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Peter Gabriel — The Rhythm of the Heat
Album: Security
Avg rating:
7.2

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2154









Released: 1982
Length: 5:15
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Looking out the window
I see the red dust clear
High up on the red rock
Stands the shadow with the spear

The land here is strong
Strong beneath my feet
it feeds on the blood
it feeds on the heat

The rhythm is below me
The rhythm of the heat
The rhythm is around me
The rhythm has control
The rhythm is inside me
The rhythm has my soul

The rhythm of the heat
The rhythm of the heat
The rhythm of the heat
The rhythm of the heat

Drawn across the plainland
To the place that is higher
Drawn into the circle
That dances round the fire
We spit into out hands
And breathe across the palms
Raising them up high
Help open to the sun

Self-conscious, uncertain
I'm showered with the dust
The spirit enter into me
And I submit to trust

Smash the radio
No outside voices here
Smash the watch
Cannot tear the day to shreds
Smash the camera
Cannot steal away the spirits
The rhythm is around me
The rhythm has control
The rhythm is inside me
The rhythm has my soul
Comments (311)add comment
This song is the first thing I ever heard from Peter Gabriel. I was in a college gym, seeing him perform without knowing any of his (or Genesis') work. He and the band came through the main entrance, each carrying a drum, making their way through the audience slowly, taking each step in time with the bottom bass drum. It took a good 3-4 minutes for them to make it to the stage. I'll never forget it. 
Long Live                                                                                                   Radio Paradise
My rating:                                                                                                 9 - OUTSTANDING
This song is like watching an entire horror movie in just five minutes. But, you know, in a good way.
thanks easmann - never knew that about this song. adds another dimension
A true artist.
too much p.g. on radio paradise. drop it.
 cely wrote:
Really love Peter Gabriel, but something about this song just goes too far.  Reminds me of the horror that was Dances with Wolves.  Modern Englishman gets inside the brain of non-European ecstatic ritual state?  Really?  So presumptuous.  It makes me want to hear a song by a Native American describing the ecstatic joy westerners feel when they go to the mall.  
 
Are you asserting that Native American rituals aren't cultural, but are somehow ... what, biological?  Magic?

Native Americans don't go to malls in your world?
 cely wrote:
Really love Peter Gabriel, but something about this song just goes too far.  Reminds me of the horror that was Dances with Wolves.  Modern Englishman gets inside the brain of non-European ecstatic ritual state?  Really?  So presumptuous.  It makes me want to hear a song by a Native American describing the ecstatic joy westerners feel when they go to the mall.  
 
I don't know about your perception of this song. When it came out I was transfixed and it still has power. I am not so sure that an untrained native American, or for that matter, a skilled musician, would create something with the power of this piece. It is not a little possible that Peter Gabriel based this song on experiences that transcend his specific background. In some ways it speaks to the power that lies unleashed in all human minds, released by various plant-based molecules and lying in wait for those who can get access. The similarity you see to Dances with Wolves is odd, but that's what individual perceptions are about. And the mall? You just wandered pretty far afield there...
 Tomasni wrote:
More MORE Peter Gabriel  :-) 

Here you go!

 

Image result for peter gabriel in genesis
Really love Peter Gabriel, but something about this song just goes too far.  Reminds me of the horror that was Dances with Wolves.  Modern Englishman gets inside the brain of non-European ecstatic ritual state?  Really?  So presumptuous.  It makes me want to hear a song by a Native American describing the ecstatic joy westerners feel when they go to the mall.  
This was on the soundtrack for the 1984 movie "Birdy".  Great movie.  Great soundtrack.

 Tomasni wrote:

For me: 9 - Outstanding  :-)



 
Same for me - what was I thinking only rating this as an 8.  Bumping up from an 8 > 9.
 easmann wrote:
'Where did this haunting song, “The Rhythm of the Heat”, come from?

