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The Clash — Clampdown
Album: London Calling
Avg rating:
7.6

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2528









Released: 1979
Length: 3:42
Plays (last 30 days): 3
The kingdom is ransacked, the jewels all taken back
And the chopper descends
They're hidden in the back, with a message on a half-baked tape
With the spool going round, saying I'm back here in this place
And I could cry
And there's smoke you could click on
What are we going to do now?

Taking off his turban, they said, is this man a Jew?
'Cause working for the clampdown
They put up a poster saying we earn more than you!
When we're working for the clampdown

We will teach our twisted speech
To the young believers
We will train our blue-eyed men
To be young believers

The judge said five to ten but I say double that again
I'm not working for the clampdown
No man born with a living soul
Can be working for the clampdown

Kick over the wall 'cause government's to fall
How can you refuse it?
Let fury have the hour, anger can be power
Do you know that you can use it?

The voices in your head are calling
Stop wasting your time, there's nothing coming
Only a fool would think someone could save you

The men at the factory are old and cunning
You don't owe nothing, so boy, get running
It's the best years of your life they want to steal

You grow up and you calm down
And you're working for the clampdown
You start wearing the blue and brown
And you're working for the clampdown

So you got someone to boss around
It makes you feel big now
You drift until you brutalize
You made your first kill now

In these days of evil presidentes
Working for the clampdown
But lately one or two has fully paid their due
For working for the clampdown

Ha, get along, get along
Working for the clampdown
Ha, get along, get along
Working for the clampdown

Yeah, I'm working hard in Harrisburg
Working hard in Petersburg
Working for the clampdown
Working for the clampdown

Begging to be melted down
Work, work, work
And I give away no secrets
Work, more work, more work
Comments (336)add comment
I recall the way the words from this stung when I got my first "real" job out of college. "You start wearin' blue and brown and workin' for the clampdown." I felt like a sellout, but, hey a guy's gotta eat! This album changed my entire musical frontier. 
The Clash ........thinking man's Ramones :-) 
Off the scale 10 plus🎸😎
Saw this lot at "Cloudland" in Brisvegas back in the day. Exact yrs etc don't easily come to me nowadays but this album gets played a lot around here.
 poetdancer wrote:
8 > 9
Great song.
Saw the Clash in San Francisco in 1982. Amazing show.
 
Was it possibly with the Who in82
At the Oakland colluesum..if so i concur 
Hello? It's London calling....
Image result for brexit protests
40 years old?!

I was listening to this in college?!

Well, bite me. 
These gentlemen saved me from the mysterious affliction known as disco in the late 70s. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Miss ya Joe.
"In these days of evil presidentes" indeed
More Clash Bill!
 kcar wrote:

Yeah, but isn't there a fairly long history of the Angry Young Man in British culture? Were the Clash that ground-breaking? I didn't grow up in England so I can't say whether they were at the vanguard of punk or socially conscious music, but I wonder whether they were just at the top of another cycle of youth rebellion in British culture. I bought "London Calling" shortly after it came out and liked some of the songs, but a lot of it felt ragged and and willfully dumb. There didn't seem to be a whole lot of message. 

I will say this: England went through far more wrenching social and economic changes in the 70s and 80s than the US did, and as a result the music that the UK created during those times—even the escapist stuff—was generally superior and a lot more interesting than what American bands put out. 
 
I have to agree - as a teenager I never got the Clash at all.  There were other bands around at the time who I found to be far more interesting and authentic - the original Buzzcocks and Magazine for example. 
Not just a powerful message that "the kids should hear," but musically so effective.  And in these days in the US it has more than a little resonance.  If you can't recognize that, then enjoy your clampdown.
An absolute corker. Great example of that combo of rock, energy inflected by hints of reggae which is particular to the greatest of the punk_-era UK bands.
I'm 69 and my truss has just burst dancin to this .. just sayin
38 years ago, these guys were getting it done:
The Clash - Trourser Press Magazine 1980
 Steely_D wrote:
Shit people, I'm 60 and pumping my fist in memory of that energy, that rawness, that freedom. 

