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Album: Music For The Native Americans
Avg rating:
7.2

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1294









Released: 1994
Length: 3:58
Plays (last 30 days): 1
(Instrumental)
Comments (158)add comment
 lynncorry1964 wrote:
huebdoo wrote:
In all the Worlds indigenous people's music I find the first nations of North America to be the most unlikable, unimaginative type of singing, rhythms, beats, melody, chorus…. It is a primitive and as basic as it gets Everyone gather around and beat on this hide stretched over some wood to a 4:4 beat and scream at the top of your lungs in a way that makes no sense or reason. Are there lyrics to these songs? Or are they just screaming? When I compare the type of drumming and screaming / chanting that first nations of North America produced and compare that with African tribal music of eastern or central Africa... and there is no comparison. I can listen to Australian, Balinese, Balkans, Indian, African, Nordic, Russian, Arabic heck even Celtic music and all of it makes sense to me in a way All accept the music from North Americas Indigenous people The only reason this Robbie Robertson track didn't receive a 1 is because he used beats and mixes that real first nations music would have never had done. Someone has finally made this music palatable to listen to....
Hmmm...Being a First Nation person (as we refer to ourselves in Canada), I enjoy this music but it cannot compare to the traditional drumming and singing at a ceremony. I also don't understand the dialect (one of many btw we are struggling to keep from being lost)but there's something about the beat of that drum. It represents the beat of the human heart. I accept the fact that you don't understand or enjoy our music. However, to be fair it really should be heard where it was meant to be played. Might I suggest attending a traditional pow wow. Our music as 'primitive' as it may seem is part of a bigger picture. A person can surely not appreciate the drumming or singing without the ceremony it is intended for or without understanding the meaning of both. Most importantly true traditional native music is not to be recorded. Recorded tradtional music hits a sorespot with many traditional Natives. I can understand why now. It has to be understood to be appreciated and respected. The Drum In Cree, commonly referred to as "Tawagun". In Ojibway, commonly referred to as "Tewikan". In Sioux, commonly referred to as "Chan-che-ga". Without the drum there would be no Pow wow. People use different drums for various occasions. The Pow wow drum is a large drum, approximately one metre in diameter. It is the center of the Pow wow celebration that can be used to heal and unify all people. The drum represents the circle of life. A drum is made of wood and hide, both natural materials. These materials represent honesty and sharing. The wood comes from a tree. The tree gives life so that we can build the drum. The tree is also telling us where life comes from. Without the sun and the earth there would be no trees - no life. The Anishinabe, the people, were lowered to this earth by the hand of the creator. The tree grows up toward the creator, the source of its life and all of the life on this earth. The hide is from an animal who gives its life for the drum and in this way, represents the gift of sharing. Once a drum has been made, it is usually given to an individual or a group. Certain people are given the responsibility or instructions in the making of the drum. It is never created as a craft or a toy. Before the drum can be sounded at a Pow wow it must be blessed through a special ceremony led by a elder or a group of elders. Once the ceremony has been completed the drum may be sounded at any Pow wow. There are usually four or more singers around the drum. A person is usually given the responsibility of caring for the drum. He is called the drum keeper or the drum carrier. The drumbeat is described as the heartbeat of the people. The drum itself is regarded as a sacred object to be treated with respect. Each drum has a keeper to ensure that no one approaches it under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or shows disrespect by reaching across or setting things on it. Written by: Harold Flett Songs In Cree, commonly referred to as "Nick gum mowin". In Ojibway, commonly referred to as " Nagamonun". In Souix, commonly referred to as "O da wan". The songs sung are very important! The sound that is made in singing is carried on the breath from deep within us. It is the Creator's breath of life. Elders tells us that the Creator took the earth from the four directions and blew his life-giving breath through the megis shell into the people of the earth so that they might begin their life on earth. Singing recalls the Creator's breath. When we celebrate through the joy of song, our voice will be heard both in the physical and spiritual worlds. The meaning becomes richer each time the song is heard or sung. Pow wow songs originate in the Grass Dance Lodge. You will not hear ceremonial songs from other traditional lodges sung at a Pow wow. Each of the three main Nations in Manitoba, the Cree, the Ojibway, and the Sioux sing different songs. Not only are the songs different because of the language used, but the beat of the drum is subtly different. Songs are usually passed on orally. Both men and women sing. The men usually lead and the women follow in harmony. Many Pow wow songs have almost been lost. Many songs come to the Anishinabe through dreams and fasting. Other songs are handed down through generations and these are never changed. The meaning becomes richer each time it is sung. Songs will also be composed by a person with a special gift for creating songs to give special messages and to honour a special person or occasion. There are songs for special occasions and special dances. For example: if an eagle feather, a sacred symbol, falls during a Pow wow, all music and dancing will stop. The "Picking up of the Eagle Feather Song" is sung, and an elder or veteran will pick up the eagle feather. Below is a list of songs you may hear and experience at a Pow wow: Grand Entry Song Victory Song Intertribal Song Friendship Song Honour Song Traditional Song Grass Dance Song Feast Song Eagle Song Flag Song Give Away Song Jingle Dress Song Fancy Dance Song Hoop Dance Song Elder's Song Veteran's Song Picking up the Eagle Feather Song Written by: Harold Flett I hope this helps!
 
