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Marijuana: Baked News. - Ohmsen - Oct 31, 2020 - 9:38am
 
COVID-19 - Lazy8 - Oct 31, 2020 - 9:36am
 
Celebrity Deaths - Ohmsen - Oct 31, 2020 - 9:34am
 
Looting & vandalism isn't protest - Ohmsen - Oct 31, 2020 - 8:59am
 
Joe Biden - Ohmsen - Oct 31, 2020 - 8:38am
 
Trump - ScottN - Oct 31, 2020 - 8:29am
 
Things You Thought Today - Ohmsen - Oct 31, 2020 - 8:23am
 
Just Time Lapse - Ohmsen - Oct 31, 2020 - 8:20am
 
Mixtape Culture Club - Ohmsen - Oct 31, 2020 - 7:56am
 
Radio Paradise NFL Pick'em Group - miamizsun - Oct 31, 2020 - 7:40am
 
The Dragons' Roost - miamizsun - Oct 31, 2020 - 7:29am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - miamizsun - Oct 31, 2020 - 6:59am
 
2020 Elections - steeler - Oct 31, 2020 - 6:11am
 
Play the Blues - sirdroseph - Oct 31, 2020 - 6:09am
 
Counting with Pictures - ScottN - Oct 30, 2020 - 8:59pm
 
Trump Lies - Manbird - Oct 30, 2020 - 7:45pm
 
Outstanding Covers - ptooey - Oct 30, 2020 - 5:40pm
 
KarmaKarma Sweepstakes - kcar - Oct 30, 2020 - 1:27pm
 
Things that piss me off - Isabeau - Oct 30, 2020 - 12:47pm
 
Name My Band - Isabeau - Oct 30, 2020 - 12:45pm
 
• • • The Once-a-Day • • •  - oldviolin - Oct 30, 2020 - 9:52am
 
Gotta Get Your Drink On - Ohmsen - Oct 30, 2020 - 8:36am
 
What the hell OV? - oldviolin - Oct 30, 2020 - 7:28am
 
Happy Halloween Yall! - sirdroseph - Oct 30, 2020 - 7:21am
 
codec - Ohmsen - Oct 30, 2020 - 6:04am
 
Lyrics that strike a chord today... - sirdroseph - Oct 30, 2020 - 5:39am
 
Message To Lucky - miamizsun - Oct 30, 2020 - 4:30am
 
The Dragon's Roots - miamizsun - Oct 30, 2020 - 4:24am
 
Media Bias - miamizsun - Oct 30, 2020 - 3:56am
 
Automotive Lust - R_P - Oct 29, 2020 - 9:10pm
 
Have you planned your Halloween costume yet?? - miamizsun - Oct 29, 2020 - 6:34pm
 