Ow, my rotator cuff.

 
I think I just hurt my neck while bobbing my head.  
Shit people, I'm 60 and pumping my fist in memory of that energy, that rawness, that freedom. 

Ow, my rotator cuff.
 On_The_Beach wrote:

How did Rod put it?
"MAGGIE!
I wish I'd
Never seen your face!"
(OK, different decade, different Maggie, but still . . .)

 
No longer "Maggie", but now "MAGA"
What are we gonna do now?
Taking off his turban, they said, is this man a Jew?
'Cause they're working for the clampdown
They put up a poster saying we earn more than you!
When we're working for the clampdown
We will teach our twisted speech
To the young believers
We will train our blue-eyed men
To be young believers
Make America Great Again {#Frustrated}

Kick over the wall 'cause government's to fall
How can you refuse it?
Let fury have the hour, anger can be power
Do you know that you can use it?
8 > 9
Great song.
Saw the Clash in San Francisco in 1982. Amazing show.
Sadly, this song is so prescient.
Saw the Clash open for the Who in NY, two high energy bands, not much sitting that night.
10 still a 10
 hayduke2 wrote:
Photograph

oh those were the days, hearing this was like grabbing a guiter and giving me a swipe at this cow
 
How did Rod put it?
"MAGGIE!
I wish I'd
Never seen your face!"
(OK, different decade, different Maggie, but still . . .)
wow - never heard this one before - love it when they shift into doubletime.
Aw, now, THAT'S The RIght Profile, there, man! Yeah, and how about a bit more of the killer cuts from that amazing landmark album?
Photograph

oh those were the days, hearing this was like grabbing a guiter and giving me a swipe at this cow
Here is The Boss doing the song with Tom Morello of Rage Against The Machine
 jarcampbell wrote:
RP is killing it right now.  I have been in a clash revival in my head.  Loving their stuff.  If you thought they were some unlistenable punk band, go back and give em a try.  

 
Exactly. Could not agree more. It is common misconception that they were some sloppy wannabes. Listen to some post-Clash output, like Strummer's Mescaleros or Jones's Big Audio Dynamite, and you begin to appreciate that they were musicians first and foremost.
RP is killing it right now.  I have been in a clash revival in my head.  Loving their stuff.  If you thought they were some unlistenable punk band, go back and give em a try.  
 barryboy wrote:
My mate Steve likes this ++
 
Yes I do 🎣🎣🎣
My mate Steve likes this ++

 as a youth in England, in an increasing atmosphere of "no hope-ism" I never really got the Clash, much preferred The Jam. Over the following years not much has changed, apart from learning Strummer was a bit of a phoney and far too much up his own arse. The Clash did some great stuff but much crap and bad reggae too.

steeler wrote:


Hmmmm . . . that is a criticism I would not have expected.

I would say The Clash was heavy on message.
   
Given, these are songs, not novels or essays.           

 

 jmsmy wrote:
I just saw Bruce Springsteen in Atlanta and he opened with this song.
 
This great song deserves a better reading.  How did Bruce do?
 jmsmy wrote:
I just saw Bruce Springsteen in Atlanta and he opened with this song.

 
Seriously?! that's really, really cool! (not sarcasm)
soundtrack to high school in the 80's... good times
Nothing less than an 8 for The Clash. Inspirational in formulating my ideology during my youth. Like most, father time has weathered that steely resolve to tilt at windmills but at the very least, sparkling nostalgia of a misspent youth (then again - maybe no so misspent)
TheBorgBuilder
(Atlanta)
Posted: Apr 30, 2014 - 11:09
 

 jmsmy wrote:
I just saw Bruce Springsteen in Atlanta and he opened with this song.

  

Glad to hear his music is improving

 


That's funny, Borg. I don't agree, but I hear you.  

I tried to convert a good, recently deceased friend of mine to Springsteen. To no avail. He was into Pink Floyd, Stevie Ray, Ramstein.  He lived in NJ but sneered and changed the channel when Springsteen came on the radio. 

