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Fleetwood Mac — Woman Of 1000 Years
Album: Future Games
Avg rating:
7.1

Your rating:
Total ratings: 976








Released: 1971
Length: 5:23
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Woman of a thousand years
How are your sons of a time ago
Do they still admire your silvered ways
As you go down
To the sea and golden sand
You may be seen up in the sky
And from the land
Or floating by, a fisherman's day
Flying down from a high
She is gone, and then appears
From the water's edge
Woman of a thousand years
He waits to see you...
You may be seen up in the sky
And from the land
Or floating by, a fisherman's day
Flying down from a high
She is gone, and then appears
From the water's edge
He waits to see you
For it has been long since you left him
On his own to wander
Woman of a thousand years
How are your sons of a time ago
Do they still admire your silvered ways
As you go down
To the sea and golden sand
Comments (79)add comment
This song so immediately and powerfully transports me to the days of my youth and naivete'. In a good way !!!  
The ho-hum is strong with this one.

Never thought I could have a "first hearing" of any Fleetwood Mac. Kudos to the DJ.
Beautiful song from one of the all time great bands.
 LAwolf8 wrote:
This is a 10, FM was so incredible and mellow mid career.  Such a beautiful tune. Christine in her most spiritual.
Incredible evening in the California desert and Paradise music.
 pure fantasy  
 Christine does indeed sing backup vocals but this song is all Danny Kirwan. 

Woman of 982 Years really was the superior work.
How different from later versions of Fleetwood Mac, eh?  This is far superior.
Another beautiful song crafted by Danny Kirwan, who sadly just passed away. Alas, his candle burned out long before, but, my god, what a talent he was. 
This era of FM was obviously guitar driven; not in the normal way of the time, but subtle. Take some time, put on those Sennheisers, and listen to the interweave of guitars in these great songs. You will be rewarded.
This is a 10, FM was so incredible and mellow mid career.  Such a beautiful tune. Christine in her most spiritual.
Incredible evening in the California desert and Paradise music.
 pure fantasy  
 Lazarus wrote: 
Peace to you, Lazarus!  You who makes our song comment boards fun to read.  I feel like we've partied together, if not in this realm, in some parallel universe of infinite hotel rooms! 
 Peace_tode wrote:
lizardking wrote:

OMG!  It only took me about 25 years to finally put a title to this song which plays in my head every once in a while.  Long story short.....one of my dad's hobbies back in the mid-70s, until I took over in the late-80s, was making mix-tapes from his vast vinyl collection.  At first I think it was mostly Sony and Ampex tapes, and then the higher fidelity "metal" tapes culminating in his purchase of a gross (12x12=144) of the Maxell hi bias Cr02 (and yes, I do still have a few of those mix-tapes left!) - the upshot of this was that 1) we NEVER used 8-tracks in my dad's house and 2) I was blessed with hearing CLASSIC ROCK albums, on tape, on our road trips to/from Seattle to Santa Barbara that we did at least twice a year. 

The reason I mention all of that is there were 2 mix-tapes in particular that I LOVED listening to as a young'un. Side A of tape 1 was WAR and side B was Rufus/Chaka Khan (I still have this relic of a tape, and if I had a tape player still I'd be worried the tape would break) and the other tape featured several tracks from Uriah Heep (July Morning was the shit!), It's a Beatufiul Day, Herbie Hancock, Herb Alpert and many others.  One of those miscellaneous tracks was THIS SONG....for the life of me I could not remember the name/artist, just the refrain and chorus would play in my head all these years.  THANK YOU BillG for playing this tune here, and ending my 25 year mental game of Name That Tune; I say....LONG LIVE RP!!



 
What a great story! I too grew up in this era. My older brother recorded a cassette of a late night radio show while we were near NYC when I was about 10 years old. This one particular tape had a fantastic song sequence and perfect segues that just fused with my soul. To this day, when I hear one of those songs, I expect the next one in sequence to just be there. Ever since that time, mix tapes as in genre, mood, emotion, musical journey and song sequence was a hobby of mine.



 
Nice!  Maybe like me you found yourself having to open the cassette to splice the tape back together, or spending hours writing the track listing on the cardboard insert provided (and my nerdy self would list the counter reading too for future fast-forwarding to the right song.)

