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Metric — Satellite Mind
Album: Fantasies
Avg rating:
7.1

Your rating:
Total ratings: 974









Released: 2009
Length: 3:41
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Hold it, I'm about to drop off
Let me tell you my last thought
Drift into a deep fog
Lost where I forgot to, hold it
I can feel you most when I'm alone

Coming home 'cause I want to
Hang out with a starlet
Stare up at the ceiling
Preview of the screening
Flashback of a feeling
Sixth sense of a calling
Heard you fuck through the wall
I heard you fuck

When I'm bored
I send vibrations
In your direction
Through the satellite mind

When I'm bored
I send vibrations
In your direction
Through the satellite mind

I'm not suicidal
I just can't get out of bed
I drift into a deep fog
Lost where I forgot to, hold it
I can feel you most when I'm alone
I can feel your ghost when I'm alone

Coming home 'cause I want to
Hang out with a starlet
Stare up at the ceiling
Hiding and revealing
Flashback of a feeling
Sick sense of a calling
Heard you fuck through the wall
I heard you fuck

When I'm bored
I send vibrations
In your direction
Through the satellite mind

When I'm bored
I send vibrations
In your direction
Through the satellite mind

When your voice
Became vibrations
Through the satellite mind
Through the satellite mind
It sounded like mine...
Comments (180)add comment
 paulstrangeway wrote:
Yeah get Chrvches on RP!
 

YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  We want Chvrches!!!
Yeah get Chrvches on RP!
 ziggytrix wrote:

I would agree with that assessment.

Also maybe Elastica or Republica.

I wonder if there are any other "overproduced" woman-fronted bands that end in -ica that I could have recommended. That would have been a nifty theme...
 
I always thought it was unfortunate that Elastica and Republica got lumped together, as they're really quite different... If you ignore Elastica's biggest hit Connection. Beyond that they were a lot less electronic... I have listened to their debut album a million times and still love it.

Oh, and Fantasies was Metrics best effort for sure. Though this year's new one Art of Doubt is a great run for it's money, being a throw back to this point in their carreer.

Come to think of it, maybe I'm just the weirdo that has a thing for female-fronted, 'overproduced' band (like, WHY do we not have Chvrches on RP?!?)
 Synth80s wrote:
I have a few Metric albums, and I believe this is the best end to end. I don't have any Garbage, but from what I hear, that might be another mine to tap in this style. Thoughts?

 
I would agree with that assessment.

Also maybe Elastica or Republica.

I wonder if there are any other "overproduced" woman-fronted bands that end in -ica that I could have recommended. That would have been a nifty theme...
Just saw Emily solo recently; excellent show!
Garbage! (The band, not the music.)
DOOM!
I liked this guitar when i heard it the first time.. in 1996

https://youtu.be/t5eIJQ73QxM?t=21

I've gotten away from Metric since the late 90s/early 00s; it's all customary now.

I'm at a 7 on this track  It might be a 6 with bonus points for use of the F word.

LONG LIVE RP!!


 On_The_Beach wrote:
Joggin' with Em'
https://www.cbc.ca/gfx/images/arts/photos/2008/04/28/emily-haines-cp-4761468.jpg
(Gown by Dolce & Duct Tape)

 
All I want to know is:  are those converse all stars?  
 westslope wrote:
Fantasies and Synthetica are excellent road music. 

 
Seconded! In the car I can turn it up to 11 and sing along as loud and tunelessly as I like (and fantasise about Emily Haines {#Hearteyes}). An easy 10 from the rocked-away Nottingham jury.
Metric - Live at Coachella Music Festival 2013.jpg
Fantasies and Synthetica are excellent road music.  

Unfamiliar with Garbage but looking forward to replies. 
I have a few Metric albums, and I believe this is the best end to end. I don't have any Garbage, but from what I hear, that might be another mine to tap in this style. Thoughts?
 Fiji5555 wrote:
{#Guitarist} {#Dancingbanana_2} {#Bananajam} {#Drummer}

 
Ditto..

reminds slightly of cardigans, wouldn't hurt to play them..
Love this, but I'd sure love to hear some Kaiser Chiefs on here again...it's been forever, it seems! They sure had some amazing stuff!
——- 
WayUpNorth wrote:
Opening bars are almost identical to the Kaiser Chiefs "I Predict a Riot" ...