Thank you for taking the time to share your culture with us. I hope more settlers such as myself can learn to appreciate the beauty of First Nations music and dance. 

Chi Megwiich, we are all treaty people
 
 
 uksminas wrote:
 
Magic!  Beauty!
 NorthernLad wrote:
"Listen for the night chant."—John J. Dunbar—

 
 
Kevin Wolfdancer of the Wannabe tribe.
Would be cool to hear Buffy St. Marie's "Bury Me at Wounded Knee" right about now.
 
 hightail wrote:
Like it a lot!
 
Like it even more
As always, this song from this wonderful magnum opus opens up a veritable sea of genetic connections to my Chicamauga Cherokee roots... Just yesterday, I ate an amazing little mushroom, did some house chores and a good hike up on Enchanted Mesa, then settled into a nice hot bath, with this album on the stereo. Though it's a ritual I've done quite often, it is a good one, and bears repeating. Listen, I am dancing underneath you...
As always, this song from this wonderful magnum opus opens up a veritable sea of genetic connections to my Chicamauga Cherokee roots... Just yesterday, I ate an amazing little mushroom, did some house chores and a good hike up on Enchanted Mesa, then settled into a nice hot bath, with this album on the stereo. Though it's a ritual I've done quite often, it is a good one, and bears repeating. Listen, I am dancing beneath you...
I'll have one set of over-ear headphones and a cup of the mushroom tea please...
Like it a lot!
One of my absolute favorite albums.
 Stephen_Phillips wrote:

Michelin man
Me neither.
 

 
Nor I. Nor. I.
 willmcnaught wrote:
I never tire of this
{#Cheers}

 
Michelin man
Me neither.
 
me likee lots
An utterly gorgeous masterpiece of sonic art...I loved discovering this fabulous dimension of Robbie R's background and expression...
I never tire of this
{#Cheers}
 LOL

stegokitty wrote:
As boring and repetitious as native American music is normally, only set over a 90's new-age background track, making it doubly boring.

 


I'm gonna have to bump this up to an 8. I agree that most "Native American music" is mind numbing but I could listen to this track for quite some time and this artist ain't no slouch. 
 Robbie stumbled onto some trippy native trance dance trails along his musical journey.. {#Mrgreen}
"Listen for the night chant."—John J. Dunbar—

 
once again the average rating is 7.3 with over 700 folks giving their view.  All the doubters and negative vibe folks, YOU are in the minority.{#Moon}
As boring and repetitious as native American music is normally, only set over a 90's new-age background track, making it doubly boring.
Wonderful track from an amazing album!

Now I'll have to shut RP off for a while so I can play the whole  album (but I'll be back)

Wish I had my headphones here.

Graham   
 
Communicates a deep essence of yearning and connection…touching.
mystical 'trickster', thank you Radio Paradise
wow, was that boring. PSD. See you on the other side.
Songs like these sound fantastic with chemical enhancement. Chemical accessories. Like headphones, but better.
While I do not agree that you have to be Native American (First Nation actually, since it's Canada) to use that as inspiration, this is straight from the official site:

"Jaime Royal "Robbie" Robertson is born on July 5th in Toronto, Canada. His father from Toronto; his mother, of Mohawk descent, born and raised on the Six Nations Reservation "

https://robbie-robertson.com/biography/

More important than all that is that song itself is amazing.
 michaelc wrote:
Wizard of oZ - Munchkin indians.

 
Yeah, eh?  Whether this is rapturous or obnoxious depends on its authenticity.

Does Robertson have genuine native American roots or is he just another hip white-guy makin' a bundle off waxing poetic about the aborigines?

I don't know one way or the other.  Below someone says Robertson is the real deal.  What does that mean?



Wizard of oZ - Munchkin indians.
Love RR, this not so much.  Like a million swans. . . Gargling.
 Cynaera wrote:
I could put the headphones on and listen to this whole CD over and over, and I think the result would be the most inspired novel I've ever written in my life. I love this beyond time and space.
 

We miss you so much, Cynaera...
 
