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The Beatles — Fixing A Hole
Album: Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
Avg rating:
8.5

Your rating:
Total ratings: 438









Released: 1967
Length: 2:30
Plays (last 30 days): 0
I'm fixing a hole where the rain gets in
And stops my mind from wandering
Where it will go

I'm filling the cracks that ran though the door
And kept my mind from wandering
Where it will go

And it really doesn't matter if I'm wrong
I'm right where I belong
I'm right where I belong
See the people standing there
Who disagree and never win
And wonder why they don't get in my door

I'm painting the room in a colourful way
And when my mind is wandering
There I will go

And it really doesn't matter if I'm wrong
I'm right where I belong
I'm right where I belong
Silly people run around
They worry me and never ask me
Why they don't get past my door

I'm taking the time for a number of things
That weren't important yesterday
And I still go

I'm fixing a hole where the rain gets in
And stops my mind from wandering
Where it will go
Where it will go
Comments (83)add comment
Throwaway album track, elevated way beyond its station.


perfect...



 ubastard wrote:
When I hear this, I know why I like the Stones!
 

 RParadise wrote:


The Stones would never even aspire to this level of musical complexity.

 

I believe that is the essence of ubastard's post - or perhaps "why" he likes The Stones.  Maybe not though. {#Whisper}

 Oscar_the_Grouch wrote:

Sounds an awful alot like typical liberal self loathing, a regrettable condition.
It's okay to be middle class and have a middle class background.
If you'd grown up poor working class like I did you'd see why I think you're being a snot-nosed prat.

Accept yourself for who you are and accept from where you came from.
 
"Right. I had to get up in the morning at ten o'clock at night half an hour before I went to bed, drink a cup of sulfuric acid, work twenty-nine hours a day down mill, and pay mill owner for permission to come to work, and when we got home, our Dad and our Mother would kill us and dance about on our graves singing Hallelujah." — Monty Python's Flying Circus - "Four Yorkshiremen"

Whatever.  We've all got sad tales to tell.  Shut up and enjoy the music. 

{#Meditate}

 ubastard wrote:
When I hear this, I know why I like the Stones!
 

When I hear this, I know why I don't like the Stones.  Just sayin...
10 to the enth. Great stuff.  Another insipid Paul "ditty."  yeah, yeah, yeah.{#Dancingbanana_2}

/sarcasm off.

 Tana wrote:
Lately I've come to a new appreciation of Sgt. Pepper's. It's an incredibly innovative album - some great John songs but maybe Paul at his best too, as in Fixing a Hole.
 
Bumpity bump!
 ubastard wrote:
When I hear this, I know why I like the Stones!
 

The Stones would never even aspire to this level of musical complexity.

And I love the Stones.
Having listened to this on vinyl on old crappy phonograph players when it first came out, I just about fell out of my chair today listening to it in digital, with headphones.  A whole new listening experience.  {#Cheesygrin}
Lately I've come to a new appreciation of Sgt. Pepper's. It's an incredibly innovative album - some great John songs but maybe Paul at his best too, as in Fixing a Hole.
fredriley wrote:
Regrettably, Sgt Pepper's reminds me of sad middle-class parties which my parents dragged me to, or gave, in their pathetic and risible attempts at social climbing, where all the men would at some point stand around with the album sleeve and sing along to the songs, sometimes trying pointless baroque frills or descants which became crunching discords. Excruciatingly embarrassing even 30 years on :(
Shack to château, is there anything more universal than parents messing with your kid sized worldview? Always intrigued by the capacity of music to package and theme an incident to the extent that the original intent of the composition is lost.

The frequent irony is that, in our attempt as parents to not repeat errors, we will do something that will have a similar effect on our own sprogs.