They play here in october. I'm very tempted to go. Love this song! 
"Heard you fuck through the wall
I heard you fuck
When I'm bored
I send vibrations
In your direction"

10 for lyrics 
{#Yes}   {#Jump}   {#Cheesygrin}
Nice rocker. Reminds me a little of Juliana Hatfield.
{#Guitarist} {#Dancingbanana_2} {#Bananajam} {#Drummer}
 lmic wrote:
"Heard you f—- through the walleye," now *that's* kinky! lol
 
I'm pretty sure Imic was joking here, but I'm not sure everyone gets that there is no fish sex suggested in the lyrics:

Heard you f*ck through the wall
I heard you f*ck

Class dismissed.  ; )
 perikleshokie wrote:

I was thinking along those lines.  Too much concern about the use of the word  f**k and too little about the walleye abuse.

Walleye

 
{#Eek}
I can wrap my head around live releasing a fish but some anglers kiss the darn things before returning them (alive and healthy) to the water.

Yuck. 
No she's not hurting a fish here, no fish are harmed during the song ... Wall, I ... As in thin walls of well, anywhere?
 GawgaBoy wrote:
OK, no disrespect Bill and Rebecca, and I don't mind this being played unedited, but why do you edit other songs.  Mumford and Sons comes to mind.  Just curious. 

I doubt very much that Bill and Rebecca are making any edits; they're simply playing the versions that were uploaded. If someone uploads a "radio-edit," or a sanitized version sold in Walmart, for example, that's what you get when you hear it.
Love me some Metric and this song. The F*** controversy on here was amusing {#Lol}
{#Bananapiano}{#Dancingbanana}{#Bananajam}{#Dancingbanana_2}
Kind of sexy to hear an attractive woman using the 'F' word using the word in its "traditional" sense.
 tpa29970 wrote:

And good music should be a family experience! 
le_colonel wrote:

I'm sorry, but no. There is plenty of great music that isn't suitable for children. Music is a form of art like films and literature, and since when is every film and every book suitable for children?

 
I could make a sound argument that even the Bible isn't really suitable for children.  Considering the amount of violence, sex, homosexuality, and depravity that they talk about in the Bible, it's much worse than the books that those crazy religious nut balls are trying to ban.  
OK, no disrespect Bill and Rebecca, and I don't mind this being played unedited, but why do you edit other songs.  Mumford and Sons comes to mind.  Just curious.  You know I love this place, and I wish I had more available for the monthly PayPal donation.  You are the best source of music that I have ever found.
 lmic wrote:
"Heard you f—- through the walleye," now *that's* kinky! lol
 
I was thinking along those lines.  Too much concern about the use of the word  f**k and too little about the walleye abuse.

Walleye
This and many other Metric tracks can be listened to on the audio player on the Metric website. And f*ck those who get f*cked off by a f*ck - songwriters write what they want to write, and it's the listener's choice whether or not to listen to them. Of all places, I wouldn't have expected petit-bourgeois prissiness on the RP board. It's rock 'n roll, folks, not a feckin' middle class Bridge party. A rare 10 from the Nottingham jury.
 tpa29970 wrote:

And good music should be a family experience! 
 
I'm sorry, but no. There is plenty of great music that isn't suitable for children. Music is a form of art like films and literature, and since when is every film and every book suitable for children?

 salice wrote:
sure it's been said -

Bit of Breeders in here...
  Opening bars are almost identical to the Kaiser Chiefs "I Predict a Riot" ...


Love, love, love, love Metric!!!!!!!!


"Heard you f—- through the walleye," now *that's* kinky! lol
 sirdroseph wrote:
This is fvcking like Disney compared to my library! Seriously the greater controversy should be how commercially cheesy they sound. However, I have heard such good things about them surely they must have much better songs, I will give them a chance. This one kinda sux though.
 
Metric is a commercial pop/rock band (with a cute lead singer) and I don't think they pretend to be anything else. This song is typical of the rest of the CD so if you don't like it you can probably move on. Emily Haines' solo stuff is a little less poppy and might be more to your tastes. Try this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ud6vj2NFU8

Turned it up loud enough that the lady in the opposite cube smiled. . . 
I just caught a bit of this song, and it reminds me somewhat of some Garbage's work.

Metric in Whistler No. 1 by ~crazycroat
Niko  ©2006-2010 ~crazycroat

Emily Haines of Metric
Playing at the Telus Ski & Snowboard Festival in Whistler, BC

.


This is fvcking like Disney compared to my library!{#Lol} Seriously the greater controversy should be how commercially cheesy they sound. However, I have heard such good things about them surely they must have much better songs, I will give them a chance. This one kinda sux though.{#Yes}

 g-rod wrote:

And the correct wording would be "I can has NEA grant money now?" {#Wink}

 
Go Kevin C; You can haz Cheezburgerz too
{#Sunny} (edited to add emoticon for NEA consideration)

sure it's been said -

Bit of Breeders in here...
 Baby_M wrote:

The f-bomb just ruins this one. She could've gotten the point across without it, and it would have made the song more univerally appealing.  I suspect it was thrown in to be "edgy" and "transgressive"—"Oooooh!  Lookit me!  I'm and independent free-thinking artiste defying bourgeoise convention!  I'm using the word FUCK in my lyrics!  Admire my artistic daring!  (Can I has NEA grant money now?)"