Among the most primally stirring -- and soothing -- songs on this landmark record that makes the Cherokee in me swoon in a raw natural rapture.  Caught me as I was heading out for my daily 6-mile run; made me sit and feel and pray it; now I'll play the whole thing on my iPod.
Sounds a lot like some Pat Methany records...
Mmmm...serene and flowing, like nature, thanks. Fine respite from the rush. Oh no, not that Rush, the other. :)
 westslope wrote:

Ambiance, ambient, noun, adjective.

This is very pleasant, and I enjoy it.  But please, this is not traditional native North American music.  Let's keep the historical revisionism to a minimum.

 

 
True, you have to listen to Idle no More for that.

This whole album moves me in a way like no other...........but if you've ever studied with, spent time with, done ceremony with Native Americans.....it'll get you right in the heart.
and well you said it...and I will always think of this, and you, being Beyond Time and Space... 
——- 

Cynaera wrote:
I could put the headphones on and listen to this whole CD over and over, and I think the result would be the most inspired novel I've ever written in my life. I love this beyond time and space.
 


 Poacher wrote:
I feel like I have accidentally walked into a Mind, Body, Bollocks shop. 
 
Or MacDonalds, for our US compatriots.
I feel like I have accidentally walked into a Mind, Body, Bollocks shop. 
Robbie Robertson - definitely a talented musician
Pure artistry. Must have this in my library.
Very effective song, it IS starting to rain.  Guess I can stop dancing.      {#Dancingbanana}
Wondering if Bill has been using his own PSD button too much... seems the order of songs he mentions is actually scrambled from what's playing on the main channel.

Ambiance, ambient, noun, adjective.

This is very pleasant, and I enjoy it.  But please, this is not traditional native North American music.  Let's keep the historical revisionism to a minimum.

 

El Condor pasa is not traditional Andean folk music either.


I could put the headphones on and listen to this whole CD over and over, and I think the result would be the most inspired novel I've ever written in my life. I love this beyond time and space.
dig
 westslope wrote:

Nice as ambiance.

 
True, but I'm distracted imagining Ewoks partying!

 westslope wrote:

Nice as ambiance.
  ambient?


 HazzeSwede wrote:
Cool,when does the song start?{#Ask}
Oh,the intro was the song,sorry,only a #6
 
Nice as ambiance.

Cool,when does the song start?{#Ask}
Oh,the intro was the song,sorry,only a #6
I hear you, Ukhi!  Music for the Native Americans!  And the way this music makes me feel (maybe the Chicamauga Cherokee on my mother's side) is the way I felt while soaking up the vibes in Cusco, Sacsayhuaman, Pisaq, Ollantaytambo, Machu Picchu, Sillustani, Uros, Taquile, Canyon de Colca, Chan Chan, and many more magic spots in YOUR amazing country!  I will surely be back, too...

 
Ukhi wrote:
WHY RADIO PARADISE DON'T PUT MORE MUSIC LIKE THIS? WONDERFULLL BEAUTIFUL , AMAZING WHAT ELSE ? GODLIKE OMG WE NEED MORE MUSIC LIKE THIS
 

 bluecshells wrote:

Still great. 


 

{#Yes} Love this entire album. It came into my life at a time when I was studying the Natural Ways with some Native Americans, and will always remind me of that time.

Still great. 


WHY RADIO PARADISE DON'T PUT MORE MUSIC LIKE THIS? WONDERFULLL BEAUTIFUL , AMAZING WHAT ELSE ? GODLIKE OMG WE NEED MORE MUSIC LIKE THIS
"Ever feel like you were born in the wrong time?  Like you should have been born earlier, when the music was....real?"
"Like the nineties?"
"No, earlier.  Like...the early nineties."
very cool! & moving!
One of my favorite albums.
Absolutely love this whole album
orthomd wrote:
Native Americans like animals lived in harmony with this planet................then the white man and civilization as we know it came along




 Cynaera wrote:
Giving this a 10. Disparaging comments aside, the music resonates with me and pulls my focus back to the ground and our temporary inhabiting of it.  Robbie Robertson's music can always shake me to my bones and make me remember that I am not alone on this earth, and that I'm only a renter.  There's so much more going on... something much bigger and more important than our little individual lives here.
 
i'm with you

Giving this a 10. Disparaging comments aside, the music resonates with me and pulls my focus back to the ground and our temporary inhabiting of it.  Robbie Robertson's music can always shake me to my bones and make me remember that I am not alone on this earth, and that I'm only a renter.  There's so much more going on... something much bigger and more important than our little individual lives here.
Wow this is good. Goosebumps good. Proof that to get to "world music" you don't have to leave the continent.

Do not disparage Robbie Robertson's heritage. He's the real deal.  
Perhaps you think the Creator sent you here to dispose of us as you see fit.  If I thought you were sent by the creator, I might be induced to think you had a right to dispose of me.  Do not misunderstand me, but understand me fully with reference to my affection for the land.