Gabriel’s song is based, in large part, on psychologist C.G. Jung’s autobiographical description of a nocturnal ritual dance (the n’goma) among villagers in the Sudan (in Africa). Carl Jung (1875-1961), as you may or may not know, was an influential psychologist and student of Sigmund Freud. In the autobiographical interviews collected in Memories, Dreams, Reflections (New York: Vintage Books, 1961), Jung outlines his own fears of the local villagers in a particular area of the Sudan, that, to him, seemed less welcoming than those in previous African villages.

Sixty men, along with women and children, gathered together and lit fires before beginning what Jung labels “savage singing, drumming, and trumpeting” (p. 271). Jung expresses that “I did not know whether I ought to feel pleased or anxious about this mass display”, a statement which reveals a tension to which I turn below. So the uncomfortable Jung decided to join in the dancing, however hesitantly, and was somewhat comforted to notice the approval he received from the villagers for doing so.

As time passed, Jung reports, “the rhythm of the dance and the drumming accelerated” (p. 271). Here Jung begins to reveal his fears in noting that “the natives easily fall into a virtual state of possession. That was the case now. As eleven o’clock approached, their excitement began to get out of bounds. . . The dancers were being transformed into a wild horde, and I became worried about how it would end” (p. 271).

...

Here, then, was the “advanced” European academic in fear of having his soul stolen by the “rhythm of the heat”, and yet unable to come to terms with his own fear and unable to analyze himself fully, let alone the supposedly “primitive” villagers.'

— The story behind a song: Haunted by “The Rhythm of the Heat” (Peter Gabriel and Carl Jung)



 
It's easy to dismiss "complex, thoughtful, referential, abstract" as pretentious. Don't the bastards get you down.
PG pretentiousness vocalizers: submit to trust, submit to a larger whole, give up your pretentions
Wow!  Here's a blast from about 35 years ago which I sure don't get to revisit very often.  Sounds OK!
 the movie kinda sux but the book is really interesting!

hayduke2 wrote:
The Serpent and the Rainbow is a book written by ethnobotanist and researcher Wade Davis and published in 1985. He investigated Haitian Vodou and the process of making zombies. He studied ethnobotanical poisons, discovering their use in a reported case of a contemporary zombieClairvius Narcisse.

 Serpentandtherainbow.png

 


Excellent song; definitely not shallow or pretentious.  {#Rolleyes}
Shallow. Pretentious. 
Never too much PG on RP, in my opinion. 
Too much Peter Gabriel on RP
 easmann wrote:
'Where did this haunting song, “The Rhythm of the Heat”, come from?

Gabriel’s song is based, in large part, on psychologist C.G. Jung’s autobiographical description of a nocturnal ritual dance (the n’goma) among villagers in the Sudan (in Africa). Carl Jung (1875-1961), as you may or may not know, was an influential psychologist and student of Sigmund Freud. In the autobiographical interviews collected in Memories, Dreams, Reflections (New York: Vintage Books, 1961), Jung outlines his own fears of the local villagers in a particular area of the Sudan, that, to him, seemed less welcoming than those in previous African villages.

Sixty men, along with women and children, gathered together and lit fires before beginning what Jung labels “savage singing, drumming, and trumpeting” (p. 271). Jung expresses that “I did not know whether I ought to feel pleased or anxious about this mass display”, a statement which reveals a tension to which I turn below. So the uncomfortable Jung decided to join in the dancing, however hesitantly, and was somewhat comforted to notice the approval he received from the villagers for doing so.

As time passed, Jung reports, “the rhythm of the dance and the drumming accelerated” (p. 271). Here Jung begins to reveal his fears in noting that “the natives easily fall into a virtual state of possession. That was the case now. As eleven o’clock approached, their excitement began to get out of bounds. . . The dancers were being transformed into a wild horde, and I became worried about how it would end” (p. 271).

...

Here, then, was the “advanced” European academic in fear of having his soul stolen by the “rhythm of the heat”, and yet unable to come to terms with his own fear and unable to analyze himself fully, let alone the supposedly “primitive” villagers.'

