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Joni Mitchell — Free Man In Paris
Album: Court and Spark
Avg rating:
7.4

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1285









Released: 1974
Length: 2:56
Plays (last 30 days): 1
The way I see it, he said, you just can't win it
Everybody's in it for their own gain
You can't please 'em all
There's always somebody calling you down
I do my best and I do good business
There's a lot of people asking for my time
They're trying to get ahead
They're trying to be a good friend of mine

I was a free man in Paris
I felt unfettered and alive
There was nobody calling me up for favors
And no one's future to decide
You know I'd go back there tomorrow
But for the work I've taken on
Stoking the star-maker machinery
Behind the popular song

I deal in dreamers and telephone screamers
Lately I wonder what I do it for
If I had my way
I'd just walk through those doors
And wander down the Champs-Élysées
Going café to cabaret
Thinking how I'd feel when I find
That very good friend of mine

I was a free man in Paris
I felt unfettered and alive
Nobody was calling me up for favors
No one's future to decide
You know I'd go back there tomorrow
But for the work I've taken on
Stoking the star-maker machinery
Behind the popular song
Comments (243)add comment
Norah
Billie
Natalie
Joni

Nice set of great ladies, Bill!
 Canadese wrote:
Aside from her many exceptional talents, she is a very approachable person.  In 2008 I met her outside a restaurant in Yorkville, Toronto, where she had spent many of her early years, spoke to her about some recent music (The Joni Letters) and when my wife lifted her camera for a photo, rather than just stand there, she put her arm in mine for a very nice memory shot.
 

I've heard many stories about her like this over the years. 
Aside from her many exceptional talents, she is a very approachable person.  In 2008 I met her outside a restaurant in Yorkville, Toronto, where she had spent many of her early years, spoke to her about some recent music (The Joni Letters) and when my wife lifted her camera for a photo, rather than just stand there, she put her arm in mine for a very nice memory shot.
 rpdevotee wrote:
Joni has such a unique vocal and guitar style and plays/sings such peculiar keys and chords...she is truly avant garde.  She had different settings and tunings for so many of her songs that she had to constantly change on stage during her live performances.  Rolling Stone ranked her the highest woman on their 2003 list of greatest guitarists of all time.  Just try to sing one of her songs to gain appreciation for how talented she is.
  
I'm an intermediate guitar player and wish I could play her songs, but even if I can fake the guitar well enough, I cannot possibly sing any of her songs. I think the list of greats who consider her one of their biggest influences says it all... Prince, Elvis Costello, Led Zeppelin, CSN, Bjork, Cassandra Wilson, Herbie Hancock, Bonnie Raitt, Chaka Khan... the long list goes on. Bob Dylan wrote "Tangled Up in Blue" after spending a weekend spinning her album "Blue" repeatedly. Chrissie Hynde said, "She's a f***in' excellent guitar player. I don't know any guitar player, any of the real greats, who don't rate Joni Mitchell up there with the best of them."
 
 On_The_Beach wrote:
Oh dear.
Baez had a few years of success as a folkie (with more than a little help from Bob) before fading away.
Joni M is a musical icon and innovator, on par with Bowie and Prince, and remained vital for decades.
  
While I agree with the general reaction you were having to the comparison, more accurate is that Joan Baez was a huge success who helped promote Bob and gave him enormous opportunities. She invited him to play at the Newport Folk Festival and he probably wouldn't have been at the '63 Civil Rights March without her.  She was famous before she met Bob and she had hits in the top 100 far after that - during the mid-70s.  One could also argue that she is still a success, though not on any grand scale. 
 
Worth a quick read... 
 
Also, for anyone who truly cares about civil rights, Baez is still the real deal - this is an amazing report: 
 
Love her, hate her, feel indifferent about her, but she does deserve a lot of respect and wasn't just some come-and-go folkie. She was and still is a force in the civil rights movement. 
 greiffenstein wrote:
Oh the rambling whine of Mitchell-Baez (I can't tell them apart) is like being stuck in an elevator with a stinky fart.  I can't undo the grimace on my face.  {#Grumpy} 

 
that's like saying you can't tell the difference between jazz and folk. 
{#Devil_pimp}zesty ! trying to remember how many grammys this record won, it was few, still on my turntable and still digging it ! and she's still sittin on her groceries
 greiffenstein wrote:
Oh the rambling whine of Mitchell-Baez (I can't tell them apart) is like being stuck in an elevator with a stinky fart.  I can't undo the grimace on my face.  {#Grumpy} 

 
says the person who rated Amy WinehouseBack To Black a 10 {#Whistle}
Oh the rambling whine of Mitchell-Baez (I can't tell them apart) is like being stuck in an elevator with a stinky fart.  I can't undo the grimace on my face.  {#Grumpy} 
I was once a free man in Peoria, walking down Adam Street.  
Ahh, the momentary liberation that comes while on vacation.
 Aphanius wrote:
A bad copy of Joan Baez
 
