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Bob Dylan — Tangled Up In Blue
Album: Blood On The Tracks
Avg rating:
8.3

Your rating:
Total ratings: 3220









Released: 1975
Length: 5:39
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Early one morning, the sun was shining
I was laying in bed
Wondering if she'd changed it all
If her hair was still red
Her folks, they said our lives together
Sure was gonna be rough
They never did like mama's homemade dress
Papa's bankbook wasn't big enough
And I was standing on the side of the road
Rain falling on my shoes
Heading out for the east coast
Lord knows I've paid some dues getting through
Tangled up in blue

She was married when we first met
Soon to be divorced
I helped her out of a jam, I guess
But I used a little too much force
We drove that car as far as we could
Abandoned it out west
Split up on a dark, sad night
Both agreeing it was best
She turned around to look at me
As I was walking away
I heard her say over my shoulder
"We'll meet again someday on the avenue"
Tangled up in blue

I had a job in the great north woods
Working as a cook for a spell
But I never did like it all that much
And one day the axe just fell
So I drifted down to New Orleans
Where I's lucky for to be employed
Working for a while on a fishing boat
Right outside of Delacroix
But all the while I was alone
The past was close behind
I seen a lot of women
But she never escaped my mind and I just grew
Tangled up in blue

She was working in a topless place
And I stopped in for a beer
I just kept looking at the sight of her face
In the spotlight so clear
And later on when the crowd thinned out
I's just about to do the same
She was standing there in back of my chair
Said, "Tell me, don't I know your name?"
I muttered something underneath my breath
She studied the lines on my face
I must admit I felt a little uneasy
When she bent down to tie the laces of my shoe
Tangled up in blue

She lit a burner on the stove and offered me a pipe
"I thought you'd never say hello," she said
"You look like the silent type"
Then she opened up a book of poems
And handed it to me
Written by an Italian poet
From the thirteenth century
And every one of them words rang true
And glowed like burning coal
Pouring off of every page
Like it was written in my soul from me to you
Tangled up in blue

I lived with them on Montague Street
In a basement down the stairs
There was music in the caf├ęs at night
And revolution in the air
Then he started into dealing with slaves
And something inside of him died
She had to sell everything she owned
And froze up inside
And when finally the bottom fell out
I became withdrawn
The only thing I knew how to do
Was to keep on keeping on like a bird that flew
Tangled up in blue

So now I'm going back again
I got to get her somehow
All the people we used to know
They're an illusion to me now
Some are mathematicians
Some are carpenter's wives
Don't know how it all got started
I don't what they do with their lives
But me, I'm still on the road
Heading for another joint
We always did feel the same
We just saw it from a different point of view
Tangled up in blue
Comments (697)add comment
How many a year has passed and gone?
Many a gamble has been lost and won.
And many a road taken by many a first friend.
And each one I've never seen again.

I wish, I wish, I wish in vain.
That we could sit simply in that room again.
Ten thousand dollars at the drop of a hat,
I'd give it all gladly if our lives could be like that.


Yeah....that's why they give Nobel prizes. 
 On_The_Beach wrote:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/img.rush.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/band_geddy_861-300x225.jpg
I wasn't aware Geddy was singing on this.
 

Your goof on Geddy does not diminish the fact that Bob's voice is annoying, as is Geddy's.  However both fit their music.  I love Geddy.  Bob took awhile for me to get used to.
 crogers wrote:

I see.  So, you liked the segue.  Or, you want to have Dylan's babies.  Or both.
 
The segue was fine.  Two quality artists, selected by Bill, lined up in harmony.  Try stepping out of that restaurant again.  Maybe that brick will do the job this time.


I lower my rating from 8 to  7    Next time I leave      Rating down to 3  + skip
 kcar wrote:

Dylan is a polarizing figure these days. I don't remember people saying that they actively hated him back during the 70s. I think he was sort of deified in the 60s 'til the mid 70s; music started changing dramatically and it became OK to openly diss him as dated, out-of-fashion. 

Dylan did an interview with Bill Bradley of "60 Minutes" back in 2004, during which he admitted that he deliberately created and released bad albums because he was so sick of his fans' hero-worship. From what I remember he found it unnerving and wanted a way to bring people's expectations of him back down to earth. It shocked me that he'd put out music he didn't like, music that would dog him for the rest of his life, because he couldn't deal with public adoration. That probably contributed to some listeners giving him the thumbs down. 