I never said the land was mine to do with as I choose.  The one who has a right to dispose of it is the one who has created it.  I claim a right to live on my land, and accord you the privilege to return to yours.  Brother, we have listened to your talk coming from our father the great White Chief at Washington, and my people have called upon me to reply to you.

And in the winds which pass through these aged pines we hear the moanings of their departed ghosts, and if the voice of our people could have been heard, that act would never have been done, but alas, though they stood around they could neither be seen or heard.

Their tears fell like drops of rain.

I hear my voice in the depths of the forest but no answering voice comes back to me. All is silent around me. My words must therefore be few.

I can now say no more.  He is silent for he has nothing to answer when the sun goes down.
 lwilkinson wrote:

Ummm...

harmony.........short life spans, old women with no teeth chewing on buckskin to make it soft for the braves to wear, high infant mortality rate, leaving the old and sick behind for the wolves to take of, no written language, no cultural or technological progress for the 10,000 years after crossing the Bering Strait......

yes, become one with the earth and nature

I'm Cherokee by the way and I do have an appreciation of what was but I certainly do not think that overly romanticizing history is the way to go.

Besides, they didn't have teepee home delivery for buffalo wings and pizza.

{#Rolleyes}

 

There is much truth in what you write lwilkinson.  I would also strongly agree that there is little to be gained by romanticizing history.  Looking after the earth and keeping it healthy for all people current and future is complicated and diffficult.  Revisionist history does not help.

But as somebody who knows a little bit about resource management and personally loves the wilderness, I would like to suggest that there is a glimmer of truth in some of the heavily romanticized fables.  Let me give you an example:

Urban-dwelling, romantic greens often depict aboriginals as being in some kind of wise harmony with nature.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  NA aboriginals commited all kinds of ecological sins that came back to hurt them.  But some groups were relatively successful and seemed to manage the earth's natural riches in an aware, careful manner.

On the west coast, tribes, clans and families established relatively secure access rights to the best, most productive fisheries.  Those rights are a little different from modern rights in that usually outsiders were allowed access but at less favourable moments.   The prime users were largely responsible for stewardship and exercised this stewardship by allowing proportions of runs past weirs, for example.  Although surpluses could gifted to less fortunate neighbours, the harvesting of salmon typically slowed after sufficiency targets were met.

Early and pre-contact NW Pacific Coast salmon tribes often exercised effective economic property rights to salmon that helped prevent overexploitation.  European colonialists came along and in the early days were content to barter and trade for salmon harvested by aboriginals.  Then growing commercial and recreational fisheries started using the court systems along with some violence and intimidation to appropriate FN fisheries under the banner of 'fairness' as articulated by the open access ideology of early British Isles settlers.

In their place, colonial settlers implemented open access regimes that with few exceptions ended in costly failures.  The entitlement right to unrestricted access or unlimited effort for access to renewable resources on crown or state land is widely supported all across Anglo-North America.

 

On the bright side, catch share fisheries, most of them commercial, are proving to be far superior to the old first-come, first-served derby fisheries.  Overfishing is reversed.  Economic values climb; government-harvester relations become harmonious.  In the French-speaking province of Quebec, all the Atlantic salmon rivers are intensively managed with use-based fees.  Two of the best rivers in Quebec are co-managed with local FN communities.

 

North American FN communities did better jobs at managing renewable resources not because they lacked the technology to extirpate but because communities exercised the right to exclude others or at the very least prioritize access and then curtail all harvesting.  Colonialism took fishery management backwards. It not only impoverished FN communities but impoverished the colonial master. Hopefully that is changing now.

 


{#Curtain}  Love, love, love this! {#Group-hug}
we are all one. maybe one day we will also be one for all....
 lwilkinson wrote:

Ummm...

harmony.........short life spans, old women with no teeth chewing on buckskin to make it soft for the braves to wear, high infant mortality rate, leaving the old and sick behind for the wolves to take of, no written language, no cultural or technological progress for the 10,000 years after crossing the Bering Strait......

yes, become one with the earth and nature

I'm Cherokee by the way and I do have an appreciation of what was but I certainly do not think that overly romanticizing history is the way to go.

Besides, they didn't have teepee home delivery for buffalo wings and pizza.

{#Rolleyes}

 
And then on the back of my last comment, I think you're doing your ancestors a bit of a disservice here.  To say that there was no "cultural or technological progress" in 10,000 years is an exaggeration.  Again to bring up the Mayans, they had a system of writing and a pretty good grasp of mathematics.

