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Billie Holiday — Ain't Nobody's Business If I Do
Album: From the Original Decca Masters
Avg rating:
7.9

Your rating:
Total ratings: 822









Released: 1947
Length: 3:19
Plays (last 30 days): 0
There ain't nothing I can do
Or nothing I can say
That folks don't criticize me
But I'm going to do
Just as I want to anyway
And don't care just what people say
If I should take a notion
To jump into the ocean
Ain't nobody's business if I do
If I go to church on Sunday
Then cabaret all day Monday
Ain't nobody's business if I do
If my man ain't got no money
And I say "take all mine, honey"
Ain't nobody's business if I do
If I give him my last nickel
And it leaves me in a pickle
Ain't nobody's business if I do
But I'd rather my man would hit me
Than follow him to jump up and quit me
Ain't nobody's business if I do
I swear I won't call no copper
If I'm beat up by my papa
Ain't nobody's business if I do
Nobody's business
Ain't nobody's business
Nobody's business if I do
Comments (167)add comment
Check out her life story and you will know why the lady has a right to sing the blues!  Sure is sad she sings its OK to beat up on women, "will not call the cops"!  I say call the S.O.B. on his ugly misogyny!
More strings & less trumpet would be a better mix.
The somber tone of today's mix -so appropriate for this no nonsense post election day. 11.09.16
She's fantastic!{#Clap} And I second the sentiment!
My sister-in-law plays hockey and a couple of years ago she sustained a major black eye during a game. It was UGLY.

A couple days later, she was stopped by an off-duty sheriff's deputy as she was going into a restaurant. The deputy identified himself and asked how the injury occurred. He assured her that he would provide protection if... My sister-in-law assured the good public servant that it was a hockey injury and not a case of domestic abuse, and they went their separate ways.

Even though it involved my brother, I'm glad the deputy asked. 

No tolerance.  

I guess I'm pretty comfortable with everything... "You keep your finger on the script, that way you don't lose your place, see..."  the place referred to being the emptiness of form. It's all art, ain't it!


 itaish wrote:
The fact that this is a Billie Holiday song from 1947 does not make the lyrics less disturbing.

 
Much of these lyrics were added by Bessie Smith in her 1923 version. As noted earlier, it is about history and context: a singer in character, being flippant — not a condoning of domestic violence - obviously, by today's standards, it is nothing to be flippant about but it's all too easy to judge the past with today's conventions.  I hear these lyrics as a story, not an endorsement.  Maybe that's just the way I hear it, but I've heard many versions of this song over the years, so maybe I don't hear or think about the lyrics the same way as someone who's heard them for the first time.
 tulfan wrote:

Agree and I hope it was in now way reflective of her life...

 
i think you mean not reflective of her opinion.  I would hope that too.  ...most certainly she lived thru more hell than even this song depicts.
 tulfan wrote:

Agree and I hope it was in now way reflective of her life...

 
Sad that's the way it was but historical context is important. She is amazing
 aaronm wrote:
Great song! But I am not in any way comfortable with the lyrical content.

 
Agree and I hope it was in now way reflective of her life...
{#Dance}{#Sunny}
I am not a friend of big band sound!
 itaish wrote:
The fact that this is a Billie Holiday song from 1947 does not make the lyrics less disturbing.
 
But I'd rather my man would hit me
Than for him to jump up and quit me
Ain't nobody's business if I do
I swear I won't call no copper
If I'm beat up by my papa
Ain't nobody's business if I do

Although the song was not written by Billie, sadly these lyrics do reflect her tragic life.
Great song! But I am not in any way comfortable with the lyrical content.
 itaish wrote:
The fact that this is a Billie Holiday song from 1947 does not make the lyrics less disturbing.

 
No kidding!  I love Billie Holliday but the lyrics are definitely disturbing.