But this is one of the best damned songs I've ever heard, even with that harmonica huffing and puffing at the end. 

 
 
As you could tell from that Bradley interview, Dylan was somewhat obsessed with getting rid of his image as some kind of prophet or something, which he didn't feel he deserved. He just wanted to destroy that image and tried several ways to do it including issuing some substandard music,  finding religion and fostering the idea that he was just a simple Jewish boy that wrote interesting songs.
 Alastair wrote:
As ever with Dylan.  Genius lyrics destroyed by the worst voice in contemporary music.  
 
I wish people would give up on hating Dyan's voice. Original lyrics sung by the composer have a certain passion that you never get in a covered version, even if their voice is not the best.
I bought all of his first 10 (vinyl) albums when each was released and prize them more than any other in my collection, even though many others have better voices.
This album was my introduction to Dylan when I was 12 yrs old. I had heard other songs by him, but he wasn't fully on my radar until this, which I fell head over heels in love with. Still love it.

I only recently learned that Dylan wrote this song after a weekend of listening to Joni Mitchell's album, Blue.  
Not much of a fan but this is one of his good ones.
Boy I spent some time with this album once upon a time long ago and far away. Nice to hear it pop up sometimes.
Absolutely amazing song!
Dylan is Dylan and his voice is as much a part of his music as his lyrics..... I happen to love his voice and a "good" voice (whatever that is) would change everything about his music.... and for the record Rolling Stone lists Dylan as 7th best voice out of 100 best singers in rock..... so guess a few more people like his voice.....
Even after all these years, I still hear moments that make me think "Ah! I see what you did there!"

Quite a piece of work.
I read someplace that Dylan originally wrote this in the key of G but sensed something was lacking. One the the session guys suggested they change the key to A to give it more tension and the result is what you hear. 

One of the keys to being a genius (pun semi intended) is to listen to those around you.
My fav Dylan tune
Dylan is one of a quick dozen good artists/bands I could toss out as bad singers, but damn, that man is a helluva wordsmith. Brilliant lyrics.
YOU PLAY THIS TOO MUCH
 lizardking wrote:

Great pic!  I think it's kinda funny how she has the total hippy look going pretty good except that there fine piece of luggage.  Where's the knapsack!?

 
That's where she keeps her Zither
 Steely_D wrote:
Saw Joan Osborne do a cover of this at Yoshi's a couple of years ago. It was enthralling and at the end she hesitated and said, "wow. that went some place special."

It was one of those transcendent unpredictable musical moments that every music lover lives for.
 
Check out her cover of "What Becomes of the Brokenhearted?" on the "Standing in the Shadows of Motown" documentary.
Phenomenal.
 Alastair wrote:
As ever with Dylan.  Genius lyrics destroyed by the worst voice in contemporary music.  

 
Are the three hundred million Dylan covers by people with supposedly better voices difficult to seek out?
Saw Joan Osborne do a cover of this at Yoshi's a couple of years ago. It was enthralling and at the end she hesitated and said, "wow. that went some place special."

It was one of those transcendent unpredictable musical moments that every music lover lives for.
 On_The_Beach wrote:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/img.rush.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/band_geddy_861-300x225.jpg
I wasn't aware Geddy was singing on this.

 
So cold, but very funny. Love it. 
 Alastair wrote:
As ever with Dylan.  Genius lyrics destroyed by the worst voice in contemporary music. 
 
https://s3.amazonaws.com/img.rush.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/band_geddy_861-300x225.jpg
I wasn't aware Geddy was singing on this.
As ever with Dylan.  Genius lyrics destroyed by the worst voice in contemporary music.  
 tomcool wrote:
A hippie chick seeks a ride.
Blue, when her hair was still red.

The RPHD Flickr group invites RP listeners, photographers, digital artists and photo editors to join us in the continual improvement of the RPHD slideshow. Come visit!

 
Great pic!  I think it's kinda funny how she has the total hippy look going pretty good except that there fine piece of luggage.  Where's the knapsack!?
 idiot_wind wrote:
Gonna see that there Bobby Dylan live, in October. Got seats in row 6. Ha!   

 
Nice!  While his singing voice has gotten "worse" lately, he is still a legend.  My only regret is that the one time I saw him perform was before I became a big fan...oh well....and I'm guessing you've seen him multiple times; hence the awesome moniker idiot_wind.  How many times have you seen him?  And let us know how the show went. LONG LIVE RP!!