Having seen two of the Boss's shows, he's passion personified. One of the hardest working men in show business. The Clash is long gone, leaving a limited catalogue, but Bruce is still here, still recording and touring. That says a lot.  Be that as it may, Clash was certainly a brilliant act. I remember hearing this song on a car radio in '79 or '80, and moments later the office mail room dude and I bought an after work dime bag from our guy Herb (yes, that was his name) on a Manhattan midtown corner and missed an aggressive wanted to-bust-us cop by 5 seconds. Whew. Now that's a clampdown. 


 jmsmy wrote:
I just saw Bruce Springsteen in Atlanta and he opened with this song.

 

Glad to hear his music is improving


I just saw Bruce Springsteen in Atlanta and he opened with this song.
 kcar wrote:

Yeah, but isn't there a fairly long history of the Angry Young Man in British culture? Were the Clash that ground-breaking? I didn't grow up in England so I can't say whether they were at the vanguard of punk or socially conscious music, but I wonder whether they were just at the top of another cycle of youth rebellion in British culture. I bought "London Calling" shortly after it came out and liked some of the songs, but a lot of it felt ragged and and willfully dumb. There didn't seem to be a whole lot of message. 

I will say this: England went through far more wrenching social and economic changes in the 70s and 80s than the US did, and as a result the music that the UK created during those times—even the escapist stuff—was generally superior and a lot more interesting than what American bands put out. 

 
Hmmmm . . . that is a criticism I would not have expected.

I would say The Clash was heavy on message.
   
Given, these are songs, not novels or essays.           
I love the nod to Elvis with the cover.


what a great freakin tune this is!
I wore this to a come as you were fancy dress party the other week. I even wore a grey mohawk. . . 


 Zonkers wrote:
Just a stellar album. Brilliance from one cut to the next. 
Long live The Clash! 

 
True Dat !
Just a stellar album. Brilliance from one cut to the next. 
Long live The Clash! 
I always notice how much he evokes Syd Barrett in the opening part...and as others have said, INCREDIBLE ALBUM...The Right Profile!
 alaken wrote:
Never ceases to amaze. Rarely do musicians catch lightning in a bottle like London Calling. 9 -> 10

 
Amen - it captures that entire time and still in many ways still does, eg NSA and its hands/eyes in everyone's business.
The clampdown exists behind the veil in the corner 
Perfect!
Play this entirely too much
Thank you (again) - one of the best of all time!
 johnjconn wrote:


The Crash
 
hirarious! working for the crampdown!
 sirdroseph wrote:


Well put, I agree wholeheartedly.{#Cheers}
 
Bollocks!
 wlpendley wrote:
get along — get along
 
Ha! get along — get along...
RIP, " Woody," you did what you set out to do!
that's thatcher's neck under the blade of that guitar man!
these boys were much needed prophets 
Thanks, that's a great interview clip from Scorsese. I had forgotten they were acquainted, and that he wanted to use them in a film.

petarsubotic wrote:
Martin Scorsese on how Clampdown inspired him to take the force, the energy he heard from the music and develop creative elements of his own:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwzZpXiwm60&t=1m40s

From: Future Is Unwritten, 2007.
 


Never ceases to amaze. Rarely do musicians catch lightning in a bottle like London Calling. 9 -> 10
Martin Scorsese on how Clampdown inspired him to take the force, the energy he heard from the music and develop creative elements of his own:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwzZpXiwm60&t=1m40s

From: Future Is Unwritten, 2007.

 yayo wrote:
good!
 
Outstanding!!
good!
 Papernapkin wrote:
But that was such a long, long time ago. You've probably forgotten what bad taste you had when you were young. Or you haven't changed in the past half century.
 
HA!!! probably right. I remember a time when I thought Micheal Jackson was the shit.

But I have changed. At least an inch shorter and maybe 20 lbs heavier.

Still I like this though.

 
Perfect song from perfect album.... Cool
 kcar wrote:

Yeah, but isn't there a fairly long history of the Angry Young Man in British culture? Were the Clash that ground-breaking? I didn't grow up in England so I can't say whether they were at the vanguard of punk or socially conscious music, but I wonder whether they were just at the top of another cycle of youth rebellion in British culture. I bought "London Calling" shortly after it came out and liked some of the songs, but a lot of it felt ragged and and willfully dumb. There didn't seem to be a whole lot of message. 