 

kevinc wrote:

Too edgy?  Really?  maybe they dont' play it unedited anymore, but I distinctly remember hearing the Who's Who Are You on FM radio unedited.  Yes, "who the fuck are you?" was aired on FM radio and not just late at night.

The same goes for Pink Floyd's Pigs (Three Different Ones), which has the line, "You fucked up old hag."  Maybe if I had a 9 year-old I'd worry about it (doubtful, but I might), but if you want to avoid profanity, I'd suggest you stick to commercial radio, where the words are all muted out.

Truth is that your daughter is unlikely to notice the word, especially since heavy rotation on RP is, at most, once/day.

 
And the correct wording would be "I can has NEA grant money now?" {#Wink}

I'm so grateful that RP introduced me to this album, apart from the sleep I've lost due to catchy lyric-replay in my head ("beating like a hammer, beating like a HAMMER!")
Me too - this album is on repeat for me right now. 
greyfin10 wrote:
Hah!  I was listening to Metric on my MP3 player (Stadium Love was playing) and pulled up Radioparadise and guess who's playing?  This album is easily at the top of my playlist these days.  Last thing I liked this much was the last Shins album (not saying they are similar, other than great music I love).
 


Have you seen that commercial which depicts a parent asking the child to *buckle-up* to then proceed to *smoke* in the car? Well, I am sure you can find many witty and funny scenarios—as well as equally pristinely true and current—when you apply the same pattern to *fucking* and something else of your choice ... go ahead, share some with us!  Meanwhile, please enjoy the richness of the music you can find here in RP!
{#Chillpill}{#Cheers}{#Sunny}


 LaurieinTucson wrote:
"...if it's something that you wouldn't want your kid or your boss to see while looking over your shoulder, then it doesn't belong here."

This implies the operators of this site have certain standards. They may not be the same as mine or yours. But they have them. All I am saying is this song is inconsistent with those standards. If they had never stated these standards, I never would have commented about this song.
Many of the people who responded to my comments seem to think I am offended by a simple word. I am not. I am also not trying to impose my standards on Radio Paradise. What I object to is inconsistency in RP's own stated standards.
 
I believe those standards refer to the input by listeners.   Not to the music they listen to.  Thankfully our hosts don't reject good music like this just because it is not PC. 

*Fuck* yeah.


 Baby_M wrote:

The f-bomb just ruins this one. She could've gotten the point across without it, and it would have made the song more univerally appealing.  I suspect it was thrown in to be "edgy" and "transgressive"—"Oooooh!  Lookit me!  I'm and independent free-thinking artiste defying bourgeoise convention!  I'm using the word FUCK in my lyrics!  Admire my artistic daring!  (Can I has NEA grant money now?)"

 
Too edgy?  Really?  maybe they dont' play it unedited anymore, but I distinctly remember hearing the Who's Who Are You on FM radio unedited.  Yes, "who the fuck are you?" was aired on FM radio and not just late at night.

The same goes for Pink Floyd's Pigs (Three Different Ones), which has the line, "You fucked up old hag."  Maybe if I had a 9 year-old I'd worry about it (doubtful, but I might), but if you want to avoid profanity, I'd suggest you stick to commercial radio, where the words are all muted out.

Truth is that your daughter is unlikely to notice the word, especially since heavy rotation on RP is, at most, once/day.

No, Sir, no!!
Joggin' with Em'
https://www.cbc.ca/gfx/images/arts/photos/2008/04/28/emily-haines-cp-4761468.jpg
(Gown by Dolce & Duct Tape)


 gjr wrote:
 fucking beats the fuck outta me  
 
Obviously.

Hah!  I was listening to Metric on my MP3 player (Stadium Love was playing) and pulled up Radioparadise and guess who's playing?  This album is easily at the top of my playlist these days.  Last thing I liked this much was the last Shins album (not saying they are similar, other than great music I love).
 Stefen wrote:
This song reminds me of neighbors I had who, I swear, were human bunnies. 
  I'm pretty sure I lived next to those folks in the early 80s.  She even howled like the assistant gym teacher in "Porky's".  Geesh.


This song reminds me of neighbors I had who, I swear, were human bunnies.  They were at it all the time.  Another neighbor finally moved because she couldn't get any sleep.   lol.
The tune wouldn't be bad if the lyricist didn't have to demonstrate the limitations of his or her vocabulary every couple of lines.
Whoa, I am digging this song!

