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Muddy Waters — I Just Want to Make Love to You
Album: The Best Of Muddy Waters
Avg rating:
7.7

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1166









Released: 1954
Length: 2:47
Plays (last 30 days): 3
I don't want you to be no slave
I don't want you to work all day
I don't want you to be true
I just want to make love to you

I don't want you to wash my clothes
I don't want you to keep my home
I don't want your money too
I just want to make love to you

Well I can see by the way that you switch and walk
And I can tell by the way that you baby talk
And I know by the way that you treat your man
I wanna love you baby, it's a cryin' shame

I don't want you to bake my bread
I don't want you to make my bed
I don't want you cause I'm sad and blue
I just want to make love to you
Comments (106)add comment
 westslope wrote:

Thanks.  So Chicago blues was an evolution of delta blues infused with urban themes.  By urban sounds, I assume you mean an electric guitar as opposed to an acoustic guitar.  

So some great music came out of the hardship caused by technical progress.  Will some great music come out of the collapse of the American coal industry?  Just curious.  

Frankly, I am watching British Columbia's resource industries shed labour on a continuous basis and I have yet to see the great music.
 
listen.
Bill if you're gonna get on a harp bender, please go find some James Cotton.
Is this Arcade Fire? 
When going to the blues roots you can never go wrong with Chess. Every Chess album was GOLDEN
Rick James to Muddy Waters-This is why I support this station!
 whtahtefcuk wrote:
I got to get this for my vinyl collection.. just perfect to hear on a turn table.
Yeah. Or  a cassette tape - or a reel-to-reel - or an 8 track  -or  a CD - or  an MP3 - or  a flac...
Got to see Muddy a couple of years before he passed. He and Eric Clapton played sitting down - for most of the show. Didn't matter though - He played and sang sitting down - better than most could manage standing up!
What a privilege that was!! 
 Businessgypsy wrote:

Chicago blues was born from (Mississippi River) delta (alluvial plain from north of Saint Louis to the Gulf of Mexico {farmland}) blues after mechanization made manual labor in the fields not as necessary. Lots of sharecroppers (black and white, including some of my family) moved north for factory and city jobs. Delta blues became infused with some urban themes and urban sounds in the process.
 
Thanks.  So Chicago blues was an evolution of delta blues infused with urban themes.  By urban sounds, I assume you mean an electric guitar as opposed to an acoustic guitar.  

So some great music came out of the hardship caused by technical progress.  Will some great music come out of the collapse of the American coal industry?  Just curious.  

Frankly, I am watching British Columbia's resource industries shed labour on a continuous basis and I have yet to see the great music.
How can you make something like the title to this song... and make it sound so depressing?
I just love those upbeat blues songs.
I Just Want to Make Love to You is a 1954 blues song written by Willie Dixon, first recorded by Muddy Waters, and released as Just Make Love to Me (Chess 1571).

Learned something today. {#Jump}
 nerakdon wrote:
Didn't think anyone could do it better than Etta James.  I stand corrected.

 
King Muddy{#Crown}
 shellbella wrote:
Everything Muddy does is a 10.... It is what it is.... {#Clap}

 
........ {#Clap} yes
Glorious education reading all your comments people!!!  Thank each and every one of you adding on to the fantastic music with solid history!
Cheers! 
Muddy can do no wrong.  Those are the facts.....
 ewisor wrote:
This the first time I heard this version.  This is way better than that ho-hum Foghat rendition!
 
Nothing is better than a live rendition by Foghat in the middle of nowhere South Carolina in 1975 (1974?) in an "outdoor arena" that was really a cow pasture on a gorgeous summer night with a big ole moon just as the mushrooms are mellowing out.

Lost my drivers license that night.  It somehow escaped from the inside sole of my boot  where I was SURE it would remain until well after the organics had passed.  Not really sure how it did that ....
This the first time I heard this version.  This is way better than that ho-hum Foghat rendition!
that's some dirty water flowin'
Muddy is my all time favorite!!
 sirdroseph wrote:
Great song and I know this might be blasphemous, but I actually prefer Foghat's rockin version.{#Lol}
 
There's no doubt - it's blasphemous.


Everything Muddy does is a 10.... It is what it is.... {#Clap}
Great song and I know this might be blasphemous, but I actually prefer Foghat's rockin version.{#Lol}
I got to get this for my vinyl collection.. just perfect to hear on a turn table.
F*@#$ Awesome
 lemmoth wrote:


Please look up the word "homage." 

Eric and other British blues artists understood their debt to these genuine American troubadors.  They (mostly) take great pains to acknowlege their debt.  Furthermore, they are responsible for introducing white America to these geniusus in our midst and in our history.  For that alone, the Brit Bluesmen should be lauded.

