[ ]   [ ]   [ ]                        [ ]      [ ]   [ ]
The Rolling Stones — Can't You Hear Me Knocking
Album: Sticky Fingers
Avg rating:
8.3

Your rating:
Total ratings: 3575









Released: 1971
Length: 7:11
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Yeah, you got satin shoes
Yeah, you got plastic boots
Y'all got cocaine eyes
Yeah, you got speed-freak jive

Can't you hear me knockin' on your window
Can't you hear me knockin' on your door
Can't you hear me knockin' down your dirty street, yeah

Help me baby, ain't no stranger
Help me baby, ain't no stranger
Help me baby, ain't no stranger

Can't you hear me knockin', ahh, are you safe asleep?
Can't you hear me knockin', yeah, down the gas light street, now
Can't you hear me knockin', yeah, throw me down the keys
Alright now

Hear me ringing big bell tolls
Hear me singing soft and low
I've been begging on my knees
I've been kickin', help me please
Hear me prowlin'
I'm gonna take you down
Hear me growlin'
Yeah, I've got flatted feet now, now, now, now
Hear me howlin'
And all, all around your street now
Hear me knockin'
And all, all around your town
Comments (607)add comment
Mick Taylor came to Ontario Place around 1986, opening for John Mayall, and didn't play a *single* Stones song, understandably because he was probably forbidden under threat of deathly copyright consequences. But there, near the end of his set, during an extended jam, he launched into the "da da da daaa da" from his solo in this song. The effect was like electricity through the audience, the tension finally broken. 

This song has always demonstrated for me, with the best lead guitarist in place that the Stones ever had, the epitome of what the Stones were, are, and will be.
My favourite Stones song on my favourite Stones album. You can just feel the grease and the sleaze and the drugs.
9 > 10 they really don't get much better.
 iloveradio wrote:
The saxophonist died in the last year or so. He was the soul of this song. Don’t remember his name.
 
Bobby Keys, Died 2014.

Greetings from Bavaria to all the listeners  outside. Stay safe.
The saxophonist died in the last year or so. He was the soul of this song. Don’t remember his name.
Bill, could you please start over from the beginning. I was feeling faint and missed it.
 khardog145 wrote:
One of the best hooks in rock n roll.  I see that I made a similar comment below.  Oh well.
 
It's all good brother...cuz it's that good! LLRP!
The best rock song of all time!
One of the best hooks in rock n roll.  I see that I made a similar comment below.  Oh well.
My favorite tune on this album!!! ...definitely a "10"! ....the entire album is great!
9 and I don’t even like the Stones. I was always a Beatles man because I was born in 1955 and the Beatles seemed to play nicer than the Stones. Play as in kids play not musically.
 MarcG wrote:
Agreed, it’s the break that changes it completely for me , every time I hear it I am surprised by it.

 

 KudaRey wrote:
One of the greatest rock and roll songs of all time. And I do not say that lightly. If the Stones brought this song out today, it would still kick ass. How many 47 year old songs can you say that about?
 

 folkes.tom wrote:
There are songs that scream R 'n R.  This is one of them.  This gets an 11. I don't know if is still the case but the volume on BBC radio did go to 11.
 
I noticed this too. Perhaps BBC is giving a nod to "This is Spinal Tap"?
There is a brief pause - kind of a missing note - after Keith's "open-G tuned" intro to this song. Jagger just can't resist, and he lets out a barely audible grunt right where the missing note should be.

I had to listen to this song LOUD several thousand times before I noticed this, but it was time well spent.
Don't know why I gave a 9, bumped to an all deserving 10, wish I had an 11! What a classic!
SO good!  Turn it all the way up!!!
One of many "10s" from the "World's Greatest  Rock n Roll Band",
long live the Stones !
 
Without a doubt one of the best rock songs ever performed. The Stones at their undeniable best. Thanks dudes.
There are songs that scream R 'n R.  This is one of them.  This gets an 11. I don't know if is still the case but the volume on BBC radio did go to 11.
 Hannio wrote:


Seen 'em lately?
 

 slates13 wrote:
Yes a 10!

 

 aspicer wrote:
Ok FINE - not a 9 - a 10!
 

Ok FINE - not a 9 - a 10!
Can't You Hear Me Knocking?