Coming home cause I want to
Hang out with a starlet
Stare up at the ceiling
Preview of a screening
Flashback of a feeling
Sixth sense of a calling


 greyfin10 wrote:
Downloaded the album on the strength of this song and it seems to be really strong all around.  Worth seeking out.
 

+1 Not a weak song in the whole bunch. Aces!
Downloaded the album on the strength of this song and it seems to be really strong all around.  Worth seeking out.
"...if it's something that you wouldn't want your kid or your boss to see while looking over your shoulder, then it doesn't belong here."

This implies the operators of this site have certain standards. They may not be the same as mine or yours. But they have them. All I am saying is this song is inconsistent with those standards. If they had never stated these standards, I never would have commented about this song.
Many of the people who responded to my comments seem to think I am offended by a simple word. I am not. I am also not trying to impose my standards on Radio Paradise. What I object to is inconsistency in RP's own stated standards.
 mandolin wrote:

...the curious thing about language is that it's continually evolving - as soon as our own seven offensive words are accepted into common dialog, seven newly-incensing words will develop to take their place...

...just listen around your own everyday speech and without even trying very hard you can readily identify dozens of words which were scandalous one, two, three, four and more generations ago, before common usage transformed them into today's innocuous meanings...scandalous language is an integral part of human expression; it'll never go away...
 

Yes, because there will probably always be the desire to shock, offend, insult in some extreme way, verbally express an extreme emotion, fit in with a group or maybe distance from another group.  Language is powerful.  Ultimately, this language tends to be negative, destructive and (IMO) not very evolved.  Could this song have the same power with other words?  The writer obviously decided not, which is their choice as an artist.
The Community Page rules are not the same rules as the ones for DJing ;)


 
LaurieinTucson wrote:
All I am asking is for the music to be consistent with the purported philosophy of Radio Paradise—and I quote from the Community page:

  • Everything posted should be appropriate for all ages. The Internet is full of adults-only hangouts. We don't see any reason to have RP be one of them.

  • Please refrain from using racist, violent, or sexual imagery in avatars & forum pictures. A good guideline is that if it's something that you wouldn't want your kid or your boss to see while looking over your shoulder, then it doesn't belong here. We reserve the right to edit or delete any post or avatar without notice.

  • Play nice. While hearty debates are big fun, bashing people with differing views is not.

  • Please refrain from the excessive use of profanity.

  • Please don't post links to warez, filesharing, or porn sites.
 


Cuss it. This song rocks.
 scrubbrush wrote:
Further, there are what, Like 7 words in the English language that we hold up as offensive? I propose that we collectively agree to ‘get the fuck over it' and concern ourselves with bigger problems.
 
...the curious thing about language is that it's continually evolving - as soon as our own seven offensive words are accepted into common dialog, seven newly-incensing words will develop to take their place...

...just listen around your own everyday speech and without even trying very hard you can readily identify dozens of words which were scandalous one, two, three, four and more generations ago, before common usage transformed them into today's innocuous meanings...scandalous language is an integral part of human expression; it'll never go away...
 scrubbrush wrote:

 

I didn't really like this song until i heard the 'heard you fuck through the wall' line. Now it's an 8.

 Also, I have 2 kids, 6 and 8, and I have no objections to them hearing artists express themselves. I've explained to them that ‘musicians are grownups who occasionally say bad words, just like everyone from the Vice President to Grandma." They know that these are not words to be repeated.

Further, there are what, Like 7 words in the English language that we hold up as offensive? I propose that we collectively agree to ‘get the fuck over it' and concern ourselves with bigger problems.


 
I don't know if I'd raise the rating cuz of the line.  But I like what you said!
I saw George Carlin do his Seven Words bit live and it was hilarious.  But it pointed out that they are just words.
They won't cause your hair to fall out, go blind, etc.

What a sexy sound! Very, very cool! {#Whipit}
this song got me going—woke me right up in the middle of my work day stupor.
{#Hearteyes} Emily Haines

 

I didn't really like this song until i heard the 'heard you fuck through the wall' line. Now it's an 8.

 Also, I have 2 kids, 6 and 8, and I have no objections to them hearing artists express themselves. I've explained to them that ‘musicians are grownups who occasionally say bad words, just like everyone from the Vice President to Grandma." They know that these are not words to be repeated.

Further, there are what, Like 7 words in the English language that we hold up as offensive? I propose that we collectively agree to ‘get the fuck over it' and concern ourselves with bigger problems.


 lmic wrote:
(edit) . . . Face it, children of this era are subjected to sexuality in media at every turn. Personally, the almost unbelievably prurient Gossip Girl serving as a vehicle to titillate young viewers into buying Maybelline mascara bothers me way more than the honesty of this song does.
 