Everybody in my mushrooming multitude of churches believes this song is good for the ears...
Far from her best.
The fact that this is a Billie Holiday song from 1947 does not make the lyrics less disturbing.
Huh. I've never really thought of Billie Holiday as an Ayn Rand objectivist. 
Those horns are a little too bombastic.
I know it's a classic, but some of the sentiment is a little hard to listen to
In my house, it would have been unthinkable for my dad to hit my mom.
But he didn't have much of a rein on his temper, he got wildeyed, so for my dad to hit the kids, hard - was certainly a possibility. {#Fire}
 alanthecowboy wrote:

Wow... never listened to those lyrics before...

Next time my dad complains about obscenity in today's music, I'll have him listen to this.

 
maybe it was meant to be ironic?
 
 dpvest wrote:
But I'd rather my man would hit me
Than follow him to jump up and quit me
Ain't nobody's business if I do
I swear I won't call no copper
If I'm beat up by my papa
Ain't nobody's business if I do

Hmmm...sounds like it should be somebody's business if she do.  {#Beat} 
 
Wow... never listened to those lyrics before...

Next time my dad complains about obscenity in today's music, I'll have him listen to this.

 dpvest wrote:
But I'd rather my man would hit me
Than follow him to jump up and quit me
Ain't nobody's business if I do
I swear I won't call no copper
If I'm beat up by my papa
Ain't nobody's business if I do

Hmmm...sounds like it should be somebody's business if she do.
 
This song is terrifying. Billie was seriously messed up.

 
But I'd rather my man would hit me
Than follow him to jump up and quit me
Ain't nobody's business if I do
I swear I won't call no copper
If I'm beat up by my papa
Ain't nobody's business if I do

Hmmm...sounds like it should be somebody's business if she do.  {#Beat} 
 piñata wrote:
Billie is the queen, the number one, i love her music... is so cute, so romantic. long life to the queen!
 
many things but cute and romantic? Really?
Talk about an Old School sentiment. Oh, the woman next door is being beaten. That's nobody else's business. Right.

Distinctive voice, way of singing, Great Singer... Play more... Thank you
 On_The_Beach wrote:
Great to see some Billie on the playlist.
 
{#Arrowu}  what he/she said

Curses, David Sedaris! Now, whenever I hear Billie Holiday, I think of Crumpet, the Christmas elf, singing Silent Night as Billie would! Oh, heck!


Billie is the queen, the number one, i love her music... is so cute, so romantic. long life to the queen!
Great to see some Billie on the playlist.
 BerkeleyAlice wrote:
What an education from Lester! Thanks!
I'm sorry to say that now when I hear Billie Holliday, I think of David Sedaris!
 
Okay, but in fifty years, Ms. Holiday will still be played, and people will say 'David who?'


What an education from Lester! Thanks!
I'm sorry to say that now when I hear Billie Holliday, I think of David Sedaris!
lester your post is amazing as is Miss Billie Holliday - thank you


 lester wrote:
My mother is of that era — well, born a couple years before Ms. Holiday, but the same era. Let's ask Mom about how the song was received in the day.

Unfortunately, in talking with her the other day, I hadn't a ready recording, nor was there any sheet music available. So it's understandable Mom doesn't recall the words to this right off hand, especially since Billy Holiday was known for varying lyrics and arrangements almost at whim. ("No two people on earth are alike, and it's got to be that way in music or it isn't music.") Also, Mom never saw her perform and is likely remembering her from radio broadcasts, done live in those days. And exactly which set of lyrics are we hearing here on RP, anyway? Which recordings survived?

After all these years, my mother's impression about this song still coincides with what she related to me when I was young: that Lady Day was an independent sort of woman, cut according to no one's mold. Speaking of this particular song, she said something which may or may not actually be true. "She {Ms. Holiday} would go out to night clubs in New York City and draw attention to herself. People {other patrons} didn't like her men friends. Maybe they were poor or roughneck or something. That's why she said 'tain't nobody's business even IF I do.'" (Mom added the "even if" part.) This is reflected in the lead-in, which I suppose has stuck with her most prominently:

     There ain't nothing I can do
     Or nothing I can say
     That folks don't criticize me.