— The story behind a song: Haunted by “The Rhythm of the Heat” (Peter Gabriel and Carl Jung)



 

I like the simpler explanation that he was simply trying to provide material for The Blue Man Group.


Seemed to have touched a nerve!! 😂
 Michael_Dean wrote:

 Michael_Dean wrote:
 

Oh glad, I found you, an Expert of Pretentiousness. 

Would it not be handy to have a quick reference chart, seeing that we have so many citations of pretentiousness here in the comments section.  Please arrange the following in order of pretentiousness.  If you will do this work, I promise to post the chart every time I see an offense registered.  We can call it the MrsTom Pretentiousness Gradient, MTPG for short.  Not to be confused with Empty Peter Gabriel, of course, THAT'S a whole other chapter, let's just handle these one at a time and in order.  (Was that too Pretentious?).  ah... wait... we were talking about something...... THE LIST ! ! ! I  I'll have it made like a mountain range, with a snow-white pillow for my big fat head, And my heaven will be a big heaven, And I will walk through the front door.  Big time. (I love me!) (Now, I think that WAS pretentious).


The MrsTom Pretentiousness Gradient - M.T.P.G. (Not to be confused with Empty Peter Gabriel, of course)...




 MrsTom wrote:
Pretentiousness of the highest level. Sounds a bit crap too
 


 Michael_Dean wrote:  Oh glad, I found you, an Expert of Pretentiousness. 

Would it not be handy to have a quick reference chart, seeing that we have so many citations of pretentiousness here in the comments section.  Please arrange the following in order of pretentiousness.  If you will do this work, I promise to post the chart every time I see an offense registered.  We can call it the MrsTom Pretentiousness Gradient, MTPG for short.  Not to be confused with Empty Peter Gabriel, of course, THAT'S a whole other chapter, let's just handle these one at a time and in order.  (Was that too Pretentious?).  ah... wait... we were talking about something...... THE LIST ! ! ! I  I'll have it made like a mountain range, with a snow-white pillow for my big fat head, And my heaven will be a big heaven, And I will walk through the front door.  Big time. (I love me!) (Now, I think that WAS pretentious).

 


Pretentiousness of the Highest Level
Indubitably Pretentious
Certainly Pretentiousness
Moderately Pretentiousness
Twinkie Defense Pretentiousness
Barely Pretentious
Criminally Pretentious
Chewbacca Defense Pretentious
Almost Pretentiousness
MTPG Pretentious

Oh glad, I found you, an Expert of a bit crap too.....



 
 Michael_Dean wrote:
 

The MrsTom Pretentiousness Gradient - M.T.P.G. (Not to be confused with Empty Peter Gabriel, of course).

 

10.)  MTPG Pretentious - Pretentiousness that precedes all other Pretentiousness, the Pretentiousness from which all Pretentiousness is borne. Big Bang MTPG some have named it - BBMTPG.

09.)  Pretentiousness of the Highest Level - The inflationary epoch occurred at approximately  10−36 seconds after the Big Bang.  Following the inflationary period, The Pretentiousness continues to expand, but at a less rapid rate.  This is why some "Good" music actually can exist.

08.)  Criminally Pretentious - deliberate, willful, malicious, spiteful, wicked, cruel or violent Pretentiousness.

07.)  Certainly Pretentiousness - deliberate, but not violent Pretentiousness.

06.)  Indubitably Pretentious - Pretentiousness Beyond a Reasonable Doubt, you will do the Time for this one.

05.)  Twinkie Defense Pretentiousness - Pretentiousness attributed to insanity AND is defensible in a Court of Law.  These offenses are often "Settled Out of Court".

04.)  Moderately Pretentiousness - A level of Pretentiousness that is still defensible, but does not oblige insanity.

03.)  Barely Pretentious - This is Pretentiousness that just made it over the line.

02.)  Almost Pretentiousness - This is Pretentiousness so feeble that it doesn't really count.