Dave's not here man ....
One can easily peg the Stones as a rock and roll bar band (what a great bar!) then you hear this and remember how many facets there were, what a great rhythm section they were, etc. Great tune.
Is it a software glitch...…..been waiting now 5 min......nothing.
if I hit the forward key it will move on but than I miss the really good song that's waiting in the Q.....Seems to always happen when a really great song comes up......hummm
Every time the station plug happens.....the following song just set's there in limbo,,,,,,this is so frustrating......
Quite possibly the perfect rock-n-roll song!
 KudaRey wrote:
One of the greatest rock and roll songs of all time. And I do not say that lightly. If the Stones brought this song out today, it would still kick ass. How many 47 year old songs can you say that about?
 

Outstanding album, Outstanding track, used in great movies as well. Memories of the album at the record store, the zipper tearing the cellophane - Classic Stones.
Don't worry about it too much. It's here in my collection...safe and sound!

 
KENRX72 wrote:
Damn, Still pissed! Had the original album with working zipper and the whole "smear", pun intended. Very risky in it's day but someone thought they should have it and it disappeared in a blue haze back in about 74ish.  
 

So fine. Mmm-mmm. Pfffft pfffft *cough*  'ere. Passing it to you.

NO riff in rock has the impact of Keith Richards' opening smack here.
None.

Bobby Keys' sax.
Mick Taylor's lead.
Song is a masterpiece.

Recorded in March & May, 1970.
Released April 23, 1971 on the album Sticky Fingers
Lead Vocals: Mick Jagger
Electric Guitars: Keith Richards & Mick Taylor 
Drums: Charlie Watts
Bass: Bill Wyman
Backing Vocals: Keith Richards
Saxophone: Bobby Keys
Congas: Rocky Dijon
Percussion: Jimmy Miller
Organ: Billy Preston





{#Crown}



Damn, Still pissed! Had the original album with working zipper and the whole "smear", pun intended. Very risky in it's day but someone thought they should have it and it disappeared in a blue haze back in about 74ish.  
One of the greatest rock and roll songs of all time. And I do not say that lightly. If the Stones brought this song out today, it would still kick ass. How many 47 year old songs can you say that about?
 h8rhater wrote:

The load was shared.  Keith early.  Mick late. 

...and the song doesn't exist without The Riff.

 
Agreed.

'The Riff' is the open G tuned guitar played by Keith with heavy distortion. I believe it's Mick on the cleaner solo in standard tuning. Great tune and a lot of fun to play.
 tonyckeller wrote:
Am I the only one who can hear Butterfield Blues Band in this. I love it but I think it is too similar to be coincidence. Cant remember the name of the BBB track though.
 
It's got a similar feel to "East-West"; different notes.
 drjimmy wrote:

It was Mick Taylor who carried the heavy guitar load on this tune.
 
The load was shared.  Keith early.  Mick late. 

...and the song doesn't exist without The Riff.
 a_genuine_find wrote:
With a Fuzz pedal and an open tuned Strat, this song is A LOT OF FUN
 
Yess indeed!!!
With a Fuzz pedal and an open tuned Strat, this song is A LOT OF FUN
Ahhhhh yesssssssss.....Mmmmmm. This following any track from the Allman Bros.Fillmore East. A sinful pleasure.
 tonyckeller wrote:
Am I the only one who can hear Butterfield Blues Band in this. I love it but I think it is too similar to be coincidence. Cant remember the name of the BBB track though.
 
East West
Excellent Classic album. This tune, Sister Morphine and Sway. 10.
Am I the only one who can hear Butterfield Blues Band in this. I love it but I think it is too similar to be coincidence. Cant remember the name of the BBB track though.
 drjimmy wrote:

It was Mick Taylor who carried the heavy guitar load on this tune.
 
The main riff and melody is entirely Keith Richards, but true, the solo is all Mick Taylor.
 drjimmy wrote:

It was Mick Taylor who carried the heavy guitar load on this tune.
 
In a sense I considered Mick Taylor to be "too good" to be in the Rolling Stones. There was a documentary in HBO I believe about the RS in which Keith talked about Mick Taylor as being "a maestro."    
 drjimmy wrote:

It was Mick Taylor who carried the heavy guitar load on this tune.
 
Indeed, especially the little impromptu jam at the end - really glad they left that on the final cut!
I think it is safe to say that the Stones were the masters of the opening riff.
11
 ronniegirl wrote:

KEEF!

