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The Police — Invisible Sun
Album: Ghost In The Machine
Avg rating:
7.6

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2641









Released: 1981
Length: 3:32
Plays (last 30 days): 2
I don't want to spend the rest of my life
Looking at the barrel of an armalite
I don't want to spend the rest of my days
Keeping out of trouble like the soldiers say
I don't want to spend my time in hell
Looking at the walls of a prison cell
I don't ever want to play the part
Of a statistic on a government chart

There has to be an invisible sun
It gives its heat to everyone
There has to be an invisible sun
It gives us hope when the whole day's done

It's dark all day and it glows all night
Factory smoke and acetylene light
I face the day with my head caved in
Looking like something that the cat brought in

There has to be an invisible sun
It gives its heat to everyone
There has to be an invisible sun
It gives us hope when the whole day's done

And they're only gonna change this place
By killing everybody in the human race
And they would kill me for a cigarette
But I dont even want to die just yet

There has to be an invisible sun
It gives its heat to everyone
There has to be an invisible sun
It gives us hope when the whole day's done
Comments (247)add comment
Doesn't have that typical Police sound, but who cares!?! A nine.
 danfl75 wrote:

This CD used to sound off and a little dead, but as my system has progressed, I realize that it is well mixed and mastered. Funny how these things change with the system, it reflects more than EQ changes. It's gradually coming alive. Funny how these things change with the system, it reflects more than EQ changes. Maybe it's slightly below optimal peak values and that led to a less than exciting mp3. Great band and song, worthy of a 10! Thanks for all the great comments and music.
 

cd has come a long way since the early eighties and streamed music is up there these days... I think some of my best listening was done on old gear ... probably younger less brass ears and on OOmPHH for life ... I am still enjoying it though thanks to sites like this .. xxx radio paradise 
 primm wrote:
{#Fire} my favorite police tune! still stands up today
 
smokin !!
Takes me way back to 1981 & the rest of the 80's. It was a 10 then and a 10 now.
A very good tune from an excellent band: excellent musicians and excellent lyricists, produced as slickly as possible in the 1980s.

I've seen them three times and am sorry that there won't be a fourth.
A 9 becomes a 10.
holy hell....Coldplay Clocks to The Police Invisible Sun.....NICE SEGUE.
 dickmahoon wrote:
Not my favourite Police album but I'm just so into Stewart Copeland's drumming that it doesn't matter....
 

I started really listening to Stewart Copeland's drumming about 5 years ago because one of the characters in the post-apocalyptic fiction series Newsflesh, by Mira Grant, waxes lyrical about how good he is. She is right, he's excellent, and his sound is as much a part of what made a great Police song as anything Sting ever contributed. This track is still brilliant after all these years.

As an aside, I strongly recommend Newsflesh for a slightly different take on the zombie theme for anyone into that sort of thing.
 danfl75 wrote:

This CD used to sound off and a little dead, but as my system has progressed, I realize that it is well mixed and mastered. Funny how these things change with the system, it reflects more than EQ changes. It's gradually coming alive. Funny how these things change with the system, it reflects more than EQ changes. Maybe it's slightly below optimal peak values and that led to a less than exciting mp3. Great band and song, worthy of a 10! Thanks for all the great comments and music.
 

I agree on the original versions sound quality.  The vinyl sounds really good.  Can't believe it's been 38 years.  It seems to me most analog recordings put on CD sound dead.  Unless RP plays them here.  Dunno how they do it, but RP's sound quality is beyond amazing.  Thanks so much. -John
One of those tunes that FM radio overplayed assassinated for the rest of my time. 
An invisible sun is like the republican health plan.
Worked in a record store in the late 70's early 80's. Label rep came in one day and said a new band was playing a very small warm up gig in Exeter and did I want tickets. I declined and it turned out it was The Police. regretted it to this day.
 capandjudy wrote:

The original recording had a fantastic sound. Was this before CDs arrived?
 
This CD used to sound off and a little dead, but as my system has progressed, I realize that it is well mixed and mastered. Funny how these things change with the system, it reflects more than EQ changes. It's gradually coming alive. Funny how these things change with the system, it reflects more than EQ changes. Maybe it's slightly below optimal peak values and that led to a less than exciting mp3. Great band and song, worthy of a 10! Thanks for all the great comments and music.
 Stephen_Phillips wrote:
I know I have said about only commenting about the song (rather than the personnel of the band for instance) but this time I have been transported to another place by the song title - Invisible Sun - what a great name for a Sci-Fi movie. Let's see... a group of people escape the dying Earth in a spacecraft hoping for a new home.  However even they know the odds are pretty hopeless because their spaceship would take hundreds of years to reach another habitable planet even if there was such a thing.  They survive in space as long as they can but just when all seems lost - what is that? An Invisible Sun... not visible with the naked eye but yet... yes the instruments are showing that a nearby planet is habitable and maybe, just maybe, they could start a new life on this distant planet after all...

