple years ago.
ulibcn wrote:
Pretty much agree. Besides, Byrds always sounded the same
Yeah... Awesome! :dancingbanana_2:
Brings back memories of (yes) my childhood. I remember being blown away by this song the first time I heard it at age nine
Paul_in_Australia wrote:
Why have the Byrd's syrupy Coca Cola when we can savour Dylan's deep and complex shiraz? Music for people who aren't old enough to drink alcohol- or who cant tell a cabsav from a pinot noir.
:cheers:
Shatner's version is a suicide note put to music. Sadly, he didn't have the guts to follow thru and dot dot dot he lives on whilst countless others die a little inside every time they see him attempt to act. Jingle jangle my arse. cattgirl813 wrote:
This just may go on my Christmas shopping list for those folks who either have a warped sense of humor, deserve coal in their stockings, or any combination of the two.
When this song came out the entire planet smiled when they heard it...I'm still smiling!
This version never fails to make me smile and sing along.
Paul_in_Australia wrote:
Why have the Byrd's syrupy Coca Cola when we can savour Dylan's deep and complex shiraz? Music for people who aren't old enough to drink alcohol- or who cant tell a cabsav from a pinot noir.
I'm afraid I find Dylan less refined than either Shiraz or Coke. He's more like corn mash - he needs some distillation and aging before I can swallow him.
bitterdave wrote:
If you can get your hands on Golden Throats, it has Shatner's Mr. Tambourine man (with a frightening Bill screaming "Hey, Mr. Tambourine man" at the top of his lungs over and over to end the tune) in addition to Leonard Nimoy's "If I had a Hammer" and "Proud Mary". Truly scary stuff that makes American Idol look, well, legitimate.
This just may go on my Christmas shopping list for those folks who either have a warped sense of humor, deserve coal in their stockings, or any combination of the two.
Love the sound of that 12-string Rickenbacker!
Too obvious. This band has a bunch of great songs. Let's stay away from AOR, shall we?
No need to think about this one. Resistance is futile.
Paul_in_Australia wrote:
Why have the Byrd's syrupy Coca Cola when we can savour Dylan's deep and complex shiraz? Music for people who aren't old enough to drink alcohol- or who cant tell a cabsav from a pinot noir.
Pretty much agree. Besides, Byrds always sounded the same
tiddalick wrote:
You're a legend! eBay here I come!
If you can get your hands on Golden Throats, it has Shatner's Mr. Tambourine man (with a frightening Bill screaming "Hey, Mr. Tambourine man" at the top of his lungs over and over to end the tune) in addition to Leonard Nimoy's "If I had a Hammer" and "Proud Mary". Truly scary stuff that makes American Idol look, well, legitimate.
hippiechick wrote:
An oldie but a goodie!
Amen! I like Dylan's version, but I love the jingling and jangling of the "jingle-jangle morning"!
An oldie but a goodie!
Why have the Byrd's syrupy Coca Cola when we can savour Dylan's deep and complex shiraz? Music for people who aren't old enough to drink alcohol- or who cant tell a cabsav from a pinot noir.
I would like to dedicate this song to Woozurdaddy...
man that 12string sounds great!!!!!!
lester wrote:
I was also doubting their seriousness, but now I recall an album released during the run of the original Star Trek series -- though whether the album was serious . . .
You're a legend! eBay here I come!
tiddalick wrote:
There's a Shatner cover?!!
I was also doubting their seriousness, but now I recall an album released during the run of the original Star Trek series — though whether the albumwas serious . . .

whitenoyse wrote:
C'mon! Please play the Shatner cover!
There's a Shatner cover?!! Outstanding! As if this and Bob's original weren't good enough already - I am definitely tracking that one down!
whitenoyse wrote:
C'mon! Please play the Shatner cover!
NO!!!
UltraNurd wrote:
Hey! Mister... Mister... Tamboriiiiine Man!!!
C'mon! Please play the Shatner cover!
Two minutes and twenty-nine seconds of jangle heaven... :clap:
Roverfish wrote:
Thank you, oh, thank you for not playing William Shatner's version.
My first exposure to this song was the Chipmunks' version and it took me years to get over that.
This is a case where--and I'm sure I'm in the minority--I prefer the Dylan original to the cover, because I think his delivery, with the world-weariness and the audible exhaustion, really puts the poetry and magic of the song across in a way that the sugar and jangle of the Byrds can't do. There's no dark side to this song in this rendition.
Roverfish wrote:
Thank you, oh, thank you for not playing William Shatner's version.
Hey! Mister... Mister... Tamboriiiiine Man!!!
Pilgrim301 wrote:
... to submit the comment or to press the back button ... hmmm......
NiceGuy2005 wrote:
Wrong choice! :moon: :whip:
No! Keep the comments coming! I happen to disagree with the pilgrim on this one, but I'd much rather hear what people think about a song than have them click the back button. And by the way, NiceGuy, that's a terrific combination of smileys :) Could we hear Venus In Furs now, please?
steeler wrote:
I'll take a stab at that. The Byrds were more cerebral than either the Stones or the early Beatles; required a bit more thought, which made them less commercial.
And, with all due respect, they really kinda built their career on Dylan covers (brilliantly done!). The Stones and Beatles also started doing covers but took off quickly...the Byrds' original stuff (in general) never kicked in the same way. I don't mean to take anything away from Eight Miles High or Sweetheart of the Rodeo but...there ya go... If nothing else, we'll always have those beautiful Rickenbackers... TJ
Pilgrim301 wrote:
There must be something wrong with me, but I've never liked anything by the Byrds. I had to mute the computer just now. I'm not even sure why I'm making this comment. ... to submit the comment or to press the back button ... hmmm......
Wrong choice! :moon: :whip:
A great soundtrack cut from my happy adolescence. Still sounds as good 40 years later.
There must be something wrong with me, but I've never liked anything by the Byrds. I had to mute the computer just now. I'm not even sure why I'm making this comment. ... to submit the comment or to press the back button ... hmmm......
MaxEmerika wrote:
I've always loved the Byrds' version of this song. How did these guys get lost in the shadow of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones?
I'll take a stab at that. The Byrds were more cerebral than either the Stones or the early Beatles; required a bit more thought, which made them less commercial.
Thank you, oh, thank you for not playing William Shatner's version. Classic tune. Great.
McGuinn is near the top of the list of "Guitarists with the best tone."
I'm sure this song would really take me back, if I went back that far. Before my time, I'm afraid.
I keep imagining Garth from WW singing this.... ....it's a good tune though! Amazing how a sound can capture a time.
MaxEmerika wrote:
I've always loved the Byrds' version of this song. How did these guys get lost in the shadow of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones?
Mick Jagger's lips obscure all
Wow, is this really the first time this classic Dylan cover has been played on RP?
I've always loved the Byrds' version of this song. How did these guys get lost in the shadow of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones?