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Grateful Dead — Me & My Uncle
Album: What A Long Strange Trip It's Been
Avg rating:
7.3

Your rating:
Total ratings: 801









Released: 1977
Length: 2:58
Plays (last 30 days): 0
Me and my uncle went ridin' down,
South Colorado, West Texas bound.
We stopped over in Santa Fe,
That bein' the point just about half way,
And you know it was the hottest part of the day.

I took the horses up to the stall,
Went to the barroom, ordered drinks for all.
Three days in the saddle, you know my body hurt,
It bein' summer, I took off my shirt,
And I tried to wash off some of that dusty dirt.

West Texas cowboys, well they was all around,
With liquor and money, they loaded down.
So soon after payday, know it seemed a shame;
You know my uncle, he starts a friendly game,
High-low jack and the winner take the hand.
(Guess you know about that)

My uncle starts winnin'; cowboys got sore.
One of them called him, and then two more,
Accused him of cheatin'; oh no, it couldn't be.
I know my uncle, he's as honest as me,
And I'm as honest as a gamblin' man can be, that's me

One of them cowboys, he starts to draw,
And I shot him down, lord, he never saw.
Well I grabbed a bottle, cracked him in the jaw,
Shot me another, oh damn he won't grow old.
In the confusion, my uncle grabbed the gold,
And we high-tailed it down to Mexico.

I love those cowboys, I love their gold,
I loved my uncle, God rest his soul,
Taught me good, lord, taught me all I know
Taught me so well, well I grabbed that gold
And I left his dead ass there by the side of the road.
Comments (126)add comment
I corrected your grammar, but I can't change your opinion. 

 
ploba wrote:
I don't (think) there is one grateful dead song (that) I like - not even a little.


Young Jerry Garcia
I do enjoy these little Deadly medleys you guys play
{#Bananajam}{#Sunny} go Bob go..... Jerry being Jerry
Best example of Jerry trying his hand at Chicken Pickin'.  Not my favorite Dead tune, but you gotta love the work.
 h8rhater wrote:

I give these comments a h8. {#Nyah}

 
I would have given them a 1 {#Ass}

....or is that a 2? 

 Delawhere wrote:
I give this comment is a 3 {#Cowboy}

justin4kick wrote:
First GD-song I didn't PSD in 10 seconds. I give it a 3.

 

 
I give these comments a h8. {#Nyah}
 joelbb wrote:

Alberta is the most boring Province of all time.  And full of BC-envy.

 
I don't know, Alberta Rye Whisky is pretty good.
I give this comment is a 3 {#Cowboy}

justin4kick wrote:
First GD-song I didn't PSD in 10 seconds. I give it a 3.

 


John Philips (of the Mamas and Papas) wrote this song during a tequila session backstage after a Judy Collins concert. He had no memory of writing the song, but claims the royalty checks helps him remember. Great song to get your feet moving!
A Live/Dead concert standard for sure ... I just LUV it!
First GD-song I didn't PSD in 10 seconds. I give it a 3.
This song shows why GD was one of the greatest RnR bands: they could play anything...quite well. 

Country, blue grass, blues, Chuck Berry RnR, jazz, psychedelic, etc. 

And you can dance to it and sing along as well.    
 luv4music wrote:
Great song written by John Phillips of The Mama's & The Papa's.

 

I'll be damned. Always assumed it was Robert Hunter.
 DaMoGan wrote:

Definitely not the best live Dead album, but even then, I love it.

 
getting in the mood for Chicago :-)  
We'll see if Trey can flat pick like that
thanks RP! 

Definitely not the best live Dead album, but even then, I love it.
i dont there is one grateful dead song I like - not even a little
Thank you for playing LIVE Dead. 
The best (only?) way for this band to be heard....
Check youtube for a young Joni Anderson (Mitchell) version.
Great song written by John Phillips of The Mama's & The Papa's.
 joelbb wrote:
Clark, I can't believe you've never heard this CLASSIC Dead outlaw tune.  It's one of my very favorites.  and no doubt that of Hell's Angels rank and file all over.  "I know my Uncle, he's as honest as me.  And I'm as honest as a human man can be!"