Painting an entire race of people that colonized an entire hemisphere with the "ignorant barbarian" brush is just as naive as that other guy's hippy-dippy earth-child nonsense.

 orthomd wrote:
Native Americans like animals lived in harmony with this planet................then the white man and civilization as we know it came along
 

Counterpoint(s): Nazca, Cahokia, Chaco Canyon, and probably most of the larger cities of the Mayans.  All the centers of large native civilizations, and all of them disappeared at least in part to environmental degradation and/or systems that relied on bringing in water and other resources from elsewhere and then collapsed when that water dried up.

Crack open a history book, leave the "animals"/"noble savage" stereotypes behind and you'll learn that Native Americans could despoil this planet right along with the best of the rest of us when they put their minds to it.

 orthomd wrote:
Native Americans like animals lived in harmony with this planet................then the white man and civilization as we know it came along
 
Ummm...

harmony.........short life spans, old women with no teeth chewing on buckskin to make it soft for the braves to wear, high infant mortality rate, leaving the old and sick behind for the wolves to take of, no written language, no cultural or technological progress for the 10,000 years after crossing the Bering Strait......

yes, become one with the earth and nature

I'm Cherokee by the way and I do have an appreciation of what was but I certainly do not think that overly romanticizing history is the way to go.

Besides, they didn't have teepee home delivery for buffalo wings and pizza.

{#Rolleyes}

This reminds me of God Is An Astronaut. I wonder if they are fans of this album. {#Think}
wow
 orthomd wrote:
Native Americans like animals lived in harmony with this planet................then the white man and civilization as we know it came along
 
Like animals? they were and are human beings with culture, just with a "little" more respect for nature than us (and a little more of wisdom)

 jameyp wrote:
    Gartholamundi wrote:
the whole album kicks ass. totally.     

ABSOLUTELY!  I love this ablum so much, too.  My dad has it and plays it every sunday announcing "time to go to church!"  heh...  Not that my dad has ever gone to church in his life, but listening to this record while rocking on the porch is spiritual for him :)

 

Sounds like you've got a pretty cool dad.{#Smile}
My favorite RR album, brings tears of joy and sadness...Even sent a copy to my pal in Scotland

Native Americans like animals lived in harmony with this planet................then the white man and civilization as we know it came along
I have this entire album. It's amazing.

On one track is a recording of a huge group of crickets, slowed down markedly, with a Native American Indian opera singer singing along. Wild...Hard dto describe. But worth buying. He also works with many of these same artists and a remix / drum programmer artist on Songs from the Redboy Underground. Another album worth getting.
    Gartholamundi wrote:
the whole album kicks ass. totally.     

ABSOLUTELY!  I love this ablum so much, too.  My dad has it and plays it every sunday announcing "time to go to church!"  heh...  Not that my dad has ever gone to church in his life, but listening to this record while rocking on the porch is spiritual for him :)

Oh, this feels good.{#Sunny}
One of the greatest album, alltime.   {#Good-vibes}
the whole album kicks ass. totally.
Very pleasant!
I bought this CD when it was first released back in the mid-90s. I haven't listened to it in years and is collecting dust in my closet. Thanks to RP for playing this song.
I am 1/4 Cherokee. =)  This song is very nice.
I recently spent a week at an Apache Reservation in New Mexico.  The music in the background was very similar, and very soothing.  I really like it. 

EDIT - almost 3 months later and I still really like it.

Very nice to see this CD being played here on RP.
Being another listener with some distant Native American (Cherokee) ties, this one strikes a strong chord within.

I just wish it ran a bit longer (especially after that 15 minute DMB song played just before it!).


Headed to Maui with this in my head..
MOST EXCELLENT!
Mother Nature, I am coming to embrace you and be embraced once again!
It is good to dance these old sacred dances!
Let us journey to the new ones
together!


