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Chicha Libre — Gnossienne No. 1
Album: Chicha Libre ¡Sonido amazónico!
Avg rating:
7

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1609









Released: 2017
Length: 3:46
Plays (last 30 days): 4
(instrumental)
Comments (62)add comment
Very cheeky cover indeed!
Is it just me or does the melody of this sound very close to the West World series credit music?
I like it!! Weird, but good!! I never heard of them before. Thank You RP!   
I was waiting for Tom Waits to start singing (which thankfully didn't happen)...
 buckshot wrote:

This would not have felt out of place on the Pulp Fiction soundtrack.

or a French New Wave movie or 'rom com'

Sounds a bit like stop-action animation music.
 grandemarch wrote:

I think Satie would appreciate it.


I think he's absolutely hate it.  It's just a melody over a tediously predictable backing, and has none of the incredible mystery of the original.
 Larrygrrl wrote:

Sounds like Combustible Edison, who I believe did the "Four Rooms" soundtrack.  They also invented a cocktail by the same name...it has campari and you set it on fire!



My thought, exactly!
Bought their first album when I had listened to one of their songs on the radio late at night. Very relaxing and fun.
8
Très cooooool!!! ✌️
gif of Disney's Goofy nodding as a group of nuns in another car pass by
 

Sounds like Combustible Edison, who I believe did the "Four Rooms" soundtrack.  They also invented a cocktail by the same name...it has campari and you set it on fire!
I think Satie would appreciate it.
Just goes to show, music and liquor go together, doesn't matter who, or where, you are.
This would not have felt out of place on the Pulp Fiction soundtrack.
Puts me in the mood for a Dry Martini. Very dry.
 haretic wrote:

That is a funny song comment!

But actually, I believe Erik Satie would likely have applauded this interpretation of his composition, while (literally) sneering at more conventional performances as "imitative."  The man was unconventional, to say the very least!  And he did not consider most of his own compositions to be at all "serious" musically.

From Wikipedia:

"The (Gnossienne) are for the most part in free time (lacking time signatures or bar divisions) and highly experimental with form, rhythm and chordal structure. The form as well as the term was invented by Satie."
 
(Yes, Bill, I think you're right on with your own comment)!
 
We need some Esquivel on RP.
Strangely attractive...can't ...look ....away...
 stargazer1 wrote:
The whirring noise in the background is Eric Satie spinning in his grave. 
 

Replacing his tombstone with a magnet and wrapping  his corpse in copper wire, one could make a donation of several kWh to RP's power bill! 
It's an excerpt from the original Satie piece (the chorus of the song, if you will).  He wrote his music very unconventionally, and used very non-standard "tempo markings" such as the French "très luisant" (something like, "very shiny," instead of typical Italian tempo markings than translate to boring stuff like, "fast," "slow," or "walking pace.")
At fist I was going to simply comment, "très luisant," but people who haven't played the piece wouldn't get it.  I realize now that the image didn't really add much clarity and should have included the explanation.
Another lay explanation of how unusual Satie's scoring is - written music is usually divided into measures, or "bars," with vertical lines between them.  Each measure represents the repeating "1-2-3-4" that repeats throughout the piece.  Satie didn't bother with those.  The excerpt below would typically be divided into four measures.  Just another thing that makes studying and playing his music more unusual and interesting.

stanohlohovec5 wrote:

sorry.. I am a musician .. but this partiture is  unintelligible for me.. Can you explain it? Be very pleasing..;)))

 
 MJdub wrote:
 
sorry.. I am a musician .. but this partiture is  unintelligible for me.. Can you explain it? Be very pleasing..;)))

Muy Bueno
They turned it into skating rink music....
Ayahuasca rules ok
 jtherieau wrote:
Satie goes to the circus.
 

Satie wrote several pieces which could be considered "circus-like".
This has a sort of Dengue Fever sound 
I am Satiesfied with this version.


A worthy band to play Bearded Theory Festival, UK. I'd enjoy a couple of beers to this.
Well there's nasty, and then there is NASTY!  alexpohlenz wrote:
¡Very, very nasty version of Eric Sati!
 

very, very nice
Where are those mushrooms? . . . Oh, oh.
 kcar wrote:
gif of Disney's Goofy nodding as a group of nuns in another car pass by
 
bump! {#Jump}
this is actually punk. because it gets up some people's noses. 
 stargazer1 wrote:
The whirring noise in the background is Eric Satie spinning in his grave. 
 
That is a funny song comment!

But actually, I believe Erik Satie would likely have applauded this interpretation of his composition, while (literally) sneering at more conventional performances as "imitative."  The man was unconventional, to say the very least!  And he did not consider most of his own compositions to be at all "serious" musically.

From Wikipedia:

"The (Gnossienne) are for the most part in free time (lacking time signatures or bar divisions) and highly experimental with form, rhythm and chordal structure. The form as well as the term was invented by Satie."
 
(Yes, Bill, I think you're right on with your own comment)!
¡Very, very nasty version of Eric Sati!
 aelfheld wrote:
Waiting for Lawrence Welk to come out of the wings.
 
This is too "exotic" for Lawrence Welk, pretty cool though.
gif of Disney's Goofy nodding as a group of nuns in another car pass by
 stargazer1 wrote:
The whirring noise in the background is Eric Satie spinning in his grave. 

 

"Last year I gave several lectures on "Intelligence and Musicality among Animals" ... Today I am going to speak to you about "Intelligence and Musicality among Critics" ... The subject is much the same, with some modifications, of course."

Waiting for Lawrence Welk to come out of the wings.
The whirring noise in the background is Eric Satie spinning in his grave. 
Okay, well, that's an interesting idea.
 ScottFromWyoming wrote:

There, there, now.

 
{#Lol}
 Andy_B wrote:

I'll bet that old Frenchman is dancing in his grave!

 
{#Jump}
Chicha Libre is a Brooklyn-based six-member band founded by Olivier Conan. Its name is a reference to Chicha, which is the name of a corn-based liquor that has been produced in South America since the time of the Incas. It is also the name of a Peruvian musical genre (also known as Peruvian cumbia) on which the band's music is based.
This makes me happy in a silly way. Wonder what would happen if someone mashed this and "Baby Elephant Walk"?
 Beanie wrote:
I'm...horrified by this.  Truly.

 
There, there, now.
Absolut superb. Use Google Translate.
Satie!?! It really is! This is nuts, brilliantly horrifying, horrifyingly brilliant. Where did you find it?
 ???? That is not Spanish music
Olé!

 

I'm...horrified by this.  Truly.
sounds familiar, I thought .... and yes: Tori Amos 'Battle of Trees'
 

I listen to the Satie version EVERY night while I put my daughter to sleep.  I still couldn't place what this was a cover of when I heard it in the background.  great find!
Sounded so familiar, but I'd have never guessed it was a cover of classical music. Neat!
 jtherieau wrote:
Satie goes to the circus.

 
I'll bet that old Frenchman is dancing in his grave!
After hearing this piece by Frank Glazer or Alessio Nanni, this seems a sacrilege. 
Sounds a little like a toned down Dengue Fever...
Gotta say more cheerful than the original.
 ubuntourist wrote:
Olé!

 
{#Bananasplit}
Olé!
Can't make up my mind if this is cool, elevator music - or cool elevator music? {#Ask}
Satie goes to the circus.
Brilliant! {#Roflol}