 
"I'm as honest as a Denver man can be".   Which ain't very honest, I guess, since he grabbed his uncle's gold and "left his dead ass there by the side of the road."
One of these days I'm going to finally get around to exploring the Grateful Dead's catalog. I only know a handful of tracks and can't even say for sure whether I've heard this one before. Pretty good if one is in the right mood.
Me & My Uncle just love ..Truckin'  ;)
 


A fine Bobby tune for sure
 joelbb wrote:

Alberta is the most boring Province of all time.  And full of BC-envy.

 
That's it? That's the best you've got?
Yea!!! This is the 50,000th time I've heard Me & My Uncle in my life!  Congratulations!!!
 joelbb wrote:

Alberta is the most boring Province of all time.  And full of BC-envy.
 
Go, Canucks, eh?
 karljonasson wrote:
This is the most boring band of all time.
 
Alberta is the most boring Province of all time.  And full of BC-envy.
This is the most boring band of all time.
Did you catch Weir and Lesh singing the National Anthem at the Giants game Monday night? Sounded great, but Bob is looking wooly. Bob Weir-wolf.
Clark, I can't believe you've never heard this CLASSIC Dead outlaw tune.  It's one of my very favorites.  and no doubt that of Hell's Angels rank and file all over.  "I know my Uncle, he's as honest as me.  And I'm as honest as a human man can be!"
RP continues to delight.  I can't believe there's a Dead song that I hadn't heard before, and rockabilly toe tapper to boot.  Thanks Bill.
I really don't like the 'Dead' but this tune is fun!
Giddyup!
This post apparently contained an image that was dragged into the post editor. Sorry, but any text contained in the post after this point has been lost.
 james_of_tucson wrote:

There are a lot of people whose primary frame of reference for music is the recording.  I don't think I started to fully appreciate the Dead before I'd seen maybe half a dozen shows.   I used to be willing to engage people who went out of their way to express their dislike for this band.  Even going to a show wasn't going to do it for everyone, just like going to a baseball game will not turn most people into a baseball fan.  Yeah, going to a dead show and not being a deadhead was a whole lot like going to a baseball game and not being a baseball fan.  If you don't get it, it cannot possibly be explained.
 
Well said!  Those were good times!
 Alafia wrote:
Used to dance my ass off to the "Tex-Mex" sets whenever they would play them...
I remember so fondly those desert shows in NM, AZ and NV: the warm sun, the dust, spectacular sunsets, the smell of herb in the air... Aaahhh... *drifts off into contemplative reverie...*
 
There are a lot of people whose primary frame of reference for music is the recording.  I don't think I started to fully appreciate the Dead before I'd seen maybe half a dozen shows.   I used to be willing to engage people who went out of their way to express their dislike for this band.  Even going to a show wasn't going to do it for everyone, just like going to a baseball game will not turn most people into a baseball fan.  Yeah, going to a dead show and not being a deadhead was a whole lot like going to a baseball game and not being a baseball fan.  If you don't get it, it cannot possibly be explained.

 Papernapkin wrote:
Hillbilly music.
 
Maybe this will help you overcome your irrational fears:

The Grateful Dead was an American rock band formed in 1965 in the San Francisco Bay Area.<1> The band was known for its unique and eclectic style, which fused elements of rock, folk, bluegrass, blues, reggae, country, improvisational jazz, psychedelia, and space rock<2><3>—and for live performances of long musical improvisation.<1><4> "Their music," writes Lenny Kaye, "touches on ground that most other groups don't even know exists."<5> These various influences were distilled into a diverse and psychedelic whole that made the Grateful Dead "the pioneering Godfathers of the jam band world."<6> They were ranked 57th in the issue The Greatest Artists of all Time by Rolling Stone magazine.<7

From my all-time favorite Dead album.... one of my favorite actual songs on it
Absolutely one of my favorite Dead tunes. Maybe because Weir is doing the vocals. I believe he still had a septum at this point, while Mr. Garcia obviously didn't.

 daveesh wrote:
didn't they use this in "smokey and the bandit II?"
 
Dude - you said that out loud
{#Motor}
didn't they use this in "smokey and the bandit II?"
post you phone number

 
mrandrew wrote:
OK, thats it. Enough of Radio Cowboy.  I'm changing the channel.  Someone call me when Radio Paradise is back.
 


 Mugro wrote:
Me And My Uncle
Lyrics: John Phillips
Music: John Phillips


I always got a kick out of the fact this was the same John Phillips who wrote "California Dreamin'" and "Monday, Monday."