Nurse - can I have my medication now.
 
Brian May (as Bill G has commented :probably the only rock song about Einstein's theory of relativity) wrote a song along similar lines...

"'39" is a song by British rock band Queen. Composed by lead guitarist Brian May, it is the fifth track on their fourth studio album A Night at the Opera. The song was also the B-side to "You're My Best Friend".


The song relates the tale of a group of space explorers who
embark on what is, from their perspective, a year-long voyage. Upon
their return, however, they realise that a hundred years have passed,
because of the time dilation effect in Einstein's special theory of relativity, and the loved ones they left behind are now all dead or aged. (Wikipedia)
 ojibwe wrote:
Cool song but sounds swishy, like it was a bad mp3 conversion. 

 
The original recording had a fantastic sound. Was this before CDs arrived?
12
Oh, this would have been a good one for the eclipse playlists yesterday!
 primm wrote:
{#Fire} my favorite police tune! still stands up today

 
I totally agree with you !
Cool song but sounds swishy, like it was a bad mp3 conversion. 
booooooooooooooooooring
10
{#Fire} my favorite police tune! still stands up today

(Austin, TX)
Posted: Aug 06, 2015 - 10:44
 < Reply >

Hannio wrote:

It will only ever get worse.

Mike wrote:  You've got the Gift...

 

Songwriters: COCKBURN, BRUCE

The Trouble With Normal

 Fashionable fascism dominates the scene
When the ends don't meet it's easier to justify the means
Tenants get the dregs and the landlords get the cream
As the grinding devolution of the democratic dream
Brings us men in gas masks dancing while the shells burst
The trouble with normal is it always gets worse


Old pre-DSOTM Pink Floyd like. So very well done.
 kcar wrote:

Yes, thanks fred. Your posts on the UK in the 70s and 80s are quite interesting and informative. This last one filled in the blank gaps of my understanding of that era; as I reading it I immediately thought of the assassination of Lord Mountbatten ('79) and the IRA bombing of the Conservative party conference in Brighton ('84), although I had to look up both events for the dates. 
"Perhaps the times weren't dissimilar to that in the US and, to a lesser extent, the UK after the 9/11 atrocity, when dissenting voices were few and the Security State gained the upper hand which it's strengthened ever since. Whenever politicians say "if you're not with us you're against us", you know for sure that truth and democracy have well and truly been suspended for the duration, and that was certainly the case in the UK and NI during The Troubles." 

We heard a lot of "If you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear"—which quickly got turned into thinking like "if you have nothing to hide, you won't mind the extra security measures and heightened surveillance powers." As far as I can tell, Americans were resigned at first to the news of government surveillance as revealed by Edward Snowden, but there's growing anger at the extent of it and the lack of restraint. It almost seems as if the NSA is hacking into customer databases of firms like Google and Facebook and spying on the heads of government because...well because it can! And it was a tough challenge to tap Angela Merkel's phone calls but hey we cracked that nut so you should be proud of our prowess! Now it's come out that the NSA has planted intercept devices on computer hardware—hell, it has an entire catalog of tools for the job. Apparently bugging computers hasn't yielded a lot of good intel, but the Fort Meade boys sure are earning their CompTIA A+ accreditations! 

At this point, I get the strong impression that the NSA doesn't know how to say "no" or "we won't go that far." That's the scariest thing: I've no doubt that the vast majority of people working on this kind of surveillance want to thwart terrorism and organized crime but there aren't enough leaders in government to impose limits on covert surveillance, organize reviews of past behavior or allow the public a full and fair say on surveillance undertaken in its name. The military-industrial complex may well morph into the military-covert complex, with the best of intentions.

 
yup, Cheney's protege' Trump would keep his beady eyes on us all

(really dig this Police tune : ) 
 lathyris wrote:

You are correct. It is, in fact, outstanding.

 

Thank you lathyris :)


 treatment_bound wrote:
I usually liked what The Police did, but this, this is not good.

 
You are correct. It is, in fact, outstanding.
I usually liked what The Police did, but this, this is not good.
 SquiddlyDiddly wrote:
Written in 1981 and now, 34 year later, here we are almost living in a Police state. 