And then on about an "independent sort of woman":

     But I'm going to do just as I want to anyway
     And don't care what people say.

Regarding Mom's comments on the "men friends":

     If my man ain't got no money
     And I say, "Take all of mine, honey" . . .

or

     If I give him my last nickel
     And it leaves me in a pickle . . .

I remember times when Mom herself even used a paraphrasing of one line to express her own idea of throwing something back in the face of an encroacher of her personal freedom:

     If I should take a notion
     To jump into the ocean . . .

Remember, this is just the impression of a listener of the day — one who never really put much significance into the last stanza and rather clued in on the earlier ones — an old woman who "hasn't heard that song in umpteen years" (Mom's words again).

Now for the son's modern take on the specific lyrics in question:

As is often true yet today, a partner indeed might prefer to endure temporary or sporadic physical (or psychological) abuse over dealing with the permanence of a separation. Is it wrong to sing about true-to-life situations? Should artists, for the sake of delicate ears, serve up watered down reality? Should we stop listening?
 

Beautiful post Lester-thank you so much
 aaronm wrote:
Yeah, I've still got nothing.
 

Hi There-pick up a copy of Billie Holiday's greatest hits on the Verve label and get back to me-I have a feeling you'll be a changed man{#Yes}
Yeah, I've still got nothing.

EDIT: This is in response to my post two below.

 farbenblinde wrote:
My mom had this record playing while I was growing up.  I loved the whole thing. This is precious to me.  Thanks Bill.  Amy
 

My Mom and her buddies would have a party every time "Lady Day" got out of jail-she is a classic!!
I came around a generation too late to grow up with this song, so this is the first time I've heard it.  Musically (her singing, the instrumentation), it's fantastic.  That much is obvious.

It will be a very long time before I can adequately formulate/articulate my feelings about the lyrics, however.  My thoughts are, to say the least, provoked.


are u kidding? she gets a 17!{#Bounce}{#Daisy}{#Roflol}{#Naughty}{#Motor}{#Bananajumprope}{#Chillpill}
oh yeah!
i'm just echoing others sentiments... even though i've known this song forever (my grandma used to sing it) i had never realized some of the lyrics.  it's surprising to hear some of the ideas. wow... 
My mom had this record playing while I was growing up.  I loved the whole thing. This is precious to me.  Thanks Bill.  Amy
Interesting that Bill would play this song with the media frenzy surrounding the domestic dispute between Rhianna and Chris Brown.  In a past generation, his treatment of her may not have ben acceptable - but society's tendency to "look the other way" would have been much more the norm.  Billy Holiday is basically saying, "Mind your own damn business".  Listening Fox News, ET, Inquirier, et al?

Just sayin... 
 shanester wrote:
One of my wishes is to find a time machine and go back to the 40's & 50's and see Billie live. SNAP!

Black tie and all.


 

Better go back to the 30s. Billie died in 1959 and was pretty tired by the late 40s. You can hear it in her voice in her later recordings. Go back to the Golden Age of the 30s and revel in the greatness...
i saw your post after i wrote mine....i loved it...so strong....also dont forget the period when Miss Holiday was raised, as a  black person in that time, you still were not free (how free we are today still is a mystery{#Confused}) however, in that time blacks, african americans, or colored people (take your pick) really had little control over much except their relations, and lovers...so if Miss Holiday found someone who she deemed worty of her last nickel, or worthy of a beating...aint nobody's business if she do........go on Lady Day! {#Notworthy}


 
lester wrote:
My mother is of that era — well, born a couple years before Ms. Holiday, but the same era. Let's ask Mom about how the song was received in the day.

Unfortunately, in talking with her the other day, I hadn't a ready recording, nor was there any sheet music available. So it's understandable Mom doesn't recall the words to this right off hand, especially since Billy Holiday was known for varying lyrics and arrangements almost at whim. ("No two people on earth are alike, and it's got to be that way in music or it isn't music.") Also, Mom never saw her perform and is likely remembering her from radio broadcasts, done live in those days. And exactly which set of lyrics are we hearing here on RP, anyway? Which recordings survived?