{#Guitarist}
Me likey likey... 
mrandrew wrote:
OK, thats it. Enough of Radio Cowboy.  I'm changing the channel.  Someone call me when Radio Paradise is back.
 

Have fun at the other channel, but i don't think anyone is gonna call you...
Right on! Live Dead!

 mrandrew wrote:
OK, thats it. Enough of Radio Cowboy.  I'm changing the channel.  Someone call me when Radio Paradise is back.
  Yes sir! Everyone appreciates and honors thoughtful commentary. It has been pointed out repeatedly that this here Radio Paradise is very out front about the, what is the word?, Oh yes, eclectic, nature of the sets. Even the Grateful Dead apparently count in an eclectic mix. 


Again guys/gals w/the 7.5. WTH?? Best Bobby song! Oh man I miss Jerry. Bring it on Bill.

 mrandrew wrote:
OK, thats it. Enough of Radio Cowboy.  I'm changing the channel.  Someone call me when Radio Paradise is back.
 
Yee-HAW and woooo-HOOO!!  {#Yell}

{#Rolleyes}
Hillbilly music.
OK, thats it. Enough of Radio Cowboy.  I'm changing the channel.  Someone call me when Radio Paradise is back.
Giddy up, y'all!{#Cowboy}
Miss ya Jerry.
Good Old Grateful Dead!
being married to a dead head, I hear this song way, way more than a person should.  still, it's a keeper.  like the hubby.
I smell gunpowder
I'll never forget the memorial in Golden Gate Park. What a glorious celebration of a life lived fully! A colorful and lively New Orleans-style funeral procession with a Dixieland jazz band on a float and a flag with an exclamation point as the very last thing in the parade(!) An altar with more flowers in every color than I've ever seen in my life and all sorts of relics and memorabilia from his life. People had come from far and wide and everyone was crying and dancing and having a great time, so grateful and sad. I was deeply touched that day, and I realised that the Grateful Dead experience had taught me what love truly means.
I was there too. Throughout the night, before the memorial, the crowd just kept getting bigger as people arrived from all over the country. A great cheer went up with the announcement that we could camp in the park. The police let us do our thing-- if there were any arrests or problems, I never heard about them. I even have a snapshot of a police officer with a Steal Your Face sticker on his name tag. I fell asleep listening to the drums. It was an amazing experience that I will never forget.
Yes! Yes! Yes!
Taught me so well, I grabbed that gold And I left his dead ass there by the side of the road. Best end to a story song! Just got Balls
For some reason the title makes me think of South Park... :shifty:
Mugro wrote:
I too was on vacation on the Cape when Jerry died. I will never forget it. My brother and I don't share too many tender moments. We have that sort of "guy" relationship where feelings are not often talked about. When we heard on the radio that Jerry had died, though, we both stopped what we were doing and talked about how the Dead had influenced our lives and how different things would be from then on. It was a touching occasion and something I will never forget.
I'll never forget the memorial in Golden Gate Park. What a glorious celebration of a life lived fully! A colorful and lively New Orleans-style funeral procession with a Dixieland jazz band on a float and a flag with an exclamation point as the very last thing in the parade(!) An altar with more flowers in every color than I've ever seen in my life and all sorts of relics and memorabilia from his life. People had come from far and wide and everyone was crying and dancing and having a great time, so grateful and sad. I was deeply touched that day, and I realised that the Grateful Dead experience had taught me what love truly means.
The_Enemy wrote:
The day Jerry died, I was on vacation in Cape Cod. While I was in a bicyle shop, one of the clerks was having an animated conversation on the phone about going to the funeral. He couldn't get the time off work and he couldn't afford the trip besides.
I may have gotten a haircut that day. I'm not too sure...
The_Enemy wrote:
The day Jerry died, I was on vacation in Cape Cod. While I was in a bicyle shop, one of the clerks was having an animated conversation on the phone about going to the funeral. He couldn't get the time off work and he couldn't afford the trip besides. His friend offered to pay for his trip under the rationale "It's Jerry. You *have* to be there." I went to bat for him with his manager, successfully getting him the time off. In hindsight, a completely out-of-character thing for me to do for a stranger but in the moment, I was moved by good memories of people I'd met at Dead concerts and felt some kind of kinship with the guy.
I too was on vacation on the Cape when Jerry died. I will never forget it. My brother and I don't share too many tender moments. We have that sort of "guy" relationship where feelings are not often talked about. When we heard on the radio that Jerry had died, though, we both stopped what we were doing and talked about how the Dead had influenced our lives and how different things would be from then on. It was a touching occasion and something I will never forget.