I don't want to spend the rest of my life
Looking at the barrel of an armalite

I don't want to spend the rest of my days

Keeping out of trouble like the soldiers say

I don't want to spend my time in hell

Looking at the walls of a prison cell

I don't ever want to play the part 

Of a statistic on a government chart


 

It will only ever get worse.


 reindeer wrote:
This is my favorite album of theirs.  It recalls a time and place for me and I love the songs on this disc.

 
Ditto
This is my favorite album of theirs.  It recalls a time and place for me and I love the songs on this disc.
I know I have said about only commenting about the song (rather than the personnel of the band for instance) but this time I have been transported to another place by the song title - Invisible Sun - what a great name for a Sci-Fi movie. Let's see... a group of people escape the dying Earth in a spacecraft hoping for a new home.  However even they know the odds are pretty hopeless because their spaceship would take hundreds of years to reach another habitable planet even if there was such a thing.  They survive in space as long as they can but just when all seems lost - what is that? An Invisible Sun... not visible with the naked eye but yet... yes the instruments are showing that a nearby planet is habitable and maybe, just maybe, they could start a new life on this distant planet after all...

Nurse - can I have my medication now.
ho hum Police. lost their spark at this point. from then on it was Sting's show
Perfect pop creation.
 dickmahoon wrote:
Not my favourite Police album but I'm just so into Stewart Copeland's drumming that it doesn't matter....

 
Best drummer of the eighties!
Not my favourite Police album but I'm just so into Stewart Copeland's drumming that it doesn't matter....
Written in 1981 and now, 34 year later, here we are almost living in a Police state. 

I don't want to spend the rest of my life
Looking at the barrel of an armalite

I don't want to spend the rest of my days

Keeping out of trouble like the soldiers say

I don't want to spend my time in hell

Looking at the walls of a prison cell

I don't ever want to play the part 

Of a statistic on a government chart

Classic timeless album. 
The Police did so much poppy stuff that the Ghost in the Machine album was so different - so much more mature and complex. Some of that was them, and some was the production. Great stuff.
 Boy_Wonder wrote:
Not aged well........................... (unlike me!!)

 

It's aged much better than I have! 
Not aged well........................... (unlike me!!)
One of their worst!
Long live my dad for listening this with wee me in the room back in the 90s
 Rick_V wrote:
Great dark tune.

 
Yes it is.  I suppose it would be very dark if the sun were invisible.
 Ahnyer_Keester wrote:
Perfect segue!

 

 
YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Sineäd
Hendrix
Police
Strummer
Siouxsie
Patty Griffin
What a F#@ Sequence!!!!!!




Perfect segue!

 
 Rick_V wrote:
Great dark tune.

 
Perfect description.
This song made me do research before Google was around...
 ambrebalte wrote:

Thank you fredriley

 
Yes, thanks fred. Your posts on the UK in the 70s and 80s are quite interesting and informative. This last one filled in the blank gaps of my understanding of that era; as I reading it I immediately thought of the assassination of Lord Mountbatten ('79) and the IRA bombing of the Conservative party conference in Brighton ('84), although I had to look up both events for the dates. 
"Perhaps the times weren't dissimilar to that in the US and, to a lesser extent, the UK after the 9/11 atrocity, when dissenting voices were few and the Security State gained the upper hand which it's strengthened ever since. Whenever politicians say "if you're not with us you're against us", you know for sure that truth and democracy have well and truly been suspended for the duration, and that was certainly the case in the UK and NI during The Troubles." 

We heard a lot of "If you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear"—which quickly got turned into thinking like "if you have nothing to hide, you won't mind the extra security measures and heightened surveillance powers." As far as I can tell, Americans were resigned at first to the news of government surveillance as revealed by Edward Snowden, but there's growing anger at the extent of it and the lack of restraint. It almost seems as if the NSA is hacking into customer databases of firms like Google and Facebook and spying on the heads of government because...well because it can! And it was a tough challenge to tap Angela Merkel's phone calls but hey we cracked that nut so you should be proud of our prowess! Now it's come out that the NSA has planted intercept devices on computer hardware—hell, it has an entire catalog of tools for the job. Apparently bugging computers hasn't yielded a lot of good intel, but the Fort Meade boys sure are earning their CompTIA A+ accreditations! 

At this point, I get the strong impression that the NSA doesn't know how to say "no" or "we won't go that far." That's the scariest thing: I've no doubt that the vast majority of people working on this kind of surveillance want to thwart terrorism and organized crime but there aren't enough leaders in government to impose limits on covert surveillance, organize reviews of past behavior or allow the public a full and fair say on surveillance undertaken in its name. The military-industrial complex may well morph into the military-covert surveillance complex, with the best of intentions.
Great dark tune.
 apd wrote:


more to the point, they're portraits of the band: Andy; Sting (with the spiky hair); Stewart (long face).