 


Bobby was just on the other side of the geniius curve here
Gonna see that there Bobby Dylan live, in October. Got seats in row 6. Ha!   
A hippie chick seeks a ride.
Blue, when her hair was still red.

The RPHD Flickr group invites RP listeners, photographers, digital artists and photo editors to join us in the continual improvement of the RPHD slideshow. Come visit!
The conviction, the urgency, with which Dylan sings this song, (and the whole album), is astonishing.
Give him a Nobel, or something...

So now I'm going back again
I got to get her somehow
All the people we used to know
They're an illusion to me now
Some are mathematicians
Some are carpenter's wives
Don't know how it all got started
I don't what they do with their lives
But me, I'm still on the road
Heading for another joint
We always did feel the same
We just saw it from a different point of view
Tangled up in blue
 GTT wrote:
The lyrics on RP are not correct, nor are the lyrics on the "official" Bob Dylan website.  The woman does not say, "Tell me, do I know your name," the lyric is, "She was standing there, at the back of my chair, said, Jimmy, don't I know your name?"  That's what makes the line clever and funny.  Dylan just amazes me (and obviously many others).  I read that Brahms once said that he did not really write any music, he just heard and wrote down music that came from some other place.  That's how it is with Dylan's lyrics, they come from some inexhaustible reservoir of genius.

 
Yep.....and that inexhaustible fount of genius is chased by every single artist, and person for that matter, who gets blessed....some would say cursed...by its fleeting touch. 

I say fleeting because like an effervescent butterfly it lands but briefly in any one spot, then flits along to the next person, place or thing.  Perhaps it never stays long because it tends to burn out anything that it selects as a conduit.  We being mere mortal coils and all that.  That said it does seem that butterfly took up a long residence on his shoulder doesn't it?  Guess he could handle it?  Anyway.....I don't think it's there now....maybe he lost the connection.....but for a long time it did seem to like him.

Highlow
American Net'Zen 

Ya can't trust mathematicians. But you trust carpenter's wives, I used to know one.  She was kind of pious. 
The lyrics on RP are not correct, nor are the lyrics on the "official" Bob Dylan website.  The woman does not say, "Tell me, do I know your name," the lyric is, "She was standing there, at the back of my chair, said, Jimmy, don't I know your name?"  That's what makes the line clever and funny.  Dylan just amazes me (and obviously many others).  I read that Brahms once said that he did not really write any music, he just heard and wrote down music that came from some other place.  That's how it is with Dylan's lyrics, they come from some inexhaustible reservoir of genius.
 amb599 wrote:
Proof that you can be disemboweled, have a crate of cotton in your mouth and still sing out music that people that took a metric ton of LSD in the 60s will think is 'great'.   Was there no one else on earth that could have possibly sung this song for him?  Its so painful to listen to this. 

 
...and how should one sing a song entitled "Tangled Up In Blue" anyways?  With a joyful voice?  I think the "crappy low quality" vocals are often times 100% appropriate for BD songs.  And then once in awhile he'll remind you that he can actually sing if needed (listen to Forever Young, for instance.)
 amb599 wrote:
I did.   I'm still having flashbacks.  Also I don't know what else to do with my free time.  I should probably go outdoors more.  :/
 
{#Roflol}  (I knew you weren't such a bad lad.)
         IMHO, only Bob's nasally twang could do the song justice.
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Quit whining like a baby and hit the PSD button.

 
I did.   I'm still having flashbacks.  Also I don't know what else to do with my free time.  I should probably go outdoors more.  :/
One of my few 10s. The best track from a great album. pxd
 amb599 wrote:
Proof that you can be disemboweled, have a crate of cotton in your mouth and still sing out music that people that took a metric ton of LSD in the 60s will think is 'great'.   Was there no one else on earth that could have possibly sung this song for him?  Its so painful to listen to this. 

 
When I grow up I want to be just like you.
 amb599 wrote:
Proof that you can be disemboweled, have a crate of cotton in your mouth and still sing out music that people that took a metric ton of LSD in the 60s will think is 'great'.   Was there no one else on earth that could have possibly sung this song for him?  Its so painful to listen to this.
 
Quit whining like a baby and hit the PSD button.
Proof that you can be disemboweled, have a crate of cotton in your mouth and still sing out music that people that took a metric ton of LSD in the 60s will think is 'great'.   Was there no one else on earth that could have possibly sung this song for him?  Its so painful to listen to this. 

 leafmold wrote:
I know there are people who don't like Dylan, even hate him.  Maybe it's because his music has always been a part of my life, but I find myself defensive about him and his talent.  I suspect Dylan himself doesn't give a rat's ass about his haters, but I do...

