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The Rolling Stones — Dead Flowers
Album: Sticky Fingers
Avg rating:
7.5

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1116









Released: 1971
Length: 4:03
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Well when you're sitting there in your silk upholstered chair
Talkin' to some rich folk that you know
Well I hope you won't see me in my ragged company
Well, you know I could never be alone
Take me down little Susie, take me down
I know you think you're the queen of the underground
And you can send me dead flowers every morning
Send me dead flowers by the mail
Send me dead flowers to my wedding
And I won't forget to put roses on your grave
Well when you're sitting back in your rose pink Cadillac
Making bets on Kentucky Derby Day
Ah, I'll be in my basement room with a needle and a spoon
And another girl to take my pain away
Take me down little Susie, take me down
I know you think you're the queen of the underground
And you can send me dead flowers every morning
Send me dead flowers by the mail
Send me dead flowers to my wedding
And I won't forget to put roses on your grave
Take me down little Susie, take me down
I know you think you're the queen of the underground
And you can send me dead flowers every morning
Send me dead flowers by the U.S. Mail
Say it with dead flowers in my wedding
And I won't forget to put roses on your grave
No, I won't forget to put roses on your grave
Comments (167)add comment
 jahgirl8 wrote:

not even close
 

ROCK'S GREATEST BAND -
Never one's to slavishly follow trends.
Comfortable enough with their roots to  be influenced.
Here, they make American country & western their bitch.
You're welcome.

 AhhtheMusic wrote:
Love to hear the English Rollin' Stones tease the crap out of good ol' Merican hillybilly music!  They nailed it, no?
 
not even close
One of my favourite LPs in my parent's vinyl collection- mostly because the original album cover featured a real front fly zipper!
Been listening to the stones since the 60's  -  A lot of old music / bands over thoes years has fallen by the wayside for me. 

But "Dead Flowers" is making my hair stand on end as I listen and type 
Love to hear the English Rollin' Stones tease the crap out of good ol' Merican hillybilly music!  They nailed it, no?
Just good fun; nothin' more, nothin' less.
Boy...Mick can sure put the Twang in it...
 thewiseking wrote:
i love the Stones. We all do. They are poseurs though. Big time. 
Ya gotta laugh at Mick's "hillbilly accent" 
 
... or at someone putting quotes around the words hillbilly accent.
 buddy wrote:
1972.  My first Rock & Roll cover band was playing maybe our 2nd or 3rd gig.  We rented the American Legion Hall in Granbury, Texas, for $25, drew up our own flyers and plastered them all over town.  Our gig was on Homecoming weekend - we had no idea if anyone would show up.  Damn near the whole town did (at least the kids).  Our girlfriends stamped hands at the door, $1 per person, $1.50 a couple.  By the middle of the first set the place was packed.  Our GF's quit taking money and were dancing with the crowd.  We were nervous but excited at the turnout.  We were a real Rock & Roll band!

We played ZZ Top, Rolling Stones, Beatles, The Who, Santana, 10 Years After, old blues.  Midway through the gig a bunch of local young cowboys (goat ropers we called them back in the day) showed up, got right up in our faces demanding that we play country music or they'd kick our asses.  We had no reason to doubt it.

We huddled at the back of the stage - okay we need to come up with something.  We decided to play "Dead Flowers", already a little bit country by The Stones, and country it up a whole lot more. So we kicked it off a little bit slower, a little bit more twangy, punched up our Texas accents, and took off.  All that was missing was a pedal steel guitar (where's Jerry Garcia when you need him!).

It was a hit!  The cowboys hooted and hollered,  swung their cowboy hats, grabbed their gals and danced their asses off!  After that we went into a blues medley, with our lead guitarist on the harp stomping his cowboy boots....Rollin & Tumblin', Crossroads, I don't know what all.  The band just kept up with our leader for a 20-minute jam. I had just turned 19, having the time of my life.

One of those nights I'll never forget.
 

...but did you have a fiddle in the band?