 
It was Mick Taylor who carried the heavy guitar load on this tune.
{#Hearteyes}
 haha, yeah, these guys. I think I went to boot camp with them in 1976. They were from New Awlens. "I can't believe you don't know the Stones, man. 'Can't You Hear Me Knocking'? You don' know tha?"
 slikr wrote:
Up to eleven!!!!  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Up_to_eleven 

hayduke2 wrote:
One of my greatest disappointments in life is that I can’t make this any LOUDER MAN!!!  WOOO-HOOOO!!!

 

 

 coloradojohn wrote:
This one rides that fat tasty groove so hard in so many rocking ways that it sears itself a few new memories deep every time I hear it...

 
Yeah it's a 10.
Up to eleven!!!!  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Up_to_eleven 

hayduke2 wrote:
One of my greatest disappointments in life is that I can’t make this any LOUDER MAN!!!  WOOO-HOOOO!!!

 


 Tomasni wrote: 
No need to apologize.  Just work on it and I'm sure you'll get to 10 some day.
One of my greatest disappointments in life is that I can’t make this any LOUDER MAN!!!  WOOO-HOOOO!!!
One of my greatest disappointments in life is that I can’t make this an 11.  
Great album and this is the best track on it.
        
 chinaski wrote:
Dam good guitar riff coming from a then 22 yr. old, wot?

 
KEEF!

The Rolling Stones
Can't You Hear Me Knocking

is only a 7 to me


Bobby Keys!!!!
This one rides that fat tasty groove so hard in so many rocking ways that it sears itself a few new memories deep every time I hear it...
TOTAL 10 IMO!!!    WOOOO-FUKKIN' HOOOO   GO DADDY GO!!!
 KalleB wrote:
a solid 9
just because of the section that starts with the sax
 

 
100% ditto 
The bridge kicks Ass! 
a solid 9
just because of the section that starts with the sax
 
Great song....sax and guitar!
Dam good guitar riff coming from a then 22 yr. old, wot?
A great song love the sax just magic
This is one of the few albums on RP that has every cut off of it in the RP library. Maybe some Beatles ones too (Abbey Road?) but I bet this is the only Stones album fully represented.

Rolling Stones - Bitch - Sticky Fingers
Rolling Stones - Brown Sugar - Sticky Fingers
Rolling Stones - Can't You Hear Me Knocking - Sticky Fingers
Rolling Stones - Dead Flowers - Sticky Fingers
Rolling Stones - I Got the Blues - Sticky Fingers (1971) (2009)
Rolling Stones - Moonlight Mile - Sticky Fingers
Rolling Stones - Sister Morphine - Sticky Fingers
Rolling Stones - Sway - Sticky Fingers
Rolling Stones - Wild Horses - Sticky Fingers
Rolling Stones - You Gotta Move - Sticky Fingers


Damn what an album.


 idiot_wind wrote:
Boy oh boy...this band, whoever they are, sure sounds alot like the Smashing Pumpkins.  
 
{#Roflol}
Best stones song....love the instrumental, edgy and raw sounding
Very nice. Can't remember when I last heard this.
 willmcnaught wrote:
45 votes for sucko barfo!!! who the hell are these people! lmao oh well,{#Cheesygrin} ignorance comes in all forms lol 

 
Chill man, 1700 voted 8, 9 or 10. As cliché goes "don't sweat the small stuff" {#Smile}
{#Bananajam}
45 votes for sucko barfo!!! who the hell are these people! lmao oh well,{#Cheesygrin} ignorance comes in all forms lol 
A Solid 10++++ lol {#Notworthy}
one mo time,....I LOVE SUMMER!!!!!!!!!!!!
 cvinson wrote:
Time Waits for No One is one of my favorites that was mostly a Brian Jones tune.  

 
Unless you've got some sort of knowledge about that song being in "storage" for 5 + years, I'm pretty sure Brian Jones had nothing to do with "Time Waits for No One".  He died 5 YEARS before it was released!
Did Loggins and Messina rip off the second half in their Angry Eyes? Second half is epic. Time Waits for No One is one of my favorites that was mostly a Brian Jones tune.  
{#Dancingbanana_2}
 LowPhreak wrote:
Jesus christ, can we get past this old "Keith/Ronnie/Taylor" crap? Taylor left, Ronnie came in, that's it. I doubt Keith or Mick or Charlie or Bill would have said cool if Ronnie wasn't up to par. Are you kidding?

