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Tori Amos — General Joy
Album: The Beekeeper
Avg rating:
6

Your rating:
Total ratings: 213









Released: 2005
Length: 4:08
Plays (last 30 days): 0
General joy I know I know
You'll take me there -
Where your boys were left behind

General joy it seems you need
A soldier girl -
Now "they" have liberty gagged

By boat by tram by motorbus
Could it be the fates are protecting us
From the hawks that have stolen the bird from the sky

And I know
You will always love sorrow
Is that why
You gave her dress to happiness?
'Cause it matches her eyes
When she cries

General joy it seems
You don't love your bride
Generally
You're friends but she is not the love of your life

To dye to perm to change your hair or your wife
The posssibilities are there
And it's time for you to decide

General joy I know I know
You'll take me there -
But you'll need strength
From within
General joy it seems you need
A soldier girl -
And a willing coalition

By boat by tram by motorbus
Could it be the hawks are protecting us
From the men who have now assumed their name
Comments (34)add comment
Great song. Love the bass line. Just high enough in the mix, and righteously boomy when it needs to be. And that voice? Like Buttah.
excellent. she kinda lost me there for the past few albums, but this new stuff seems to be back on track with her great earlier work.
kmh wrote:
brilliant, as usual. i'm a tori devotee, sorry guys! i wish you all can hear what i hear, it's a shame for those that don't get it. oh well
Seems like it would be pretty easily gotten. But that's humans for ya'. Can't live with them... ...and killing them's illegal.
I'm glad we have Tori around to anchor all those 3's. Ho hum indeed.
trekhead wrote:
AMOS = French for Crepe.
:stupid: ??
trekhead wrote:
Ah, yes. The Hassenpfeffer Flapjack arguement... TORI = British for Rabbit. AMOS = French for Crepe. Thus , her music is like rabbit crap. Although seemingly small and slightly annoying, there's WAY too much of it around.
:lol: :nodhead: well put.
is it over yet??
I like it, it rocks harder than Tori normally does ...
for those interested, "original sinsuality" & " the beekeeper " are amazingly written songs. they give me chills...... -kmh
brilliant, as usual. i'm a tori devotee, sorry guys! i wish you all can hear what i hear, it's a shame for those that don't get it. oh well
healyf52 wrote:
I think I'm just gonna have to buy this CD...
You should- it's good, you won't regret it. I think I like it more than Scarlet's Waltz. This disk has a permanent home in my cd player these days. Enjoy!
Old_Pool_Skunk wrote:
H'm... could this be the RP equivalent of heavy rotation? Every time I hear this song I see a rabbit with a pancake on its head. :ask: Time for a drink.
Rabbit? Where'd you put the keys, girl.
Could this possibly sound any more like Kate Bush without actually becoming a Kate Bush song? I think not.
I think I'm just gonna have to buy this CD...
There's just something about this song that crawls right under my skin. And no amount of scratching will remove it.
H'm... could this be the RP equivalent of heavy rotation? Every time I hear this song I see a rabbit with a pancake on its head. :ask: Time for a drink.
Trustocity wrote:
We can agree to disagree. ATTENTION RP LISTENERS -- CIVILITY IN EFFECT -- CAUTION, CAUTION
Right on, the woman brought in the piano in a powerful way... she is amazing, she is a real woman not afraid of being who she is....
Hmmm...this Tori song doesn't get on my nerves...no...it's just...just...boring, really...
I thought I'd never hear it, but here it is - a Tori Amos song that doesn't make me want to clean my ears with a power drill.
beelzebubba wrote:
I have no idea what you're talking about, so here's a bunny with a pancake on it's head:
Ah, yes. The Hassenpfeffer Flapjack arguement... TORI = British for Rabbit. AMOS = French for Crepe. Thus , her music is like rabbit crap. Although seemingly small and slightly annoying, there's WAY too much of it around.
I want a pony!
beelzebubba wrote:
I have no idea what you're talking about, so here's a bunny with a pancake on it's head:
Damnit, where's the bunny - you promised a bunny!
Trustocity wrote:
Someone asked me recently what Tori is "about." I took the opportunity to explain why I'm a fan. Here's what I said: You want to know what Tori Amos is about, and I always start with the notes first. I'm a fan of so many different artists who attempt grandious projects with characters, plots, mythos, you know, just a bunch of crap. In my opinion, if the music is good, then it will support the lyrics no matter what they say. Rush has just as much to say as Yes and Genesis, in terms of storytelling, but Yes melodies used to be stellar even though the words made NO sense. I still don't know what the hell "Fragile" is about. Meanwhile, Rush keeps using the same tired keyboard solo over and over, and it's old. The story ends with Yes tweaking their sound to make it more commercial, and the lyrics, once so grand, turn out to be slight and syrupy. Enter Tori Amos. She brought the piano back into rock and roll as a hard lead instrument, even as her lyrics and vocal stylings evoke some of the great female folk singers of the sixties and seventies. Of course, those
trekhead wrote:
To Trust- I'm afraid here is where we differ.... Well put though. I'm muting.
We can agree to disagree. ATTENTION RP LISTENERS -- CIVILITY IN EFFECT -- CAUTION, CAUTION
To Trust- I'm afraid here is where we differ.... Well put though. I'm muting.
I have tried to like Tori, really I have.
Please stop the Tori. Please.