01.)  Anomalous Pretentiousness  - Sometimes it's there, sometimes not.  Physicists are baffled, naming it  a non-zero vacuum energy Pretentiousness.  In the special case of vacuum energy, general relativity stipulates that the gravitational field is proportional to ρ+3p (where ρ is the mass-energy density, and p is the Pretentiousness).

00.)  Chewbacca Defense Pretentious - Red Herring Pretentiousness, not actually pretentiousness at all, 'tis a strategy, should not be listed here. 


 Balthazar50 wrote:
 Wonder if he ever asked the indigenous people of Australia if this was okay by them, heavily borrows from their culture.
The native man does not stand on the rock (Uluru), for it is sacred, and they find it offensive when others do!
 
fredriley wrote:
I wonder if yer man's ever spent time in the Strine outback, going by the intensity of this number. I've never been to Oz myself, but listening to this on 'phones I can almost taste the red dust, feel the searing heat, and smell the wallaby poop :o)

 

 
This song does not directly have anything to do with indigenous Australians. It is based on Carl Jung's writing about his experience with a group of drummers and dancers in Africa. 
 Balthazar50 wrote:
 Wonder if he ever asked the indigenous people of Australia if this was okay by them, heavily borrows from their culture.
The native man does not stand on the rock (Uluru), for it is sacred, and they find it offensive when others do!
 
fredriley wrote:
I wonder if yer man's ever spent time in the Strine outback, going by the intensity of this number. I've never been to Oz myself, but listening to this on 'phones I can almost taste the red dust, feel the searing heat, and smell the wallaby poop :o)

 

 
He does not need to ask for permission, nor do the natives of Oz need to feel offended. They do not even need to listen to this song.

Stronger even, why do you feel the need to bring up the potential for offence here? Surely you don't feel offended yourself? Why then state unequivocally that 'they find it offensive'? Rest assured that those natives can take care of themselves - they've been doing so for several tens of thousands of years. They do not need someone from the other side of the planet to tell them they (should) feel offended.

In short, think for yourself and let others do their own thinking. Don't bring up the subject of 'offence' when there is no call for it, there is enough of that going around as it is. Also, grow some skin against all those potential offenders, sticks and stones may break your bones but words can only hurt you if you allow them to. Put yourself above the subject of offence, and above those supposed offenders. Don't try to get the world to adjust to each and every potential 'offence', before you know it there won't be any word left to utter for fear of offending someone - anyone...

 
 Wonder if he ever asked the indigenous people of Australia if this was okay by them, heavily borrows from their culture.
The native man does not stand on the rock (Uluru), for it is sacred, and they find it offensive when others do!
 
fredriley wrote:
I wonder if yer man's ever spent time in the Strine outback, going by the intensity of this number. I've never been to Oz myself, but listening to this on 'phones I can almost taste the red dust, feel the searing heat, and smell the wallaby poop :o)

 


 thatslongformud wrote:
Thanks to RP (and my air-drumming) my 4-year old LOVES this song and I had to listen to it EVERYDAY on the way to pre-school last summer...
 
{#Roflol} Get that kid a set of drums.
This song is awesome.
terrible song
 MrsTom wrote:
Pretentiousness of the highest level. Sounds a bit crap too
 
very profound comment
 gregschenkel wrote:
unfrickingbelievable!
profound!
moving!
compelling!
inspiring!

 
{#Clap}{#Yes}

Oh Yeah... Want to buy some 45mm uzis?
unfrickingbelievable!
profound!
moving!
compelling!
inspiring!
 mksupersessions wrote:
Nice

 


 hayduke2 wrote:
"The ethnobotanical researcher...must realize that far from being a superior individual, he - the civilized man - is in many respects far inferior...."— Richard Schultes reflecting on his experiences with indigenous peoples

Richard Evans Schultes (SHULL-tees) was a biologist (January 12, 1915 – April 10, 2001) and may be considered the father of modern ethnobotany, for his studies of indigenous peoples' (especially the indigenous peoples of the Americas) uses of plants, including especially entheogenic or hallucinogenic plants (particularly in Mexico and the Amazon), for his lifelong collaborations with chemists, and for his charismatic influence as an educator at Harvard University on a number of students and colleagues who went on to write popular books and assume influential positions in museums, botanical gardens, and popular culture.