And dammit.. Their interpretations were usually inspired and fun an really good stuff etc.
 
Also guffaw, as if Eric doesn't know the blues. Look up his life sometime; if it weren't for Pete Townshend driving his car through the front of Eric's house and kidnapping him to the emergency room, he'd have died of an overdose from the depression he suffered after his wife left him. And we won't even get into losing his young son.

Classic Blues on Radio Paridise!!!{#Bananasplit} The album was one of the first blues albums I bought back in the 80's. Yea haw!!!

You mean, I don't have to work!? {#Cowboy} {#Motor}
Sorry, I can't hear you over the sound of how cool I am
 Papernapkin wrote:
I remember Foghat's fast version of this. I like Muddy's raw voice better, I do like the quicker tempo of that cover.
 
I don't like this song in any incarnation, but grudgingly, I have to agree with Papernapkin - Foghat's version is the one that sticks in my head. And I do like Muddy Waters' version much better. The song itself makes me want to rip off my own head... Yeah, I know it's old blues and history and allathat stuff, but I just can't embrace it as something I'd want to put in my CD player and listen to while traveling from northern Nevada to Oregon...

 ziakut wrote:
This is the real thing!!! Love it! Clapton does the blues an injustice. Wealthy and British doesn't cut it for me. Love Muddy though...
 

Please look up the word "homage." 

Eric and other British blues artists understood their debt to these genuine American troubadors.  They (mostly) take great pains to acknowlege their debt.  Furthermore, they are responsible for introducing white America to these geniusus in our midst and in our history.  For that alone, the Brit Bluesmen should be lauded.

And dammit.. Their interpretations were usually inspired and fun an really good stuff etc.
Didn't think anyone could do it better than Etta James.  I stand corrected.
Quite erotic song
 


This is the real thing!!! Love it! Clapton does the blues an injustice. Wealthy and British doesn't cut it for me. Love Muddy though...
 Papernapkin wrote:
I remember Foghat's fast version of this. I like Muddy's raw voice better, I do like the quicker tempo of that cover.
 
Yeah, they do a pretty good version—-and you can sing their vocals with this version.

ValosAtreide wrote:
Man I love Delta blues.. too bad so many great, unrecognized (usually because they were black) blues artists were plagiarized and ripped off completely...
Or you could say the music was preserved and promoted by devoted fans and performers so it would stay alive to be adopted by succeeding generations.
westslope wrote:

Took in Muddy Waters a few times in the early 1970s. Question for you aficionados:

What is the difference between "Delta blues" and "Chicago blues"?


Chicago blues was born from (Mississippi River) delta (alluvial plain from north of Saint Louis to the Gulf of Mexico {farmland}) blues after mechanization made manual labor in the fields not as necessary. Lots of sharecroppers (black and white, including some of my family) moved north for factory and city jobs. Delta blues became infused with some urban themes and urban sounds in the process.


Took in Muddy Waters a few times in the early 1970s.  Question for you aficionados:

What is the difference between "Delta blues" and "Chicago blues"?


Ah, here's the whole cloth.
Damn, I saw him in concert when I was still in High School, hard to believe that concert was 41 years ago! eeeek!
Wooooo Yeah, Muddy Baby!
 HarrO wrote:

Don't forget Freddie King!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
Yeah, I wish he'd played Freddie King instead. Can't hack this guy...after this last set it's time to switch for a bit.
 toterola wrote:

Yeah, Clapton emulated Robert Johnson, and Buddy Guy,and Muddy, and B.B. King, and Howlin' Wolf, and Elmore James, and "Sonny Boy" Williamson, and so many others. But thank God Clapton and all the others did copy and learn from them!

I have always loved the Delta blues, but I "lived" for the electric blues! And I still do! {#Bananajam}{#Devil_pimp} {#Cheers}
 
Don't forget Freddie King!!!!!!!!!!!!

Man I love Delta blues.. too bad so many great, unrecognized (usually because they were black) blues artists were plagiarized and ripped off completely...
At age 14 or so I saw the Rolling Stones play this tune on Ed Sullivan I believe around 1964 or 65. I was shocked—-but survived.


 That_SOB wrote:
"This is the man Mick Jagger most wanted to sound like/be." ——Wrote Toterola

 Indeed,  and another 1000 Brit invaders. Does Clapton come to mind ?
 
Yeah, Clapton emulated Robert Johnson, and Buddy Guy,and Muddy, and B.B. King, and Howlin' Wolf, and Elmore James, and "Sonny Boy" Williamson, and so many others. But thank God Clapton and all the others did copy and learn from them!