Well said.

Laurie,

Having been raised in the 60s and 70s by hippie parents who—to say the very least—respected few boundaries, I have some sympathy for your comments. As a young girl, I got plenty disturbed when they subjected us children to the Fugs:

Do you like boobs a lot?
Yes, I like boobs a lot!
Boobs a lot, boobs a lot!
You gotta like boobs a lot!


Or Country Joe at Woodstock, sexually explicit Zappa, etc., etc....

However, I fail to see the issue if your kids aren't themselves troubled by the content of this song... IIRC, you mentioned that your daughter sings happily along with it?

Face it, children of this era are subjected to sexuality in media at every turn. Personally, the almost unbelievably prurient Gossip Girl serving as a vehicle to titillate young viewers into buying Maybelline mascara bothers me way more than the honesty of this song does.

-Michelle

Fuck it, really, I am not a prude. I have never objected to anyone else's use of the word "fuck" in these commentaries. I have been known to say the word aloud sometimes. But I would not say it to someone I did not know well. I would not use it to describe what I did last night. The word has many uses. And it has been used in music for the last 30 or 40 years. But the use of it in this song is unusual in that it is used as a very literal verb instead of an exclamation or an epithet.
If my 9-year-old daughter broke a glass and said "oh, fuck!" I would try to give her a disapproving look, while I tried to suppress a laugh.
But if she said "I heard you and daddy fucking last night," I would ask her to use the terms "making love" or "having sex." It's just more polite. Do you see the difference?
We are all here listening because we have the same taste in music as Bill and Rebecca. If I could speak to them, I would ask if they really feel this song, because of its literal use of fuck, isn't crossing the line.
If I talk about the word "Nigger," it's one thing. If I use it to describe someone, it's another. I have said the word "Nigger." And I didn't cover it up by saying "N-word." But I have never, and will never, use it to describe or address a person. That would be rude.
If Radio Paradise did not have the standards it states in its "Community" page, I never would have spoken up here in the first place.


 lmic wrote:
Hi bluefrog, {#Arrowd}

I believe that vandal is using the word as Ayn Rand employed it in her novel Atlas Shrugged.

 
close. . . but I was shooting for a more Heinlein-esque definition: "Beware of altruism. It is based on self-deception, the root of all evil."

bluefrog's definition of altruism is textbook.  I'm looking for something more contextual.  Where Rand (who despised the concept) might define altruism as self-destruction and further that altruistic people felt that they could only be valuable in subjugation to others; Heinlein held a different view and also supplies the context.

Heinlein believed that it was better not to be too altruistic and also not to live in subjugation.  But his view was more pragmatic: "The human race divides politically into those who want people to be controlled and those who have no such desire. The former are idealists acting from highest motives for the greatest good of the greatest number. The latter are surly curmudgeons, suspicious and lacking in altruism. But they are more comfortable neighbors than the other sort."

Bottom line: it is self deception to believe that in the name of doing good for us all that the greatest good would be for one to suggest that the song writer should censor the song or that Bill should not play the song.  'Voluntary' censorship is top of the slippery slope.  'If you're not for us, you're against us.'  Or, 'If you don't censor yourself because it is the right thing to do then you're wrong.'  That is the bottom of the slope.

That's what I was shooting for.  More or less. . .

{#Meditate}

Hi bluefrog, {#Arrowd}

I believe that vandal is using the word as Ayn Rand employed it in her novel Atlas Shrugged.

 vandal wrote:

The old adage that "it never hurts to ask," is situational and contextually defined. 

I can tell you "what's up with them."  We don't like others directing our lives.  Your "suggestion" is altruistic in nature: A directive couched in passive aggressive, yet reasonable and civil language.  Misguided altruism, well - altruism in most forms, is a slippery slope toward dystopia. 

{#Meditate}



I do not think that word means what you think it means.

Altruism : unselfish regard for or devotion to the welfare of others

So while I share your sentiment that RP should keep songs with "fuck" in them, I think that altruism as a slippery slope towards dystopia is a bit over-the-top.

Someone trying to direct my life is certainly not what I would consider altruistic.

 tpa29970 wrote:
On the balance, I am happy to have RP playing in the house, "fuck" and all.    I just thought: "Hey, it wouldn't hurt to ask."    It really seems to bug some people, though, just asking.  I wonder what's up with them?
 
The old adage that "it never hurts to ask," is situational and contextually defined. 

I can tell you "what's up with them."  We don't like others directing our lives.  Your "suggestion" is altruistic in nature: A directive couched in passive aggressive, yet reasonable and civil language.  Misguided altruism, well - altruism in most forms, is a slippery slope toward dystopia. 