This weekend I spent some time trying to organize my digital files.  My problem was that I first ripped my collection back when a GB was unheard of at home, so the majority of my collection is super-compressed and nearly unlistenable (esp. compared to the FLAC files BillG's giving us to listen to now) - while thinking that my 18 y/o daughter has NO clue what ANY of what I'm talking about means.  So now starts my re-trek to the world of vinyl, with my currently small collection of LPs and decent hi-fi at home.  And this xmas, I asked for and got a new copy of the 200g Bob Dylan (one of the first) double-albums "Blonde on Blonde" - we'll see how intrigued/impressed/indifferent she is to the whole process of cutting the plastic, looking at the album cover and art, etc., and then gently placing the stylus at track one. 

I will also comment on the last post about this being a "desert island LP" - the thought of having a record player and a small collection of vinyl on a desert island makes me laugh at how absurd an idea and yet somehow comforting it would be to have that setup. 

PEACE and Long Live RP!!


 DaveInVA wrote:
Another "desert island" lp for sure

 
Personally for me yes. I was living in a fraternity house around 1971/72 and Future Games floated out of rooms and down the hallways. It was a dreamy marijuana LP (I hate referring to drugs) that mixed with an unusually warm and sunny February.  Kirwin and Welch were magic together.
lizardking wrote:

OMG!  It only took me about 25 years to finally put a title to this song which plays in my head every once in a while.  Long story short.....one of my dad's hobbies back in the mid-70s, until I took over in the late-80s, was making mix-tapes from his vast vinyl collection.  At first I think it was mostly Sony and Ampex tapes, and then the higher fidelity "metal" tapes culminating in his purchase of a gross (12x12=144) of the Maxell hi bias Cr02 (and yes, I do still have a few of those mix-tapes left!) - the upshot of this was that 1) we NEVER used 8-tracks in my dad's house and 2) I was blessed with hearing CLASSIC ROCK albums, on tape, on our road trips to/from Seattle to Santa Barbara that we did at least twice a year. 

The reason I mention all of that is there were 2 mix-tapes in particular that I LOVED listening to as a young'un. Side A of tape 1 was WAR and side B was Rufus/Chaka Khan (I still have this relic of a tape, and if I had a tape player still I'd be worried the tape would break) and the other tape featured several tracks from Uriah Heep (July Morning was the shit!), It's a Beatufiul Day, Herbie Hancock, Herb Alpert and many others.  One of those miscellaneous tracks was THIS SONG....for the life of me I could not remember the name/artist, just the refrain and chorus would play in my head all these years.  THANK YOU BillG for playing this tune here, and ending my 25 year mental game of Name That Tune; I say....LONG LIVE RP!!



 
What a great story! I too grew up in this era. My older brother recorded a cassette of a late night radio show while we were near NYC when I was about 10 years old. This one particular tape had a fantastic song sequence and perfect segues that just fused with my soul. To this day, when I hear one of those songs, I expect the next one in sequence to just be there. Ever since that time, mix tapes as in genre, mood, emotion, musical journey and song sequence was a hobby of mine.


OMG!  It only took me about 25 years to finally put a title to this song which plays in my head every once in a while.  Long story short.....one of my dad's hobbies back in the mid-70s, until I took over in the late-80s, was making mix-tapes from his vast vinyl collection.  At first I think it was mostly Sony and Ampex tapes, and then the higher fidelity "metal" tapes culminating in his purchase of a gross (12x12=144) of the Maxell hi bias Cr02 (and yes, I do still have a few of those mix-tapes left!) - the upshot of this was that 1) we NEVER used 8-tracks in my dad's house and 2) I was blessed with hearing CLASSIC ROCK albums, on tape, on our road trips to/from Seattle to Santa Barbara that we did at least twice a year. 

The reason I mention all of that is there were 2 mix-tapes in particular that I LOVED listening to as a young'un. Side A of tape 1 was WAR and side B was Rufus/Chaka Khan (I still have this relic of a tape, and if I had a tape player still I'd be worried the tape would break) and the other tape featured several tracks from Uriah Heep (July Morning was the shit!), It's a Beatufiul Day, Herbie Hancock, Herb Alpert and many others.  One of those miscellaneous tracks was THIS SONG....for the life of me I could not remember the name/artist, just the refrain and chorus would play in my head all these years.  THANK YOU BillG for playing this tune here, and ending my 25 year mental game of Name That Tune; I say....LONG LIVE RP!!


For years Fleetwood Mac was a two-guitar band  and I think the better for that. I wonder if the later (Buckingham/Nicks) band wouldn't have done better with a second guitarist. Food for thought.