Reminds me that the 'Red Path' if a good one. We are all a part of Nature and her wonderful Life Giving Energy. :notworthy: I could listen to this for hours.....
prairieskye wrote:
This album by Robbie Robertson and the Red Road Ensemble is one of my favorites. My daughter has loved it from childhood :clap:
5 or so years ago I got really sick and was in the hospital for a while. I listened to this cd over and over. It calmed me. I tell everyone now that it healed me.
This album by Robbie Robertson and the Red Road Ensemble is one of my favorites. My daughter has loved it from childhood :clap:
eastcoast wrote:
From Dave to this...going nowhere fast.
just what I was thinking, except not too fast since that last song took something like a half hour. At least I've stopped trying to twist my own head off since Dave Matthews stopped.
Pyro wrote:
Some friends and I listened to this in the wee hours Sunday morning, floating on a barge on the lake...it was surreal.
Very cool to think about the place music has in our lives - and how you will always remember that experience.
prickelpit96 wrote:
Someone else here who survived the attack of the Apache-warriors? :snooty: :confused:
I think Okies are required to be fans. But I fell in love with the Native American feel of this music before moving here.
Some friends and I listened to this in the wee hours Sunday morning, floating on a barge on the lake...it was surreal.
eastcoast wrote:
From Dave to this...going nowhere fast.
Bill did it again. Please not again on a Friday afternoon at least.
I thought this was Peter Gabriel's Biko at first, too bad it wasn't.
Someone else here who survived the attack of the Apache-warriors? :snooty: :confused:
Trance-endental
prickelpit96 wrote:
Take me with you pls. :no:
move over - I'd like to get on that bus outta here, too
ThePoose wrote:
And for the Haida, a drum is called guujaaw.
Wow. Thank you for sharing this.
eastcoast wrote:
From Dave to this...going nowhere fast.
Take me with you pls. :no:
:yawn:
This CD gives me chill bumps every time. Thank you to all the posters who helped me to understand the music. Unlike the previous poster who didn't care for the songs, I have always been fascinated with the Native American culture...and find the chanting to be beautiful!
From Dave to this...going nowhere fast.
pomalley wrote:
Sounds like Pat Metheny to me..... :eh: :eh:
I was thinking Robert Rich or Steve Roach... :think: very hypnotic (now where's the emoticon for peyote?)
Sounds like Pat Metheny to me..... :eh: :eh:
lynncorry1964 wrote:
Hmmm...Being a First Nation person (as we refer to ourselves in Canada), I enjoy this music but it cannot compare to the traditional drumming and singing at a ceremony. I also don't understand the dialect (one of many btw we are struggling to keep from being lost)but there's something about the beat of that drum. It represents the beat of the human heart. I accept the fact that you don't understand or enjoy our music. However, to be fair it really should be heard where it was meant to be played. Might I suggest attending a traditional pow wow. Our music as 'primitive' as it may seem is part of a bigger picture. A person can surely not appreciate the drumming or singing without the ceremony it is intended for or without understanding the meaning of both. Most importantly true traditional native music is not to be recorded. Recorded tradtional music hits a sorespot with many traditional Natives. I can understand why now. It has to be understood to be appreciated and respected. The Drum In Cree, commonly referred to as "Tawagun". In Ojibway, commonly referred to as "Tewikan". In Sioux, commonly referred to as "Chan-che-ga". Without the drum there would be no Pow wow. People use different drums for various occasions. The Pow wow drum is a large drum, approximately one metre in diameter. It is the center of the Pow wow celebration that can be used to heal and unify all people. The drum represents the circle of life. A drum is made of wood and hide, both natural materials. These materials represent honesty and sharing. The wood comes from a tree. The tree gives life so that we can build the drum. The tree is also telling us where life comes from. Without the sun and the earth there would be no trees - no life. The Anishinabe, the people, were lowered to this earth by the hand of the creator. The tree grows up toward the creator, the source of its life and all of the life on this earth. The hide is from an animal who gives its life for the drum and in this way, represents the gift of sharing. Once a drum has been made, it is usually given to an individual or a group. Certain people are given the responsibility or instructions in the making of the drum. It is never created as a craft or a toy. Before the drum can be sounded at a Pow wow it must be blessed through a special ceremony led by a elder or a group of elders. Once the ceremony has been completed the drum may be sounded at any Pow wow. There are usually four or more singers around the drum. A person is usually given the responsibility of caring for the drum. He is called the drum keeper or the drum carrier. The drumbeat is described as the heartbeat of the people. The drum itself is regarded as a sacred object to be treated with respect. Each drum has a keeper to ensure that no one approaches it under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or shows disrespect by reaching across or setting things on it. Written by: Harold Flett Songs In Cree, commonly referred to as "Nick gum mowin". In Ojibway, commonly referred to as " Nagamonun". In Souix, commonly referred to as "O da wan". The songs sung are very important! The sound that is made in singing is carried on the breath from deep within us. It is the Creator's breath of life. Elders tells us that the Creator took the earth from the four directions and blew his life-giving breath through the megis shell into the people of the earth so that they might begin their life on earth. Singing recalls the