I have always loved the Delta blues, but I "lived" for the electric blues! And I still do! {#Bananajam}{#Devil_pimp} {#Cheers}
"This is the man Mick Jagger most wanted to sound like/be." ——Wrote Toterola

 Indeed,  and another 1000 Brit invaders. Does Clapton come to mind ?
 themotion wrote:
Awesome! Sounds like the harmonica player's in the studio bathroom. When you gotta go, you gotta go.
 
That actually happened on some recordings all the way into the 70's. The tile walls made a very cool echo chamber effect especially suited to the harmonica.

 themotion wrote:
Awesome! Sounds like the harmonica player's in the studio bathroom. When you gotta go, you gotta go.
 
This is some harp playin'!


This is the man Mick Jagger most wanted to sound like/be. Muddy is peerless! :guitarist:
Papernapkin wrote:
I remember Foghat's fast version of this. I like Muddy's raw voice better, I do like the quicker tempo of that cover.
And I was just logging on to comment "beats the hell out of Foghat." IMHO. But yeah, I do like the up-tempo of that version.
I remember Foghat's fast version of this. I like Muddy's raw voice better, I do like the quicker tempo of that cover.
gumby wrote:
this is beyond 10
HELL YEAH!
this is beyond 10
A legend. And a legendary song. Gotta be a 10. Our beloved Rock n' roll, and rock, springs from legends like Mr. Waters.
So this is where the Violent Femmes got those lines! Learn something new every day! "Tell by the way you that you switch and walk I can see by the way that you baby talk I can know by the way that you treat your man I could love you baby 'til it's a cryin...."
buckskin wrote:
What part of BLUES do you NOT GET? The blues are not fiery, feel-good, jump-up-&-down, make-love-until-you-nearly-have-a-heart-attack-or-drown-in-your(pl)-sweat music. Get some musical history. In case you are incapable of reading-for-comprehension, requires the ability to take in & process the printed word without pictures, watch the PBS Series about the blues.
While I wouldn't consider what Foghat does to be blues, blues is more than slow 12-bar songs. That's a post-war cliche. Listen to some pre-war blues from the 20s & 30s. You will hear very distinct regional styles that are upbeat as well as downbeat. There was also a good deal of humor in many songs from that era. In fact, hokum blues and jugbands specialized in humorous double-entendre songs. Delta (and by extention Chicago blues are great. But there's also Texas, Piedmont, St Louis and other styles. For contrast try: Blind Willie McTell Blind Blake The Memphis Jug Band even Robert Johnson had both upbeat and funny songs.
Now I know where Gordon Gano got some of the lyrics for Gone Daddy Gone
My boy: Rolling Fork: (click here)
:bounce:
HA!HA!HA!HA!:stop:HA!HA!HA!HA! lionirons wrote:
Funny, that's my best pick up line.
Awesome! Sounds like the harmonica player's in the studio bathroom. When you gotta go, you gotta go.
Let's hear some Wolf on RP!
How superb is this, not to mention the dynamite harmonica! Absolutely wonderful! Mungo Jerry had a hard rock version of this that was quite excellent, hard to believe maybe, but true!
lionirons wrote:
Funny, that's my best pick up line.
:lol: :clap:
Barman wrote:
There is a rare, older, slower live version you should check.
Funny, that's my best pick up line.
passsion8 wrote:
I first heard this tune by The Rolling Stones. They added a youthful zest, but just as raw.
There is a rare, older, slower live version you should check.
Foghat?!?! Not knocking Foghat, but this is MUDDY FREAKIN' WATERS! I'll discard physicsgenius' comment (everyone else does), but come on, Foghat? They wouldn't consider themselves worthy to wash his (muddy) feet! They would bow to the master, chanting 'we are not worthy...' Muddy, Huddie, Lightin', John Lee, Robert, Bessie, Willie Mae and a host of others LIVED the blues. It comes through the music. Not saying others don't do the blues well, but the founding fathers (and mothers) deserve the props first. I don't dispute a reinterpretation or an homage can sound 'better' to some folks, personal taste being what it is. (I don't like using the word 'cover' because it makes me think of hotel bar bands.) Originals aren't always the best (see Trent Reznor's opinions on J.R. Cash's version of 'Hurt'), but legends like Muddy get top billing. I'm sure Foghat would agree... Happy Listening! c.
cattgirl813 wrote:
Interrupting the discussion thread for this special report: Anything Muddy does is beyond compare. Anything. Please make a note of it. And now, back to regular chatting.
I couldn't have said it any better. Thank you. Now please bow your heads.
¿qué más sino sólo hacerte el amor?... ¡mami!