Joni Mitchell is what Joan Baez never was & never could be.
Robbie Robertson has some great insight into this song in his new bio Testimony.  Apparently,  he was hanging out with David Geffen and Joni Mitchell when they were in Paris and she wrote this song.  
Saw a PBS special about David Geffen's life — the subject of this song — probably funded by Mr Geffen himself.  It was terribly interesting, though.  Link is here.

I had no idea about his beginnings or who were his early clients, like Laura Nyro, and the photos of him "back in the day" were actually pretty funny.  And of course, the story of this song and his involvement with Ms Mitchell got a few minutes' mention.
Joni has such a unique vocal and guitar style and plays/sings such peculiar keys and chords...she is truly avant garde.  She had different settings and tunings for so many of her songs that she had to constantly change on stage during her live performances.  Rolling Stone ranked her the highest woman on their 2003 list of greatest guitarists of all time.  Just try to sing one of her songs to gain appreciation for how talented she is.
 Aphanius wrote:
A bad copy of Joan Baez
 
Oh dear.
Baez had a few years of success as a folkie (with more than a little help from Bob) before fading away.
Joni M is a musical icon and innovator, on par with Bowie and Prince, and remained vital for decades.
 Aphanius wrote:
A bad copy of Joan Baez

 
Joni's work stands on its own, no need to "copy" Joan. They're two completely different writing and singing styles.
A bad copy of Joan Baez
One of the best hooks ever.
1974...outside in the park, 10 friends, wine, brie, apples, Joni.
God bless her. 
 mdfergy wrote:
I shouldn't rate joni mitchell songs as I think she has a squeaky whiny voice.... but I can respect the fact that she has millions of fans..

 
Squeaky, whiny? No that doesn't fit. If you don't like Ms Mitchell that's fine but at least be accurate
Joni at her best. Transcends her folksy roots and before she went astray.
 
I shouldn't rate joni mitchell songs as I think she has a squeaky whiny voice.... but I can respect the fact that she has millions of fans..
I need exact coordinates.
Is it possible to be in love with a woman you never met? 
I have been asking this of myself for decades. 
As good as it's ever been. As good as it'll ever be.
 steven88 wrote:
after recent events, an a propos anthem.

 
Oh for christsakes, this song has nothing to do with any of that, just that it happened in Paris.
from barenaked ladies to joni mitchell... eek. are you trying to hurt me?
Brilliant artist....get better soon, Joni! {#Daisy}
grammy winner
just the beginning of a string of groundbreaking albums. 

in the news:
https://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/15/arts/music/percy-sledge-who-sang-when-a-man-loves-a-woman-dies-at-74.html?_r=0 
Joni is a goddess.  Wishing her good health.
Great tune and album. Thanks Joni!
 kcar wrote:

 
You were lucky, nagsheadlocal: you DJed when you had input about playlists. Her voice is so high and clear on first few albums. This song still works beautifully...Why anyone with that much vocal talent would smoke is beyond me.
 
 rdo wrote:

This was never a "Standard" in the US on FM radio.  Not by any possible definition of the term.
 
Could you take all your sweeping, unsupported over-generalizations and cram them up your ass? That'd be super.   {#Wave}

Why don't you ask nagsheadlocal about this song's popularity on FM radio during the 70s? The man says he was an FM DJ back then and I have no reason to doubt him. The late WCGY (93.7 FM, "The Rock Garden") in the Boston area even used this song for its TV ads promoting the station. I heard this song on the radio all the time growing up, and not just on WCGY. 

Or, hey, ask Bill G. He was DJing back then, wasn't he? 

Oh and good luck on that AESTHETE gig. Is that a replacement for THE PROGRAM?

 
Oh, this entire album was in heavy rotation in the college market, where I was working. Not only this song but "Help Me" were No. 1 hits in that market, and "Court and Spark" plus "Car on a Hill" went pretty big as I recall. 

