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Radio Paradise NFL Pick'em Group - Coaxial - Jan 17, 2022 - 9:05am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - Coaxial - Jan 17, 2022 - 8:47am
 
Wordle - daily game - maryte - Jan 17, 2022 - 8:27am
 
Annoying stuff. not things that piss you off, just annoyi... - islander - Jan 17, 2022 - 7:33am
 
Patrick Watson should play on RP - ScottFromWyoming - Jan 17, 2022 - 6:53am
 
Sunrise, Sunset - ScottFromWyoming - Jan 17, 2022 - 6:50am
 
Religion - kurtster - Jan 17, 2022 - 12:12am
 
The Dragons' Roost - GeneP59 - Jan 16, 2022 - 8:49pm
 
Talk Behind Their Backs Forum - GeneP59 - Jan 16, 2022 - 8:47pm
 
The Obituary Page - GeneP59 - Jan 16, 2022 - 8:43pm
 
What Did You See Today? - Steely_D - Jan 16, 2022 - 8:26pm
 
volcano! - NoEnzLefttoSplit - Jan 16, 2022 - 11:56am
 
Things You Thought Today - haresfur - Jan 16, 2022 - 10:00am
 
Mixtape Culture Club - Lazy8 - Jan 15, 2022 - 10:22pm
 
If not RP, what are you listening to right now? - westslope - Jan 15, 2022 - 4:17pm
 
Climate Change - helenofjoy - Jan 15, 2022 - 1:21pm
 
COVID-19 - westslope - Jan 15, 2022 - 12:00pm
 
See This Film - islander - Jan 15, 2022 - 11:34am
 
Thank you, RP! - Steely_D - Jan 15, 2022 - 10:05am
 
Florida - Red_Dragon - Jan 15, 2022 - 9:28am
 
What happened to Radio Paradise? - miamizsun - Jan 15, 2022 - 6:00am
 
Hard Core Trivia - Manbird - Jan 14, 2022 - 4:51pm
 
Who is that guy? - Manbird - Jan 14, 2022 - 3:36pm
 
Yes - miamizsun - Jan 14, 2022 - 2:48pm
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - BillG - Jan 14, 2022 - 2:30pm
 