Little Walter (I believe) really kicking in there. Wow. Just, Wow.
I first heard this tune by The Rolling Stones. They added a youthful zest, but just as raw.
dionysius wrote:
Indeed. Everything stops. Full stop. Close the account. Lock the door. Hide the women.
:clap: Of course, he'd make love to them in five minnits time.
jlind wrote:
Nobody makes music like this anymore, which is a frickin shame.
Anyone who has the belief the Blues isn't around much anymore should check out Blueswax magazine and BluesRevue magazine.(click here)and (click here) Also, Blues acts when they come to your area. In chicago, that is: 24th Annual Chicago Blues Festival, June 7-10, 2007. "C'mon, baby dont you want to go....?"---Robert Johnson
Basic. Elemental. Frickin' awesome!
buckskin wrote:
What part of BLUES do you NOT GET? The blues are not fiery, feel-good, jump-up-&-down, make-love-until-you-nearly-have-a-heart-attack-or-drown-in-your(pl)-sweat music. Get some musical history. In case you are incapable of reading-for-comprehension, requires the ability to take in & process the printed word without pictures, watch the PBS Series about the blues.
Whoa, lighten up there poopbutt.
hell yeah, 10 +
chfLarry wrote:
yeeeeeaaaaaaaa everthing stopes for when muddy sings
Indeed. Everything stops. Full stop. Close the account. Lock the door. Hide the women.
Thats hits the spot at 9am on a friday!!!!
chfLarry wrote:
yeeeeeaaaaaaaa everthing stopes for when muddy sings
oops STOPS hehehe
yeeeeeaaaaaaaa everthing stopes for when muddy sings
Old_Pool_Skunk wrote:
This may be the original, but Foghat put some fire into it.
What part of BLUES do you NOT GET? The blues are not fiery, feel-good, jump-up-&-down, make-love-until-you-nearly-have-a-heart-attack-or-drown-in-your(pl)-sweat music. Get some musical history. In case you are incapable of reading-for-comprehension, requires the ability to take in & process the printed word without pictures, watch the PBS Series about the blues.
Always more roots music! Thank you!
cattgirl813 wrote:
Interrupting the discussion thread for this special report: Anything Muddy does is beyond compare. Anything. Please make a note of it. And now, back to regular chatting.
:yes: :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy:
TMI
more entergetic entertaining versions out there, but where would they be without this blues original. 10 period
cattgirl813 wrote:
Interrupting the discussion thread for this special report: Anything Muddy does is beyond compare. Anything. Please make a note of it. And now, back to regular chatting.
HERE, HERE!! :yes:
Nobody makes music like this anymore, which is a frickin shame.
Interrupting the discussion thread for this special report: Anything Muddy does is beyond compare. Anything. Please make a note of it. And now, back to regular chatting.
:guitarist: blues the way they're supposed to be played!
Foghat's version is better.Most of the time however the original is the best!
stickers11 wrote:
This does not sound great. No disrespect to Muddy, but there are better versions.
Wha....? ¿Dónde están las versiones mejores, guey? You're hearing it right here, dude.
This does not sound great. No disrespect to Muddy, but there are better versions.
mmmmm mmmmmmm yum....
maryte wrote:
This is great, but can we get some Magic Sam?
Magic Sam is indeed great, but can't we get a decent hefeweissen in the USA?
Muddy does a nice cover of Foghat. ;-) (to be fair, the latter do put some nice energy into it) Excellent tune from the master.
mfassett wrote:
This SUX! Foghat's version is WAAYYYY better!!!! Er... not.
:roflol: Nothing against Foghat, but they weren't "worthy" to do this song lol
Robben Ford does a really good rendition of this song, but the original is good to hear every once in a while.
This is great, but can we get some Magic Sam?
Good stuff, but I'd like to hear some Howlin' Wolf...
This may be the original, but Foghat put some fire into it.
Blues is the roots, the rest is the fruits
This SUX! Foghat's version is WAAYYYY better!!!! Er... not.
If you want a great crash course on Chicago electric blues, but this album. It is packed with great songs, like Hootchie Kootchie Man, Rollin' & Tumblin' and about 20 hits in all. Muddy Waters, after all, was the one generally credited with adding electric guitar to blues, even though some may have done it earlier. Few exceeded his technique and repertoire.
Trustocity wrote:
Powerful! What woman could resist? (The women about to respond to this post, that's who.)
that's hysterical.... thanks for the laugh.... :lol:
Powerful! What woman could resist? (The women about to respond to this post, that's who.)
One of the masters of the Blues.
awesome.
Love Muddy but prefer Koko Taylor doing this song.