Great story!
 mattenuttall wrote:
Mick is all smugness in this song. If you listen to the version of this song by Coeur de Pirate, she's all despair and loss. Nifty contrast.
 
I see what you mean. Interesting interpretation from the young Canadian. Here's a pretty good version:

 kcar wrote:
 

Agreed. The guitars save this song. If you're going to do a parody, it helps to be more interesting or funnier than the original stuff. Mick as a cowboy is riduckulous. 

 
I find it as (if not more) interesting and funnier than "the original stuff".  This song isn't a "parody", it's a style of music they genuinely liked and emulated on a number of songs over the years.  "Tongue-in-cheek" perhaps, but not a parody - parodies are performed by people like Stan Freberg or Al Yankovic.
 buddy wrote:
1972.  My first Rock & Roll cover band was playing maybe our 2nd or 3rd gig.  We rented the American Legion Hall in Granbury, Texas, for $25, drew up our own flyers and plastered them all over town.  Our gig was on Homecoming weekend - we had no idea if anyone would show up.  Damn near the whole town did (at least the kids).  Our girlfriends stamped hands at the door, $1 per person, $1.50 a couple.  By the middle of the first set the place was packed.  Our GF's quit taking money and were dancing with the crowd.  We were nervous but excited at the turnout.  We were a real Rock & Roll band!

We played ZZ Top, Rolling Stones, Beatles, The Who, Santana, 10 Years After, old blues.  Midway through the gig a bunch of local young cowboys (goat ropers we called them back in the day) showed up, got right up in our faces demanding that we play country music or they'd kick our asses.  We had no reason to doubt it.

We huddled at the back of the stage - okay we need to come up with something.  We decided to play "Dead Flowers", already a little bit country by The Stones, and country it up a whole lot more. So we kicked it off a little bit slower, a little bit more twangy, punched up our Texas accents, and took off.  All that was missing was a pedal steel guitar (where's Jerry Garcia when you need him!).

It was a hit!  The cowboys hooted and hollered,  swung their cowboy hats, grabbed their gals and danced their asses off!  After that we went into a blues medley, with our lead guitarist on the harp stomping his cowboy boots....Rollin & Tumblin', Crossroads, I don't know what all.  The band just kept up with our leader for a 20-minute jam. I had just turned 19, having the time of my life.

One of those nights I'll never forget.
 

this remembers me the blues brothers
Covered this tune in my first rock & roll cover band way back in 1972. Being in a small Texas town, it was our "country song" when the goat ropers demanded it. Worked every time.


{#Cowboy}
Featuring Mick Taylor! My fave stones period 
Steve Earle's version is killer
Mick is all smugness in this song. If you listen to the version of this song by Coeur de Pirate, she's all despair and loss. Nifty contrast.
I can't make it past the 30 seconds without wanting to barf into my soundsystem. What the heck is this?
 Foot wrote:

Thank you Gram Parsons!

 

hey Foot,
With all due respect, I've concluded that Buffalo Springfield was the first "country rock" band, circa 1967?   
 idiot_wind wrote:
Prine and now Stones!!!!

Yeah baby...country rock lives!

 
{#Yes}  lovin it
One of the best country bands the world has ever seen. These lyrics are timeless, and Keith's work is just the right kind of understated.
                                                         

                                                                 Keith and Gram Parsons at Nellcote

        



.
God almighty, was a great song. This is when this band could play anything and make it sound soooooooo good. 
This sounds even better using the new website!  Thanks RP!
 buddy wrote:
1972.  My first Rock & Roll cover band was playing maybe our 2nd or 3rd gig.  We rented the American Legion Hall in Granbury, Texas, for $25, drew up our own flyers and plastered them all over town.  Our gig was on Homecoming weekend - we had no idea if anyone would show up.  Damn near the whole town did (at least the kids).  Our girlfriends stamped hands at the door, $1 per person, $1.50 a couple.  By the middle of the first set the place was packed.  Our GF's quit taking money and were dancing with the crowd.  We were nervous but excited at the turnout.  We were a real Rock & Roll band!