Canada - haresfur - Oct 29, 2020 - 3:41pm
 
Two questions. That's it. I promise. - kcar - Oct 29, 2020 - 3:39pm
 
Supreme Court: Who's Next? - R_P - Oct 29, 2020 - 3:05pm
 
Questions. - pigtail - Oct 29, 2020 - 10:49am
 
Photos you have taken of your walks or hikes. - Antigone - Oct 29, 2020 - 6:05am
 
NEED A COMPUTER GEEK! - miamizsun - Oct 29, 2020 - 4:20am
 
Can't sleep - westslope - Oct 28, 2020 - 10:07pm
 
The Obituary Page - ScottN - Oct 28, 2020 - 9:49pm
 
Add a "Modern mix" - darrio - Oct 28, 2020 - 6:59pm
 
what the hell, miamizsun? - oldviolin - Oct 28, 2020 - 6:10pm
 
Today in History - miamizsun - Oct 28, 2020 - 4:27pm
 
HALF A WORLD - oldviolin - Oct 28, 2020 - 8:53am
 
TWO WORDS - rgio - Oct 28, 2020 - 6:57am
 
Baseball, anyone? - miamizsun - Oct 28, 2020 - 4:31am
 
Vinyl Only Spin List - kurtster - Oct 27, 2020 - 7:21pm
 
how do you feel right now? - kurtster - Oct 27, 2020 - 6:23pm
 
VTuner drop Radio Paradise’s main mix? - BillG - Oct 27, 2020 - 3:56pm
 
Environment - Ohmsen - Oct 27, 2020 - 2:39pm
 
Recommended documentaries - Ohmsen - Oct 27, 2020 - 2:33pm
 
Republican Party - Steely_D - Oct 27, 2020 - 1:28pm
 
• • • BRING OUT YOUR DEAD • • •  - oldviolin - Oct 27, 2020 - 11:45am
 
Great guitar faces - GINRUSH - Oct 27, 2020 - 11:27am
 
david bromberg - Antigone - Oct 27, 2020 - 6:09am
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - R_P - Oct 26, 2020 - 7:27pm
 
Strips, cartoons, illustrations - R_P - Oct 26, 2020 - 4:59pm
 
::odd but intriguing:: - miamizsun - Oct 26, 2020 - 4:42pm
 
New Zealand - R_P - Oct 26, 2020 - 3:09pm
 
Favorite Quotes - westslope - Oct 26, 2020 - 2:04pm
 
Films you're excited about. - oldviolin - Oct 25, 2020 - 7:06pm
 
Rock Movies/Documentaries - KurtfromLaQuinta - Oct 25, 2020 - 6:29pm
 
Philosophy (Meaty Metaphysical Munchables!) - oldviolin - Oct 25, 2020 - 3:02pm
 
Quick! I need a chicken... - oldviolin - Oct 25, 2020 - 2:54pm
 
How's the weather? - haresfur - Oct 25, 2020 - 2:25pm
 
What's that smell? - Antigone - Oct 25, 2020 - 9:49am
 
De onde você ouve a Radio Paradise? Cidade/Local no Brasil - crishtiane - Oct 24, 2020 - 10:33pm
 
RPeeps I miss. - KurtfromLaQuinta - Oct 24, 2020 - 9:51pm
 
RightWingNutZ - R_P - Oct 24, 2020 - 5:01pm
 
More reggae, less Marley please - Ohmsen - Oct 24, 2020 - 10:22am
 
What The Hell Buddy? - oldviolin - Oct 24, 2020 - 10:17am
 
Lyrics That Remind You of Someone - oldviolin - Oct 24, 2020 - 10:10am
 
Dialing 1-800-Manbird - oldviolin - Oct 24, 2020 - 10:09am
 
Music Videos - Ohmsen - Oct 24, 2020 - 9:50am
 
Ambient Music - Ohmsen - Oct 24, 2020 - 9:41am
 
Live Music - Ohmsen - Oct 24, 2020 - 9:11am
 
Index » Regional/Local » USA/Canada » Evolution! Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 119, 120, 121  Next
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Posted: Oct 3, 2020 - 8:21am

Not-so-hostile takeover: Human Y chromosome displaced the Neanderthals’ version
Neanderthal genes increase risk of serious Covid-19, study claims
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Posted: Sep 22, 2020 - 8:50pm

Japan-Canada team discovers bone cancer in dinosaur leg

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Posted: Aug 1, 2020 - 12:14pm

British naturalist Charles Darwin got it right, but maybe we got Darwin wrong.

Most people assume that Darwin was talking about physical strength when referring to “survival of the fittest,” meaning that a tougher, more resilient species always will win out over its weaker counterparts. But what if he didn’t mean that at all?

Scientists Brian Hare and Vanessa Woods, both researchers at Duke University’s Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, believe something else has been at work among species that have thrived throughout history, successfully reproducing to sustain themselves, and it has nothing to do with beating up the competition.

Their new book, “Survival of the Friendliest: Understanding Our Origins and Rediscovering Our Common Humanity,” posits that friendly partnerships among species and shared humanity have worked throughout centuries to ensure successful evolution. Species endure — humans, other animals and plants — they write, based on friendliness, partnership and communication. And they point to many life examples of cooperation and sociability to prove it.

“Survival of fittest, which is what everyone has in mind as evolution and natural selection, has done the most harm of any folk theory that has penetrated society,” Hare says. “People think of it as strong alpha males who deserve to win. That’s not what Darwin suggested, or what has been demonstrated. The most successful strategy in life is friendliness and cooperation, and we see it again and again.”