 

Well put, I agree wholeheartedly.{#Cheers}
But that was such a long, long time ago. You've probably forgotten what bad taste you had when you were young. Or you haven't changed in the past half century.

 gemtag wrote:
What a great album. It screams my youth. 
 


Seems like people want to compare a band like the Clash to a like YES or something. if anything, the Clash were a reaction to overplayed, overextended and over produced song writing . Not that there isn't a place for those bands, obviously plenty of people like that kind of music, so it's valid of course. To deride a band for not being "technical" is just plain musical snobbery. Are you going to dis Chuck Berry, Hank Williams, Bob Dylan and the  Beatles on and on  etc..? These artist wrote some of the most important and ground breaking music of our times all on 3 chords. A simple 3 chord song that sticks with the listener is arguably harder than some opus. I would suggest to those that think a band like the Clash were musical simpletons go try to learn one of their songs . If you enjoy playing it and find even just one creative element in any one song, guess what? That's called creativity , anyone can learn to play a tune, coming up with something hooky fresh and valid with a message  is much harder. IMO. You don't have to like it to appreciate it's worth
 sirdroseph wrote:

Thanks fred, you actually did a very good job of addressing my point without getting nasty. I agree with your assessment.{#Cheers}
 
Miracles do happen.  (OK, OK,  I'll stop it.  Could not resist)

Cannot agree they are an average rock band as musicians. If you consider their environment, british punk rock, and still they were so creative in their music. I say they are great musicians, and adding intelligent, critical, sometimes sensitive lyrics to that, one of the greatest bands of all. Love The Clash ! Happy New Year RP folks !
 lemmoth wrote:


As Lester Bangs called them at the time "The only band that matters"
 



Somewhere, Les is smiling (more than he ever did while he was still with us) knowing his comment on The Clash seems to be holding up quite nicely almost 35 years after he penned it...
 drsteevo wrote:

That's because The Sex Pistols were just a bunch of posers.  The Clash was a real band and made great music.  The Sex Pistols were a contrived stage act, and their music sucked. 
 
All rock bands are posers.  The Sex Pistols were essentially, a contrivance of Malcolm McLaren, but they had quite a few good tunes.  I agree, they were not as good as The Clash, but they opened a lot of doors for bands which followed.

 lemmoth wrote:
HA!! GIT ALONGGIT ALONG!!!

Love it!  You are so erudite in your comments, great to hear your "id" express itself!
{#Roflol}


 drsteevo wrote:

That's because The Sex Pistols were just a bunch of posers.  The Clash was a real band and made great music.  The Sex Pistols were a contrived stage act, and their music sucked. 
 

Couldn't agree more, nor could I have said it better other that to add that SP were more "noise makers" than artist
 kittyharker wrote:
I love it every time RP plays The Clash. I am also surprised that not a single song by the Sex Pistols has made it onto RP — surely "Submission" at least would fit into a segue with The Clash or some other such similar song?
 
That's because The Sex Pistols were just a bunch of posers.  The Clash was a real band and made great music.  The Sex Pistols were a contrived stage act, and their music sucked. 


Songs with power, passion and political significance are often more than the sum of their parts and this is no exception.  Not meaning to upset too many purists but I first heard it covered by the Indigo Girls which is also a particularly powerful rendition of a great song but then I'm a sucker for a political folk number and a political punk number so happy either way.
What a great album. It screams my youth. 
 kcar wrote:

Yeah, but isn't there a fairly long history of the Angry Young Man in British culture? Were the Clash that ground-breaking? I didn't grow up in England so I can't say whether they were at the vanguard of punk or socially conscious music, but I wonder whether they were just at the top of another cycle of youth rebellion in British culture. I bought "London Calling" shortly after it came out and liked some of the songs, but a lot of it felt ragged and and willfully dumb. There didn't seem to be a whole lot of message. 