I own just about everything the group did between 1971-1987. Now, with no disrespect to the Buckingham/Nicks era which is good in its own right, this song and the Future Games album, in entirety, are among the best the group ever created and Danny Kirwan's skills were at their too-brief peak. For me, it's the perfect balance of their later pop orientation and their earlier blues-based songs.

From this album on they began a slow trek toward the sound that Buckingham/Nicks perfected in the band. Along the way on Bare Trees, Mystery to Me and Heroes Are Hard to Find, they produced some great music -  and just as great as their later period.
 easmann wrote:

I generally like the tone and sentiment of your comment however you've dipped your toe into a hot topic.

You've made two statements I'd like to comment on. First the one with which I agree:

 "... the group seems to have performed at a very high level regardless of personnel."

It's true, all the incarnations of this group made some great music. However, when you say:

'The advent of the Buckingham/Nicks era drove "Future Games" and "Bare Trees" into obscurity.'

Firstly, this statement flirts with, but stops short of, the popular notion that Buckingham/Nicks somehow "ruined" the previous versions of the band. You actually don't say this, so I'm not picking on you for that, but lots of commenters do say that (and I disagree with that idea but that's a different conversation). Secondly, and most importantly, you claim that the popularity of the later work made the prior work more obscure than it already was. I don't think this is possible. 

I respectfully submit that the opposite is true: That the popularity of the later albums inspired many listeners, who previously were unaware of Fleetwood Mac, to seek out and discover those prior albums, and in some cases, became fans of the older stuff too (or discover that a song they already liked was actually by an earlier Fleetwood Mac incarnation). Thereby making that past work less obscure rather than more. By the way the first Buckingham/Nicks album was the band's tenth release, so there were nine prior albums of which Future Games and Bare Trees were the fifth and sixth, there's plenty more past work to mine for gems. 

If someone was already an FM fan and did not like the musical direction they took after Buckingham/Nicks were recruited that's understandable and I sympathize, and if they want to express their displeasure that's fine too. Folks can blame Buckingham and Nicks if they like but I think that's misguided.
Peace.
 I would agree but I would inc Christine perfect mcvie in that rhythm section !
 


 easmann wrote:

I generally like the tone and sentiment of your comment however you've dipped your toe into a hot topic.

You've made two statements I'd like to comment on. First the one with which I agree:

 "... the group seems to have performed at a very high level regardless of personnel."

It's true, all the incarnations of this group made some great music. However, when you say:

'The advent of the Buckingham/Nicks era drove "Future Games" and "Bare Trees" into obscurity.'

Firstly, this statement flirts with, but stops short of, the popular notion that Buckingham/Nicks somehow "ruined" the previous versions of the band. You actually don't say this, so I'm not picking on you for that, but lots of commenters do say that (and I disagree with that idea but that's a different conversation). Secondly, and most importantly, you claim that the popularity of the later work made the prior work more obscure than it already was. I don't think this is possible. 

I respectfully submit that the opposite is true: That the popularity of the later albums inspired many listeners, who previously were unaware of Fleetwood Mac, to seek out and discover those prior albums, and in some cases, became fans of the older stuff too (or discover that a song they already liked was actually by an earlier Fleetwood Mac incarnation). Thereby making that past work less obscure rather than more. By the way the first Buckingham/Nicks album was the band's tenth release, so there were nine prior albums of which Future Games and Bare Trees were the fifth and sixth, there's plenty more past work to mine for gems. 

If someone was already an FM fan and did not like the musical direction they took after Buckingham/Nicks were recruited that's understandable and I sympathize, and if they want to express their displeasure that's fine too. Folks can blame Buckingham and Nicks if they like but I think that's misguided.
Peace.
 
 
Well said, I am exactly one of those people. At 13 I saw Fleetwood Mac in 77 on the Rumors tour. I had never really listened to them all that much. But afterwards , fell in love with the band and all of its incarnations. Seeing them, made me want more. I found Bare Trees and Future Games and loved the differing styles that those band mates represented from B&N. But I still loved the B&N. There's no win or lose, its opinion, it's what you like.        
 


Sweet, sweet, nostalgic stuff...
 joelbb wrote:
I totally agree.  The advent of the Buckingham/Nicks era drove "Future Games" and "Bare Trees" into obscurity.  They are both terrific albums.  In fact, the group seems to have performed at a very high level regardless of personnel.  Mick Fleetwood and John McVie are the only start-to-finish continuity.  Who would have thought a rhythm section would have that kind of impact, even if it is the best one in R&R history.
 