Thanks for your kind words, kcar, it was a great time to be in radio. I'm still in touch with most of the men and women I DJed with, we still love music and a number of them are here on Radio Paradise because it has that same vibe. 

 

 nagsheadlocal wrote:

I was working as an FM DJ when this came out. I can remember taking it out of the mailer and listening to it with a fellow DJ for the first time. We both nodded in amazement and said: "This is going to be HUGE."

Her voice has degraded a lot in the past few years. Age is a part of it, but I blame the cigarettes. 

  
You were lucky, nagsheadlocal: you DJed when you had input about playlists. Her voice is so high and clear on first few albums. This song still works beautifully...Why anyone with that much vocal talent would smoke is beyond me.
 
How big was this song's on FM radio during the 70s, nagsheadlocal? The late WCGY (93.7 FM, "The Rock Garden") in the Boston area even used this song for its TV ads promoting the station. I heard this song on the radio all the time growing up, and not just on WCGY. (Curt Gowdy, BoSox fans miss you). 

Someone should ask Bill G. He was DJing back then, wasn't he? 

Her fearless evolution has taught me more than any alleged creative writing group or poetry workshop ever came close to. And continues.
 deepwoodskev wrote:

Her voice makes my ears melt.

 
Well said, deepwoodskev.
Play more tunes from "Blue"? 
 kcar wrote:

I haven't heard this in many (too many) years but your words capture the beauty and power of her voice that grabs me anew. 

This was a STANDARD on FM radio when I was growing up. I never gave much time to female singers back then--or serious songwriters--but I always loved this one. 

Would love to read comments from longtime Joni fans about how her voice has changed over the years (and it has changed dramatically).  

 
This was never a "Standard" in the US on FM radio.  Not by any possible definition of the term.
 kcar wrote:
This was a STANDARD on FM radio when I was growing up. I never gave much time to female singers back then--or serious songwriters--but I always loved this one. 

Would love to read comments from longtime Joni fans about how her voice has changed over the years (and it has changed dramatically).  

 
I was working as an FM DJ when this came out. I can remember taking it out of the mailer and listening to it with a fellow DJ for the first time. We both nodded in amazement and said: "This is going to be HUGE."

Her voice has degraded a lot in the past few years. Age is a part of it, but I blame the cigarettes. 
Stellar 
I tihnk this is one of her best albums, but it never seems to get due notice.
{#Meditate}  and no one's future to decide.
 coloradojohn wrote:
The first few notes take me back; her incredibly expressive voice and vibrant words color it all in...and I find that it still SHINES mighty fine...

 
I haven't heard this in many (too many) years but your words capture the beauty and power of her voice that grabs me anew. 

This was a STANDARD on FM radio when I was growing up. I never gave much time to female singers back then--or serious songwriters--but I always loved this one. 

Would love to read comments from longtime Joni fans about how her voice has changed over the years (and it has changed dramatically).  
Like hearing Band on the Run earlier today, most of this early 70's crap we can (gladly) leave to other venues.
Outstanding song from a terrific album.  Love the jazz influence in her music which was there from the start.
Should be an eleven.{#Clap}
She's put out so much great music that it's hard to know where to settle, but this is my favorite Joni Mitchell song ever. I had the pleasure of hearing Aimee Mann sing this song (twice even), and do it real justice.


 bpkengor wrote:

I had a friend back in the day that would always say she didn't like Joni Mitchell because she always "sung between the notes".   that always stuck with me.

 
That is a pretty good description. I prefer someone like Neko Case or Shirley Bassey who can belt out a lyric, none of the wispy weak stuff. Perhaps if her voice came down an octave.
 Cynaera wrote:
I had this on cassette.  I bought it on vinyl and wore it out. I got two CD's of it, and it's still in my CD player most times. I tried my best to learn the guitar progressions in this song, but failed, so I settled for listening to it repeatedly. This work, along with Jackson Browne's "Late For The Sky", got me through some pretty not-nice events. I can remember sitting in one of the top rooms of Bath's Rooming House in Carson City, Nevada, with my friend Peggy. (I have a picture, but I can't figure out how to upload it.)   I'd just run away from home right after graduating from high school, and that room was festooned with paper flowers, dog-eared issues of Rolling Stone, and gypsy-scarves that had been purchased at yard sales.  It was an amazing time for me - I had a troubadour who had a convertible land-yacht and played guitar, and who serenaded Peggy and me  from the street while we sat on the balcony and threw flowers down to him.