 

 fredriley wrote:

I'd forgotten that it was banned, but I'm not at all surprised. You really had to be in the UK when the Troubles were at their height to appreciate the highly febrile atmosphere of the time. The early 80s were a time of intense guerilla warfare in Northern Ireland/Six Counties/Ulster (delete according to political/sectarian taste) which also spilled over on to the mainland with the IRA and INLA carrying out bombing campaigns, and even assassinations of UK political figures. To the British State, and by extension the official media, the UK was at war with 'Republican terrorists', and any comment - written, spoken, sung - that deviated from the standard State line was considered to be aiding and abetting the enemy.

Although this song's lyrics about the experience of ordinary folk caught up in the Troubles may seem tame, apolitical and uncontentious by today's standards, at the time they'd have been seen as implicitly Republican because they didn't follow the standard State line. This is a period when the Thatcher regime famously decreed that the words of Republican spokespeople could not be heard on TV and radio so that they wouldn't be afforded "the oxygen of publicity", leading to the ludicrous and comical situation where actors were hired to dub the words of Gerry Adams, Martin McGuinness and others on TV. The UK political police - MI5 and Special Branch - openly and covertly monitored and harassed groups such as Troops Out who campaigned, legally, for the withdrawal of the British army from NI. Left politicians in the UK, such as Ken Livingstone (then leader of the Greater London Council), were pilloried in the media and parliament for breaking the consensus on the 'Northern Ireland situation'. Innocent Irish people were framed for terrorist atrocities and imprisoned for decades.

Perhaps the times weren't dissimilar to that in the US and, to a lesser extent, the UK after the 9/11 atrocity, when dissenting voices were few and the Security State gained the upper hand which it's strengthened ever since. Whenever politicians say "if you're not with us you're against us", you know for sure that truth and democracy have well and truly been suspended for the duration, and that was certainly the case in the UK and NI during The Troubles. I wouldn't be surprised if I were told that Sting et al were investigated by the political police.

 
Thank you fredriley
 ckcotton wrote:
LOVE this album cover... cool how they got the images of the band in digital form.....

 
Sting had great hair in those days
 h8rhater wrote:

80's music had a style about it that seemed to permeate everything that came out.  Especially during the mid part of the decade.  That "style" seemed to water down the greater artists (great examples are Eric Clapton and one of Red Machine's favorites, Neil Young) and allow lesser lights and one-hit-wonders to shine.  Artists like Elton John, Rod Stewart, and Phil Collins COMPLETELY lost their way in that decade and haven't been relevant since. To his credit, Clapton bounced back with the Journeyman album in 89 by getting back to his roots.  Neil did it too in 89 with Freedom.

That being said, the aforementioned Police, U2, and REM are good examples of great bands that thrived in that time. 


 
No one forced Rod Stewart, Elton, Eric, etc. to put out pop crap during that decade. They went for easy money and stadium tours. I suspect that the 80s were the height of power for recording companies, which pushed lesser artists to put out formulaic FM hits. 

Some of the guys you mentioned had to reinvent themselves. Elton went out of style, got into drugs and IIRC stopped working with Bernie Taupin. Rod Stewart's gig as singer/songwriter and white man singing the blues ended during the 70s and he had get raunchy. I'd forgotten he'd come out with "Do Ya Think I'm Sexy" back in '78-79. I just remember that for a lot of the 80s he'd become a punchline as had Elton.  No idea what drove Phil Collins and Genesis--how do you go from songs like "Carpet Crawlers" (thanks Bill for playing this on RP) to "Sussudio"?

As for Neil, I think he's always done what he wanted to do. No record company could have forced him to put out Re.Ac.Tor or Everybody's Rockin' as Neil and Shocking Pinks. (iTunes claims that he was flipping off Geffen Records with the latter album after the company tried "to direct the artistic content of Neil Young's career." The iTunes notes for Re.Ac.Tor are pretty funny btw). 

I think a fair number of these guys just had gotten too rich or bored or safe and let other people tell them what to produce.  Probably a lot of coke was involved--didn't Clapton get into that for a while? It's also hard to stay on top over the span of two decades or even stay relevant as musical tastes change. 
LOVE this album cover... cool how they got the images of the band in digital form.....
Indeed, very invisible, the Sun, lately -
Ages since I last listened to this song! Love it.
This playlist has been nothing but made of *awesome* :-)
Another reason to love RP! Who knew?
 hcaudill wrote:
I was staring at the album cover just now trying to figure out for the millionth time what those symbols are supposed to MEAN, when I finally saw that they're faces. Three decades slow on the uptake...
 

more to the point, they're portraits of the band: Andy; Sting (with the spiky hair); Stewart (long face).
 bronorb wrote:

I count myself amongst the ignorant on this too. Never looked at it that closely.
Thanks for that tidbit.