We played ZZ Top, Rolling Stones, Beatles, The Who, Santana, 10 Years After, old blues.  Midway through the gig a bunch of local young cowboys (goat ropers we called them back in the day) showed up, got right up in our faces demanding that we play country music or they'd kick our asses.  We had no reason to doubt it.

We huddled at the back of the stage - okay we need to come up with something.  We decided to play "Dead Flowers", already a little bit country by The Stones, and country it up a whole lot more. So we kicked it off a little bit slower, a little bit more twangy, punched up our Texas accents, and took off.  All that was missing was a pedal steel guitar (where's Jerry Garcia when you need him!).

It was a hit!  The cowboys hooted and hollered,  swung their cowboy hats, grabbed their gals and danced their asses off!  After that we went into a blues medley, with our lead guitarist on the harp stomping his cowboy boots....Rollin & Tumblin', Crossroads, I don't know what all.  The band just kept up with our leader for a 20-minute jam. I had just turned 19, having the time of my life.

One of those nights I'll never forget.

 

One of the best stories I've read on RP. Thank you. {#Notworthy}{#Clap}

thewiseking wrote:
i love the Stones. We all do. They are poseurs though. Big time. 
Ya gotta laugh at Mick's "hillbilly accent" 

  

Agreed. The guitars save this song. If you're going to do a parody, it helps to be more interesting or funnier than the original stuff. Mick as a cowboy is riduckulous. 

 SeriousLee wrote:
C(ountry) RA(dio) P(aradise)

 
Couldn't disagree more
C(ountry) RA(dio) P(aradise)
Country Stones!  Still like this song!!
i love the Stones. We all do. They are poseurs though. Big time. 
Ya gotta laugh at Mick's "hillbilly accent" 
 buddy wrote:
1972.  ...
One of those nights I'll never forget.

 
Very vivid story! Thanks for sharing. Just a bright little story in this dull morning.

 
Is that Nicky Hopkins tickling the ivory? That is some lovely piano and guitar interplay
1972.  My first Rock & Roll cover band was playing maybe our 2nd or 3rd gig.  We rented the American Legion Hall in Granbury, Texas, for $25, drew up our own flyers and plastered them all over town.  Our gig was on Homecoming weekend - we had no idea if anyone would show up.  Damn near the whole town did (at least the kids).  Our girlfriends stamped hands at the door, $1 per person, $1.50 a couple.  By the middle of the first set the place was packed.  Our GF's quit taking money and were dancing with the crowd.  We were nervous but excited at the turnout.  We were a real Rock & Roll band!

We played ZZ Top, Rolling Stones, Beatles, The Who, Santana, 10 Years After, old blues.  Midway through the gig a bunch of local young cowboys (goat ropers we called them back in the day) showed up, got right up in our faces demanding that we play country music or they'd kick our asses.  We had no reason to doubt it.

We huddled at the back of the stage - okay we need to come up with something.  We decided to play "Dead Flowers", already a little bit country by The Stones, and country it up a whole lot more. So we kicked it off a little bit slower, a little bit more twangy, punched up our Texas accents, and took off.  All that was missing was a pedal steel guitar (where's Jerry Garcia when you need him!).

It was a hit!  The cowboys hooted and hollered,  swung their cowboy hats, grabbed their gals and danced their asses off!  After that we went into a blues medley, with our lead guitarist on the harp stomping his cowboy boots....Rollin & Tumblin', Crossroads, I don't know what all.  The band just kept up with our leader for a 20-minute jam. I had just turned 19, having the time of my life.

One of those nights I'll never forget.
great cut !
 markpeachey wrote:
will this band please die!

 
HA HA HA. 
They're about to release another album. The 30th Stones. A bluesy collection. Let's conjure a title. ...
Exile on Bourbon Street.    Tame Horses.   (This Will Really Be) The Last Time. 
 
 Foot wrote:

Thank you Gram Parsons!

 
actually Gram Parsons hated the term country rock
he said he made Cosmic American Music 
.
.btw, Merle Haggard died today 
and he called Gram Parsons a pussy
.
RIP Merle but i love Gram 
Sticky Fingers and Exile have aged very well, IMO, and remain the best RS albums. Thanks for playing!
 idiot_wind wrote:
Prine and now Stones!!!!