lawman wrote:
8 point for the song, plus 2 for the memories. :sunny:
Same here. sigh.
My least favorite Dead song ever. Next!
8 point for the song, plus 2 for the memories. :sunny:
Reminds me of when I rode for a while with an outfit known as the Banditos (not the MC gang) a'horseback in the New Mexico Sangre de Cristo Range. This song was more or less their theme song. Wild and ruthless we were, as youngsters, but it was sure a fun time in life!
holy segue, batman!
horstman wrote:
When my wife told me Jerry had died, I didn't mourn.
The day Jerry died, I was on vacation in Cape Cod. While I was in a bicyle shop, one of the clerks was having an animated conversation on the phone about going to the funeral. He couldn't get the time off work and he couldn't afford the trip besides. His friend offered to pay for his trip under the rationale "It's Jerry. You *have* to be there." I went to bat for him with his manager, successfully getting him the time off. In hindsight, a completely out-of-character thing for me to do for a stranger but in the moment, I was moved by good memories of people I'd met at Dead concerts and felt some kind of kinship with the guy.
Xeric wrote:
One of the few Dead tunes that I find much better than okay. Really like this one.
I wouldn't go that far but it's a lot closer to OK than most of their stuff.
Me And My Uncle Lyrics: John Phillips Music: John Phillips This is the song the Grateful Dead played more than any other, cover or original, all the way from 1966 to 1995. Me and my uncle went riding down South Colorado, West Texas bound We stopped over in Santa Fe That being the point just about half way And you know it was the hottest part of the day I took the horses up to the stall Went to the bar-room, ordered drinks for all Three days in the saddle, you know my body hurt It being summer, I took off my shirt And I tried to wash off some of that dusty dirt West Texas cowboys, they's all around With liquor and money, they're loaded down So soon after pay day, you know it seemed a shame You know my uncle, he starts a friendly game Hi-lo jacks and the winner take the hand My uncle starts winning, cowboys got sore One of them called him, and then two more Accused him of cheating, well no it couldn't be I know my uncle, he's as honest as me And I'm as honest as a Denver man can be One of them cowboys, he starts to draw Well I shot him down, Lord, he never saw Shot me another, hot damn he won't grow old In the confusion my uncle grabbed the gold And we high-tailed it down to Mexico Now I love those cowboys, I love their gold I love my uncle, God rest his soul Taught me good, Lord, taught me all I know Taught me so well, I grabbed that gold And I left his dead ass there by the side of the road
capandjudy wrote:
I may be mistaken but I believe that John Phillips of the Mammas and Pappas wrote this. I was in a band in the 1970s and this was one of our core tunes. P.S.--It did not sound like the Dead.
Yes indeed.
Background The song was written by John Phillips of The Mamas And The Papas. According to the liner notes for his (solo) recording on "Phillips 66":
John often used to tell the story behind "Me And My Uncle." Years ago he began receiving publishing royalties from a song on a Judy Collins record with which he was unfamiliar. It was titled "Me And My Uncle." He called Judy to let her know of the mistake because he hadn't written any such song. She laughed and told him that about a year before, in Arizona after one of her concerts, they had a 'Tequila' night back at the hotel with Stephen Stills, Neil Young and a few others. They were running a blank cassette and John proceeded to write "Me And My Uncle" on the spot. The next day, John woke up to the tequila sunrise with no recollection of the songwriting incident. Judy kept the cassette from that evening and then, without informing John, recorded the song for her own record. Over the years the song was recorded by several people, and eventually became a standard of the Grateful Dead. John used to joke that, little by little, with each royalty check, the memory of writing the song would come back to him.
It isn't clear how Bob Weir learnt the song - Blair Jackson in "Going Down The Road" says:
"According to Bob Weir, he learn this John Phillips-penned tune from 'a hippy named Curly Jim' who I can only assume is Curly Jim Cook, onetime member of the Bay Area band A.B.Skhy. ... Judy Collins recorded a slower version of the song on a mid-sixties live album, and that may well be where Weir got it from."
capandjudy wrote:
I may be mistaken but I believe that John Phillips of the Mammas and Pappas wrote this. I was in a band in the 1970s and this was one of our core tunes. P.S.--It did not sound like the Dead.
yeah, John Phillips
Xeric wrote:
One of the few Dead tunes that I find much better than okay. Really like this one.
Nver liked Bobby all that much, but this is a good song