His book The Plants of the Gods: Their Sacred, Healing, and Hallucinogenic Powers (1979), co-authored with chemist Albert Hofmann, the discoverer of LSD, is considered his greatest popular work: it has never been out of print and was revised into an expanded second edition, based on a German translation by Christian Rätsch(1998), in 2001.
I really dig this piece  : )



 


"The ethnobotanical researcher...must realize that far from being a superior individual, he - the civilized man - is in many respects far inferior...."— Richard Schultes reflecting on his experiences with indigenous peoples

Richard Evans Schultes (SHULL-tees) was a biologist (January 12, 1915 – April 10, 2001) and may be considered the father of modern ethnobotany, for his studies of indigenous peoples' (especially the indigenous peoples of the Americas) uses of plants, including especially entheogenic or hallucinogenic plants (particularly in Mexico and the Amazon), for his lifelong collaborations with chemists, and for his charismatic influence as an educator at Harvard University on a number of students and colleagues who went on to write popular books and assume influential positions in museums, botanical gardens, and popular culture.

His book The Plants of the Gods: Their Sacred, Healing, and Hallucinogenic Powers (1979), co-authored with chemist Albert Hofmann, the discoverer of LSD, is considered his greatest popular work: it has never been out of print and was revised into an expanded second edition, based on a German translation by Christian Rätsch(1998), in 2001.
I really dig this piece  : )

read/see the "Serpent and the Rainbow"
Thanks to RP (and my air-drumming) my 4-year old LOVES this song and I had to listen to it EVERYDAY  on the way to pre-school last summer...
Thanks to RP (and my air-drumming) my 4-year old LOVES this song and I had to listen to it EVERYDAY on the way on the way to pre-school last summer...
He is ridiculously talented...
 
 ziggytrix wrote:
sell the house sell the car sell the kids forget it i'm never coming back

 
The horror...The horror...

Still from "Apocalypse Now" showing Captain Willard with camouflaged face rising from swampy water
One of my fav PG tunes.
His last cutting edge album. The beginning of digital sounds.
A brilliant album but...

even better is the German version. He remixes it a bit and kinda gets a second chance on how he wants it to sound. For instance, this tune is better on the German. 
sell the house sell the car sell the kids forget it i'm never coming back
Pretentiousness of the highest level. Sounds a bit crap too
Not that I am a PG connoisseur, but I am a fan.  This is new to me!
Brilliant! Only a 7.4? {#Think}
reminds me of the battlestar galactica music :)
Make it stop {#Frustrated}
I wonder if yer man's ever spent time in the Strine outback, going by the intensity of this number. I've never been to Oz myself, but listening to this on 'phones I can almost taste the red dust, feel the searing heat, and smell the wallaby poop :o)
 TerryS wrote:

BillG said:

Actually we do all of that:  gentle compression on the stream as a whole, modern masters where available, and lowering the level on newer material.  The volume-matching of the music files themselves is a work in progress — and we're not willing to add more aggressive compression to the entire stream — so the overall effect is still short of perfect. But hopefully getting better all of the time.

Yes, better and better, sez I.



 
Yes, this true. Volume equalization on an automatic basis is very difficult without compromising fidelity. Every song is a little different, some engineers like to burn the songs hotter than they should in an attempt to catch your attention. 
Its a difficult problem to solve when playing songs 24/7.  
 mandolin wrote:


...nah, it's not blasphemous:  the cacaphony of strings is an interesting interpretation, certainly...