Creator's breath. When we celebrate through the joy of song, our voice will be heard both in the physical and spiritual worlds. The meaning becomes richer each time the song is heard or sung. Pow wow songs originate in the Grass Dance Lodge. You will not hear ceremonial songs from other traditional lodges sung at a Pow wow. Each of the three main Nations in Manitoba, the Cree, the Ojibway, and the Sioux sing different songs. Not only are the songs different because of the language used, but the beat of the drum is subtly different. Songs are usually passed on orally. Both men and women sing. The men usually lead and the women follow in harmony. Many Pow wow songs have almost been lost. Many songs come to the Anishinabe through dreams and fasting. Other songs are handed down through generations and these are never changed. The meaning becomes richer each time it is sung. Songs will also be composed by a person with a special gift for creating songs to give special messages and to honour a special person or occasion. There are songs for special occasions and special dances. For example: if an eagle feather, a sacred symbol, falls during a Pow wow, all music and dancing will stop. The "Picking up of the Eagle Feather Song" is sung, and an elder or veteran will pick up the eagle feather. Below is a list of songs you may hear and experience at a Pow wow: Grand Entry Song Victory Song Intertribal Song Friendship Song Honour Song Traditional Song Grass Dance Song Feast Song Eagle Song Flag Song Give Away Song Jingle Dress Song Fancy Dance Song Hoop Dance Song Elder's Song Veteran's Song Picking up the Eagle Feather Song Written by: Harold Flett I hope this helps!
And for the Haida, a drum is called guujaaw.
I like this one
slartibart_O wrote:
lordy, lordy, what a diatribe (pun intended). Agree with you to a miniscule degree but then opera ain't my cup of tea either but I can respect the cultural and historical differences. Setting yourself up for lots of flaming responses dude. Listened to the FM station playing "traditional" music from the pueblo community in Taos NM maybe 20 years ago and the DJ was your typical FM jock introducing each song in all seriousness with the artist, album, label, etc. that sounded exactly like the last ten drums with chanting songs he had just played. It was hilarious. Wonder if they are still in business. Any of you New Mexicans know?
I grew up in New Mexico, get back there frequently to visit relatives - I have occasion to listen to the local stations, and I'm familiar with the formats you mention. I'd like to gently point out that you may have experienced someone hearing your music-of-choice as sounding all alike. I know my mother used to say things like that about the rock-n-roll I listened to.
Only on RP could I hear a track from one of my most tresured cd's. Thank you.
WOOHOOO! This is one of my all time favorite songs! :jump:
What's up? This is the second song from this lame album in the last few hours. Somebody give the computer a swift kick.
diane wrote:
:-$ I keep thinking Carlos Castaneda's going to show up...
:lol:
Just. Had this on for my DTW, this AM Thanks! 10 as always...
lynncorry1964 wrote:
Ah nee! (hello in Ojibwa dialect) You're more than welcome. I appreciate your honesty (although somewhat brutal lol). I'm glad to have helped with your understanding of First Nation 'music'. It amazes me how my ancestors before me managed to keep the culture alive. As recent as the 50's, my people were forbidden to drum or sing traditionally. A small group from the reservation in Parry Sound, Ontario would sneak away to a small uninhabited island on the Georgian Bay to practice their culture. There was one police officer who would warn the group that someone had reported them to the authorities by flashing a light in their direction. This light was to inform them that he was on his way to investigate the complaint. By the time he would arrive, all signs of celebration would be gone and no charges could be layed. He also may not have enjoyed the music but he understood its importance in our culture. Understanding and acceptance, it's what the world needs. Meegwetch (thank you) for your understanding.
fuh2 wrote:
Unbelievable. How sad. Was that true in the US also?
Ah nee! You betcha! Also in Scotland, where the language and the bagpipes and the Mod and anythin' else you care to think of as traditionally Scottish were banned with a Capital B; that's why so many Scots headed over to Canada, The States, Australia and New Zealand. They called it the Highland Clearance, same goes for the Irish, Welsh, Indians and every other indiginous people, same same wherever the Poms Promulgated; Divide and conquer! :war: Now of course all has gone full circle in all places mentioned and now we can get on with bein' who we intrinsically are :music: Robbie Robertson yea! Good Scottish name eh? :think: Now we're layin' our trips on the Muslim World
lynncorry1964 wrote:
Ah nee! (hello in Ojibwa dialect) You're more than welcome. I appreciate your honesty (although somewhat brutal lol). I'm glad to have helped with your understanding of First Nation 'music'. It amazes me how my ancestors before me managed to keep the culture alive. As recent as the 50's, my people were forbidden to drum or sing traditionally. ...... Meegwetch (thank you) for your understanding.
Unbelievable. How sad. Was that true in the US also?
huebdoo wrote:
Thank you very much ... this is the kind of information that makes my initial coments mute. Thanks for your clarification and clarity of reason It may not be my cup of tea... but I understand it much better now.