New RP listener - miamizsun - Jan 14, 2022 - 1:36pm
 
RightWingNutZ - Steely_D - Jan 14, 2022 - 12:44pm
 
Think About It - miamizsun - Jan 14, 2022 - 11:45am
 
Media Matters - Red_Dragon - Jan 14, 2022 - 11:38am
 
let it spin!! - oldviolin - Jan 14, 2022 - 10:46am
 
Is Wikipedia Objective? - miamizsun - Jan 14, 2022 - 10:17am
 
Russia - R_P - Jan 14, 2022 - 10:02am
 
A lot of 'obscure' repetition lately? - Manbird - Jan 14, 2022 - 10:01am
 
Remembering the Good Old Days - Steely_D - Jan 14, 2022 - 8:23am
 
Ukraine - black321 - Jan 14, 2022 - 8:11am
 
Today in History - Red_Dragon - Jan 14, 2022 - 7:18am
 
OUR CATS!! - sunybuny - Jan 14, 2022 - 5:52am
 
Baseball, anyone? - rgio - Jan 14, 2022 - 5:01am
 
Those Lovable Policemen - Lazy8 - Jan 13, 2022 - 9:46pm
 
Vinyl Only Spin List - kurtster - Jan 13, 2022 - 9:44pm
 
Automotive Lust - miamizsun - Jan 13, 2022 - 3:12pm
 
Britain - miamizsun - Jan 13, 2022 - 12:11pm
 
Food Democracy - haresfur - Jan 13, 2022 - 11:59am
 
Play the Blues - rhahl - Jan 13, 2022 - 10:30am
 
Terrorist Watch! - Ohmsen - Jan 13, 2022 - 10:26am
 
WTF??!! - ScottFromWyoming - Jan 13, 2022 - 10:12am
 
Photography Forum - Your Own Photos - fractalv - Jan 12, 2022 - 8:16pm
 
What the hell OV? - Manbird - Jan 12, 2022 - 3:39pm
 
What is the meaning of this? - Manbird - Jan 12, 2022 - 3:37pm
 
Trump - Steely_D - Jan 12, 2022 - 1:57pm
 
Marijuana: Baked News. - Ohmsen - Jan 12, 2022 - 5:36am
 
Crazy conspiracy theories - miamizsun - Jan 12, 2022 - 5:00am
 
Dialing 1-800-Manbird - oldviolin - Jan 11, 2022 - 6:52pm
 
• • • Things Magicians Exclaim • • •  - Red_Dragon - Jan 11, 2022 - 6:37pm
 
Word of the Day - miamizsun - Jan 11, 2022 - 5:19pm
 
what the hell, miamizsun? - miamizsun - Jan 11, 2022 - 5:09pm
 
Batman Begins - Manbird - Jan 11, 2022 - 3:50pm
 
• • • The Once-a-Day • • •  - oldviolin - Jan 11, 2022 - 3:04pm
 
260,000 Posts in one thread? - oldviolin - Jan 11, 2022 - 12:45pm
 
Name My Band - Isabeau - Jan 11, 2022 - 12:00pm
 
Out the window - Isabeau - Jan 11, 2022 - 11:59am
 
Fox Spews - Isabeau - Jan 11, 2022 - 11:56am
 
Streaming Marantz/HEOS - jarro - Jan 11, 2022 - 11:09am
 
NASA & other news from space - miamizsun - Jan 11, 2022 - 10:28am
 
Guns - Red_Dragon - Jan 11, 2022 - 5:59am
 
Derplahoma! - sunybuny - Jan 11, 2022 - 4:57am
 
Breaking News - westslope - Jan 10, 2022 - 3:38pm
 
Other Medical Stuff - Red_Dragon - Jan 10, 2022 - 3:26pm
 
Irish Traditional - rhahl - Jan 10, 2022 - 2:40pm
 
Positive Thoughts and Prayer Requests - Antigone - Jan 10, 2022 - 2:38pm
 
Poetry Forum - ScottN - Jan 10, 2022 - 10:55am
 
::Famous Birthdays:: - miamizsun - Jan 10, 2022 - 10:04am
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - R_P - Jan 10, 2022 - 10:02am
 
RPeep News You Should Know - GeneP59 - Jan 10, 2022 - 8:18am
 
Military Matters - Red_Dragon - Jan 10, 2022 - 5:55am
 
Index » Radio Paradise/General » General Discussion » Climate Change Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 112, 113, 114  Next
Post to this Topic
helenofjoy

helenofjoy Avatar

Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Gender: Female


Posted: Jan 15, 2022 - 1:21pm

 R_P wrote:
The Great Siberian Thaw
Permafrost contains microbes, mammoths, and twice as much carbon as Earth’s atmosphere. What happens when it starts to melt?
Over thousands of years, the frozen earth swallowed up all manner of organic material, from tree stumps to woolly mammoths. As the permafrost thaws, microbes in the soil awaken and begin to feast on the defrosting biomass. It’s a funky, organic process, akin to unplugging your freezer and leaving the door open, only to return a day later to see that the chicken breasts in the back have begun to rot. In the case of permafrost, this microbial digestion releases a constant belch of carbon dioxide and methane. Scientific models suggest that the permafrost contains one and a half trillion tons of carbon, twice as much as is currently held in Earth’s atmosphere.

Trofim Maximov, a scientist who studies permafrost’s contribution to climate change, was seated next to me in the Antonov, shouting directions to the pilot in the cockpit. Once a month, Maximov charters the plane in order to measure the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere above Yakutia. He described the thawing permafrost as a kind of feedback loop: the release of greenhouse gases causes warmer temperatures, which, in turn, melt the permafrost further. “It’s a natural process,” he told me. “Which means that, unlike purely anthropogenic processes”—say, emissions from factories or automobiles—“once it starts, you can’t really stop it.”



I remember reading about permafrost in high school science class and remember clearly the information about the danger the planet would be in if the permafrost were to ever thaw.  Never thought I'd see the day.  At least not until Al Gore's "An Inconvenient Truth" was published.
R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Jan 13, 2022 - 12:21pm

The Great Siberian Thaw
Permafrost contains microbes, mammoths, and twice as much carbon as Earth’s atmosphere. What happens when it starts to melt?
Over thousands of years, the frozen earth swallowed up all manner of organic material, from tree stumps to woolly mammoths. As the permafrost thaws, microbes in the soil awaken and begin to feast on the defrosting biomass. It’s a funky, organic process, akin to unplugging your freezer and leaving the door open, only to return a day later to see that the chicken breasts in the back have begun to rot. In the case of permafrost, this microbial digestion releases a constant belch of carbon dioxide and methane. Scientific models suggest that the permafrost contains one and a half trillion tons of carbon, twice as much as is currently held in Earth’s atmosphere.