 
Dylan is a polarizing figure these days. I don't remember people saying that they actively hated him back during the 70s. I think he was sort of deified in the 60s 'til the mid 70s; music started changing dramatically and it became OK to openly diss him as dated, out-of-fashion. 

Dylan did an interview with Bill Bradley of "60 Minutes" back in 2004, during which he admitted that he deliberately created and released bad albums because he was so sick of his fans' hero-worship. From what I remember he found it unnerving and wanted a way to bring people's expectations of him back down to earth. It shocked me that he'd put out music he didn't like, music that would dog him for the rest of his life, because he couldn't deal with public adoration. That probably contributed to some listeners giving him the thumbs down. 

But this is one of the best damned songs I've ever heard, even with that harmonica huffing and puffing at the end. 

 
Always and eternally, YEAH! I love the way he wove deeply poetic tapestries like this into such nimble, lilting melodies... For me, he reached a new peak, and captured my heart all over again, with Love and Theft (and I was going through a divorce at the time!), but in songs like this one, he's THE QUINTESSENTIAL ROCK POET, the wry chronicler of loves and loves lost, the TRUE BLUESMASTER.
 Schmoogsley wrote:
Sucko-barfo

 
ofrab-okcuS indeed

love this song, love the story 
I rated it a humble 8
Holy hell they did do a duet!!! It was worse than I ever imagined
Imagine Van Morrison and Bob Dylan doing a duet!? Two people who can't carry a tune In a bucket
Sucko-barfo
great song ! great album ! nobel prize indeed!!!
As I sit here on a Sunday writing my essay on tent camping = altered states, because I just back yesterday from a two day camp, I listen to this Bob Dylan, while noting in my essay that I'm typing, how much of this album I listened to, during my camp out.

It's all sop freaky.  
 wgsu_1978 wrote:
Hands down my favorite Dylan song. Nothing else even comes close.
 
Agree. Even now after so many years, I can' shake her.
10 all the way. One of the few certainties in any top ten for me. pxd
I think that's cool.  So far, I still find myself among those unfortunate folks who have not found a way to fire neurons in the order required to get past Bob's delivery to find the beauty that reportedly resides there just under the surface.   It's not that I don't think it's there, rather, I prefer to believe that I simply have yet to find a way to appreciate it.  I may never — and that will surely be my loss.

Granted, I do get a little kick out of teasing about him - but even as I (sometimes rudely) disparage his work, I respect the opinions of those who love his stuff and I'm honestly glad that his music makes you feel as good as I do about the music that I love.  Try not to take the haters comments personally — though it may feel like an attack on you and your taste, I believe that it has much more to do with their (our) inability to grasp something that just comes easily to you.  Rock on.
 
leafmold wrote:
I know there are people who don't like Dylan, even hate him.  Maybe it's because his music has always been a part of my life, but I find myself defensive about him and his talent.  I suspect Dylan himself doesn't give a rat's ass about his haters, but I do...

 
I know there are people who don't like Dylan, even hate him.  Maybe it's because his music has always been a part of my life, but I find myself defensive about him and his talent.  I suspect Dylan himself doesn't give a rat's ass about his haters, but I do...
One of his best for sure, my fav is Lay Lady Lay. I just remember it was always on the radio when I was a kid.
 idiot_wind wrote:
Watch out for those mathematicians and carpenter's wives...

 
my favourite line in it too


Ladies and Gentlemen,
Mr Bob Dylan 
 wgsu_1978 wrote:
Hands down my favorite Dylan song. Nothing else even comes close.
 
Agree! 
this song is alive
Dylan does Dylan better than the Byrds do.
Actually an 11...
He actually conjured up these lyrics in his mind and wrote this. Seriously, think about it for a moment. Amazing. 
Brilliant
Is there a better story teller yet?
Such visuals, weavings  and double entendre's that I never grow tired of listening.
Pure unadulterated genius
You all have to check out Bobby D.having a conversation with IBM Watson (the talking computer) in an IBM commercial. It's a hoot!

You can Google it. 
 westslope wrote:
For the Dylan haters:

 

 
Thank you sir, may I have another?