 



I always thought that they were figures for the band members. Was I wrong?
 Dave_Mack wrote:


O M F G!!!

I'm right there with you in ignorance. I'd always just assumed they were creepy, possessed LEDs — never looked closer than that. Guess you really do learn something new every day. And thanks for pointing it out!
 
I count myself amongst the ignorant on this too. Never looked at it that closely.
Thanks for that tidbit.


A heavy song from a heavy album. There're few light=hearted tunes on Ghost, but "Invisible Sun" is brilliant.
 scraig wrote:
I heard last week playing a trivia game that this song was banned by the BBC because of it's content. Seriously. The Police were banned.
 
I'd forgotten that it was banned, but I'm not at all surprised. You really had to be in the UK when the Troubles were at their height to appreciate the highly febrile atmosphere of the time. The early 80s were a time of intense guerilla warfare in Northern Ireland/Six Counties/Ulster (delete according to political/sectarian taste) which also spilled over on to the mainland with the IRA and INLA carrying out bombing campaigns, and even assassinations of UK political figures. To the British State, and by extension the official media, the UK was at war with 'Republican terrorists', and any comment - written, spoken, sung - that deviated from the standard State line was considered to be aiding and abetting the enemy.

Although this song's lyrics about the experience of ordinary folk caught up in the Troubles may seem tame, apolitical and uncontentious by today's standards, at the time they'd have been seen as implicitly Republican because they didn't follow the standard State line. This is a period when the Thatcher regime famously decreed that the words of Republican spokespeople could not be heard on TV and radio so that they wouldn't be afforded "the oxygen of publicity", leading to the ludicrous and comical situation where actors were hired to dub the words of Gerry Adams, Martin McGuinness and others on TV. The UK political police - MI5 and Special Branch - openly and covertly monitored and harassed groups such as Troops Out who campaigned, legally, for the withdrawal of the British army from NI. Left politicians in the UK, such as Ken Livingstone (then leader of the Greater London Council), were pilloried in the media and parliament for breaking the consensus on the 'Northern Ireland situation'. Innocent Irish people were framed for terrorist atrocities and imprisoned for decades.

Perhaps the times weren't dissimilar to that in the US and, to a lesser extent, the UK after the 9/11 atrocity, when dissenting voices were few and the Security State gained the upper hand which it's strengthened ever since. Whenever politicians say "if you're not with us you're against us", you know for sure that truth and democracy have well and truly been suspended for the duration, and that was certainly the case in the UK and NI during The Troubles. I wouldn't be surprised if I were told that Sting et al were investigated by the political police.
I heard last week playing a trivia game that this song was banned by the BBC because of it's content. Seriously. The Police were banned.
Haunting song about Northern Ireland and England. One of the understated hits from a band that seemed to touch gold on almost anything it did.
Flash back to high school.
FILLER
 ScottFromWyoming wrote:

Me too.
 
WT...   So DO I!   I'm a little less ignorant, now. Thank you!
Definitely not my favourite tune but it's still great to listen something from this great great band.
 hcaudill wrote:
I was staring at the album cover just now trying to figure out for the millionth time what those symbols are supposed to MEAN, when I finally saw that they're faces. Three decades slow on the uptake...
 
Me too.
 drsteevo wrote:

"80s music does suck, generally" - that is an idiotic statement
 
This in the same post as "but hip hop sucks anyway, so who really cares".

{#Think}
 hcaudill wrote:
I was staring at the album cover just now trying to figure out for the millionth time what those symbols are supposed to MEAN, when I finally saw that they're faces. Three decades slow on the uptake...
 

O M F G!!!

I'm right there with you in ignorance. I'd always just assumed they were creepy, possessed LEDs — never looked closer than that. Guess you really do learn something new every day. And thanks for pointing it out!

This hasn't aged well at all. Filler from this album.
Just tossed on the vinyl of Novo Combo after hearing this.
 hencini wrote:
I've often wondered what would happen if 1978 Sting met 2008 Sting.  Would he punch himself in the face or shake his own hand?  How did the same man who wrote "Dead End Job" also release and album of lute music?  LUTE MUSIC!!!!  