I always appreciate a vignette of someone's life framed by music - especially if it's foreign to my own experience. I finally adopted the following maxim to deal with the craptastic storms we all encounter: If you're going to look back and laugh about this someday, cut out the middleman and start laughing now.



 fredriley wrote:
Regrettably, Sgt Pepper's reminds me of sad middle-class parties which my parents dragged me to, or gave, in their pathetic and risible attempts at social climbing, where all the men would at some point stand around with the album sleeve and sing along to the songs, sometimes trying pointless baroque frills or descants which became crunching discords. Excruciatingly embarrassing even 30 years on :(
 
Sounds an awful alot like typical liberal self loathing, a regrettable condition.
It's okay to be middle class and have a middle class background.
If you'd grown up poor working class like I did you'd see why I think you're being a snot-nosed prat.

Accept yourself for who you are and accept from where you came from.


 ubastard wrote:
When I hear this, I know why I like the Stones!
 

Me too
Bill, you've sought the sounds of my soul wanderings...and sang them...{#Good-vibes}
When I hear this, I know why I like the Stones!
 fredriley wrote:
Regrettably, Sgt Pepper's reminds me of sad middle-class parties which my parents dragged me to, or gave, in their pathetic and risible attempts at social climbing, where all the men would at some point stand around with the album sleeve and sing along to the songs, sometimes trying pointless baroque frills or descants which became crunching discords. Excruciatingly embarrassing even 30 years on :(
 
Seriously?!?!?.... "sad middle-class parties", "pathetic and risible attempts at social climbing".  Dude, you've got a problem with your family and your past that you need to address.  Maybe your society too. 

I'm thinking some serious therapy may be required. 

I'm excruciatingly embarrassed for you.



love it...  from the greatest album of all time...


 fredriley wrote:
Regrettably, Sgt Pepper's reminds me of sad middle-class parties which my parents dragged me to, or gave, in their pathetic and risible attempts at social climbing, where all the men would at some point stand around with the album sleeve and sing along to the songs, sometimes trying pointless baroque frills or descants which became crunching discords. Excruciatingly embarrassing even 30 years on :(
 
Wow, I don't get anything like that from this album.  I think of four young working class guys, driven to make the music their own music; they've hit the big time with no idea it would be so spectacular.  Heady with theis overwhelming success and the freedom and money to do whatever they want, but frustrated with the lack of privacy and maybe scared that they'll run out of creative ideas... so they take mind-expanding drugs and this opens up another new world to them that they could not have imagined. 

"Fixing a Hole" is one of my all-time favourite Beatles songs... maybe my favourite McCartney piece.  It really is regrettable that those particular memories have ruined this wonderful album for you, Fred!

 fredriley wrote:
Regrettably, Sgt Pepper's reminds me of sad middle-class parties which my parents dragged me to, or gave, in their pathetic and risible attempts at social climbing, where all the men would at some point stand around with the album sleeve and sing along to the songs, sometimes trying pointless baroque frills or descants which became crunching discords. Excruciatingly embarrassing even 30 years on :(
 
Wow!  That is terrible!  Did they throw their car keys in a bowl too?  Seems like it would have been the era...
;-)
 fredriley wrote:
Regrettably, Sgt Pepper's reminds me of sad middle-class parties which my parents dragged me to, or gave, in their pathetic and risible attempts at social climbing, where all the men would at some point stand around with the album sleeve and sing along to the songs, sometimes trying pointless baroque frills or descants which became crunching discords. Excruciatingly embarrassing even 30 years on :(
  ...Could of been worse.  Ever heard Flock of Seagulls?


 treepop wrote:
I love the Beatles!!!!!!!!!!!!{#Dancingbanana_2}
 


Yeah, so do I... this great song is from the best album of all time...


I love the Beatles!!!!!!!!!!!!{#Dancingbanana_2}
 fredriley wrote:
Regrettably, Sgt Pepper's reminds me of sad middle-class parties which my parents dragged me to, or gave, in their pathetic and risible attempts at social climbing, where all the men would at some point stand around with the album sleeve and sing along to the songs, sometimes trying pointless baroque frills or descants which became crunching discords. Excruciatingly embarrassing even 30 years on :(
 

Is this part of that "hanging on in quiet desperation" thing that Pink Floyd talks about? Because if it is, I don't think you're supposed to mention it. {#Sealed}
 fredriley wrote:
Regrettably, Sgt Pepper's reminds me of sad middle-class parties which my parents dragged me to, or gave, in their pathetic and risible attempts at social climbing, where all the men would at some point stand around with the album sleeve and sing along to the songs, sometimes trying pointless baroque frills or descants which became crunching discords. Excruciatingly embarrassing even 30 years on :(
 