I will say this: England went through far more wrenching social and economic changes in the 70s and 80s than the US did, and as a result the music that the UK created during those times—even the escapist stuff—was generally superior and a lot more interesting than what American bands put out. 
 

Fred gave you the history. 

As Lester Bangs called them at the time "The only band that matters"
HA!! GIT ALONGGIT ALONG!!!
 fredriley wrote:

That's perhaps because you're looking at The Clash with an ahistorical perspective, as simply a rock band. You're right that, musically, they were pretty much average, but culturally they were extraordinary in their time because they expressed the anger and rebellion of working class youth at a time of very sharp class conflict in the UK, sparked by continual economic and political crises then the rise to power of the Thatcher regime which actively pursued class war (sorry, "took on trade union might"). The Clash were highly committed and active Marxists, more social movement with agitprop (listen to the lyrics of this song, for instance) than just a rock band. They were part of the 'alternative' music scene of the late 70s and early 80s which was politically engaged, in stark contrast to the 'mainstream' pop of that time (Roxy Music, Spandau Ballet, etc) which was apolitical and hedonistic. Joe Strummer and Paul Weller were seen at the time as "working-class heroes", a phrase used routinely by the musical press (I used to read NME religiously every week).

That's what all the hub bub was about, bub :)
 
Yeah, but isn't there a fairly long history of the Angry Young Man in British culture? Were the Clash that ground-breaking? I didn't grow up in England so I can't say whether they were at the vanguard of punk or socially conscious music, but I wonder whether they were just at the top of another cycle of youth rebellion in British culture. I bought "London Calling" shortly after it came out and liked some of the songs, but a lot of it felt ragged and and willfully dumb. There didn't seem to be a whole lot of message. 

I will say this: England went through far more wrenching social and economic changes in the 70s and 80s than the US did, and as a result the music that the UK created during those times—even the escapist stuff—was generally superior and a lot more interesting than what American bands put out. 
 thefoodoflove wrote:

Tyrants who have had decades of support from the US, here in lies some of the hypocrisy in US foreign policy, now before you overreact please do some resrearch on the history of the region.
 
Who mentioned US foreign policy? I just quoted the title of the great movie about Joe. And don't you think that anyone who knew something about the Clash, and their attitude to world politics (and the subject of this song, for one) would know something about the hypocrisy of Imperialist politics, the history of the Middle East etc etc? Why assume anything else?
Are you sure I'm the one who overreacted?

At least I wasn't patronizing.
 Jared wrote:

If Gene Simmons read this, there would be a Kiss alarm clock.

 
Isn't there already a Kiss alarm clock?  About the only thing Kiss has not stamped their logo on is birth control pills.


Like a shot glass full of Jameson, this quickly washes away the tedium of Portishead's "The Rip"
 

 deepwoodskev wrote:

Big fan of the word "pretty," eh?
 
I think that is pretty clear.

 fredriley wrote:

That's perhaps because you're looking at The Clash with an ahistorical perspective, as simply a rock band. You're right that, musically, they were pretty much average, but culturally they were extraordinary in their time because they expressed the anger and rebellion of working class youth at a time of very sharp class conflict in the UK, sparked by continual economic and political crises then the rise to power of the Thatcher regime which actively pursued class war (sorry, "took on trade union might"). The Clash were highly committed and active Marxists, more social movement with agitprop (listen to the lyrics of this song, for instance) than just a rock band. They were part of the 'alternative' music scene of the late 70s and early 80s which was politically engaged, in stark contrast to the 'mainstream' pop of that time (Roxy Music, Spandau Ballet, etc) which was apolitical and hedonistic. Joe Strummer and Paul Weller were seen at the time as "working-class heroes", a phrase used routinely by the musical press (I used to read NME religiously every week).

That's what all the hub bub was about, bub :)
 
Thanks fred, you actually did a very good job of addressing my point without getting nasty. I agree with your assessment.{#Cheers}
I was listening to this on my MP3 player while watering plants at the nursery (yeah, that's my job.) I heard the first few bars of it and started dancing as I was watering the coniferous trees (well, I call them Sid, Mary, Charlie,Barb, and the cast of "Phantom of the Opera, because while I'm in charge of the watering, they are my kids and I'll damned well name them whatever I want).  I tripped over the hose, fell onto the gravel, and sort of screwed up my knee, but it doesn't matter. I love the Clash - they teach us all to soldier on, no matter what the obstacles.