“Dogs are exhibit A,” he says. “They are the extremely friendly descendants of wolves. They were attracted to humans and became friendly to humans, and changed their behavior, appearance and developmental makeup. Sadly, their close relative, the wolf, is threatened and endangered in the few places where they live, whereas there are hundreds of millions of dogs. Dogs were the population of wolves that decided to rely on humans — rather than hunting — and that population won big.” (...)

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Posted: Jul 21, 2020 - 2:54pm

Coronavirus has mutated 590 times so far in Bangladesh, government research shows
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Posted: Jul 17, 2020 - 7:54pm

How Viruses Evolve
Pathogens that switch to a new host species have some adapting to do. How does that affect the course of a pandemic like COVID-19?
(...) This evolutionary two-step — first spillover, then adaptation to the new host — is probably characteristic of most viruses as they shift hosts, says Daniel Streicker, a viral ecologist at the University of Glasgow. If so, emerging viruses probably pass through a “silent period” immediately after a host shift, in which the virus barely scrapes by, teetering on the brink of extinction until it acquires the mutations needed for an epidemic to bloom.

Streicker sees this in studies of rabies in bats — which is a good model for studying the evolution of emerging viruses, he says, since the rabies virus has jumped between different bat species many times. He and his colleagues looked at decades’ worth of genetic sequence data for rabies viruses that had undergone such host shifts. Since larger populations contain more genetic variants than smaller populations do, measuring genetic diversity in their samples enabled the scientists to estimate how widespread the virus was at any given time.

The team found that almost none of the 13 viral strains they studied took off immediately after switching to a new bat species. Instead, the viruses eked out a marginal existence for years to decades before they acquired the mutations — of as yet unknown function — that allowed them to burst out to epidemic levels. Not surprisingly, the viruses that emerged the fastest were those that needed the fewest genetic changes to blossom.

SARS-CoV-2 probably passed through a similar tenuous phase before it acquired the key adaptations that allowed it to flourish, perhaps the mutation to the polybasic cleavage site, perhaps others not yet identified. In any case, says Colin Parrish, a virologist at Cornell University who studies host shifts, “by the time the first person in Wuhan had been identified with coronavirus, it had probably been in people for a while.”

It was our bad luck that SARS-CoV-2 adapted successfully. Many viruses that spill over to humans never do. About 220 to 250 viruses are known to infect people, but only about half are transmissible — many only weakly — from one person to another, says Jemma Geoghegan, an evolutionary virologist at the University of Otago, New Zealand. The rest are dead-end infections. Half is a generous estimate, she adds, since many other spillover events probably fizzle out before they can even be counted. (...)

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Posted: May 2, 2020 - 8:34pm

My, what big teeth and strange bones you have. Scientists discover a creature that roamed south of the equator 66 million years ago
Sixty-six million years ago, before the age of dinosaurs came to a fiery close, most mammals were puny and shrew-like. Which means a newly described Madagascar critter, though the size of a groundhog, was a giant of its day. And it packed a titan’s worth of oddities into its 7-pound frame.

The ancient animal’s fossils, the oldest mammal skeleton found in the Southern Hemisphere, show teeth and bones unlike anything seen before or since. “It’s a game-changer,” said Ohio University paleontologist Patrick M. O’Connor, who was not a part of the study. Though the researchers found a single skeleton, O’Connor said its remarkable preservation let scientists analyze the mammal in ways they previously “could only dream of."

An international team of scientists, including researchers in Madagascar and the United States, described the animal in the journal Nature on Wednesday. They named it Adalatherium hui — the first name, its genus, translates to “crazy beast”; the second, the species name, is in honor of the deceased mammalian scientist Yaoming Hu.

Adalatherium helps fill in the gaps of mammalian evolution that occurred during the time of the dinosaurs. Scientists know quite a bit about mammals from the Northern Hemisphere, especially China, O’Connor said. But that knowledge vanishes south of the equator.

Until 180 million years ago, the familiar continents of the Southern Hemisphere were mashed together in a landmass known as Gondwana. The mammals that lived there, which scientists call gondwanatherians, were known only from scattered fragments of jaw, teeth and a lone skull. Until this discovery. (...)