...the biggest problem i have with these pre-loudness-wars masters in the mix on radio paradise is that they're barely audible by comparison to everything else in the stream, so they kind of disrupt the flow:  bill should do some sort of volume-equalisation on his end, be that through massaging everything with a touch of compression, replacing older material with modern masters, or just turning down the gain on newer material to match old RIAA loudness levels...

...hey, speaking of new blood, here comes ane brun!..

 
BillG said:

Actually we do all of that:  gentle compression on the stream as a whole, modern masters where available, and lowering the level on newer material.  The volume-matching of the music files themselves is a work in progress — and we're not willing to add more aggressive compression to the entire stream — so the overall effect is still short of perfect. But hopefully getting better all of the time.

Yes, better and better, sez I.


 RabbitEars wrote:
Will never forget... October 1982, went to see PG. I had never heard him before and had no idea who he was, didn't know Genesis and hadn't heard as much as a song by them or him. The show was at a college gym and it started with this song. Peter and a drumline formed by his band entered from the opposite end of the stage, slowly parting the general admission audience, walking in step with this rhythm. It wasn't a big place but at the pace they walked, it took a long time to cross the room. It was electrifying, as was the entire show. I ended up seeing it again on a later leg and by then he was playing a venue 3x the size. 

 

 
Almost exact same experience here. Saw that show in K.C. in a small hall. It changed everything. The next time he came here was with the New Blood Orchestra thingy (nearly 30 years later.) I snoozed. Still, will always have '82! Masterpiece.
 mandolin wrote:


...nah, it's not blasphemous:  the cacaphony of strings is an interesting interpretation, certainly...

...the biggest problem i have with these pre-loudness-wars masters in the mix on radio paradise is that they're barely audible by comparison to everything else in the stream, so they kind of disrupt the flow:  bill should do some sort of volume-equalisation on his end, be that through massaging everything with a touch of compression, replacing older material with modern masters, or just turning down the gain on newer material to match old RIAA loudness levels...

...hey, speaking of new blood, here comes ane brun!..

 
Actually we do all of that:  gentle compression on the stream as a whole, modern masters where available, and lowering the level on newer material.  The volume-matching of the music files themselves is a work in progress -- and we're not willing to add more aggressive compression to the entire stream -- so the overall effect is still short of perfect. But hopefully getting better all of the time.
Last five songs have been well, meh.....now my hated Peter Gabriel, its too much...I'm outta here...lol
I was introduced to this album in about 1985 and felt like i was late to the Peter Gabriel party. Love this song
One of his most intense songs. Paired with talking heads remain in light cd they were moving in an imteresting directiion back then.
Can't blame the guy on the cover for looking like he does when strapped down and forced to listen to this. A pity he can't just "PSD" his way outta there.  
I don't want to hear this again.
 t00lur wrote:
jobannyj piter gabrel suka zajebal do usrachki

 
A little Lanacane might clear that up.
 Alafia wrote:
The man is a musical GOD.

 
Best concert I ever saw, "Secret World", worst concert ever was ...ok, most disappointing concert ever was, "I'll scratch mine"
Will never forget... October 1982, went to see PG. I had never heard him before and had no idea who he was, didn't know Genesis and hadn't heard as much as a song by them or him. The show was at a college gym and it started with this song. Peter and a drumline formed by his band entered from the opposite end of the stage, slowly parting the general admission audience, walking in step with this rhythm. It wasn't a big place but at the pace they walked, it took a long time to cross the room. It was electrifying, as was the entire show. I ended up seeing it again on a later leg and by then he was playing a venue 3x the size. 

 
A great, great Gabriel track
 hayduke2 wrote:
The Serpent and the Rainbow is a book written by ethnobotanist and researcher Wade Davis and published in 1985. He investigated Haitian Vodou and the process of making zombies. He studied ethnobotanical poisons, discovering their use in a reported case of a contemporary zombieClairvius Narcisse.

 

Movie scared the pee outta me. Something about being buried alive does not sit well with my palete.
The Serpent and the Rainbow is a book written by ethnobotanist and researcher Wade Davis and published in 1985. He investigated Haitian Vodou and the process of making zombies. He studied ethnobotanical poisons, discovering their use in a reported case of a contemporary zombieClairvius Narcisse.