I generally like the tone and sentiment of your comment however you've dipped your toe into a hot topic.

You've made two statements I'd like to comment on. First the one with which I agree:

 "... the group seems to have performed at a very high level regardless of personnel."

It's true, all the incarnations of this group made some great music. However, when you say:

'The advent of the Buckingham/Nicks era drove "Future Games" and "Bare Trees" into obscurity.'

Firstly, this statement flirts with, but stops short of, the popular notion that Buckingham/Nicks somehow "ruined" the previous versions of the band. You actually don't say this, so I'm not picking on you for that, but lots of commenters do say that (and I disagree with that idea but that's a different conversation). Secondly, and most importantly, you claim that the popularity of the later work made the prior work more obscure than it already was. I don't think this is possible. 

I respectfully submit that the opposite is true: That the popularity of the later albums inspired many listeners, who previously were unaware of Fleetwood Mac, to seek out and discover those prior albums, and in some cases, became fans of the older stuff too (or discover that a song they already liked was actually by an earlier Fleetwood Mac incarnation). Thereby making that past work less obscure rather than more. By the way the first Buckingham/Nicks FM album was the band's tenth release, so there are nine prior albums of which Future Games and Bare Trees were the fifth and sixth, meaning there's plenty more past work to mine for gems. 

If someone was already an FM fan and did not like the musical direction they took after Buckingham/Nicks were recruited that's understandable and I sympathize, and if they want to express their displeasure that's fine too. Folks can blame Buckingham and Nicks if they like but I think that's misguided.
Peace.
wow this is dull
 Tana wrote:
It's breathtaking how different and wonderful this Fleetwood Mac is from its later incarnations.

 
Very different songwriters (Kirwan, Welch) in the band at this time, but Buckingham and Nicks were to replace them only four years after this.
one of the mac's best ever! beginning of the bob welch era as well / timeless / thanks bill !
 DaveInVA wrote:
Another "desert island" lp for sure

 
{#Yes}
nice song to ease into the shock of morning
 kaybee wrote:
I'm not familiar with this album and don't think I've heard this before... what a captivating piece!

 
Shades of Fleet Foxes
wow cool tune! it floats on a languid sea of echo-laden acoustic and electric guitars, and bongo's too  woo-hoo-hoo
 Woman Of 1000 Years is a. lifesaver.
 joelbb wrote:

I totally agree.  The advent of the Buckingham/Nicks era drove "Future Games" and "Bare Trees" into obscurity.  They are both terrific albums.  In fact, the group seems to have performed at a very high level regardless of personnel.  Mick Fleetwood and John McVie are the only start-to-finish continuity.  Who would have thought a rhythm section would have that kind of impact, even if it is the best one in R&R history.

 
Everybody in my galalactic presidential campaign love this song, which is from a priceless album...  we be dancing like bowlegged gypsy muleskinners...  love sex, drugs, and rock 'n roll...  hope life is grand for you right this minute,  joelbb...  time flies when we're having fun...
wonderfull stuff and the beginning of the bob welsh era as well
Almost hearing a bit of Real Estate towards the end there... or rather, almost hearing the end of this song in Real Estate?
 romeotuma wrote:


Daniel David "Danny" Kirwan wrote this song... when this album was released, some unknown critic said this song "floated on a languid sea of echo-laden acoustic and electric guitars"...

love this song...  this whole album is incredible...

 

 
I totally agree.  The advent of the Buckingham/Nicks era drove "Future Games" and "Bare Trees" into obscurity.  They are both terrific albums.  In fact, the group seems to have performed at a very high level regardless of personnel.  Mick Fleetwood and John McVie are the only start-to-finish continuity.  Who would have thought a rhythm section would have that kind of impact, even if it is the best one in R&R history.


Daniel David "Danny" Kirwan wrote this song... when this album was released, some unknown critic said this song "floated on a languid sea of echo-laden acoustic and electric guitars"...

love this song...  this whole album is incredible...

 


The aural equivalent of a bottle of full-strength Dreamy Sleepy Nighty Snoozy Snooze {#Sleep}
Two totally distinct musical sounds, ten years or less apart, with the same brand and band name! 
 michaelc wrote:
Fleetvwood before the girls
Nice like this and mystery to me
 
Well, no. Before one of the girls. Christine McVie wrote and sang "Morning Rain" and, probably my favorite on the album, "Show Me a Smile."