Trofim Maximov, a scientist who studies permafrost’s contribution to climate change, was seated next to me in the Antonov, shouting directions to the pilot in the cockpit. Once a month, Maximov charters the plane in order to measure the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere above Yakutia. He described the thawing permafrost as a kind of feedback loop: the release of greenhouse gases causes warmer temperatures, which, in turn, melt the permafrost further. “It’s a natural process,” he told me. “Which means that, unlike purely anthropogenic processes”—say, emissions from factories or automobiles—“once it starts, you can’t really stop it.”

Red_Dragon

Red_Dragon Avatar



Posted: Jan 12, 2022 - 6:20am

miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 11, 2022 - 5:21pm

 rgio wrote:

 
isn't skin cancer cause by solar energy?
just sayin'
rgio

rgio Avatar

Location: West Jersey
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 11, 2022 - 3:52pm

 ScottFromWyoming wrote:



Gates: Well, in providing energy we’ve had coal-mining accidents, natural gas pipelines blow up, you know, particulates causing bad health. And yes, nuclear, to get that to be used broadly, we need a completely new generation where it’s inherently safe because there’s no high pressurant. So that fourth-generation, designed-from-scratch nuclear is what a company called TerraPower is working on, and the demo plant that’s been done will prove out whether that can work or not.

Brancaccio: And you have an interest in that. Some of these newer approaches to generating nuclear power require enriched fuel, enriched uranium, and that worries people worried about the fuel getting into the wrong hands around the world.

Gates: That’s right. You always want to make sure that it’s never a source of weapons material. Eventually, you could move away from enriched uranium and just breed in the reactor itself. But, yes, nuclear has lots of challenges, but so does every other path. And because climate change is so important, we need to pursue many paths to make sure we actually get a solution because 30 years is a very short period of time.

Brancaccio: And to be clear, you actually have an interest in a company, TerraPower, that is trying to do work in this area with a new generation of nuclear power.

Bill Gates: That’s right. Because of my interest in climate, I got that going as a potential solution. You know, I don’t know that it will work, or even if it works that the public will accept it. But, you know, along with investing in many storage companies, raising the odds of solving climate is worth taking big risks if it proves out to be super-, supersafe.


Wyoming’s First Nuclear Facility to be Located in Kemmerer





ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 11, 2022 - 3:45pm

 black321 wrote:

Gates seems to have well-rounded opinions


Brancaccio: Can I ask why your goal — you make it very clear in the book — why is your goal net zero? I mean, you must have told your people a million times over the years, “The perfect is the enemy of the good.” But you want zero, as in none, nada, zip. Wouldn’t phasing down our carbon dioxide and carbon production be more reasonable than setting success at zero?

Gates: If you don’t mind all the corals dying and Miami Beach disappearing and island countries being underwater and farmers near the equator starving and trying to migrate up to northern latitudes. You know, CO2 stays in the atmosphere for thousands of years. So if you have positive emissions, you’re driving the temperature up on an ongoing basis. And that’s more crop failures, more days humans can’t go outside. It gets pretty extreme, and those natural ecosystems won’t come back.


https://www.marketplace.org/20...



Gates: Well, in providing energy we’ve had coal-mining accidents, natural gas pipelines blow up, you know, particulates causing bad health. And yes, nuclear, to get that to be used broadly, we need a completely new generation where it’s inherently safe because there’s no high pressurant. So that fourth-generation, designed-from-scratch nuclear is what a company called TerraPower is working on, and the demo plant that’s been done will prove out whether that can work or not.

Brancaccio: And you have an interest in that. Some of these newer approaches to generating nuclear power require enriched fuel, enriched uranium, and that worries people worried about the fuel getting into the wrong hands around the world.

Gates: That’s right. You always want to make sure that it’s never a source of weapons material. Eventually, you could move away from enriched uranium and just breed in the reactor itself. But, yes, nuclear has lots of challenges, but so does every other path. And because climate change is so important, we need to pursue many paths to make sure we actually get a solution because 30 years is a very short period of time.

Brancaccio: And to be clear, you actually have an interest in a company, TerraPower, that is trying to do work in this area with a new generation of nuclear power.