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Posted: Feb 25, 2020 - 2:32pm

 sirdroseph wrote:
Someone posted this on FB the other day and I have always known that oppression is part of natural human evolution.  The European colonization version is but a part of the overall phenomenon.   This articulates the positive evolutionary side effect of this and we are in the midst of this pendulum swing right now.  Hold on tightly, the cycle will be perpetual until we evolve spiritually enough to stop it though personally I think we will become extinct before we reach this level, but one can always hope.

"Humans have targeted other groups for as long as humanity has existed. The adversity that this creates for the targeted groups eventually causes them to resist and rise up in tenacity and determination and accomplishment. And at some point throughout history, the targeted almost always become the targeters, and then those people will eventually rise up in defiance. Adversity is a primary driver of longterm human development and achievement through the ages."

Social Darwinism
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Posted: Feb 25, 2020 - 4:52am

Someone posted this on FB the other day and I have always known that oppression is part of natural human evolution.  The European colonization version is but a part of the overall phenomenon.   This articulates the positive evolutionary side effect of this and we are in the midst of this pendulum swing right now.  Hold on tightly, the cycle will be perpetual until we evolve spiritually enough to stop it though personally I think we will become extinct before we reach this level, but one can always hope.

 

"Humans have targeted other groups for as long as humanity has existed. The adversity that this creates for the targeted groups eventually causes them to resist and rise up in tenacity and determination and accomplishment. And at some point throughout history, the targeted almost always become the targeters, and then those people will eventually rise up in defiance. Adversity is a primary driver of longterm human development and achievement through the ages."

 

 

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Posted: Feb 23, 2020 - 5:05pm

OM
Gee

 R_P wrote:
Fossil ape hints at how walking on two feet evolved
Approximately 11.6-million-year-old fossils reveal an ape with arms suited to hanging in trees but human-like legs, suggesting a form of locomotion that might push back the timeline for when walking on two feet evolved.

 


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Posted: Feb 23, 2020 - 4:59pm

You can’t fight feelings with facts: start with a chat
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Posted: Jan 31, 2020 - 10:24pm

Slime Molds Have Been Oozing around Earth for at Least 100 Million Years
Stunning new fossil reveals that at least one Cretaceous slime mold—an “intelligent” giant amoeba—looks identical to one alive today
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Posted: Dec 9, 2019 - 11:09pm


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Posted: Nov 18, 2019 - 12:39pm


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Posted: Nov 7, 2019 - 5:26am

 R_P wrote: 
according to my genomic test results

i've got mucho neanderthal variants

and some days i feel like they're steering the ship




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Posted: Nov 6, 2019 - 3:19pm

Fossil ape hints at how walking on two feet evolved
Approximately 11.6-million-year-old fossils reveal an ape with arms suited to hanging in trees but human-like legs, suggesting a form of locomotion that might push back the timeline for when walking on two feet evolved.

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Posted: Oct 19, 2019 - 3:40pm

Modern Humans Inherited Even More DNA from Neanderthals and Denisovans Than We Thought
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Posted: Oct 7, 2019 - 5:09am

The Clitoris is not a button, it is an iceberg

Perk up your usual Monday morning 
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Posted: Oct 1, 2019 - 8:15pm

250-million-year-old evolutionary remnants seen in muscles of human embryos
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Posted: Aug 28, 2019 - 10:23am

Line graph. Americans’ opinions of God’s role in the origin and development of human beings, since 1982.

The latest findings
, from a June 3-16 Gallup poll, have not changed significantly from the last reading in 2017. However, the 22% of Americans today who do not believe God had any role in human evolution marks a record high dating back to 1982. This figure has changed more than the other two have over the years and coincides with an increasing number of Americans saying they have no religious identification.

As many as 47% and as few as 38% of Americans have taken a creationist view of human origins throughout Gallup's 37-year trend. Likewise, between 31% and 40% of U.S. adults have attributed humans' development to a combination of evolution and divine intervention over the same period.
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Posted: Jul 24, 2019 - 11:26am

The Dinosaur That Started a Craze
The story of the fossil formerly known as Scrotum humanum.
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