Fred, that is just so depressing.  Thanks for sharing{#Snooty}

Thanks Bill!
Still raining here.....(day 17 maybe?) 
Regrettably, Sgt Pepper's reminds me of sad middle-class parties which my parents dragged me to, or gave, in their pathetic and risible attempts at social climbing, where all the men would at some point stand around with the album sleeve and sing along to the songs, sometimes trying pointless baroque frills or descants which became crunching discords. Excruciatingly embarrassing even 30 years on :(


At the time, a lot of people thought this song was yet another drug song.  As many here have pointed out, it was something other than that.
 Shimmer wrote:

I think this song demonstrates the benefits of friendly competition within the group - it's basically Paul trying to write a John tune.

 

Er it's an interesting point and I love the song of course but I don't really agree with you. The main phrase of the verse - Fm/C, C aug (or Fmaj/min), Bb9 on a harpsichord - Lennon songs might have had descending bassnotes, but not that sort of voicing. The way the chorus ends with the arpeggio resolving down a semitone at the end isn't Lennon either. Basically Lennon didn't write such harmonically interesting songs. The lyrics are about retreat and escapism - a Lennon theme - yes, but John wouldn't have been so phlegmatic about the problems of the world. Sorry - I don't mean to be a w*nker.



Yessss... from the best album of all time...  a song of retreat and isolation...