Bill Gates: That’s right. Because of my interest in climate, I got that going as a potential solution. You know, I don’t know that it will work, or even if it works that the public will accept it. But, you know, along with investing in many storage companies, raising the odds of solving climate is worth taking big risks if it proves out to be super-, supersafe.


Wyoming’s First Nuclear Facility to be Located in Kemmerer


R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Jan 11, 2022 - 1:00pm

 black321 wrote:

Gates seems to have well-rounded opinions


He likes to read.

black321

black321 Avatar

Location: An earth without maps
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 11, 2022 - 11:11am

Gates seems to have well-rounded opinions


Brancaccio: Can I ask why your goal — you make it very clear in the book — why is your goal net zero? I mean, you must have told your people a million times over the years, “The perfect is the enemy of the good.” But you want zero, as in none, nada, zip. Wouldn’t phasing down our carbon dioxide and carbon production be more reasonable than setting success at zero?

Gates: If you don’t mind all the corals dying and Miami Beach disappearing and island countries being underwater and farmers near the equator starving and trying to migrate up to northern latitudes. You know, CO2 stays in the atmosphere for thousands of years. So if you have positive emissions, you’re driving the temperature up on an ongoing basis. And that’s more crop failures, more days humans can’t go outside. It gets pretty extreme, and those natural ecosystems won’t come back.


https://www.marketplace.org/20...
Red_Dragon

Red_Dragon Avatar



Posted: Jan 10, 2022 - 5:32am

The last 7 years have been the warmest on record as planet approaches critical threshold
Ohmsen

Ohmsen Avatar

Location: Over the rainbow
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 2, 2022 - 3:53pm

 Red_Dragon wrote:
This is fine.

Gold stainless nail
Torn through the distance of man as they regard the summit


Red_Dragon

Red_Dragon Avatar



Posted: Jan 2, 2022 - 3:36pm

 Ohmsen wrote:

At the island community of Kodiak, the air temperature hit 19.4C (67F) on Sunday, the highest December reading ever recorded in the state, scientist Rick Thoman of the Alaska Centre for Climate Assessment and Policy said.



This is fine.
Ohmsen

Ohmsen Avatar

Location: Over the rainbow
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 2, 2022 - 3:26pm

At the island community of Kodiak, the air temperature hit 19.4C (67F) on Sunday, the highest December reading ever recorded in the state, scientist Rick Thoman of the Alaska Centre for Climate Assessment and Policy said.

R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Jan 2, 2022 - 2:00pm

Postcards From a World on Fire
Politicians have argued. The summits have come and gone. But the truth is that climate change is already upon us. This is Times Opinion’s tour of how climate change has begun reshaping reality in the 193 member states of the United Nations, in ways big and small.
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 2, 2022 - 6:54am

 Red_Dragon wrote:
Tornado watches in January. This is fine.
 
this is developing into a really good channel and i think you (and everyone else) would be interested in the content 
especially the climate material (a series)
please check it out and enjoy


Red_Dragon

Red_Dragon Avatar



Posted: Jan 1, 2022 - 3:53pm

Tornado watches in January. This is fine.

R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Oct 5, 2021 - 11:11am

Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded for Study of Humanity’s Role in Changing Climate
The work of Syukuro Manabe, Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi “demonstrate that our knowledge about the climate rests on a solid scientific foundation,” the committee said.
In 1967, Dr. Manabe developed a computer model that confirmed the critical connection between the primary greenhouse gas — carbon dioxide — and warming in the atmosphere.

That model paved the way for others of increasing sophistication. Dr. Manabe’s later models, which explored connections between conditions in the ocean and atmosphere, were crucial to recognizing how increased melting of the Greenland ice sheet could affect ocean circulation in the North Atlantic, said Michael Mann, a climate scientist at Pennsylvania State University.

“He has contributed fundamentally to our understanding of human-caused climate change and dynamical mechanisms,” Dr. Mann said.

About a decade after Dr. Manabe’s foundational work, Dr. Hasselmann created a model that connected short-term climate phenomena — in other words, rain and other kinds of weather — to longer-term climate like ocean and atmospheric currents. Dr. Mann said that work laid the basis for attribution studies, a field of scientific inquiry that seeks to establish the influence of climate change on specific events like droughts, heat waves and intense rainstorms.

“It underpins our efforts as a community to detect and attribute climate change impacts,” Dr. Mann said.