I gathered the Rolling Stones and read them while I was trying to figure out what to do with my life, and I read an interview with Jackson Browne in one of them. That led me to Joni Mitchell, and I read whatever I could about her. Then, when I left that place with all its wonder and unnerving events, I subscribed to Rolling Stone.  All the while, I had music, and Joni Mitchell was at the top of my list, along with Jackson Browne, Bonnie Raitt, and James Taylor.  Dan Fogelberg followed shortly after, as did Neil Young, Eagles, and Souther-Hillman-Furay.  Yes, I ran the gamut, but "Court and Spark" still remains one of my favorite pieces of music.  And this song, in particular, continues to resonate with me.  I truly believe that whatever dubious gifts I possess in the creative realm, I owe to Peggy, Rolling Stone, Joni Mitchell, and Bath's Rooming House.
 

I know what you mean...

miss you...
 

 bh1 wrote:
. . . This & Hissing of Summer Lawns are my favorites of hers . . .
 
The Hissing of Summer Lawns is my fave as well. Great album.
Her guitar work is hard to emulate, she uses lots of alternate tunings. Not sure if she got into it from David Crosby or the other way around, but she & CSN were close back in the day. Crosby & Nash do backup on this album I believe. I always thought it funny that she wrote Woodstock but didn't bother to go, and they made the song a hit after they did go. This  & Hissing of Summer Lawns are my favorites of hers, latere when she got nto her jazz mode the music became less accessible to me. 
1974? No, it can't be. It was just yesterday, it's so fresh. To me.
Great song, no doubt, but THE version is found on "Shadows and Light," recorded live.  Pat Methany, Lyle Mays (sp?), Jaco Pastorius (sp? again) are all a part of an amazing back up band.  You can here all of them, Joni included, as they know they are making magic! 
Saw her on the Court and Spark tour at the Syria Mosque in Pittsburgh with Tom Scott and the LA Express:music was perfect and Joni was beautiful in a red dress (it was Valentine's Day, 1974) could be one of the most perfect shows I've ever seen.
narareth cover of this flight tonite Dig It! maybe you could dig it up Bill with a lot more Narareth minus hair of the dog and love hurts!
 terrapin52 wrote:

Sounds like you don't like the natural sound of a woman's voice.
 
Huh? I don't think that has anything to do with it.
I was a free man in Paris, I felt unfettered and alive,
Nobody was calling me up for favours, no-one's future to decide.
And I'd go back there tomorrow, but for the work I've taken on,
Stoking the star-making machinery behind the popular song.

 
To me, just stunning lyrics.  The whole package just works for me.  Love it, a 9. 


The first few notes take me back; her incredibly expressive voice and vibrant words color it all in...and I find that it still SHINES mighty fine...
David Geffen on vacation in Paris - around 1973.

Quite wonderful and exquisite.
 iTuner wrote:
Fireproof suit on, but Joni Mitchell is fingernails on a chalkboard to me. The good thing about this song is that its short.
 
Sounds like you don't like the natural sound of a woman's voice.
 iTuner wrote:
Fireproof suit on, but Joni Mitchell is fingernails on a chalkboard to me. The good thing about this song is that its short.
 
I'd hate to see what makes your hit list...
 scraig wrote:
Her voice makes me melt
 
Her voice makes my ears melt.
 iTuner wrote:
Fireproof suit on, but Joni Mitchell is fingernails on a chalkboard to me. The good thing about this song is that its short.
 
I had a friend back in the day that would always say she didn't like Joni Mitchell because she always "sung between the notes".   that always stuck with me.

 iTuner wrote:
Fireproof suit on, but Joni Mitchell is fingernails on a chalkboard to me. The good thing about this song is that its short.
 

IT'S THE W O R D S!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Fireproof suit on, but Joni Mitchell is fingernails on a chalkboard to me. The good thing about this song is that its short.


Very nice production.  Amazing bass work and tasty drums as well.  And the voice... 10!
Cool song from one of my all-time favorite albums.
I had this on cassette.  I bought it on vinyl and wore it out. I got two CD's of it, and it's still in my CD player most times. I tried my best to learn the guitar progressions in this song, but failed, so I settled for listening to it repeatedly. This work, along with Jackson Browne's "Late For The Sky", got me through some pretty not-nice events. I can remember sitting in one of the top rooms of Bath's Rooming House in Carson City, Nevada, with my friend Peggy. (I have a picture, but I can't figure out how to upload it.)   I'd just run away from home right after graduating from high school, and that room was festooned with paper flowers, dog-eared issues of Rolling Stone, and gypsy-scarves that had been purchased at yard sales.  It was an amazing time for me - I had a troubadour who had a convertible land-yacht and played guitar, and who serenaded Peggy and me  from the street while we sat on the balcony and threw flowers down to him.