Yeah baby...country rock lives!

 
Thank you Gram Parsons!
  markpeachey wrote:
will this band please die!

 
Virtualearthman wrote:
great bands don't die they just fade away to the girl with the far away eyes.......
 

 
... or head back into the studio in 2016 to record a new album (their 25th in 52 years) right on the heels of their latest sell out concert tour. Whichever......

Rejected FTD Flowers slogans-

1) "Say It With Dead Flowers"


Beyond awesome.

I don't know why but this is one of my favorite Stones songs.  Always puts me in a beer at the pub kind of mood. 


I can't help but hear the voice and influence of Gram Parsons when I hear this record.  He was hanging out with the Stones in the studio, especially Keith, at this time.
 markpeachey wrote:
will this band please die!

 
Why would you wish death on a band? 
great bands don't die they just fade away to the girl with the far away eyes.......
 
 markpeachey wrote:
will this band please die!

 

Keith will OUTLIVE US ALL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
will this band please die!
Is that Keith Richards channeling his inner Waylon Jennings?  Classic
Brilliant B & R!! From John Prine "Please Don't Bury Me" to one of the Stones' forays int o country music: Dead Flowers!! A tip of the 10 gallon hat {#Devil_pimp}
Bleah. So much better work from them.
It's really funny that a bunch of London lads produce something so country waaay back in 1971. Heck, they'd hardly been in the USA that much by then. 
For those who say they can't stand country-sounding music, but will argue to the maximum about loving the Stones......this-here song is a grand one!! {#Cheers}
Great!!!!!
the stones do the dead....{#Eek}{#Dance}
Mediocre at best. 

Certainly ones with just the zipper cover are not worth too much... check out EBay 

The album's artwork emphasizes the suggestive innuendo of the Sticky Fingers title, showing a close-up of a jeans-clad male crotchwith the visible outline of a large penis; the cover of the original (vinyl) release featured a working zipper and mock belt buckle that opened to reveal cotton briefs. The vinyl release displayed the band's name and album title along the image of the belt; behind the zipper the white briefs were seemingly rubber stamped in gold with the name of American pop artist Andy Warhol, below which read "THIS PHOTOGRAPH MAY NOT BE--ETC." While the artwork was conceived by Warhol, photography was by Billy Name and design by Craig Braun.

The cover photo of a male model's crotch clad in tight blue jeans was assumed by many fans to be an image of Mick Jagger, but the people actually involved at the time of the photo shoot claim that Warhol had several different men photographed (Jagger was not among them) and never revealed which shots he used. Among the candidates, Jed Johnson, Warhol's lover at the time, denied it was his likeness, although his twin brother Jay is a possibility. Those closest to the shoot, and subsequent design, name Factory artist and designer Corey Tippin as the likeliest candidate. Warhol "superstar" Joe Dallesandro claims to have been the model. 

After retailers complained that the zipper was causing damage to the vinyl (from stacked shipments of the record), the zipper was "unzipped" slightly to the middle of the record, where damage would be minimized.

The album features the first usage of the band's "tongue & lips" logo, which was originally designed by Ernie Cefalu. Although Ernie's version was used for much of the merchandising and was the design originally shown to the band by Craig Braun, the design used for the album was illustrated by John Pasche.



Everybody in my church loves this song...

 Giselle62 wrote:
My mom had this—-and it had the  zipper. You can imagine we pre-pubescent girls were a little interested in that cover!
 
I hope she still has it .. you can see an earlier post I made about this cover.  The one released in Europe — only 500 of them — you could pull the zipper down and observe a relatively large Organ of Extreme Delight and Punishment ....  They are worth upwards of $100,000 when you can find one ... 
 Giselle62 wrote:
That Joe Dallesandro's  "bulge" is showing?
Good right after Prine.
 
Was that " Little Jo " on the cover ?
 