:) 
 
would old sting be punching young sting or t'other way round? And who cares?
I've often wondered what would happen if 1978 Sting met 2008 Sting.  Would he punch himself in the face or shake his own hand?  How did the same man who wrote "Dead End Job" also release and album of lute music?  LUTE MUSIC!!!!  

:) 
Great song. So want 'Hungry For You' to kick in next.
Teen angst years before Nirvana. Good stuff.

C'mon y'all & get un-stuck..


 sronis wrote:

first, some of these bands were formed in the 70s or even before that.
second, some did their finest work before or after the 80s.
third, that's all you can think of? 10 bands of the top off your head? for every other era i have many more than that...
and lastly - electronica was birthed in the 90s, and hip-hop got to its peak only then.

In conclusion - 80s music does suck, generally ;-)

 
You are so wrong.  Electronica started in the 70's (ever hear of Kraftwerk?).  Hip-hop started in the 80's (but hip hop sucks anyway, so who really cares).  I think you have to consider the late 70's through mid-80's (1977-1985) as the last great music era.  Since the mid 90's there just hasn't been the same quantity and quality of music as there was before that.  The early 90's showed a small surge, but nothing compared to the late 70's/early 80's or the second half of the 60's.  The variety, richness, and quality of music has generally been lacking since 1995 or so...

"80s music does suck, generally" - that is an idiotic statement


 Tippster wrote:

You're High.  I love this masturbatory "The 80's SUCKED" BS but it is just that,  These are just off the top of my head:

Guitar Rock:
Van Halen
Rush
Metallica
Guns n'Roses

Alternative Rock (British New Wave:)
Clash
Smiths
Cure
Joy Division/New Order
Depeche Mode
Psychedelic Furs

So many more.  Maybe you had your head stuck in Led Zeppelin breaking up or Gabriel leaving Genesis, but There was some serious music that came out in the 80's.  Hell, it birthed/solidified two new genres - Hip Hop and Electronica.
 
 
first, some of these bands were formed in the 70s or even before that.
second, some did their finest work before or after the 80s.
third, that's all you can think of? 10 bands of the top off your head? for every other era i have many more than that...
and lastly - electronica was birthed in the 90s, and hip-hop got to its peak only then.

In conclusion - 80s music does suck, generally ;-)

I was staring at the album cover just now trying to figure out for the millionth time what those symbols are supposed to MEAN, when I finally saw that they're faces. Three decades slow on the uptake...
 lemmoth wrote:


You are either too young or don't remember how awful the 80's were for music that received any widespread airplay. The Police and Elvis Costello put out some very good work at the beginning of the decade.  U2 and REM put out good work (IMHO) throughout.  Other than that all the best music - in the US anyway - was heard on college radio and other indie stations - that includes some of the good Brit bands of the decade.  Lots of artists who did good to great work and were popular in the 70s put out lesser works by most account in the 80s.
 
Nicely articulated. There were few good bands that came out of the 80's. Depeche Mode and The Smiths besides the previously mentioned are a few. The 80's was the Micheal Jackson sound, and everybody wanted to capitalize on it, Because the magnet draw to money and the latest sound the music suffered. Thank you to the groups that refused to compromise their sound for the dollar.   
 h8rhater wrote:

80's music had a style about it that seemed to permeate everything that came out.  Especially during the mid part of the decade.  That "style" seemed to water down the greater artists (great examples are Eric Clapton and one of Red Machine's favorites, Neil Young) and allow lesser lights and one-hit-wonders to shine.  Artists like Elton John, Rod Stewart, and Phil Collins COMPLETELY lost their way in that decade and haven't been relevant since. To his credit, Clapton bounced back with the Journeyman album in 89 by getting back to his roots.  Neil did it too in 89 with Freedom.

That being said, the aforementioned Police, U2, and REM are good examples of great bands that thrived in that time. 
 
You're High.  I love this masturbatory "The 80's SUCKED" BS but it is just that,  These are just off the top of my head:

Guitar Rock:
Van Halen
Rush
Metallica
Guns n'Roses

Alternative Rock (British New Wave:)
Clash
Smiths
Cure
Joy Division/New Order
Depeche Mode
Psychedelic Furs

So many more.  Maybe you had your head stuck in Led Zeppelin breaking up or Gabriel leaving Genesis, but There was some serious music that came out in the 80's.  Hell, it birthed/solidified two new genres - Hip Hop and Electronica.
 
Just so overplayed everywhere...

{#Rolleyes}
 lemmoth wrote:


You are either too young or don't remember how awful the 80's were for music that received any widespread airplay. The Police and Elvis Costello put out some very good work at the beginning of the decade.  U2 and REM put out good work (IMHO) throughout.  Other than that all the best music - in the US anyway - was heard on college radio and other indie stations - that includes some of the good Brit bands of the decade.  Lots of artists who did good to great work and were popular in the 70s put out lesser works by most account in the 80s.
 