Oh how the dead have positively changed my life and outlook on the world. I got turned on in my freshman year of college in 1980 when the cost of shows were still less than the cost of the drugs we so happily put in our bodies. It was a beautiful time to be alive shaking our asses off and just being free. But youth is usually that way (I suppose). When my wife told me Jerry had died, I didn't mourn. I was really pissed off that a guy with such talent and enormous love from so many people would treat his body and soul like that slowly poisoning himself. The tributes and evening candlelight vigils just didn't do it for me either. I lent all my tapes and CDs to a friend of mine so he could experience the experience find out what was the big deal (he figured it out pretty well I might add!). Several months later, while driving home from work from a long business trip, I was floating through some music on the radio and a dead song came on. I suddenly realized I was crying. I had to pull over to the side of the road to get my shit back together. It was really something. Just holding all that in for so long like a dark cloud waiting to burst. I feel much better about his death and life now. I still love their music and the people that gathered around it but don't listen to it all to often. But I still miss Jerry and the way the band infused American folk rock bluegrass country into a unique sound that is truly American rock and roll. Peace. :daisy:
One of the few Dead tunes that I find much better than okay. Really like this one.
Odyzzeuz wrote:
Isn't this a Marty Robbins song? :lol:
I may be mistaken but I believe that John Phillips of the Mammas and Pappas wrote this. I was in a band in the 1970s and this was one of our core tunes. P.S.--It did not sound like the Dead.
summer, fireflies, ohh so lovey!!!!!!!!!!!
ChardRemains wrote:
YES! Much of the live stuff is superior to the studio recordings. You can keep arguing about the Dead all you like, the fact is they are icons of American music, and their covers of traditional American/English folk songs like "Peggy O" are the only contemporary recordings available. They may be history, but they're also historians. And they put on a great show, and I have never met so many kind people in one place in my life. But if i never hear "Dark Star" again, it will be too soon. Like it or don't like it, but don't make it personal.
I repeat myself when under stress.... Thanks for a moment of relief, RP!
Isn't this a Marty Robbins song? :lol:
Bless. Love this! Great song, beautiful day...
Used to dance my ass off to the "Tex-Mex" sets whenever they would play them... I remember so fondly those desert shows in NM, AZ and NV: the warm sun, the dust, spectacular sunsets, the smell of herb in the air... Aaahhh... *drifts off into contemplative reverie...*
Oh, the Dead... *sigh* They are what they are: Good-Like. I love 'em, ever did!
The Dino Valente version of this song is much better.
this reminds me of the "smokey and the bandit" theme...
I've tried my best to "get" the Grateful Dead but just never have. They've always sounded like a band practicing in someone's garage, rather scattered, simplistic and unrefined. Before the inevitable insults roll in, however, let me say that millions of Dead Heads can't be wrong so after trying hard for many years and just not getting it, I'm envious of those who do appreciate the Dead.
One of the lasting benefits of having been a Deadhead is having developed a keen appreciation for roots music. The Dead were an eclectic band in their musical taste, and their appreciation of, and love of, Country and Blues, the music styles that gave birth to Rock and Roll, led many including me to learn more about, respect, and eventually appreciate Country and Blues music. It's puzzling to see some of the comments people offer when artists like Johnny Cash, Roseanne Cash, Dwight Yoakam, Lucinda Williams, etc. get played on RP. Country doesn't belong on RP, this sucks, etc. etc. I guess not everyone benefited from the eclectic tastes of the Dead and other rock artists who have paid homage to their roots. Ah well.
Let's do the time warp again!
It took me a LONG, LONG time to come around to enjoying the Dead's music. This song, however, has always been one that I love to hear.
Ah, definitely on a roll here, Bill! Ditty into Dylan into Dead... :clap:
Thanks for the Dead Bill!!
My favorite contingent at Dead concerts was always the geeks... back in the day (before geek was cool) they still wore the standard geek uniform: dark slacks, short haircuts and white shirts with pocket protectors. They attended in droves. Alot of the early nerd stuff was Dead-centric including the Well which was pretty much run by and "dead"icated to the 'Heads. There are still some pretty interesting people who have Well accounts. Live was the best way (some say the only) way to experience the Dead. LOL... so many stories of first timers becoming converts. My sister-in-law was one. She went with us just to spend family time once, and ended up writing an article about her experience for the Washinton Post (even tho she was in the bean counter dept, she just *needed* to... heh.) (It was the tour with Dylan, BTW.)