{#Meditate}

tpa29970 wrote:
Good parenting. Which starts with treating children with respect, not calling them "sprogs," trying to find quality cultural content for them (like Radio Paradise), and taking an active interest in supporting and improving what's there.

I could take a "turn it off if you don't like it" approach to Radio Paradise. Or anything else in my life. Seems a little hostile and defeatist, though. I prefer to take a "make a polite request if you don't like it" approach. By taking such an approach, you can accomplish nice things—like getting children to cheerfully wipe down your counters.

On the balance, I am happy to have RP playing in the house, "fuck" and all. I just thought: "Hey, it wouldn't hurt to ask." It really seems to bug some people, though, just asking. I wonder what's up with them?

Yes, it really does bother adults when you attempt to control them because of a situation you elected - what's up with that is erosion of freedom. The zeitgeist of "we know what's best for you, just let us engineer your life and everything will be fine" is becoming so pervasive in government that an disproportionately vocal minority seems to think it also applies to societal behavior.

Huge difference between "turn it off if you don't like it" and "you change the content you enjoy because I don't like it". I lovingly refer to myself as a child as "sprog" - if you don't like the word check your own head, not mine.

Request for mind control denied. Take responsibility for your own situation, don't dump it on my plate and think you're making the world a better place.




Metric by KATE YANG NIKODYM 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/katealvarez/
 
emily haines of metric
virgin festival!
toronto
09september07 

© All rights reserved.


 Baby_M wrote:

OK, just for purposes of discussion, let's try a little thought experiment here.  What if, instead of an F-bomb, it was the N-word?

If she dropped a gratuitous N-bomb in the song, I would object to it at least as strongly, and on much of the same grounds: it's unnecessary, it's offensive and family-unfriendly, it's not anywhere near as creative or original as she probably thinks it is.

Would those of you who are defending her right to shout "FUCK!" in a crowded public square defend her "poetic license" to use the N-word with the same vigor?  Would you be as comfortable with Bill playing it?  If not, why not?

I'll concede that there are times when either an F-bomb or an N-bomb would be artistically defensible (for instance, in a portrayal of an historic event where it's an actual quote), but using either for the "shock" value is just a sign of immaturity.
 
I think you missed my original point: you're ridiculing the singer based on your values.  Its obvious she doesn't share yours.  To put her down because she doesn't believe what you believe is a fool's game. 

Hmm.  Let's take a quick peek at your statements from above.  I happen to have a very large number of black relatives whom I like to call family.  If I were playing the altered version of the song as you described above while they were in my home I think they wouldn't bat an eye.  The "N" word has no meaning in our family because we don't view each other through a color filter.  We are people in our family and we don't give petty words like nigger any more power than the word fuck. 

You are part of the problem, not a proponent of a solution.  Give up your sensibility that says the word nigger is powerful and you empower yourself. 

{#Meditate}


Emily and Josh by ~escape-is-at-hand
Kyle Raven   ©2006-2010 ~escape-is-at-hand

Emily Haines and Josh Winstead of the band Metric.



i fucking love this fucking song.  what the fuck is wrong with saying fuck?  or fucking singing it?  fucking beats the fuck outta me    {#Bounce}

 Businessgypsy wrote:


On a completely unrelated note, how do you get a 9 year old to help with cleaning, cheerfully or otherwise? On this count, I am extremely impressed.
 
Good parenting.  Which starts with treating children with respect, not calling them "sprogs," trying to find quality cultural content for them (like Radio Paradise), and taking an active interest in supporting and improving what's there.   

I could take a "turn it off if you don't like it" approach to Radio Paradise.  Or anything else in my life.  Seems a little hostile and defeatist, though.  I prefer to take a "make a polite request if you don't like it" approach.   By taking such an approach, you can accomplish nice things—like getting children to cheerfully wipe down your counters.  

On the balance, I am happy to have RP playing in the house, "fuck" and all.    I just thought: "Hey, it wouldn't hurt to ask."    It really seems to bug some people, though, just asking.  I wonder what's up with them?

 ktcl wrote:
Can we please give this song a rest?  It seems like it plays daily.
 

No fucking way.   This obession with using the F word is ridiculous.   you don't even notice it unless you listen close anyway.   It IS a SONG  ya know... and a damn good one too.

Baby_M wrote:
OK, just for purposes of discussion, let's try a little thought experiment here. What if, instead of an F-bomb, it was the N-word?
The N word? The F bomb? Cripes, it's nigger. Like fuck, it's used for a variety of forms to communicate everything from friendship to hate - depending on context. You hear it every day on every street corner if you're in an urban area. Less often and from car speakers at stoplights if not. Like water fountains, it's not for the exclusive use of any race. What about real life scares people so much?