Ah nee! (hello in Ojibwa dialect) You're more than welcome. I appreciate your honesty (although somewhat brutal lol). I'm glad to have helped with your understanding of First Nation 'music'. It amazes me how my ancestors before me managed to keep the culture alive. As recent as the 50's, my people were forbidden to drum or sing traditionally. A small group from the reservation in Parry Sound, Ontario would sneak away to a small uninhabited island on the Georgian Bay to practice their culture. There was one police officer who would warn the group that someone had reported them to the authorities by flashing a light in their direction. This light was to inform them that he was on his way to investigate the complaint. By the time he would arrive, all signs of celebration would be gone and no charges could be layed. He also may not have enjoyed the music but he understood its importance in our culture. Understanding and acceptance, it's what the world needs. Meegwetch (thank you) for your understanding.
lynncorry1964 wrote:
Hmmm...Being a First Nation person (as we refer to ourselves in Canada), I enjoy this music but it cannot compare to the traditional drumming and singing at a ceremony. I also don't understand the dialect (one of many btw we are struggling to keep from being lost)but there's something about the beat of that drum. It represents the beat of the human heart. I accept the fact that you don't understand or enjoy our music. However, to be fair it really should be heard where it was meant to be played. Might I suggest attending a traditional pow wow. Our music as 'primitive' as it may seem is part of a bigger picture. A person can surely not appreciate the drumming or singing without the ceremony it is intended for or without understanding the meaning of both. Most importantly true traditional native music is not to be recorded. Recorded tradtional music hits a sorespot with many traditional Natives. I can understand why now. It has to be understood to be appreciated and respected. The Drum In Cree, commonly referred to as "Tawagun". In Ojibway, commonly referred to as "Tewikan". In Sioux, commonly referred to as "Chan-che-ga". Without the drum there would be no Pow wow. People use different drums for various occasions. The Pow wow drum is a large drum, approximately one metre in diameter. It is the center of the Pow wow celebration that can be used to heal and unify all people. The drum represents the circle of life. A drum is made of wood and hide, both natural materials. These materials represent honesty and sharing. The wood comes from a tree. The tree gives life so that we can build the drum. The tree is also telling us where life comes from. Without the sun and the earth there would be no trees - no life. The Anishinabe, the people, were lowered to this earth by the hand of the creator. The tree grows up toward the creator, the source of its life and all of the life on this earth. The hide is from an animal who gives its life for the drum and in this way, represents the gift of sharing. Once a drum has been made, it is usually given to an individual or a group. Certain people are given the responsibility or instructions in the making of the drum. It is never created as a craft or a toy. Before the drum can be sounded at a Pow wow it must be blessed through a special ceremony led by a elder or a group of elders. Once the ceremony has been completed the drum may be sounded at any Pow wow. There are usually four or more singers around the drum. A person is usually given the responsibility of caring for the drum. He is called the drum keeper or the drum carrier. The drumbeat is described as the heartbeat of the people. The drum itself is regarded as a sacred object to be treated with respect. Each drum has a keeper to ensure that no one approaches it under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or shows disrespect by reaching across or setting things on it. Written by: Harold Flett Songs In Cree, commonly referred to as "Nick gum mowin". In Ojibway, commonly referred to as " Nagamonun". In Souix, commonly referred to as "O da wan". The songs sung are very important! The sound that is made in singing is carried on the breath from deep within us. It is the Creator's breath of life. Elders tells us that the Creator took the earth from the four directions and blew his life-giving breath through the megis shell into the people of the earth so that they might begin their life on earth. Singing recalls the Creator's breath. When we celebrate through the joy of song, our voice will be heard both in the physical and spiritual worlds. The meaning becomes richer each time the song is heard or sung. Pow wow songs originate in the Grass Dance Lodge. You will not hear ceremonial songs from other traditional lodges sung at a Pow wow. Each of the three main Nations in Manitoba, the Cree, the Ojibway, and the Sioux sing different songs. Not only are the songs different because of the language used, but the beat of the drum is subtly different. Songs are usually passed on orally. Both men and women sing. The men usually lead and the women follow in harmony. Many Pow wow songs have almost been lost. Many songs come to the Anishinabe through dreams and fasting. Other songs are handed down through generations and these are never changed. The meaning becomes richer each time it is sung. Songs will also be composed by a person with a special gift for creating songs to give special messages and to honour a special person or occasion. There are songs for special occasions and special dances. For example: if an eagle feather, a sacred symbol, falls during a Pow wow, all music and dancing will stop. The "Picking up of the Eagle Feather Song" is sung, and an elder or veteran will pick up the eagle feather. Below is a list of songs you may hear and experience at a Pow wow: Grand Entry Song Victory Song Intertribal Song Friendship Song Honour Song Traditional Song Grass Dance Song Feast Song Eagle Song Flag Song Give Away Song Jingle Dress Song Fancy Dance Song Hoop Dance Song Elder's Song Veteran's Song Picking up the Eagle Feather Song Written by: Harold Flett I hope this helps!
Thank you very much ... this is the kind of information that makes my initial coments mute. Thanks for your clarification and clarity of reason It may not be my cup of tea... but I understand it much better now.