jbtidwell wrote:
Bobby and his Country/Western tunes... at least this one doesn't have his signature screech in it (those who listen to the Dead's bootlegs know exactly what I'm talking about). :D
:lol: he spits a little when he does that. :nodhead:
Bobby and his Country/Western tunes... at least this one doesn't have his signature screech in it (those who listen to the Dead's bootlegs know exactly what I'm talking about). :D
AHHHHHHHHhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!..........that feels good. :sunny.gif:
RTFO!
In the confusion, my uncle grabbed the gold.
ANNE_MARIE wrote:
we should form a club. :highfive:
well yer gonna need some fellas to shake your bones with.
ankhara99 wrote:
I too will be the 90 year old lady in a tie dye rocking out to the Dead.
we should form a club. :highfive:
I could never figure out why radio stations refused to play live tracks from the Grateful Dead. Is it because they could only play tracks that would result in record sales for the record companies? I guess that is it. Anyway, Live Dead is the only Dead for me (with a few exceptions of course -- the American Beauty album for example). My theory is that most people that hate the dead do so because they are not aware of the live stuff because it was never played on radio. When I was growing up, I HATED the Dead. I was 16 when "Touch of Gray" hit it big on the charts, and I wanted to :puke: whenever it came on the radio. But then, my sister came home from college with some of their live stuff on tape, and I was instantly hooked (against my better nature at the time, I might add). Now, whenever I need to relax, improve my mood, or play something in the background that will help me to concentrate, I always go to Dead live sets. Go live, or Go Home!! RP, please play live stuff!!
Back in 'the day', when I and a few others lived a'horseback in the mountains of New Mexico, this was our theme song. Yeah, we were a rowdy bunch of young outlaws, full of ourselves, but the world was ours for the taking. Now, thirty years later, I do what I can to give back to the world for the gift of room for my life in it. But ya know.... I still love this song, and I am still that outlaw... hee-hee!
chinacat wrote:
What about some live Dead off the boards or by Tapers? Dick's Picks?
YES! Much of the live stuff is superior to the studio recordings. You can keep arguing about the Dead all you like, the fact is they are icons of American music, and their covers of traditional American/English folk songs like "Peggy O" are the only contemporary recordings available. They may be history, but they're also historians. And they put on a great show, and I have never met so many kind people in one place in my life. But if i never hear "Dark Star" again, it will be too soon. Like it or don't like it, but don't make it personal.
ginathelintqueen wrote:
Now I'm short. Not itty-bitty short, but 5'4"ish, and I was behind a whole bunch of really tall guys who were near the back of the floor. I noticed one of them had a "me-sized" hole in front of him, so I tapped him on the shoulder to ask him if he'd mind me standing there so I could see a little better. Well, next thing you know I'm being scooted from one person to another towards the front of the show until -- I kid you not -- I was on the second row of people standing (right behind some kids who'd gotten married and were following the dead on their honeymoon).
Same thing happened to me! I ended up AGAINST THE STAGE at the show in Santa Fe New Mexico. It was my first show. There were roses at the foot of the stage, I picked one out and threw it - Bobby caught it and held it up. Those 4 hours completely changed my life and I've been a fan ever since. I too will be the 90 year old lady in a tie dye rocking out to the Dead.
holborne wrote:
Please, please, please, please *please* do not play any more effing Grateful Dead. The Grateful Dead are not a good band. The Grateful Dead has never been a good band. Their huge grassroots following is certainly admirable, but their music is dreadful. Just *dreadful*. The fact that they can noodle for a long (long, long long . . .) time doesn't make them talented. Too bad Deadheads (ew! Deadheads!) don't know how to separate admiration for the personalities from admiration for the music. If you're tripping their work is perhaps adequate--if you're not tripping, there's no reason to listen to them. Please. Enough. Throw it into the circular file with all the other tired, overplayed, overrated classic rock.