Damn..more and more I'm leaning towards the Stones over the Beatles..not to say the B-boys didn't have a good tune or two..
Prine and now Stones!!!!

Yeah baby...country rock lives!
My mom had this—-and it had the  zipper. You can imagine we pre-pubescent girls were a little interested in that cover!
That Joe Dallesandro's  "bulge" is showing?
Good right after Prine.
That's when the Stones were good.

Trivia: anyone know the controversy about this album cover?

Wow, it seems that the new draft of Mick Jagger "SuperHeavy" overlapped the new draft of the Rolling Stones!


 unclehud wrote:

Parody, in my opinion.  They did a couple of other "country" tunes, perhaps as a gentle slap to the colonies ... ?  Why else would they even bother with this genre?
 
Now that is just a plain ol' ignaramoose statement.{#Snooty} Country music has a deep, long and rich history and deserves as much respect as any other genre. The only genre of music that one can even consider blanketly disrespecting is commercial pop.



Everybody in my hotel room loves this song...

 
 unclehud wrote:

Parody, in my opinion.  They did a couple of other "country" tunes, perhaps as a gentle slap to the colonies ... ?  Why else would they even bother with this genre?
 
Because... they enjoyed it?
 unclehud wrote:

Parody, in my opinion.  They did a couple of other "country" tunes, perhaps as a gentle slap to the colonies ... ?  Why else would they even bother with this genre?
 
Perhaps because they enjoyed "this genre"?  They did more than a couple of "country tunes".  They were hanging around with Gram Parsons around the time this (and "Wild Horses") was recorded.
 On_The_Beach wrote:

I'm with you. I don't want to have to scroll through pages and pages of generic pictures of Keith Richards' ugly mug just to get to some song comments. Come on Calypsus, ease off the gas just a little, dude.

 

Others like it just the way it is. Carry on Calypsus.
 rdo wrote:
Calypsus and Romeotuma are in a dead heat in the competition to see who can use up the most RP bandwidth.  I hope they are paying double the usual rate.
 
I'm with you. I don't want to have to scroll through pages and pages of generic pictures of Keith Richards' ugly mug just to get to some song comments. Come on Calypsus, ease off the gas just a little, dude.

 Pharlap wrote:
is it really "country" or a parody? Or both?
 
Parody, in my opinion.  They did a couple of other "country" tunes, perhaps as a gentle slap to the colonies ... ?  Why else would they even bother with this genre?

Rolling Stones by bp fallon
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bpfallon/

Phil Spector & Gene Pitney & Andrew Loog Oldham & The Rolling Stones at the 'Not Fade Away' sessions London 1964

Photographer unknown.


Note how the very famous American record producer/songwriter/millionaire/then-diety Phil Spector is the main man in the studio with this exciting hot English combo that everyone's talking about. The brilliant Stones manager and producer Andrew Oldham - in shades of course and the youngest in the room - worships Spector. American pop star Gene Pitney wrote 'He's A Rebel' which Spector produced by The Crystals, making more millions. The first-ever Jagger-Richards hit song was 'That Girl Belongs To Yesterday' recorded by Gene Pitney. Mick doesn't look wildly happy. Both Spector and Pitney play on the first Stones album and on the much-bootlegged Stones track 'Andrew's Blues' which features lewd-lyrics lead vocals by Spector and Jagger before Phil launches into a mad filthy rap about the delighted Stones manager, with fierce twanging by Brian and Keith and pumping piano by Ian Stewart. Raw, vulgar and excellent.    ~bp fallon

Copyright All rights reserved

 Cynaera wrote:
Thank you, as always, Calypsus_1, for the visuals and supplemental info! *hugs you* 
 

Calypsus and Romeotuma are in a dead heat in the competition to see who can use up the most RP bandwidth.  I hope they are paying double the usual rate.