Someone asked me recently what Tori is "about." I took the opportunity to explain why I'm a fan. Here's what I said: You want to know what Tori Amos is about, and I always start with the notes first. I'm a fan of so many different artists who attempt grandious projects with characters, plots, mythos, you know, just a bunch of crap. In my opinion, if the music is good, then it will support the lyrics no matter what they say. Rush has just as much to say as Yes and Genesis, in terms of storytelling, but Yes melodies used to be stellar even though the words made NO sense. I still don't know what the hell "Fragile" is about. Meanwhile, Rush keeps using the same tired keyboard solo over and over, and it's old. The story ends with Yes tweaking their sound to make it more commercial, and the lyrics, once so grand, turn out to be slight and syrupy. Enter Tori Amos. She brought the piano back into rock and roll as a hard lead instrument, even as her lyrics and vocal stylings evoke some of the great female folk singers of the sixties and seventies. Of course, those girls used to sing about freedom and war and whatever, while Tori, a hard-edge 80's punk chick with a huge chip on her shoulder, had somethng important to say about mistreatment of women just like the other ladies but with a much harsher, vulgar edge. She wanted to shock people with the truth (as she saw it), which is reflected in so much art of the 80's and 90's; everyone seemed to be saying, "Yeah, I know, it's not subtle -- that's the point." Tori's first album, "Little Earthquakes," had some pretty pedestrian lyrics, even as the music was groundbreaking in its originality: Classical piano motifs combined with breathy vocalizations straight out of Velvet Underground. But her next album, "Under The Pink," was the start of the revolution. All of a sudden, she's using metaphor and shit to replace her in-your-face storytelling from the first album. She improved her piano play (and I mean "play" as in, she ran and jumped and frolicked across the keys), even as she's wielding irony, sarcasm, innuendo, and sometimes flat out deception to make her points about religious fakery and social injustices on scales both large and small. I love "Waitress," which sort of sits in the middle of all her feminist rally songs as an objective statement about how, hey, girls suck too sometimes. Everything after "Under The Pink" has been, to some degree, and in my opinion, an attempt to reclaim the perfection of that second album. "Boys For Pele" was touted by Amos as a collection of observations on the spiritual world, and the music was all over the place. One moment she's spending seven minutes playing one piano note (ok, that's an exaggeration), the next she's experimenting for the first time with electronic loops on top of harpsichord ("Caught A Lite Sneeze"). A lot of people hated it, but Tori "fans" (I'm one) see this as the beginning of her daring tailspin AWAY from commercial radio. That's not to say she doesn't get a little commercial. Like I said, I'm still not totally convinced that she hasn't lost her edge as I listen to cuts from "The Beekeeper." Honestly, the lyrics are probably pretty deep and have a lot to do with psychology and ancient myths, and I'm sure I'll dig deeper to figure it all out in coming months, but for now I'm just listening to her melodies with their hyper-lite-rock productions and so many of the same musical trends she created five albums ago (like looping her own falsetto voice as her backing choir), and I think, man, this isn't very original at all. If I were to draw it on a chart on my dry erase board, with different factors like "commercial sound v. alternative extreme," "straightforward storytelling v. literary hubris," and throw in "album cohesion v. thematic mess," it would be a pretty much straight line across the board from "From The Choir Girl Hotel" to "The Beekeeper." The only deviations might come from "To Venus And Back," where again so many people turned their nose up at some of the experimental cuts (echoes of "Pele") while "fans" like me go back again and again to that album for some of her best work. You asked what "General Joy" might be about. Seriously, who knows. I still have no idea what "The Springtime of His Voodoo" might refer to. I only this week figured out what the lyrics to "Yes Anastasia" might be -- I believe she's telling the story of a girl who's father abandons her, and she draws connections between the isolation she feels and the isolation of the Russian princess who was the only royal to (allegedly) survive her family's destruction at the hands of a populist revolution. In the end, I suspect most of her work refers back to when Tori was rapped as a child; she's mentioned it throughout her career, and her pet charity is an anti-domestic violence organization. I mean, seriously, you can figure out what Persephone has to do with ANYTHING she's talking about, and you still won't get past some very basic, cemented themes in all her work: She sees evil in the world, and she doesn't really believe anything can fix it, but she's at least willing to listen to any solution (though she'll have one eyebrow raised the whole time). I won't even ask if that answered your question. I'm sure it didn't. LOL. I said in the beginning that I'm a Tori fan for her melodies, first and foremost. They sound a little tired on "The Beekeeper," but that's only in relation to her previous albums. She's still superior to about 45% of the artists I hear here. Which means, predictably, that 45% of the people who might read this will disagree with me. (grin)
Like fingernails on a blackboard... nothing like Tori Amos to get me out of my office looking to head to the dreaded mail room.... blech!
Oooh, a momentary dip in the ratings these past few, holding my proverbial breath 'til it gets better. Working my way through a 'tori' vendetta lately...is MUTE the same as a silencer?
FINALLY! Three spins and I "get" it. Great song. The goddess rewards patience, so she does.
does RP take requests? just curious...
Didn't you just play her!!? Enough already!
Getting there... closer than the other cuts I've heard... I'm such a devoted fan, I'm going to be a little unforgiving on this album. Still, mediocre Tori is better than Grammy-winning Maroon 5 anyday.