{#Cheesygrin}
I always enjoy this, and the alternate lyrical version of it are fun to hear, too.
From Rolling Stone:
" took me 10 years to live, and two years to write," Dylan often said before playing "Tangled Up in Blue" in concert. His marriage was crumbling in 1974 as he wrote what would become the opener on Blood on the Tracks and his most personal examination of hurt and nostalgia. Dylan's lyrical shifts in perspective, between confession and critique, and his acute references to the Sixties experience evoked a decade of both utopian and broken promise. His plaintive vocal and the fresh-air picking of the Minneapolis session players, organized by his brother, David Zimmerman, hearkened to an earlier pathos: the frank heartbreak and spiritual restoration in Appalachian balladry. Dylan has played this song many different ways live but rarely strays from the perfect crossroads of this recording, where emotional truths meet the everlasting comfort of the American folk song.

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/the-10-greatest-bob-dylan-songs-20110511#ixzz3hypN72Q1 


Watch out for those mathematicians and carpenter's wives...
 blkstd wrote:
on a roll, bill!

 
Today too...  Shout out to UIUC RP'ers, best years of my life, there in Chambana.  Except for that -50F day once, that sucked.
For the Dylan haters:

 
on a roll, bill!
 pallasathene82 wrote:
I need a script that automatically presses the Play Something Different button every time a Dylan song comes on. :-/

 
Ya know, I should think that would be totally do-able on Bill's end.  A simple algorithm to check if an artist or specific song is listed on a user's DNP list - if so, fork to the PSD subroutine for that stream, et voila — 40% fewer grumpy listeners = >10% boost in donations.   I think it's brilliant!  

Whaddya say, Bill?  Hell, I'd even send you a Jackson just to cover the Red Bull bill for your developer!

 
 pallasathene82 wrote:
I need a script that automatically presses the Play Something Different button every time a Dylan song comes on. :-/

 
Can you make it Raspberry Pi compatible? 
I need a script that automatically presses the Play Something Different button every time a Dylan song comes on. :-/
Hands down my favorite Dylan song. Nothing else even comes close.
My all time favourite Bob Dylan album.  I still remember when I first heard it on CHUM-FM in Toronto.
Solid 10.
Keep up the good tunes.   
{#Cheers}
Ahhhhhh, the master. 

Bobby is now on the road. Was on Highway 61 on Monday/Tuesday of this week when he played STL.   

 
A great lyric, but the BobbyZ's rangadang version of the Blooouuuuuuzzzzz is  irksome to my ears
 h8rhater wrote:

What was on my mind was what is not in yours.

 
I see.  So, you liked the segue.  Or, you want to have Dylan's babies.  Or both.
 Grammarcop wrote:
I read this morning that Bob gave a concert in September 1964 in Ann Arbor High School (Ann Arbor, Michigan). The most expensive ticket was $3.75.

 
Saw him in Honolulu in April of '66: $4.50 a ticket.  Seemed expensive at the time.  Great concert w/, I believe, Mike Bloomfield on lead. 
Probably my favorite Dylan tune.  {#Bananajam}{#Drummer}{#Bananapiano}{#Bananajam}
Yep, feeling tangled up today!
 crogers wrote:
Anywhere you like — what's on your mind? 


h8rhater wrote:

Where to begin... (sigh)

 
 
What was on my mind was what is not in yours.
very nice!
I love how you can really feel this must have happened to him, and I love the touches that tell you, like Zimmy don't I know your name?
Anywhere you like — what's on your mind? 


h8rhater wrote:

Where to begin... (sigh)

 

 crogers wrote:
Ugh.  Following Sarah McLachlan's angelic live rendition of Ice with this groaner of a ditty by ol' Uncle Croaky is nearly unforgivable.  It's like stepping out of a nice restaurant after a really good meal and getting hit square in the face with a brick.  Wife says, "Dylan's voice can ruin a perfectly good evening."   3 > 2 if only for the uncharacteristically dreadful segue.
 
Where to begin... (sigh)
I'm finally beginning to understand what he's saying. But what exactly does "Mangled up in bleh" mean?
Sing on Bob, sing on...till you die...which will be on the road.

One the road...in the grand style of Jack K. and the beat writers. 

The road is where America was,is, and will be. 

Sing on, Bob.   