 Serpentandtherainbow.png
The man is a musical GOD.
 Gajdzin wrote:

Does somebody moderate this forum and could we please not have such language here...? And I don't mean Croatian, but the content, which is just a series of curses.
 
very good comment!
 mandolin wrote:


...nah, it's not blasphemous:  the cacaphony of strings is an interesting interpretation, certainly...

...the biggest problem i have with these pre-loudness-wars masters in the mix on radio paradise is that they're barely audible by comparison to everything else in the stream, so they kind of disrupt the flow:  bill should do some sort of volume-equalisation on his end, be that through massaging everything with a touch of compression, replacing older material with modern masters, or just turning down the gain on newer material to match old RIAA loudness levels...

...hey, speaking of new blood, here comes ane brun!..
 
Or you could simply turn the volume up and down as needed.  Geez.....
 t00lur wrote:
jobannyj piter gabrel suka zajebal do usrachki
 
Does somebody moderate this forum and could we please not have such language here...? And I don't mean Croatian, but the content, which is just a series of curses.


 t00lur wrote:
jobannyj piter gabrel suka zajebal do usrachki
 
Well, obviously

 




(Google Translate choked on that entry, I'll have you know).  
The drums in this song just totally freaked out my cat.
 Cynaera wrote:

They were probably stoned as goats.

Betting they were still harboring the vain hope that Larry would ditch his music career and become a lawyer, or a doctor. You know, something where random drug-testing is mandatory, and which would be "respectable" in dinner-party conversation:  "Our son's a DOCTOR!"  Sorta loses something in the translation when they're forced to say, "Our son's a, uh, musician."

 
Well said...  miss you so much...

 
 (former member) wrote:


Everybody in my hotel room loves this song...

 
 
but tough to dance to
I saw PG during this tour(Capital-Passaic,NJ).......I was mesmerized during this song.The sounds were quite unique!What a showman!
 chirpie wrote:
Is it blasphemy to say I like the New Blood version just as much? ^_^;
 

...nah, it's not blasphemous:  the cacaphony of strings is an interesting interpretation, certainly...

...the biggest problem i have with these pre-loudness-wars masters in the mix on radio paradise is that they're barely audible by comparison to everything else in the stream, so they kind of disrupt the flow:  bill should do some sort of volume-equalisation on his end, be that through massaging everything with a touch of compression, replacing older material with modern masters, or just turning down the gain on newer material to match old RIAA loudness levels...

...hey, speaking of new blood, here comes ane brun!..
Just caught the Back-To-Front tour recently, which was an awesome show.

Amazing that his voice still has such power!

This is an amazing album, and one of my favorites of all time.

He did "The Family and The Fishing Net" at the show, and I've always thought that song has a similar feel and pacing to this one.

Cool stuff.
Strange and to complicated...
Like his other songs better here on RP...
... with the best drum section in a pop/rock song, ever
This is a great song for all time
This is a great song any time of the day.
This is an annoying song in the middle of the afternoon.
This is an annoying song this early in the AM
 stunix wrote:
what I would call a "transportation song". Gabby is good at them.
 
I'm going with "transcendent".
Probably my fave PG song and album.
what I would call a "transportation song". Gabby is good at them.
this whole record is great.
 old_shep wrote:

No rhythm nor heat detected.

 
Then you might want to check your wrist for a pulse.
 old_shep wrote:

No rhythm nor heat detected.

 
Pressed the PSD button too soon?
jobannyj piter gabrel suka zajebal do usrachki
New version....very very cool

From the New Blood DVD

No rhythm nor heat detected.


Love that album Love that song!
Was this in the soundtrack of "Apocalypse Now"?