You know, I don't understand why you would listen to RP. As the old comic used to say from time to time you are clearly "unclear on the concept." Me - I don't like much U2, don't like reggae, many songs and bands on RP don't do it for me. But someone else likes 'em. RP has enough variety and enough of it is good that I stay "tuned." I don't cry to Bill to stop playing reggae, or that not every single hour needs a U2 tune. Further, when I comment on a song I dislike, I am careful to frame it as my opinion. I don't say that the music is without value, etc. etc. In fact, much of the Dead played on RP I don't especially like either. I'd choose Bertha, Sugar Magnolia, some others. But no one is justified in making comments that indicate that there is no value in some particular music. I'm confident that I know as much about music as you do, whether from a music theory viewpoint, from a historical viewpoint, a breadth of listening experience viewpoint or a "what rocks?" viewpoint. It's ridiculous and shows your ignorance for you to dismiss the Dead and the people who like and respect their music. So..... go pound sand!
...and I left his dead ass there by the side of the road. Excellent!
Leslie wrote:
You have just pretty much summed up what it was like to attend a Dead show. I used to go to their shows all by myself and I always made friends at the shows. Can you say that for any other group that tours today? (Maybe one or two, but not many). Deadheads were and are a wonderful group of people who care about one another. The music and atmosphere always brought us together in ways that were totally unique. I will never forget the Dead shows I attended for they were some of the best times in my life. I listen to their music every dayâ€"I have for the last 27 years and I have no doubt that I will be enjoying their music for the rest of my life. Yes...I'll be the 90 year old lady jamming to the Dead :smile:
There's a deli in Southern MD called the DooDah Deli. My wife tells me it is staffed by older ladies wearing tie-dye. This band has fans of all ages. Few bands are ageless.
ginathelintqueen wrote:
I've said ever since that this is one of the few public events I've ever attended where I was sure that if I'd lost my wallet, someone would give me a ride or cab fare home. The music was -- if you're the sort of person who can "lose" herself in a show -- fabulous. Lots of energy, lots of smiles, lots of fun.
You have just pretty much summed up what it was like to attend a Dead show. I used to go to their shows all by myself and I always made friends at the shows. Can you say that for any other group that tours today? (Maybe one or two, but not many). Deadheads were and are a wonderful group of people who care about one another. The music and atmosphere always brought us together in ways that were totally unique. I will never forget the Dead shows I attended for they were some of the best times in my life. I listen to their music every dayâ€"I have for the last 27 years and I have no doubt that I will be enjoying their music for the rest of my life. Yes...I'll be the 90 year old lady jamming to the Dead :smile:
I've always thought this summed it up well: "... more fun than a bullfrog in a glass of milk" Bob Weir on the David Letterman show when asked about the acid tests. This remark brought a very puzzled look from both Letterman and Garcia. Somehow, I knew exactly what he meant.
ginathelintqueen wrote:
I've said ever since that this is one of the few public events I've ever attended where I was sure that if I'd lost my wallet, someone would give me a ride or cab fare home. The music was -- if you're the sort of person who can "lose" herself in a show -- fabulous. Lots of energy, lots of smiles, lots of fun.
There were many a time when I also got a ride home; and many a time that ride home was in another state! Always had faith someone would help me find my way back home.
I consider myself lucky, as I did have a chance to see the Dead before Garcia died. The concert was an experience that (honestly) blew my mind -- and there were no drugs involved (at least not on my part). What I really appreciated (and have, as yet, to see repeated at a concert) was the sense of community amongst the fans. Everyone I interacted with was so *nice* (and not in stupid stoned way, just in a laid-back way). Here's an example: the show was in Greensboro, NC (about 1.5 hours from where I was in university at the time). We got caught in a nasty traffic jam and didn't make it to the show until the GD were about to start. When we walked into the colliseum, which was "open seating" (/standing actually) on the floor, we were (unsurprisingly) at the back of a rather large crowd. Now I'm short. Not itty-bitty short, but 5'4"ish, and I was behind a whole bunch of really tall guys who were near the back of the floor. I noticed one of them had a "me-sized" hole in front of him, so I tapped him on the shoulder to ask him if he'd mind me standing there so I could see a little better. Well, next thing you know I'm being scooted from one person to another towards the front of the show until -- I kid you not -- I was on the second row of people standing (right behind some kids who'd gotten married and were following the dead on their honeymoon). Can you imagine that happening at another show? I've been in masses of people who were *throwing elbows* (most recently at Lucinda Williams -- what's up with that) at the front of a show and *certainly* wouldn't have given a latecoming interloper such a nice space. During intermission, some guy passed out paper cups of water from a big 5-gallon water thingy he'd brought, while another couple had a big bag of oranges that they were sharing with all of us. I've said ever since that this is one of the few public events I've ever attended where I was sure that if I'd lost my wallet, someone would give me a ride or cab fare home. The music was -- if you're the sort of person who can "lose" herself in a show -- fabulous. Lots of energy, lots of smiles, lots of fun.