But don't forget to play hard RnR at the next show and croak out the lyrics and piss off all the folks that don't get it.    
Ugh.  Following Sarah McLachlan's angelic live rendition of Ice with this groaner of a ditty by ol' Uncle Croaky is nearly unforgivable.  It's like stepping out of a nice restaurant after a really good meal and getting hit square in the face with a brick.  Wife says, "Dylan's voice can ruin a perfectly good evening."   3 > 2 if only for the uncharacteristically dreadful segue.

 treatment_bound wrote:
Is Bob the only guy in history to spend his time in a "topless place" lookin' at the side sight of a stripper's face?

 
It must've worked out for him; a little later on she "bent down to tie the laces" of (his) shoe".  That's probably some sort of folk music euphemism, like "strummin' on the ol' banjo" or "Cockles and mussels, alive, alive-oh".
 pontfarrer wrote:
Bob Dylan = painful.  Not a fan.  Never was. 
Please shut him up !

 

I do not agree with you.
But I really understand your pain: I feel the same about Mark Knopfler
Is Bob the only guy in history to spend his time in a "topless place" lookin' at the side of a stripper's face?
Bob Dylan = painful.  Not a fan.  Never was. 
Please shut him up !
Saw him play this in Philly some years ago.  Acoustic.  Alone, his band and Patti Smith on the wings of the stage watching.  It really was transformative.

He was amazing
 idiot_wind wrote:
Just play the entire album. 

 
Yeh
 
Just play the entire album. 
 caatgrrrl wrote:
Does anybody know what the part about montgue steet and dealing in slaves is about?
 
 
This may offer some explanation.  Tangled Up In Blue meanings
 Grammarcop wrote:
I read this morning that Bob gave a concert in September 1964 in Ann Arbor High School (Ann Arbor, Michigan). The most expensive ticket was $3.75.

  At a time when the average yearly US income was about $6,000, this was already a lot of (too much?) money lost in vain.
 bendame wrote:
Instant PSD !!!!!!!!
 
+1. Can't stand this chirping over-inflated balloon.
Watch out for mathematicians and carpenters wives... and people that think they can link mysticism with math with physics 
I read this morning that Bob gave a concert in September 1964 in Ann Arbor High School (Ann Arbor, Michigan). The most expensive ticket was $3.75.
kcar thanks for that.... hilarious comment
 kcar wrote:

Ohmigod dude it's like tangled up in blue like the song but it's like Beatrix Potter instead. This is cosmic. 

hippie shaking his head in amazement...mouth wide open

We must twirl to honor this harmonic convergence: 


hippies dancing with guy in Santa Claus twirling



 


 cosmiclint wrote:

{#Lol}

Hope you're having a great day too, man!
 
Same to you, brother...

I still think this song should be entitled "Tangled Up In Glue", but everybody in my homeless camp loves this song... 
 RabbitEars wrote:


 
Ohmigod dude it's like tangled up in blue like the song but it's like Beatrix Potter instead. This is cosmic. 

hippie shaking his head in amazement...mouth wide open

We must twirl to honor this harmonic convergence: 


hippies dancing with guy in Santa Claus twirling


The inimitable vocal styleings of Bobby D.
Like it or not, it's iconic and definitive.
You might not like what it defines, of course, and that's what makes life interesting: we're all different and various things turn us on.
But this was a special album, and this tune is a cornerstone. 
Instant PSD !!!!!!!!
Hmm. .. a catchy Dylan song{#Group-hug}
Makes a pleasant change, and no irritating harmonica overtones is a real bonus.... @#$#@$$!!! The bl**dy harmonica kicked in last minute! Was going to be 7, now it's 5:/
The worst concert I ever saw was Dylan at the U. of Alabama circa 1989. He phoned it in.
Maybe in my next life I'll like Dylan more. As for this life, I've heard enough to last a while.
I might be too young for Dylan - he always sounds like a parody of himself to me. You can imagine what Dylan singing 'Twinkle twinkle little star' might sound like too easily. My foot was tapping though. 
Not much a fan of Mr. Zimmerman but this one so captures the spirit of the times at an empirical level. Reminds me of "On the Road" for the 70's.
 PA1749 wrote:

Funny, so do I,,, wonder if its the same girl.....Seriously, when any guy hears this song, I think they all think of a girl they once use to know.  
One of Dylan's best! This song will always bring back fond memories of a girl I used to know.

 


I love the sense of urgency that Dylan sings this song...and the whole album.

So now I'm going back again
I got to get her somehow
All the people we used to know
They're an illusion to me now
Some are mathematicians
Some are carpenter's wives
Don't know how it all got started
I don't what they do with their lives
...... this is what "G O D L I K E" was made for
10{#Crown}