I gathered the Rolling Stones and read them while I was trying to figure out what to do with my life, and I read an interview with Jackson Browne in one of them. That led me to Joni Mitchell, and I read whatever I could about her. Then, when I left that place with all its wonder and unnerving events, I subscribed to Rolling Stone.  All the while, I had music, and Joni Mitchell was at the top of my list, along with Jackson Browne, Bonnie Raitt, and James Taylor.  Dan Fogelberg followed shortly after, as did Neil Young, Eagles, and Souther-Hillman-Furay.  Yes, I ran the gamut, but "Court and Spark" still remains one of my favorite pieces of music.  And this song, in particular, continues to resonate with me.  I truly believe that whatever dubious gifts I possess in the creative realm, I owe to Peggy, Rolling Stone, Joni Mitchell, and Bath's Rooming House.
1974...a really fun, fun, year. Joni was part of the sound track. Infinitely gifted.
10
 Mugro wrote:
I always wondered: how can SHE be a "free MAN" in Paris? Maybe I should listen to the lyrics more closely?
 
"The way I see it," he said, "you just can't..." etc.

 Frater_Kork wrote:


Because she wrote it from the perspective of her friend David Geffen, who was a record exec at the time and still is.
It's interesting to note the Joni turned her back on the music industry quite a while back since she found it to be a corrupted cesspool.
Geffen is still very much a a hard line lobbyist for the UK music industry pushing loads of (not very) nice laws through the House of Lords.
Wonder if they still are friends...
 
It's my understanding that they spoke less to one another as Geffen became increasingly reptilian* - though I may be misinformed

*No offense to actual reptiles is intended.


This song always makes me think of Gordon Lightfoot and Sesame Street.
One of the very few songs I sing softly to myself when traveling overseas. A real touchstone for my youth and dreams. Thanks, Joni.
 scraig wrote:
Her voice makes me melt
 

Yeah, I know what you mean...  soooo special...


Her voice makes me melt
This one reminds me very much of CSN&Y.
Don't know what to think about the song yet.

 

Joni Mitchell - Interview


 Mugro wrote:
I always wondered: how can SHE be a "free MAN" in Paris?

Maybe I should listen to the lyrics more closely?
 

Because she wrote it from the perspective of her friend David Geffen, who was a record exec at the time and still is.
It's interesting to note the Joni turned her back on the music industry quite a while back since she found it to be a corrupted cesspool.
Geffen is still very much a a hard line lobbyist for the UK music industry pushing loads of (not very) nice laws through the House of Lords.
Wonder if they still are friends...
an idiosyncratic artist, often uneven... at her best so very good.

This album is the most consistent proof of her talent.  Not one bad track.

This song is only one of a number of strong tracks... probably the best is "Car On a Hill" - but I'd be happy to be wrong about that.
Is that The Dead backing her up? Sure sounds that way...{#Think}
 mirland wrote:


If I had a rock I'd have thrown it into the speaker cone about now.
 

Please do us all a favor and throw that rock.


This song is soooo good for the ears...


 lemmoth wrote:


Please crawl back under your rock and leave the rest of us alone.
 

If I had a rock I'd have thrown it into the speaker cone about now.
 superfido wrote:
Can't understand, and never could understand, why people actually like this artist. She sounds like a "schoolhouse rock" thing. you know, nouns, interjections, figure 8.  yes...that's what this is like. 
 

Please crawl back under your rock and leave the rest of us alone.
A Geffentastic song!!!! If you know what I mean.
more joni pleez
 birdland wrote:
Amazing album, amazing tune.

Poor production | reproduction.

I checked my cd of this - yeah, the mix is muddy and the reproduction is second rate at best. I wonder if there is a reissue with decent fidelity.

I'd drop a stylus on the vinyl to check its integrity, but I know it's been played to death and won't be a good measure.

As you were.
 
Much respect, birdland. But I have always loved this album, and always will. There were a lot of screwed up things about the 70s, but there was some damned good music. Case in point.

Dismissed! {#Wave}
Amazing album, amazing tune.

Poor production | reproduction.