Hempletons wrote:
...Although Jerry has been practically cannonized after his death, ...
I think you meant "canonized". "Cannonized" has such ghastly connotations.
Hempletons wrote:
From personal experience, I would like to debunk a few myths about Deadheads.
Thanks for the personal account. It is all to easy for people to write the Dead off and it seems more popular now than ever. I wish people would base their opinions on the music rather than the following, ideas about the members of the band, or perceptions on drug use. Listen to the album versions of Uncle Johns Band, Brokedown Palace, or Ripple. There is no acid needed, no extended jamming. It's just straight up american roots music. While the band was not know for its prowess in the studio, the live 'noodling' everyone rambles on about is in part responsible for the proliferation of the live 'jamband' music scene happening right now. The Grateful Dead's policies on taping live music and allowing its circulation for free has been adopted by major acts that fall well outside the realm of jambands. They also began their own ticketing system that allowed better availability and prices for concert tickets, something that the likes of Dave Mathews Band and Pearl Jam use in some form. So if you want to judge the band on something other than its musical merits, the aforementioned are just a couple of ways that the GD may have directly/indirectly influenced a band you like or even listen to here on RP.
Originally Posted by holborne: Too bad Deadheads (ew! Deadheads!) don't know how to separate admiration for the personalities from admiration for the music. If you're tripping their work is perhaps adequate--if you're not tripping, there's no reason to listen to them.
From personal experience, I would like to debunk a few myths about Deadheads. I came into the fold relatively late in the history of the Dead, actually around the time Jerry died. Had an invite to go to the last show, but passed. (I didnt know!) So I have never actually seen them in concert - unless last summer's Terrapin Station counts. Although Jerry has been practically cannonized after his death, he had his share of undesirable personal traits. Taken on face value, most popular music personalities do and they would be LAST people I would want to put of any sort faith into.The personalities of the players had nothing to do with my admiration of the music. I was drawn into the beautiful interplay of sounds, the modern day applicability of the common and sometimes uncommon folk stories, the lack of fear experimentation and sometimes just the immense power of the groove. I don't think you really need to be tripping to undertand these things. In fact I have never even taken acid and listened to the Dead, but I enjoy their music nearly everyday. Maybe a few nips of the old bud here and there, but mostly I take my Dead straight. This music makes me happy and sad, makes me dance and sit silently, energizes me and sedates me. I just plain enjoy the music. Peace
What about some live Dead off the boards or by Tapers? Dick\'s Picks?
In my opinion the Grateful Dead is the most American music out there. And oh well BillG, its too late to get it now. :Shrugs:
Originally Posted by BillG: Now, I do like a lot of the Dead's stuff (wouldn't play them otherwise) but this comment reminded me of my favorite GD joke: Q: What did the Deadhead say when the drugs wore off? A: Man, this music SUCKS! :D
just because some people never GOT IT doesn\'t mean you should stop playing the dead. it makes many of us SMILE SMILE SMILE :)
Originally Posted by holborne: Please, please, please, please *please* do not play any more effing Grateful Dead. The Grateful Dead are not a good band. The Grateful Dead has never been a good band. (snip)
Now, I do like a lot of the Dead's stuff (wouldn't play them otherwise) but this comment reminded me of my favorite GD joke: Q: What did the Deadhead say when the drugs wore off? A: Man, this music SUCKS! :D
Please, please, please, please *please* do not play any more effing Grateful Dead. The Grateful Dead are not a good band. The Grateful Dead has never been a good band. Their huge grassroots following is certainly admirable, but their music is dreadful. Just *dreadful*. The fact that they can noodle for a long (long, long long . . .) time doesn't make them talented. Too bad Deadheads (ew! Deadheads!) don't know how to separate admiration for the personalities from admiration for the music. If you're tripping their work is perhaps adequate--if you're not tripping, there's no reason to listen to them. Please. Enough. Throw it into the circular file with all the other tired, overplayed, overrated classic rock.