The singer did not utter a racial epithet, kill an endangered animal or abuse an altar boy. Misdirection = failed argument.


Funny, people saying they have a problem with the word fuck, but probably are the same people who watch 'reality shows' in which the word is used extensively by the 'reality actors' but, it's bleeped. 
 vandal wrote:

"Universally appealing?"  Its a pop song.  She's not trying to "get her point across."  She's writing poetry to music and poetic license proposes that she can create however she chooses. 

Likewise, you can react however you so choose, but to project your political sensibilities into the mind of the poet and ridicule her based on your mindset is absurd. 

I happen to like the lyrics and the presence of the word fuck, which typically appears in my casual verbal discourse on a regular basis. 

{#Meditate}

 
OK, just for purposes of discussion, let's try a little thought experiment here.  What if, instead of an F-bomb, it was the N-word?

If she dropped a gratuitous N-bomb in the song, I would object to it at least as strongly, and on much of the same grounds: it's unnecessary, it's offensive and family-unfriendly, it's not anywhere near as creative or original as she probably thinks it is.

Would those of you who are defending her right to shout "FUCK!" in a crowded public square defend her "poetic license" to use the N-word with the same vigor?  Would you be as comfortable with Bill playing it?  If not, why not?

I'll concede that there are times when either an F-bomb or an N-bomb would be artistically defensible (for instance, in a portrayal of an historic event where it's an actual quote), but using either for the "shock" value is just a sign of immaturity.


 tpa29970 wrote:
  ...I have nothing against the word "Fuck," and I'm pretty liberal about my teenage sons' language.  But I've got do draw the line somewhere.  My line is somewhere around my nine-year-old daughter cheerfully mopping down the counters singing "...I heard you fuck through the wall..."  
 Flashback to 1976, James Taylor blasting from my turntable on the live version of Steamroller Blues. I hear the door open and run to lift the needle before my mom gets in the house, slamming into her carrying a bag of groceries. I stare helplessly as Sweet Baby James belts out a cathartic Mother-fuckin! and my Mom's jaw drops. What follows is a great parent son discussion about appropriate venues for arty colorful language and a lot of laughs. Life passages.

Where to draw the line is the age at which YOU choose to expose your child to magazines, movies, television and internet radio using adult themes and language. The idea that the rest of us have to curb our brains because you make a parenting error with your 9 year old is right up there with parents choosing to bring their screaming sprogs into the restaurant where I'm dropping $200 bucks on a special occasion meal, holding every adult interaction in the room hostage to their selfish blunder.

If you don't want your 9 year old cheerfully singing fuck, don't play Radio Paradise around them - and never expect the rest of us to stop cheerfully singing whatever brings us joy if you do.


On a completely unrelated note, how do you get a 9 year old to help with cleaning, cheerfully or otherwise? On this count, I am extremely impressed.


 ziggytrix wrote:


I only wish to make a point.  Please don't take this as patronizing.


Main Entry: ex·ces·sive
Pronunciation: ik-ˈse-siv
Function: adjective
Date: 14th century

: exceeding what is usual, proper, necessary, or normal



You see how this is not equivalent to a zero-tolerance policy for profanity?

 
And as Bill says...
 Actually we try to avoid that since a lot of people have us on at work, in coffee shops & other public locations, etc. Sometimes one slips through anyway.

 LaurieinTucson wrote:
  • Please refrain from the excessive use of profanity.
 

I only wish to make a point.  Please don't take this as patronizing.


Main Entry: ex·ces·sive
Pronunciation: \ik-ˈse-siv\
Function: adjective
Date: 14th century

: exceeding what is usual, proper, necessary, or normal



You see how this is not equivalent to a zero-tolerance policy for profanity?

Mooooom!!!  The horse girl said fuck again!!
Can we please give this song a rest?  It seems like it plays daily.
 Dalebarely wrote:
I like to use bad language, badly.

got my tickets to Muse/Metric in the mail today. WOO HOO!!
 
NoEnzLefttoSplit wrote:

Hey dude, that's pretty bad language for a site like this.

It's "hear fucking hear!"
 
 
lucky you!!  great line up.  Be interested to hear who gave the better performance.

All I am asking is for the music to be consistent with the purported philosophy of Radio Paradise—and I quote from the Community page:

  • Everything posted should be appropriate for all ages. The Internet is full of adults-only hangouts. We don't see any reason to have RP be one of them.

  • Please refrain from using racist, violent, or sexual imagery in avatars & forum pictures. A good guideline is that if it's something that you wouldn't want your kid or your boss to see while looking over your shoulder, then it doesn't belong here. We reserve the right to edit or delete any post or avatar without notice.