After all these years, my mother's impression about this song still coincides with what she related to me when I was young: that Lady Day was an independent sort of woman, cut according to no one's mold. Speaking of this particular song, she said something which may or may not actually be true. "She {Ms. Holiday} would go out to night clubs in New York City and draw attention to herself. People {other patrons} didn't like her men friends. Maybe they were poor or roughneck or something. That's why she said 'tain't nobody's business even IF I do.'" (Mom added the "even if" part.) This is reflected in the lead-in, which I suppose has stuck with her most prominently:

     There ain't nothing I can do
     Or nothing I can say
     That folks don't criticize me.

And then on about an "independent sort of woman":

     But I'm going to do just as I want to anyway
     And don't care what people say.

Regarding Mom's comments on the "men friends":

     If my man ain't got no money
     And I say, "Take all of mine, honey" . . .

or

     If I give him my last nickel
     And it leaves me in a pickle . . .

I remember times when Mom herself even used a paraphrasing of one line to express her own idea of throwing something back in the face of an encroacher of her personal freedom:

     If I should take a notion
     To jump into the ocean . . .

Remember, this is just the impression of a listener of the day — one who never really put much significance into the last stanza and rather clued in on the earlier ones — an old woman who "hasn't heard that song in umpteen years" (Mom's words again).

Now for the son's modern take on the specific lyrics in question:

As is often true yet today, a partner indeed might prefer to endure temporary or sporadic physical (or psychological) abuse over dealing with the permanence of a separation. Is it wrong to sing about true-to-life situations? Should artists, for the sake of delicate ears, serve up watered down reality? Should we stop listening?
 


so much pain......and hope in one song....damn {#Sad} and thank you Miss Holiday for all that you were
I agree. Wow.  islander wrote:
Wow, Beastie Boys to Billie Holiday... and it works. Go Bill.
 