80's music had a style about it that seemed to permeate everything that came out.  Especially during the mid part of the decade.  That "style" seemed to water down the greater artists (great examples are Eric Clapton and one of Red Machine's favorites, Neil Young) and allow lesser lights and one-hit-wonders to shine.  Artists like Elton John, Rod Stewart, and Phil Collins COMPLETELY lost their way in that decade and haven't been relevant since. To his credit, Clapton bounced back with the Journeyman album in 89 by getting back to his roots.  Neil did it too in 89 with Freedom.

That being said, the aforementioned Police, U2, and REM are good examples of great bands that thrived in that time. 

 redmachine wrote:

It's clearly neither.
They are not even close.
 

You are either too young or don't remember how awful the 80's were for music that received any widespread airplay. The Police and Elvis Costello put out some very good work at the beginning of the decade.  U2 and REM put out good work (IMHO) throughout.  Other than that all the best music - in the US anyway - was heard on college radio and other indie stations - that includes some of the good Brit bands of the decade.  Lots of artists who did good to great work and were popular in the 70s put out lesser works by most account in the 80s.
 MiracleDrug wrote:
all through the late 80's I thought the best band in the world was either:

The Police

OR

U2

I still haven't figured this out... {#Lol}

 
It's clearly neither.
They are not even close.


 peter_james_bond wrote:
Wonderful comments gentlemen. I sometimes get the impression that many people think that peace is the normal state of affairs and as such it is an inevitability. That's just not the case. Peace is brought about through the hard work and sacrifice of many people. I tip my hat to all the people who toiled to bring peace to Northern Ireland. There is still more work ahead but if peace can be brought to that troubled region, then there is hope for many others.



Well said! {#Clap}


all through the late 80's I thought the best band in the world was either:

The Police

OR

U2

I still haven't figured this out... {#Lol}

I don't know why I didn't like these guys when they were new. Oh well, as my grandmother used to say, "Too soon oldt, too late schmart". But maybe it's not too late?
I see - song still ranking high.. High!{#Skull}
 Poacher wrote:

In these digital times, I would say uncompressed files are 'best'. Vinyl is so old school ;)

 
Good point !  I'm checking out the ogg feed right now, and so far, outstanding use of technology by RP, as usual.  Good LP, too.


 horstman wrote:

Go to a used record store (sorry, used music store) and buy some CDS. Or go to Amazon or ebay and do same.

There is no excuse. And yes, vinyl is still better just not easily transportable.
 
In these digital times, I would say uncompressed files are 'best'. Vinyl is so old school ;)

 rosedraws wrote:
For the 2nd time today I will say, I sure as hell wish my Police collection wasn't all vinyl!

 
 

Uh, you DO know that you can now buy CD's right?  Just askin'....  {#Stupid}
 rosedraws wrote:
For the 2nd time today I will say, I sure as hell wish my Police collection wasn't all vinyl!

 
 
Go to a used record store (sorry, used music store) and buy some CDS. Or go to Amazon or ebay and do same.

There is no excuse. And yes, vinyl is still better just not easily transportable.

my favorite song of a band that I don't think that much of
 Stingray wrote:
STILL THINK STING IS A GENIUS (despite his long-lasting composer's block),
but never liked POLICE (despite 2,3,4 songs/hits)

Then, recently, I saw their reunion-concert (Japan, I think) and was
EXTREMELY AMAZED how GREAT, how PERFECT (in a good way) they were!

ESPECIALLY ANDY SUMMERS (I seriously did not know
that he is such a great guitarist!)
All of them were terrific!
TRUELY AN AMAZING CONCERT,
THAT I WOULD LIKE TO RECOMMEND!

PS
This song is CRAPPY, of course!!!
 
And you still crack me up, Stingray! {#Lol}  I have this album on vinyl, and I love pretty much every song on it. (Note to self:  Get this on CD!)

One of my favorite Sting/Police songs {#Music}
STILL THINK STING IS A GENIUS (despite his long-lasting composer's block),
but never liked POLICE (despite 2,3,4 songs/hits)

Then, recently, I saw their reunion-concert (Japan, I think) and was
EXTREMELY AMAZED how GREAT, how PERFECT (in a good way) they were!

ESPECIALLY ANDY SUMMERS (I seriously did not know
that he is such a great guitarist!)
All of them were terrific!
TRUELY AN AMAZING CONCERT,
THAT I WOULD LIKE TO RECOMMEND!