I checked my cd of this - yeah, the mix is muddy and the reproduction is second rate at best. I wonder if there is a reissue with decent fidelity.

I'd drop a stylus on the vinyl to check its integrity, but I know it's been played to death and won't be a good measure.

As you were.


Though I tried my absolute best to fight off her influence and taste, my hat's off to Carla Siegel for having turned me on to this LP at the Mars Hotel when the recording was new.
Y'all, do yourselves a favour and check Eltons' cover of this at the JM tribute...............both versions are simply inspired!
Nothing but 10 could could possibly be correct! THANK YOU BILL!


I like how Joni could always sound insightful and introspective without sounding whiny. A lesson the current crop of singer-songwriters could learn. 
Someone has said that Blue is a work of Blues perfection, Hejira a work of Jazz perfection and Court & Spark a work of Pop perfection. Could not agree more. Joni, 30 years later you're still rocking my world. 10
 philbertr wrote:


I bet that response took longer to think of than it took for your original post.  Such insightful criticism.
 

Oh, how clever. Right up there with "I know you are, but what am I??"

My original post wasn't meant to be "insightful criticism," and at least I wasn't calling anyone names like "whiner" for giving their opinion on, you know, a comment board, where people are supposed to post their opinions. Now maybe you'd like to run along and contemplate your depleted 401k along with the rest of the superannuated hippies.


 holborne wrote:


Yes, that's right, folks — any criticism must be "whining."

Wow, what an intelligent response. Did it take you a long time to think of it?

 

I bet that response took longer to think of than it took for your original post.  Such insightful criticism.
 laozilover wrote:

Well, I have expensive coffee every day, and it's not nearly as good, so "YEAH!   HELL YEAH!"
 
giggle  {#Daisy}
 holborne wrote:

Hosts, must we have Joni Fucking Mitchell every day? I mean, really — must we?

1.

 
Well, I have expensive coffee every day, and it's not nearly as good, so "YEAH!   HELL YEAH!"


Awright.  I already gave this a ten!  Wish I could give the whole album a ten! {#Smile}
 holborne wrote:

Except for the fact that the Schoolhouse Rock songs were actually good.

 
Somebody said Joni defines the word "artist".  I agree.

 superfido wrote:
Can't understand, and never could understand, why people actually like this artist. She sounds like a "schoolhouse rock" thing. you know, nouns, interjections, figure 8.  yes...that's what this is like. 
 
Except for the fact that the Schoolhouse Rock songs were actually good.

 meloman wrote:
Great song and album.
 


Can't understand, and never could understand, why people actually like this artist. She sounds like a "schoolhouse rock" thing. you know, nouns, interjections, figure 8.  yes...that's what this is like. 
what a nice little run she had back there from 1969-76
boffo!
{#Cowboy}
One of my all-time favourites. Thanks, Bill!
 Hannio wrote:


Whiner.
 

Yes, that's right, folks — any criticism must be "whining."

Wow, what an intelligent response. Did it take you a long time to think of it?

 holborne wrote:

Hosts, must we have Joni Fucking Mitchell every day? I mean, really — must we?

1.


 

Whiner.

Hosts, must we have Joni Fucking Mitchell every day? I mean, really — must we?

1.


 stewliscious wrote:
Somebody squeezed the Universe's jubblies really really hard... he strained..and out came Joni M. She has been wailing like that ever since.
 
{#Roflol}  That is one terribly, terribly unfair (not to mention irreverent) commentary. But funny as hell! {#Roflol}
From a time when lyrics still mattered. Great song and album.
I didn't like this much back in the 70s but it sounds pleasant to me now.
YES!  
Joni channeling David Geffen. Brilliant!
sirrus wrote:
Well, when a man and a woman love each other very much.... ..they hire a stork.
Somebody squeezed the Universe's jubblies really really hard... he strained..and out came Joni M. She has been wailing like that ever since.
MsFine wrote:
Ahhh Paris.... This song will always take me there.
Me, too. But also to LA. What a contrast! How could two cities be so different?! Beautifully painted word portraits!
PurplePrincess wrote:
This is a 10, GODDESS like....
hehe agreed - comfort food, this is...takes me back to a house where I used to live, in a big meadow in the middle of nowhere...warm sunny days, hours of horseback riding, and endless music playing on vinyl.
Great song from my college days. Lots of stuff happening in music as well as society.
volume UP! :yes:
oh man. i love this. probably in my top 3 favs of her songs.