I agree - not that im an advocate of censorship but what type of message does this song send?
betterdaze wrote:
I'd never really heard the words to this before. :sad:
And you thought disturbing lyrics were a modern thing . . .
It is the concern of no one if I perchance, do. Love the Lady Day...
Wow, Beastie Boys to Billie Holiday... and it works. Go Bill.
One of my wishes is to find a time machine and go back to the 40's & 50's and see Billie live. SNAP! Black tie and all. :clap:
themotion wrote:
What a horrible left turn after the high of the Chemical Bro's and Beastie Boys.
I'm in total disagreement with you on this one. Bill switched gears quite deftly here. The quietly funky groove of the Beasties track actually goes well with Billie's one-of-a-kind croon.
I'd never really heard the words to this before. :sad:
Lots of talent. The message makes me want to jump off a bridge.
themotion wrote:
What a horrible left turn after the high of the Chemical Bro's and Beastie Boys.
A left turn into a brick wall! Serious downer.
I found it quite pleasant. themotion wrote:
What a horrible left turn after the high of the Chemical Bro's and Beastie Boys.
Oh yes :music:
davin wrote:
The lyrics are a bit wack.
BillnDollarBaby wrote:
Remember the era she was of.
My mother is of that era -- well, born a couple years before Ms. Holiday, but the same era. Let's ask Mom about how the song was received in the day. Unfortunately, in talking with her the other day, I hadn't a ready recording, nor was there any sheet music available. So it's understandable Mom doesn't recall the words to this right off hand, especially since Billy Holiday was known for varying lyrics and arrangements almost at whim. ("No two people on earth are alike, and it's got to be that way in music or it isn't music.") Also, Mom never saw her perform and is likely remembering her from radio broadcasts, done live in those days. And exactly which set of lyrics are we hearing here on RP, anyway? Which recordings survived? After all these years, my mother's impression about this song still coincides with what she related to me when I was young: that Lady Day was an independent sort of woman, cut according to no one's mold. Speaking of this particular song, she said something which may or may not actually be true. "She {Ms. Holiday} would go out to night clubs in New York City and draw attention to herself. People {other patrons} didn't like her men friends. Maybe they were poor or roughneck or something. That's why she said 'tain't nobody's business even IF I do.'" (Mom added the "even if" part.) This is reflected in the lead-in, which I suppose has stuck with her most prominently:      There ain't nothing I can do      Or nothing I can say      That folks don't criticize me. And then on about an "independent sort of woman":      But I'm going to do just as I want to anyway      And don't care what people say. Regarding Mom's comments on the "men friends":      If my man ain't got no money      And I say, "Take all of mine, honey" . . . or      If I give him my last nickel      And it leaves me in a pickle . . . I remember times when Mom herself even used a paraphrasing of one line to express her own idea of throwing something back in the face of an encroacher of her personal freedom:      If I should take a notion      To jump into the ocean . . . Remember, this is just the impression of a listener of the day -- one who never really put much significance into the last stanza and rather clued in on the earlier ones -- an old woman who "hasn't heard that song in umpteen years" (Mom's words again). Now for the son's modern take on the specific lyrics in question: As is often true yet today, a partner indeed might prefer to endure temporary or sporadic physical (or psychological) abuse over dealing with the permanence of a separation. Is it wrong to sing about true-to-life situations? Should artists, for the sake of delicate ears, serve up watered down reality? Should we stop listening?
Nothing like an RP mug full of coffee and that big fat orchestra to wake you up!
billy holiday a solid 10.0pannaramma wrote:
Damn right, Lady Day
Damn right, Lady Day
What a horrible left turn after the high of the Chemical Bro's and Beastie Boys.
wow
Geo_orc1 wrote:
Not true, stinkeroo. :beat:
:nyah:
Almo80 wrote:
Totally Agree.
Not true, stinkeroo. :beat:
davin wrote:
The lyrics are a bit wack.
Remember the era she was of. She was also a heroin adict (allegedly) later in life.
davin wrote:
The lyrics are a bit wack.
..in more ways than one.
SSSSSSSSMMEEEOOOOOOOOTHTHTHTHTHTHTHTHTHTH
Ixion wrote:
I feel like I should be wearing a tux, sipping a martini at the bar while I survey the dance floor on a luxury liner steaming across the Atlantic to England...
This is not too far off from what I pictured when I closed my eyes. Great song, great lady.
davin wrote:
The lyrics are a bit wack.
Agree