PS
This song is CRAPPY, of course!!!


For the 2nd time today I will say, I sure as hell wish my Police collection wasn't all vinyl!

 
 ronniegirl wrote:

me either.  I can tolerate this song.

 
me neither...blech.{#Puke}

 FluorideFreeMN wrote:
not a fan of the Police....at all!
 
me either.  I can tolerate this song.

 iTuner wrote:
This song was AWESOME in seventh grade. 25 years on, not so much. Other Police songs I'd much rather hear.
 

I have not heard this since college, and I have to agree. I used to love this song, but it no longer has the same effect.
This song was AWESOME in seventh grade. 25 years on, not so much. Other Police songs I'd much rather hear.
 SantaFeGrace wrote:


{#Yes}    I like the cover art too!

 

Took me a long time before I saw the portraits. I thought it was some sci-fi typography.

 FluorideFreeMN wrote:
not a fan of the Police....at all!
 
Okay then.

Great tune.    Seems like a band that had the sense to call it quits before their success and the record company made them suck.
I have to share this.  This song is playing, and outside, we have a very weird orange glow, signaling a storm. It's absolutely quiet out there, and the sky is an eerie color. I'm battoning down the hatches, gathering the critters, and waiting for the rain. "Invisible Sum" just puts me pre-apocalyptic.
No Gordon, you just need a new alarm clock.  The display is messed up.  No Gordon, there isn't a "ghost in the machine".  I'll tell you what, I'll pick up a new alarm clock on my way home tomorrow.  OK?

not a fan of the Police....at all!
 sirdroseph wrote:
The Police at their best!!{#Yes}
 
Agreed. {#Music}
These guys sure got a hellluva lot of sound out of a trio
 Wizzuvv_oz wrote:
 SparkyMarky wrote:
...isn't that the acid test?
The acid test looks like 9' clowns walking upside down on the bottom of the ocean waves....{#Wink}
 


The Police at their best!!{#Yes}
Perfect follow-up to the Nirvana track. Thanks Bill!
vaiodon wrote:
 
There are a number of comments in this thread about the song and its connotations with the Northern Irish troubles. There's probably no doubt that it does obliquely reference the events of the time. The album was recorded in 1981, that year was the culmination of the IRA hunger stikes in HMP Maze, the "H-blocks", near Belfast. At that time Sting was married to Francis Tomelty, an actress from Belfast, and one would expect that she an influence on his perspective of what was happening in NI.

It was a pretty horrific time, I guess I was lucky to spend some of that era away from Belfast (home) attending college in England.

The video (not the record) was banned by the BBC as it contained footage of events in Northern Ireland that must have been regarded as too partisan. That was probably influenced by the ban that the UK government placed, during the 1980's, on Irish Republican's directly appearing on UK broadcast media (that led to a ridiculous situation where their words spoken were voiced, verbatim, by an actor). On a pedantic note, the Armalite wasn't the standard issue British Army foor soldier's weapon, that was the FN SLR. The Armalite was the IRA's "standard issue" weapon, hence, the Republican strategy of attaining its objective of a united Ireland through "a ballot paper in this hand and an Armalite in the other".

My tuppence worth is that the song speaks of the futility of what was going on, to all perspectives, and expresses hope that the light to illuminate a way out will be found. It was but it took another 15 years and many more lives lost. I won't say countless lives, they are all counted here.

 
 
fredriley wrote:

Nicely put, mate. Sorry about the error about the Armalite - my memory's not what it used to be, young 'un :(. I normally have little time for Sting, and wasn't that much of a Police fan in the day, but kudos to them for this number which really is heartfelt and expressed hope at a time when there was none. It may seem strange to folk these days now that the "Peace Process" is winning, but back in the 80s The Troubles were as intractable as Apartheid was immovable, such that many Brits outside NI thought that the UK should just shuck off the province and let the backward natives sort it all out amongst themselves (not my view, but a common feeling at the time). Hope was a very rare and precious thing.

 
Wonderful comments gentlemen. I sometimes get the impression that many people think that peace is the normal state of affairs and as such it is an inevitability. That's just not the case. Peace is brought about through the hard work and sacrifice of many people. I tip my hat to all the people who toiled to bring peace to Northern Ireland. There is still more work ahead but if peace can be brought to that troubled region, then there is hope for many others.

Ugh this is horrible. They sound... bored.
 EssexTex wrote:
Horse shit...apart from the drumming
 
I don’t agree with the first part......but the second....OH YA...Stewart Copeland remains in my top three drummers of all time..{#Drummer}