Dr. Parisi is credited with the discovery of the interplay of disorder and fluctuations in physical systems, including everything from a tiny collection of atoms to the atmosphere of an entire planet.

“The main thing about his work is that it is incredibly eclectic,” said David Yllanes, a researcher with the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, a nonprofit research center. “Many important physical phenomena involve collective behavior that arises out of fundamentally disordered, chaotic, even frustrated systems. A system that looks hopelessly random, if analyzed the right way, can yield a robust prediction for a collective behavior.”

These ideas can help understand climate change, which “involves fluctuations that come from the interaction of many, many moving parts,” Dr. Yllanes said.

But Dr. Parisi’s affect on climate science is small compared to his impact across many other fields, including mathematics, biology and computing. This involves everything from lasers to machine learning.

westslope

westslope Avatar

Location: BC sage brush steppe


Posted: Sep 22, 2021 - 8:27am

UK strikes deal for CO2 producer CF to restart operations

In a world, concerned about climate change, the UK government is subsidizing CO2 production.  

In the background, disrespect for the Russian bear is costing Europe plenty.   B-l-o-w-b-a-c-k.  But the important thing to retain is that US natural gas producers and LNG exporters might make some good coin on all of this.
R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Sep 19, 2021 - 6:21pm

The Manchin guarding the hen house...
As chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, Mr. Manchin holds the pen and the gavel of the congressional panel, with the authority to shape Mr. Biden’s ambitions.

But Mr. Manchin is also closely associated with the fossil fuel industry. His beloved West Virginia is second in coal and seventh in natural gas production among the 50 states. In the current election cycle, Mr. Manchin has received more campaign donations from the oil, coal and gas industries than any other senator, according to data compiled by OpenSecrets, a research organization that tracks political spending.

He profits personally from polluting industries: He owns stock valued at between $1 million and $5 million in Enersystems Inc., a coal brokerage firm which he founded in 1988. He gave control of the firm to his son, Joseph, after he was elected West Virginia secretary of state in 2000. Last year, Mr. Manchin made $491,949 in dividends from his Enersystems stock, according to his Senate financial disclosure report.

“It says something fascinating about our politics that we’re going to have a representative of fossil fuel interests crafting the policy that reduces our emissions from fossil fuels,” said Joseph Aldy, who helped craft former President Barack Obama’s climate change bill and now teaches at Harvard.

R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Aug 20, 2021 - 12:51pm

It Rained at the Summit of Greenland. That’s Never Happened Before.
Something extraordinary happened last Saturday at the frigid high point of the Greenland ice sheet, two miles in the sky and more than 500 miles above the Arctic Circle: It rained for the first time.

The rain at a research station — not just a few drops or a drizzle but a stream for several hours, as temperatures rose slightly above freezing — is yet another troubling sign of a changing Arctic, which is warming faster than any other region on the planet.

“It’s incredible, because it does write a new chapter in the book of Greenland,” said Marco Tedesco, a researcher at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. “This is really new.”

At the station, which is called Summit and is occupied year-round under the auspices of the National Science Foundation, there is no record of rain since observations began in the 1980s. And computer simulations show no evidence going back even further, said Thomas Mote, a climate scientist at the University of Georgia. (...)

R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Aug 12, 2021 - 10:58am

A monitoring station on the Italian island of Sicily reached a scorching temperature of 48.8 degrees Celsius, or 119.84 degrees Fahrenheit, on Wednesday. If verified by the World Meteorological Organization, it would mark the hottest temperature ever recorded in Europe, topping the previous record of 48 degrees set in Athens in July 1977.

Though long accustomed to the summer heat, Sicilians don’t need an official record to tell them that this season has been particularly oppressive.

“I have no memory of such an unbearable heat,” said Francesco Italia, the mayor of the ancient city of Syracuse, near where the station recorded the potential heat record, in a phone interview. “It is so humid that you just can’t be outside after a certain hour.”

Elsewhere around the Mediterranean, after 10 days of battling blazes across the country, firefighters in Greece managed to contain most of them on Thursday, although a thunderstorm was a mixed blessing: The rain doused some of the smoldering fires, but lightning sparked new ones.

Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis of Greece said radical changes were required to prevent and respond to the “megafires” that have raged in many parts of Europe this summer amid record-breaking heat waves. “The climate crisis is here,” Mr. Mitsotakis told reporters, adding that “everything needs to change,” citing energy policy and the way people treat the environment.

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