I feel like I should be wearing a tux, sipping a martini at the bar while I survey the dance floor on a luxury liner steaming across the Atlantic to England...
davin wrote:
The lyrics are a bit wack.
+100
madaxeman wrote:
What a sublime way to follow the crap of The Beastie Boys and The Chemical Brothers.
Totally Agree.
The lyrics are a bit wack.
What a sublime way to follow the crap of The Beastie Boys and The Chemical Brothers.
hippiechick wrote:
Sorry, this old stuff doesn't do a thing for me. :frown:
It's all old stuff when you get right down to it.
Sorry, this old stuff doesn't do a thing for me. :frown:
From Bob to Billie
namesbenny wrote:
Except my pee doesn't stink after I listen to her
:roflol: i'm dyin' here!
What a pleasant surprise! Billie, the tragic genius.
First time I heard this song, it was live and by the Irish singer Mary Coughlin. Excellent performance! You should take a listen to her!
Oh yeah.
Christ folks, it's a song!
:meditate: Billie is always a bliss.
ploafmaster wrote:
"A text without a context is a pretext for a proof text." -- D.A. Carson, quoting his father.
BLBOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST"D
algrif wrote:
Every verse is a hyperbole. Listen to the lyrics before picking out one line out of context
"A text without a context is a pretext for a proof text." -- D.A. Carson, quoting his father.
mojoman wrote:
Really? Look at what won the Oscar for best song this year: "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp."
gag. I'd take Billie any day over that.
CanuckBeaker wrote:
Nice! Now how about a spin around the block with today's Billie - Madeleine Peyroux? ... we need more Madeleine on RP. :)
No thanks for me. I'll stick with the original.
This song is the namesake of my favorite Lesbian bar in Phoenix, "Nobody's Business", fondly just "the Biz". Ah, good times, good times..... :shhh: :kiss: :shhh: :kiss: :shhh:
Sure got that right... Aint Nobody's Business if I do.
wikipedia wrote:
Billie Holiday (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), also called Lady Day, was an American singer, generally considered one of the greatest jazz voices of all time, alongside Sarah Vaughan and Ella Fitzgerald.
I could listen to her all day and all night.
I want to run to the shelf and grab and slap on that Billie H disc and let it feel SO GOOD... but I'd have to mute RP and I don't want to! Yow, it's JIMI! Here goes the knob, to 11!
The way they used to blast those horns just kills me.
Shesdifferent wrote:
'I won't call no coppa (copper) if I'm beat up by my papa' wow, has the world ever changed......
Really? Look at what won the Oscar for best song this year: "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp."
Shesdifferent wrote:
'I won't call no coppa (copper) if I'm beat up by my papa' wow, has the world ever changed......
Every verse is a hyperbole. Listen to the lyrics before picking out one line out of context
I heard Billie sing "Fine and Mellow" on WPFW last night and it put me in the mood to hear Lady Day on RP, and this is just what the Dr. ordered!
'I won't call no coppa (copper) if I'm beat up by my papa' wow, has the world ever changed......
dionysius wrote:
(Sound of thirteen hands clapping...) Good one! Applause from (almost) all quarters.
I dislike D.R.'s snooty attitude almost more than her dysphonious voice, and wish she had given up radio. Have felt this way ever since I first heard her.
anniebear wrote:
That makes it ever more frelled up that she had to sing about being beaten by her "pappa". Ya know, all thru history, women have decided enough was enough, and walked out on their abusive husbands, fathers, boyfriends, uncles, brothers. Billie Holliday aparrently was savvy enough to have her own career, yet not savvy enough to not sing (with pride no less!) about being abused by a man. More's the pity.
Point taken... Altho it does seem to have been written with Billie in mind, it was done earlier by others, including Bessie Smith, and was one of the rare songs of the era written with the reality of its audience in mind. Like "Get a Job" by the Silhouettes, the singer is playing a down and out character to try to relate to the audience, not necessarily describing the actual situation at home.
Well... if it ain't nobody's biz then why did she spend the vast majority of her "adult" (and I use that term loosely) awash in a drug induced haze. Maybe, just maybe, it did matter to her what other people thought.
redeyespy wrote:
In a shining moment sans spasmodic dysphonia, Ms. Rehm eloquently explains to her listeners that physicsgenius composes some of the most jaw-droppingly idiotic comments that she has ever had the misfortune to read.
(Sound of thirteen hands clapping...) Good one! Applause from (almost) all quarters.
physicsgenius wrote:
If by "phrasing and soul" you mean "geriatric warbling that even Diane Rehm would be ashamed of" then I agree.