Keith Richards  by rising70
https://www.flickr.com/photos/the_first_rays/

.
Copyright All rights reserved

———————————————————————————————————————————-
Keith Richards - Dead Flowers, Live

"I wish they had've miked Willie's guitar. Willie Nelson is a terrific guitar player. This proves again that Keith can still bring it!"       PeteTSSF


I read / heard somewhere that the "dead flowers" were of an injectable nature (or perhaps smoke-able)...  No opinions as to the "truthiness" of such info, but amusing to consider.
reminds me of Big Lebowski
 calypsus_1 wrote:

Keith by =FireCaster
©2008-2010 =FireCaster

I never thought the very first dude that I would add in my portraits gallery would be Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones. I was browsing through my sister's Time magazine when I saw this monumental photo of Keith in a hotel room, posing for Louis Vuitton (for the guitar case). Fuck it's the smallest reference I had to work on!

I would like to remain cool when I grow old, but not looking like this.

2H, H, B, HB, 2B and 8B pencils. To be consistent with the creases on his face I didn't use my smudge stick. Bleh.
Normally i dont like this style of Drawings. But this one of Keith is perfect!
 

Thank you, as always, Calypsus_1, for the visuals and supplemental info! *hugs you*  And the "Y'alternative" comment had me laughing myself into hiccups. Brilliant word-play.

I still haven't figured out why I love this song, or why I turn it up whenever I hear it. Maybe it's because I live in a cow-town and I actually might have country music flowing through my veins. Or, maybe it's because it's the Rolling Stones.  Or, more likely, it's because I'm a simple dork and I just like what I like and can't explain why.  Feh.{#Stupid}
Love this !!
 calypsus_1 wrote:
I would like to remain cool when I grow old, but not looking like this.

 
It's sort of an accomplishment just to grow old.
Listen to the beat.  Its still rock.  Did the Stones ever do a parody?  


 
Pharlap wrote:
is it really "country" or a parody? Or both?
 


Keith by =FireCaster
©2008-2010 =FireCaster

I never thought the very first dude that I would add in my portraits gallery would be Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones. I was browsing through my sister's Time magazine when I saw this monumental photo of Keith in a hotel room, posing for Louis Vuitton (for the guitar case). Fuck it's the smallest reference I had to work on!

I would like to remain cool when I grow old, but not looking like this.

2H, H, B, HB, 2B and 8B pencils. To be consistent with the creases on his face I didn't use my smudge stick. Bleh.


Personnel -studio album:  
Additional musicians

 Pharlap wrote:
is it really "country" or a parody? Or both?
 
Why it's Y'Alternative!

posworld wrote:
This is the kind of Stones I can do without.

Gotta disagree! This is one of the best beer drinking with your buddies sing along songs ever! {#Devil_pimp} {#Drunk}


This is the kind of Stones I can do without.
I've used the "I'll put roses on your grave" line more than once!

Now I just have to hope I actually get to fulfill it...
last guy on John Prine said keep the country in America....this is just as "country"....what was he TALKING about!?!?!?  Great is Gr8 even if there's a twang!
 rickhoran wrote:
i would add beggar's banquet too. but i am a stone's kinda guy. 
They produced so much virtuosity, it's almost unfair to have to choose :)

 keller1 wrote:
In my mind it's a tossup between this one and Let It Bleed for the Stones' high water mark.

Whatever ... they're both desert island records.
 

i would add beggar's banquet too. but i am a stone's kinda guy.

In my mind it's a tossup between this one and Let It Bleed for the Stones' high water mark.

Whatever ... they're both desert island records.
hmmm a set about passing on - hope to hear Angel to Be in here, happiest death song ever! 
Ah! My favorite set!  Radio Hula —> Please Don't Bury Me —> Dead Flowers - it just fits...
Agreed. And Let it Bleed. And Exile. And Ya Yas.
lmic wrote:

Yep. Pretty much the whole album.




 HarrO wrote:
10
 
Yep. Pretty much the whole album.

 Misterfixit wrote:


Sure, why not? I can't take it with me, that's for sure. It's just green pieces of paper with some old white slave holder's picture on it, anyway.
 

I'm not here to tell anyone what to do with their cash, but those old white slave holders would sure help some poor young people in africa, or heck in the US. i'm just sayin' {#Yes}

 Pharlap wrote:
is it really "country" or a parody? Or both?
 