For fucks sake wake up. It's the same shit that drones on about Peter Gabriel and Genesis.

GET OVER IT.

And BTW, Ronnie did the long solo on the Love You Live version of You Can't Always Get What You Want. It wasn't Keith as many think. Did Mick Taylor ever do something that killer? Nope.

thewiseking - you're as "wise" as a bag of hammers. {#Frustrated}

 
Indeed.

Ronnie also does a killer version of the solo to this song whenever the Stones break it out these days. 
Jesus christ, can we get past this old "Keith/Ronnie/Taylor" crap? Taylor left, Ronnie came in, that's it. I doubt Keith or Mick or Charlie or Bill would have said cool if Ronnie wasn't up to par. Are you kidding?

For fucks sake wake up. It's the same shit that drones on about Peter Gabriel and Genesis.

GET OVER IT.

And BTW, Ronnie did the long solo on the Love You Live version of You Can't Always Get What You Want. It wasn't Keith as many think. Did Mick Taylor ever do something that killer? Nope.

thewiseking - you're as "wise" as a bag of hammers. {#Frustrated}
 thewiseking wrote:
They peaked during the Taylor years.
Ronnie Wood was always just a Keith clone 

 
This is patently false.  Ronnie is not as melodic of a guitar player as Mick, nor as accomplished a blues guitarist, but he is no Keith clone.  Keith is a blues and R&B (old school R&B) guitar player.  Ronnie is a "boogie-woogie" rock and roll guitar player (see his work with The Faces).  As such, he has always been a  complementary guitar player to Keith, which is why he has lasted 4 decades with the band. 

See:  https://www.slideonron.com/weaving.htm
This song is so good I just paid $1.29 for it on ITunes.
 kingart wrote:

Same! Time Waits for No One, Sympathy for the Devil and Gimme Shelter are within micrometers of this one! Smokin'. They were never ever any better than this. 
 

 
You forgot Monkey Man.
WHOOOOO HOOOOOOOO
 idiot_wind wrote:
Hold it...is this greatest RnR song ever?   YUP!!!

Guitars! Keyboards! Drum! Sax!   WOOO-HOOOOO!!!

And Mick singing lustfully about wanting to see a young girl in the middle of the night.    GO DADDY GO!!!

 

my fav stones song. its all together on this one
 NicJohn wrote:
Maybe my favorite Stones song!  Love the second half!

 
Same! Time Waits for No One, Sympathy for the Devil and Gimme Shelter are within micrometers of this one! Smokin'. They were never ever any better than this. 
 
Maybe my favorite Stones song!  Love the second half!
One of the best songs off all time...
one of the stones songs of all time.   wish they did this live on their last tour.    although midnight rambler is great stones too.
again bobby keys ! mick taylor era ! outstanding !
BOBBY KEYS!!!!
 ppopp wrote:
World's most over-rated singer. Second-best average band of all time (behind U2).

{#Moon} kiss my what ppopp? lmao 
They peaked during the Taylor years.
Ronnie Wood was always just a Keith clone 
If this ain't a 10, there ain't no 10 in your RnR world.
Love this tune-always thought the crunchy guitars sounded like they belonged on Exile.
 ppopp wrote:
World's most over-rated singer. Second-best average band of all time (behind U2).
 
Oh gee, another negative (and laughably off-base) comment from ppoop; what a surprise.  {#Rolleyes}
Great song, great band, great singer.
 ppopp wrote:
World's most over-rated singer. Second-best average band of all time (behind U2).

 
...and you wonder why no one takes you seriously.
11+
 orangecraig wrote:

I always in a very few occasions rate a song as  "10" and even then have some ambivalence doing so-not in this case.
MickTaylor is the man!
 



 
Mick Taylor rules, pure and simple. The extended coda to this song is some of the best rock ever.
World's most over-rated singer. Second-best average band of all time (behind U2).

simply amazing....


Only an 8.4? This tune deserves at least a 9, if not 10, just for the intro and ending, and everything in between. The MT years were the best for this band.
Hold it...is this greatest RnR song ever? 

Guitars! Keyboards! Drum! Sax!

And Mick singing lustfully about wanting to see a young girl in the middle of the night.    

I always in a very few occasions rate a song as  "10" and even then have some ambivalence doing so-not in this case.
MickTaylor is the man!
 


Well that's a 10 + 10 = 20
What ever happened to Mick Taylor after leaving the Stones?