Another "desert island" lp for sure
Such a great song, such a great album! Really no clinkers. I especially like "Show Me a Smile" as well.
It's breathtaking how different and wonderful this Fleetwood Mac is from its later incarnations.


This really is an incredible song from a truly great album...
 


Everybody in my hotel room loves this song...
 
This could honestly pass for a new, 2011 release. (though not as a F.M. new release) Sounds so fresh, I didnt know who it was.



This song is still soooo good for the external auditory meatus...


 
Fleetvwood before the girls
Nice like this and mystery to me
 andrewimft wrote:
Some folks should try listening to this whole album all the way through. The ideal conditions would be a cold winter's day, with a fire in the fireplace, hot chocolate in your cup, and some enhancement with a smoken weed (I don't do that stuff anymore but just being honest, as paying attention to the intricacies and soundscape will be enhanced and that's what you should be listening for).

T.....

 

I prefer to listen to my favourite music straight.

 

Fleetwood Mac is so bubble gum to me.  This track sounds nice.  Thankfully I don't recall it.  -hehe-


I'm not familiar with this album and don't think I've heard this before... what a captivating piece!
As said by others... great to hear this again - it's been a long time.
Peter Green days were the best musically.
{#Sleep}

it is absolute heaven to hear this song again..




This song is soooo good for the ears...

 audiozeb wrote:
One of the better songs from the Bob Welsh era. Very nice indeed. this whole album is GREAT!
 
This is a Danny Kirwan track.
Some folks should try listening to this whole album all the way through. The ideal conditions would be a cold winter's day, with a fire in the fireplace, hot chocolate in your cup, and some enhancement with a smoken weed (I don't do that stuff anymore but just being honest, as paying attention to the intricacies and soundscape will be enhanced and that's what you should be listening for).

There will be very few who will survive that experience, even without the smoken enhancement, who will not appreciate this record. It was groundbreaking in a quiet way, full of intricate beauty. It's funny seeing people diss it here because it's so much more than it seems from a quick listen on the radio.

I love this song.
dreadpixie wrote:
this song sucks
prog wanking.
Wow is this making me ill.
:yawn:
this song sucks
jksteacher wrote:
Toad the Wet Sprocket took their vibe, but at least Toad's music went somewhere. I'd be happy if this at least went "away."
Oh my?!
still a great song
Haven't heard this in at least 20 years...love it! Good memories... :angel:
Going for that special CSN-on-quaaludes vibe.
Toad the Wet Sprocket took their vibe, but at least Toad's music went somewhere. I'd be happy if this at least went "away."
Wow! Surprisingly tedious!
Kurt_from_La_Qui wrote:
i agree keenevision. that era of fleetwood mac was truly unique. we never get to hear hardly any of those great tunes. come on bill, dig them up for us.
Hear, hear. Tunes from Bare Trees would be good, too.
:D one of my favorite FM songs of all time! so dreamy...
One of the better songs from the Bob Welsh era. Very nice indeed. this whole album is GREAT! :wave:
zzzzzzzzzzz
Originally Posted by keenevision: Man- RP has turned me on to so much new music- and then again you give me these old great tunes! Play Heros Are Hard To Find; or anything from "Mystery To Me"!!!! :clap: Actually- Play the title cut "Future Games", Danny Kirwan at his best!
i agree keenevision. that era of fleetwood mac was truly unique. we never get to hear hardly any of those great tunes. come on bill, dig them up for us.
Originally Posted by deneb: At several moments, this song reminds me of Verve. Hmm. There's one guitar passage that's especially so. I wonder if it's a conscious influence, a subconscious influence, or a complete coincidence. :)
What a memorable album (Future Games) this was. Im going to have to rummage through my collection to see if Ive I still got it somewhere. As far as the Verve is concerned, since this album was released in '71, I'm going to go out on a limb here and conclude that is was the Mac who was providing the influence. Just a guess.
At several moments, this song reminds me of Verve. Hmm. There\'s one guitar passage that\'s especially so. I wonder if it\'s a conscious influence, a subconscious influence, or a complete coincidence. :)
I concur with the other comments. It\'s great to hear the old, obscure stuff. How about \"Tell me all the things you do\" or \"Station Man\" off of Kiln House.
Man- RP has turned me on to so much new music- and then again you give me these old great tunes! Play Heros Are Hard To Find; or anything from "Mystery To Me"!!!! :clap: Actually- Play the title cut "Future Games", Danny Kirwan at his best!
Man this is really nice to hear again. I love early Fleetwood Mac :clap: Thanks for playing this.