I SO miss them...  And tomorrow, I'll have the Clash and Joe Strummer and the Mescaleros  in my headphones, so everything will be all right. I'll be limping, but everything will be all right.

Happy trails to everyone in RP-Land. Step carefully, and look up sometimes. It will help. {#Daisy}
 ick wrote:

Now if I were a kid, I'd like a Clash alarm clock!

 
If Gene Simmons read this, there would be a Kiss alarm clock.

 apd wrote:
I'm listening to this as tyrants are being over-thrown in the Middle East. Truly, the future is unwritten.
 


Tyrants who have had decades of support from the US, here in lies some of the hypocrisy in US foreign policy, now before you overreact please do some resrearch on the history of the region.
 sirdroseph wrote:
This song, like The Clash is pretty good. It is a pretty good plain ol little rock and roll song. The Clash was a pretty good basic rock and roll group with a handful of good tunes and a bunch of bland ones. All in all, they were a pretty good band, nothing more, nothing less. Never understood the hub bub, never will. Having said that, Joe Strummer emerged as a genius once he grew up and started to realize his full potential with The Mescaleros and will be sadly missed.{#Cry}
 
Big fan of the word "pretty," eh?
 sirdroseph wrote:
This song, like The Clash is pretty good. It is a pretty good plain ol little rock and roll song. The Clash was a pretty good basic rock and roll group with a handful of good tunes and a bunch of bland ones. All in all, they were a pretty good band, nothing more, nothing less. Never understood the hub bub, never will.
 
That's perhaps because you're looking at The Clash with an ahistorical perspective, as simply a rock band. You're right that, musically, they were pretty much average, but culturally they were extraordinary in their time because they expressed the anger and rebellion of working class youth at a time of very sharp class conflict in the UK, sparked by continual economic and political crises then the rise to power of the Thatcher regime which actively pursued class war (sorry, "took on trade union might"). The Clash were highly committed and active Marxists, more social movement with agitprop (listen to the lyrics of this song, for instance) than just a rock band. They were part of the 'alternative' music scene of the late 70s and early 80s which was politically engaged, in stark contrast to the 'mainstream' pop of that time (Roxy Music, Spandau Ballet, etc) which was apolitical and hedonistic. Joe Strummer and Paul Weller were seen at the time as "working-class heroes", a phrase used routinely by the musical press (I used to read NME religiously every week).

That's what all the hub bub was about, bub :)


This song, like The Clash is pretty good. It is a pretty good plain ol little rock and roll song. The Clash was a pretty good basic rock and roll group with a handful of good tunes and a bunch of bland ones. All in all, they were a pretty good band, nothing more, nothing less. Never understood the hub bub, never will. Having said that, Joe Strummer emerged as a genius once he grew up and started to realize his full potential with The Mescaleros and will be sadly missed.{#Cry}
 kittyharker wrote:
I love it every time RP plays The Clash. I am also surprised that not a single song by the Sex Pistols has made it onto RP — surely "Submission" at least would fit into a segue with The Clash or some other such similar song?
 

...or Sid singing My Way
 kittyharker wrote:
I love it every time RP plays The Clash. I am also surprised that not a single song by the Sex Pistols has made it onto RP — surely "Submission" at least would fit into a segue with The Clash or some other such similar song?
 
Yeah, I don't think "Bodies" or "New York" are family friendly, but "Submission" or "Holidays in the Sun" might be suitable for all ages!



I wanna see some history
'Cause now I got a reasonable economy





I love it every time RP plays The Clash. I am also surprised that not a single song by the Sex Pistols has made it onto RP — surely "Submission" at least would fit into a segue with The Clash or some other such similar song?
 Ja300Mes wrote:

I just want to crank this up right now, but my kids are asleep!