If you have to—absolutely must—put a label on it, the term back then was "country rock." Among those in the forefront were The Eagles (early), Poco, The Byrds (later), The Flying Burrito Brothers, New Riders of the Purple Sage, and others. It was in the air, and the Stones on this song and others proved their amazing versatility. Tongue-in-cheek, maybe, but not a parody. My take is that they had too much respect for the originators, country music's pioneers (Frizzell, Williams, Rose, Acuff, Atkins, and others),  to mock their music.

 Pharlap wrote:
is it really "country" or a parody? Or both?
 
It's what country music should sound like.

is it really "country" or a parody? Or both?
One of my favorite Stones song; I always loved all of their country sounding tunes!!{#Clap}
This is just horrible. Fake country music.
Agreed! Its a great song and a great album. But sometimes, doesn't it rub you just a little wrong that this, and the other truly dark songs on the album make you want to roll down the windows and sing them at the top of you lungs?      No?  OK  I was just checking......

 
keller1 wrote:


True, except this is a great song.
 

what color is his underwear?? I think white, cd's don't unzip, maybe the UK do
My favorite Stones album
{#Daisy} in my basement room.......  {#Motor}
 denmom wrote:
The Townes van Zandt version is the one that's stuck in my ears; I'm afraid.
 
Not the worst thing that could happen.


 jjbix wrote:
just becasue it's the Stones doesn't mean it's a great song. . . 
 

True, except this is a great song.
"Ditto"

 
jjbix wrote:
just becasue it's the Stones doesn't mean it's a great song. . . take this song for example. . .
 


 toterola wrote:
Steve Earle does a killer live version of this on his "Shut Up and Die Like an Aviator" disc. But there is none better than Gram Parsons singing with Mick and Keith. {#Bananajam}
 
Nah... their version of this song on their Stripped album is off-the-hook coolness. 

The Townes van Zandt version is the one that's stuck in my ears; I'm afraid.
Steve Earle does a killer live version of this on his "Shut Up and Die Like an Aviator" disc. But there is none better than Gram Parsons singing with Mick and Keith. {#Bananajam}
10
keller1 wrote:
This is a great tune to share with an ex.

(who's cryin now?)

This is a great tune to share with an ex.
that's my nickname!!! ok i admit, i actually like the cover on the big lebowski soundtrack a lot better...
Wizzuvv_oz wrote:
Dude....what is it that you're fixin' that you can spend 26K on a record? Horse races? Can you teach me? I really dislike it when Mick tries to sing with an American accent. Quite ridiculous really. I like this song though, except for that.
Horse races? Ewwwww ... poor things little things all skinny and eating styrofoam and then hurling. Oh and the horses too poor dobbin, lose the race and he's off to France for lunch meat. Money? It's ephemeral "neither gold or silver compares to the slightest touch of a lover's hand ..."
Misterfixit wrote:
Sure, why not? I can't take it with me, that's for sure. It's just green pieces of paper with some old white slave holder's picture on it, anyway.
Dude....what is it that you're fixin' that you can spend 26K on a record? Horse races? Can you teach me? I really dislike it when Mick tries to sing with an American accent. Quite ridiculous really. I like this song though, except for that.
wish wrote:
YOU CAN PLAY WITH MY ZIPPER FOR $26 GRAND
You wish ....
drtjdel wrote:
YOU spent 26K for a FRIGGIN RECORD? :lol:
Sure, why not? I can't take it with me, that's for sure. It's just green pieces of paper with some old white slave holder's picture on it, anyway.
rtkmusic wrote:
I think I have two in the garage...
I'm serious. If you do, sell the best one and frame the other one. Oh, BTW, there were some "bootleg" copies of this album which feathered the illustration of a rather largish uncut male organ of procreation visible when you unzipped. it. Believe it came out of Germany in the late 1970's. They are, of course, priceless today. Anyway, the Stones are -- IMHO -- the paradigm of a rock and roll band, never to be surpassed.