(Just kidding. I know the answer.) 
This is way too epic for 9:01 in the morning. I'm barely awake, I'm not ready to go into battle!
 chirpie wrote:
Is it blasphemy to say I like the New Blood version just as much? ^_^;
 



Nope!
Best song in concert last year with the new blood orchestra
That's the last 4 times I have tuned in that I have been subjected to bloody Peter Gabriel - I'm sure thats no problem for some of you but could not be worse luck for me.


Everybody in my hotel room loves this song...

 
godlike?
in my opinion, there are some gods that did not reach this level of magic!

the final part is simply the best drum/percussion-piece ever published in rock music, imho
 X-jock wrote:

Having been to well over 200 concerts, he still ranks top 5....AMAZING!!!


 
Agreed
I too have seen hundreds and PG is maybe 3rd on the list , maybe 2nd
Saw him in 82 or 83 ,,, outstanding

 vicariance wrote:
Surprised no one has yet posted this, but this song always reminds me of the best AMV I've seen, set to Princess Mononoke
 
hah, yes!!  That was my first introduction to this song, and the reason I sought out all of PG's older albums, I'm so glad he's playing this regularly again with the New Blood Orchestra

 boober wrote:

I agree.....he is(was?)the ultimate showman.
At this concert I sat next to Larry Fast's parents(synth player)....they didn't like smoke eminating from our side.

They never clapped and never said a word.
 
They were probably stoned as goats.

Betting they were still harboring the vain hope that Larry would ditch his music career and become a lawyer, or a doctor. You know, something where random drug-testing is mandatory, and which would be "respectable" in dinner-party conversation:  "Our son's a DOCTOR!"  Sorta loses something in the translation when they're forced to say, "Our son's a, uh, musician."

Is it blasphemy to say I like the New Blood version just as much? ^_^;
I first got this album on cassette (yes cassette!) and completely worn the poor thing out within months... a principal moment opening my musical horizons! 
 obstetricus wrote:
This song was at the beginning of one of the best Miami Vice ever...Evan;  They also played another PG song that's cool in Biko.  Nice. 
 
Had completely forgotten about that....so since I read your comment I went back and watched the episode (took some digging, not free on hulu anymore), excellent episode.  The music fit well.

 vicariance wrote:
Surprised no one has yet posted this, but this song always reminds me of the best AMV I've seen, set to Princess Mononoke
 
That video has been pulled due to copyright laws. Feh.  I do love this song, though. It's compelling and vital - makes me want to wrap a big ol' scarf around my body and tribal-dance. Fortunately, I don't yield to these impulses, and the world's a better place as a result. {#Jump}
A bit suprised to hear this on here, but I am glad it is being played, Security is my absolute favorite PG album, never get tired of it.

the rythm has my soul
mmmmh
a Radio Paradise catch phrase?
You could have told me that this was just released... and I would have believed it.

Talk about standing the test of time? 
 jagdriver wrote:
Atrocious!
 

I am with you, broham. I don't think there is any other artists that has fallen out of favor more with me over the years than this guy. At one time, I even liked some of his songs. Now, {#Puke}
This song was at the beginning of one of the best Miami Vice ever...Evan;  They also played another PG song that's cool in Biko.  Nice. 
Awesome!!
Atrocious!
 X-jock wrote:

Having been to well over 200 concerts, he still ranks top 5....AMAZING!!!


 
I agree.....he is(was?)the ultimate showman.
At this concert I sat next to Larry Fast's parents(synth player)....they didn't like smoke eminating from our side.

They never clapped and never said a word.

Having been to well over 200 concerts, he still ranks top 5....AMAZING!!!


Unbelievable that this was 30 years ago....Seriously..


Surprised no one has yet posted this, but this song always reminds me of the best AMV I've seen, set to Princess Mononoke

Yeah {#Drummer} - his best album, I agree

Smash the radio
No outside voices here



yeah! one of the best 10s of many^^
Not really for me -
but since it's Peter...!?

 On_The_Beach wrote:

I agree. Gabriel's best effort.
 
Better for you than "Passion"? 
Aaaaaaaaaah!

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