 
Now if I were a kid, I'd like a Clash alarm clock!

I just want to crank this up right now, but my kids are asleep!


I'm listening to this as tyrants are being over-thrown in the Middle East. Truly, the future is unwritten.
 horstman wrote:


The only typo is your lack of a paranthesis at the end of your sentence. You also shouldn't have had one at the beginning of your sentence. I'd say this has more with your lack of proper english than a keyboard malfunction.

Oh well, you left the door open on that one Cynaera. As for the Clash, I agree with others, listen to all of London Calling and you will become a convert.

London Calling was my ringtone long ago (before it was popularized). I very attractive woman came up to me after my phone rang and asked : Who from London Calling was that? I was so dumbstruck that she would even talk to me let alone make such a clever joke that I just stood there searching for a clever response.

None came.
 
Hmmmm....

"I'm not sure but they said they lived down by the river..."

"Joe Strummer; he wanted to know what the hell a ringtone was and why he was getting a half-pence royalty check from me..."

I'm sure a dozen better ones have occurred to you by now. My sympathies!

I feel like this is one of the few Clash songs that gets played over and over, but there is so much more.  (We have RP on at work everyday!)
 horstman wrote:
London Calling was my ringtone long ago (before it was popularized).
 
??

London Calling was popular before ringtones existed.... right?

I'm so confused.


Wisconsin.


 Foot wrote:
On 2nd thought...10
 
Yeah, me to 9 > 10!
{#Bananajam}{#Drummer}{#Dancingbanana}{#Guitarist}
On 2nd thought...10
 Cynaera wrote:
Not real fond of The Clash, but this song is surprisingly tuneful and rhythmic for them.  Tolerable. (Please excuse any typos - my stupid keyboard is gummed up and some keys don't work, and I type fast, so if I miss errors, I guess it's nobody's fault but mine.
 

The only typo is your lack of a paranthesis at the end of your sentence. You also shouldn't have had one at the beginning of your sentence. I'd say this has more with your lack of proper english than a keyboard malfunction.

Oh well, you left the door open on that one Cynaera. As for the Clash, I agree with others, listen to all of London Calling and you will become a convert.

London Calling was my ringtone long ago (before it was popularized). I very attractive woman came up to me after my phone rang and asked : Who from London Calling was that? I was so dumbstruck that she would even talk to me let alone make such a clever joke that I just stood there searching for a clever response.

None came.


My new years' resolution! Clampdown!

Or more Clash this year... havent decided yet.
Way to start my day Bill!!!!  As good now as it ever was, probably better as I was only just a teenager when this came out!  Top of my list of bands I never saw that I wish I had.
 Cynaera wrote:
Not real fond of The Clash, but this song is surprisingly tuneful and rhythmic for them.  Tolerable. (Please excuse any typos - my stupid keyboard is gummed up and some keys don't work, and I type fast, so if I miss errors, I guess it's nobody's fault but mine.
 

I'll excuse your typos.  But please don't tell you me you find this surprisingly "tuneful and ryhtmic" for the Clash.

You must have been listening to some songs from another Clash - or maybe - and I hesitate to say this because I love their power, only the first two albums.

Listen to all of London Calling and....oh well just London Calling .... and I'm sure your opinion will change.
c_c  Has anyone done any studies on divination via random musical selections?  Born in 79, wearing blue and brown, as usual.  And then it gets followed with a gypsy song ORLY. 

wish the volume went to 11 for this set...
The Clash - Clampdown
The Who - The Real Me



My 20 month old just climbed up into my chair in front of the computer and started jamming to The Clash...that's my boy!
 
 4merdj wrote:
Love the sound of the bongoes—adding suspense to the background melody ... {#Chillpill}

kiptipla

 
ha! I didn't know that Lladro made things I'd want.


Just bought The Future is Unwritten (Joe Strummer documentary)... have yet to watch it. i hear it's great.

Hadn't heard his "mescaleros"-era stuff until hearing it on RP and now it's on regular rotation at my house.

thanks RP

{#Clap}

Yes!
Only the good die young. {#Arrowd}
RIP Joe