He seemed to be the perfect balance against Keith R's guitar work.  
{#Music} @ 10 = {#Meditate}
{#Clap}

Easily a ten
Best saxophone part in Rock n' Roll. Guitar work is not too shabby, either.


This song's an "11" in my opinion :-)
Boy oh boy...this band, whoever they are, sure sounds alot like the Smashing Pumpkins.  
Wow, great song! {#Bananajam}
Ah, the sax.  RIP.
Just read that Bobby Keys, who blows the killer sax on this song (and many other classic Stones' cuts) has passed away.

Here's to you, Bobby!  You really could BRING IT!!!
I'll reprint your Wiki career section as a tribute...IT'S DAMN IMPRESSIVE!!

>>Keys started touring at age fifteen with Bobby Vee and fellow Texan Buddy Holly. Keys is best known as being the main saxophone player for The Rolling Stones. He played on every album from 1969 until 1974 and from 1980 to present, and has performed on all Stones tours since 1970. Keys has played on hundreds of recordings, many uncredited, including Dion's "The Wanderer."

Keys met the Rolling Stones at the San Antonio Teen Fair in 1964. He is known for his relationship both as a musician (for example, the saxophone solo on the 1971 hit "Brown Sugar") and his friendship with Keith Richards - the two were born on the same day - (there is a film of him and Richards throwing a television set from the 10th floor of a hotel during the 1972 American Tour, as seen in the Stones' unreleased 1972 concert movie Cocksucker Blues). Keys recorded with them around 1969 on their track "Live with Me". Keys, along with the addition of Mick Taylor, made their debut on Let it Bleed. Mick Jagger and Keys became close in the early 1970s, with Keys serving as an attendant at Jagger's wedding. Together with Jim Price on trumpet, Keys toured with the Stones in 1970, 1971 and 1972, and with Steve Madaio and Trevor Lawrence on the first half of the 1973 European Tour, at which Keys was thrown out after missing some shows. According to legend Keys filled a bathtub with Dom Perignon champagne and drank most of it. Allegedly this caused a falling out with Mick Jagger, and Keys only guested on some shows of the 1975 and 1978 tours, missing the 1976 tour completely. He performed only two tracks on the 1981 tour, on which Ernie Watts was the main sax player. Keys returned to backing the Stones together with Gene Barge on the 1982 European Tour, and has toured with the Stones on all tours ever since.

He is also featured in the 1971 concert movie, Mad Dogs and Englishmen, narrating the story of his early life while driving around downtown Dallas. Other recordings made by Keys was the baritone saxophone on Elvis Presley's "Return to Sender" (though this is disputed), and on John Lennon's first American solo #1 single hit (and the only US #1 in Lennon's lifetime) "Whatever Gets You thru the Night".

From 1973-1975, Keys participated in John Lennon's Lost Weekend in Los Angeles along with Ringo Starr, Harry Nilsson and Keith Moon. Keys had played with Lennon in the Plastic Ono Band and, while in Los Angeles, he played on Lennon's albums Walls and Bridges and Rock 'n Roll. Additionally, Keys took part in the last known recording session between Paul McCartney and Lennon; A Toot and a Snore in '74.

In the late 1980s, Keys became the musical director for Ronnie Wood's Miami club, Woody's On the Beach. The first week the club opened, Keys booked Jerry Lee Lewis, Fats Domino and The Crickets.

Although more commonly known as a session musician, Keys released two albums of his own in the 1970s; a self-titled instrumental album on Warner Bros. Records that featured Ringo Starr, George Harrison and Eric Clapton in 1972; and Gimme the Key on Ringo Starr's record label Ring O'Records in 1975.

Still active in 2011, Keys appeared on December 16 with the Athens, Georgia, band Bloodkin in their "Exile on Lumpkin Street" show at the legendary Georgia Theater (which re-opened in August 2011 in its spectacularly remodeled and enlarged space after the building was gutted by fire in June 2009); besides performing some of their own music, Bloodkin rocked out with Keys on numerous hits from three of the biggest Stones' albums on which Keys had performed, Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers, and Exile on Main Street.

In 2013 he played with the Rolling Stones at their Glastonbury Festival debut, headlining on Saturday 29 June. Keys also played on the 14 On Fire.



Great album one of the best sounds the Stones did was recorded at Muscle Shoals Sound {#Bananajam}{#Drummer}{#Bananajam}