A fantastic jewel of one of the albums of the 60's.
I love the guitar in this.
{#Sunny}
fill yer head and all that......so interesting that they had never smoked mota until Dylan "turned them on" during their first visit to to the good ole US of A :cowboy:
aaroncanderson wrote:
Never understood why a band that ripped off so many got so famous...oh wait yeah I can Nickelback, Coldplay...
Ummmm.... I think the beatles had their innovative moments... :stupid: :rolleyes:
thermion7 wrote:
Usually I can tell if a Beatles song was primarily written by Lennon or McCartney. This one has personality traits from both of them . A pure Beatles tune!
Very true. I think this song demonstrates the benefits of friendly competition within the group - it's basically Paul trying to write a John tune.
Can it be I never heard this before? It seems okay for a pop song.
Paul's voice was really beautiful, wasn't it?
Never understood why a band that ripped off so many got so famous...oh wait yeah I can Nickelback, Coldplay...
MojoJojo wrote:
When does the import and weight start? :ask: Nice pop-licious song and all, but...
Well, yes, maybe fluff--but what glorious fluff! 10+
A headphone labyrinthe of masterful sounds (this whole album for that matter). :music:
wferrier wrote:
coloradojohn wrote:
God, when these lads were ON, they were really ON, weren't they?!
I think so. . . at least I think I know so. . .
I think, eventually, the drugs had an effect on their songwriting, surprisingly, with a positive effect! (Sometime shortly after "I wanna Hold Your Hand" occurred.) Take for instance..."I am the eggman, I am the walrus...kookoo-ka choo!" What is that? I don't know, but I like it!!
cycleman wrote:
Isn't it amazing that such a sweet, seemingly simply little song can pack such import and weight...
When does the import and weight start? :ask: Nice pop-licious song and all, but...
coloradojohn wrote:
God, when these lads were ON, they were really ON, weren't they?!
I think so. . . at least I think I know so. . .
God, when these lads were ON, they were really ON, weren't they?! And now, as then -- as I suspect always shall be -- they sound SO GOOD especially when one is at or above a certain Standard Orbit... -- and it starts my mind a wandering and wondering where it will go and it will go everywhere with RP!
This song and "Getting Better" are my favorites from this album. Thanks Bill!
It really does'nt matter if I am wrong or right.....it's a 10 for me. :music:
Clearly a masterpiece...
One of my favorite songs from a favorite album. Easy 9.
Paul writing eliptically about TRIPPING.
thermion7 wrote:
Usually I can tell if a Beatles song was primarily written by Lennon or McCartney. This one has personality traits from both of them . A pure Beatles tune!
good insight
drover wrote:
Play it unadulterated for a 17-year-old kid who's never heard it before and tell him it's the latest Chemical Brothers single; he'd probably believe you.
Naaaaaaawh!
I bumped it to an 8.3 with my 10 vote.
you know, i love fiona apple ripoffs! this song reminds me of on the bound! (tee hee hee)
...everybody kept on playing Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band...
drover wrote:
Play it unadulterated for a 17-year-old kid who's never heard it before and tell him it's the latest Chemical Brothers single; he'd probably believe you.
Or Oasis!!
"Fixing a Hole" after Fiona Apple's "Paper Bag?" Masterful! You guys have exactly the right amount of time on your hands.
zaakster wrote:
This is probably the trippiest song they ever did.
Good topic. Lots to choose from. I'd have to Within You Without You is also fairly trippy. 8)
drover wrote:
Play it unadulterated for a 17-year-old kid who's never heard it before and tell him it's the latest Chemical Brothers single; he'd probably believe you.
Tru dat. Here's a link to a simpe but interesting fan-boy video of Tomorrow Never Knows https://www.i-am-bored.com/bored_link.cfm?link_id=5873
rulebritannia wrote:
incredibly radical in its time and still very hip today.
Play it unadulterated for a 17-year-old kid who's never heard it before and tell him it's the latest Chemical Brothers single; he'd probably believe you.
Thanks for the trip down memory lane. :)
redeyespy wrote:
"Tomorrow Never Knows" might actually take that prize.
Incredibly radical in its time and still very hip today.
redeyespy wrote:
"Tomorrow Never Knows" might actually take that prize.
Yep.
veegez wrote:
Love it when George Burns sings it! ;)
You are sick! (And I assume, kidding.)
Love that fuzz bass! At least I think that's what it's called....
Usually I can tell if a Beatles song was primarily written by Lennon or McCartney. This one has personality traits from both of them . A pure Beatles tune!
i don't know why, but this is my favorite beatles song.
zaakster wrote:
This is probably the trippiest song they ever did.
"Tomorrow Never Knows" might actually take that prize.
zaakster wrote:
This is probably the trippiest song they ever did.
The lyrics are a bit trippy, but I like it because of its simple beauty. Paul didn't overdress it like he did with some other songs (e.g. She's Leaving Home from the same album). It's just a tune with some instrumentation, but what a tune, and what a great arrangement.
eddief wrote:
Couldn't agree with you more. Great vocals.
Love it when George Burns sings it! ;)
zaakster wrote:
This is probably the trippiest song they ever did.
Have you listened to Revolver?
Isn't it amazing that such a sweet, seemingly simply little song can pack such import and weight. Such a great Beatles song....thanks for playing it.
veegez wrote:
I don't know why, but this is one of my favorite Beatles tunes! :)
Couldn't agree with you more. Great vocals.
Time warp!: Sgt. Pepper wasn't out in 65!
Why do we like it? Listen to the lyrics, the lyrics. :nodhead: An apocryphal story from 1965: I'm sitting in class, the guy in front of me spins around in his seat and asks "have you heard the Beatles' new album, Sgt. Pepper's?" "Nope", I reply. "Sucks", he says. #-o DOH!
This wonderful song has aged a whole lot better than I have. :)
Originally Posted by veegez: I don't know why, but this is one of my favorite Beatles tunes! :)
Mine too.
I don\'t know why, but this is one of my favorite Beatles tunes! :)
I want to know who gave this a \'1\', and why? Insanity, perhaps?
Makes me picture being in London... :cool:
I love this song. I wasn\'t all that impressed with it when Sgt Pepper\'s first came out, but it has grown on me so much that now it\'s one of my favorite Beatles tunes. The Beatles have this in common with Beethoven - better *every* time you hear it.
Originally Posted by zaakster: This is probably the trippiest song they ever did.
Is that a feature or a bug?
Originally Posted by zaakster: This is probably the trippiest song they ever did.
hmm. there's a thought.
This is probably the trippiest song they ever did.