In a shining moment sans spasmodic dysphonia, Ms. Rehm eloquently explains to her listeners that physicsgenius composes some of the most jaw-droppingly idiotic comments that she has ever had the misfortune to read.
physicsgenius wrote:
If by "phrasing and soul" you mean "geriatric warbling that even Diane Rehm would be ashamed of" then I agree.
You, sir, are an ignorant ass. As evidence, I would like to call attention to your "lowest rated" list.
dionysius wrote:
Billie didn't write the song, of course! It's an old Percy Grainger/Robert Prince/Clarence Williams composition. She "merely" sang the hell out of it.
That makes it ever more frelled up that she had to sing about being beaten by her "pappa". Ya know, all thru history, women have decided enough was enough, and walked out on their abusive husbands, fathers, boyfriends, uncles, brothers. Billie Holliday aparrently was savvy enough to have her own career, yet not savvy enough to not sing (with pride no less!) about being abused by a man. More's the pity.
physicsgenius wrote:
What's with the ridiculous voice? And the stupid "stings" from the horn section.
Musical style of the time?
dionysius wrote:
Amusingly, physicsgenius's ignorance knows no bounds. Billie didn't write the song, of course! It's an old Percy Grainger/Robert Prince/Clarence Williams composition. She "merely" sang the hell out of it. The phrasing and soul Billie brings to the tune are matchless, far beyond anything the trite pop singers physicsgenius evidently prefers are capable of.
If by "phrasing and soul" you mean "geriatric warbling that even Diane Rehm would be ashamed of" then I agree. And your logic is 100% sound--if I don't like Billie Holiday, I must prefer the only other alternative: the Backstreet Boys.
physicsgenius wrote:
Sorry, I missed the brilliant rhyming of "Monday" with "Sunday". Clearly an unsung genius. Except that she is sung--oversung, in fact.
Amusingly, physicsgenius's ignorance knows no bounds. Billie didn't write the song, of course! It's an old Percy Grainger/Robert Prince/Clarence Williams composition. She "merely" sang the hell out of it. The phrasing and soul Billie brings to the tune are matchless, far beyond anything the trite pop singers physicsgenius evidently prefers are capable of. By the way, Roverfish is correct--the song's correct title is "T'Ain't Nobody's Bizness If I Do" ("misspellings" in the original). Can we change the attribution, please, Bill?
phineas wrote:
"We have a winner! The Stupidest Post Ever Award goes to....physicsgenius!! You can pick up your Jessica Simpson CD on your way out."
Sorry, I missed the brilliant rhyming of "Monday" with "Sunday". Clearly an unsung genius. Except that she is sung--oversung, in fact.
jbmckee wrote:
Musically, this may be considered great and was certainly influential. But I hate the sentiments expressed. Really bothers me. "It is my right to be abused." Might be true, yes, but perhaps it is time to develop the self-esteem to rise above that. You are a person with real value. You don't "need" these abusers, nor do you deserve them.
It's just the first S&M song...
Style. Class. Talent. Pride.
Roverfish wrote:
Uh, she's been dead almost 50 years. I'm pretty sure she's fine with herself now. More importantly, this song's 60 years old, don't you think psychoanalysis might be a bit of a wasted effort?...
hardly a wonder the world is as screwed up as it is when you consider the kind of lyrics we've been listening to for nearly a century. but I won't cry out loud. i'll keep it inside. i'll learn how to hide my feelings...
jbmckee wrote:
Musically, this may be considered great and was certainly influential. But I hate the sentiments expressed. Really bothers me. "It is my right to be abused." Might be true, yes, but perhaps it is time to develop the self-esteem to rise above that. You are a person with real value. You don't "need" these abusers, nor do you deserve them.
Uh, she's been dead almost 50 years. I'm pretty sure she's fine with herself now. More importantly, this song's 60 years old, don't you think psychoanalysis might be a bit of a wasted effort? Absolutely wonderful tune. Close to godlike. By the way, I'm pretty sure the title is "Tain't" not "Ain't"...
You can never go wrong with anything by Billie Holiday! :clap:
Love listening to Billie at Christmas :nodhead: Thanks Bill for the pressssy :kiss: Ain't Nobody's Business If I Do 8)
:bounce: pickllle
Musically, this may be considered great and was certainly influential. But I hate the sentiments expressed. Really bothers me. "It is my right to be abused." Might be true, yes, but perhaps it is time to develop the self-esteem to rise above that. You are a person with real value. You don't "need" these abusers, nor do you deserve them.
physicsgenius wrote:
What's with the ridiculous voice? And the stupid "stings" from the horn section.
"We have a winner! The Stupidest Post Ever Award goes to....physicsgenius!! You can pick up your Jessica Simpson CD on your way out."