  • Play nice. While hearty debates are big fun, bashing people with differing views is not.

  • Please refrain from the excessive use of profanity.

  • Please don't post links to warez, filesharing, or porn sites.


This one is really growing on me. Reminds me a lot of some of Liz Phair's stuff (and, no, not just because they both drop the f-bomb {#Smile}), along with Belly, Veruca Salt, and other 90's chick rockers.

I like to use bad language, badly.

got my tickets to Muse/Metric in the mail today. WOO HOO!!
 
NoEnzLefttoSplit wrote:

Hey dude, that's pretty bad language for a site like this.

It's "hear fucking hear!"
 


 Dalebarely wrote:

here fucking here!
 
Hey dude, that's pretty bad language for a site like this.

It's "hear fucking hear!", ok?



Emily Haines by ~Karelliann
©2010 ~Karelliann 

Emily Haines.

Metric - Fantasies Tour - Sherbrooke.


 vandal wrote:

"Universally appealing?"  Its a pop song.  She's not trying to "get her point across."  She's writing poetry to music and poetic license proposes that she can create however she chooses. 

Likewise, you can react however you so choose, but to project your political sensibilities into the mind of the poet and ridicule her based on your mindset is absurd. 

I happen to like the lyrics and the presence of the word fuck, which typically appears in my casual verbal discourse on a regular basis. 

{#Meditate}
 
here fucking here!
 Baby_M wrote:

The f-bomb just ruins this one. She could've gotten the point across without it, and it would have made the song more univerally appealing.  I suspect it was thrown in to be "edgy" and "transgressive"—"Oooooh!  Lookit me!  I'm and independent free-thinking artiste defying bourgeoise convention!  I'm using the word FUCK in my lyrics!  Admire my artistic daring!  (Can I has NEA grant money now?)"

 
"Universally appealing?"  Its a pop song.  She's not trying to "get her point across."  She's writing poetry to music and poetic license proposes that she can create however she chooses. 

Likewise, you can react however you so choose, but to project your political sensibilities into the mind of the poet and ridicule her based on your mindset is absurd. 

I happen to like the lyrics and the presence of the word fuck, which typically appears in my casual verbal discourse on a regular basis. 

{#Meditate}

 Darkmatter wrote:
  Col. Kurtz:
We train young men to drop fire on people. But their commanders won't allow them to write "fuck" on their airplanes because it's obscene!
Perfect. Thank you for the perspective, Darkmatter. I absolutely agree that we have the much bigger things to worry about in this world than the artful use of a profanity in a pop song.


 LaurieinTucson wrote:
Bill and Rebecca,
I'm not a prude—really. But I play RP at work. And like you say in the forum disclaimer, "if you wouldn't want your kid or your boss..." Well, I wouldn't want my kid or my boss to hear this song coming from my office.
It also seems immature as a song, anyway.
 
 Col. Kurtz:
We train young men to drop fire on people. But their commanders won't allow them to write "fuck" on their airplanes because it's obscene!


 rcurrier wrote:
Try as I might, I can't get "Heard you have sexual intercourse through the wall" to work in the lyrics.
 
It's the image of having sexual intercourse through the wall which makes my mind boggle ;)

 rcurrier wrote:
Try as I might, I can't get "Heard you have sexual intercourse through the wall" to work in the lyrics.

I guess for a single syllable word, "Heard you screw through the wall" might work, although it could just as well mean someone was attaching some shelving brackets with too long of a fastener.

"Fuck" fits and is clear and unambiguous. Let's just stick with what works.
 
How about "heard it all through the wall"...
I can't help but love this whole album, I'm fine with everything else...I'm not picky,,,


Try as I might, I can't get "Heard you have sexual intercourse through the wall" to work in the lyrics.

I guess for a single syllable word, "Heard you screw through the wall" might work, although it could just as well mean someone was attaching some shelving brackets with too long of a fastener.

"Fuck" fits and is clear and unambiguous. Let's just stick with what works.
 tpa29970 wrote:

By "family experience," I mean: "An experience that one shares with one's family."   I'm not using "family" to mean "Family Values."  

To get it out on the table:  This song uses the word "Fuck" quite prominently in its catchy and hummable chorus.    I have nothing against the word "Fuck," and I'm pretty liberal about my teenage sons' language.  But I've got do draw the line somewhere.  My line is somewhere around my nine-year-old daughter cheerfully mopping down the counters singing "...I heard you fuck through the wall..."  

 

Modern secular folk used to have a residual amount of respect for the more conservative attitudes and cultures that meandered life with us.

No more.


This group is starting to grow on me.  She seems to actually have something to say and does it well.  Nice light touch.
 
 Baby_M wrote:

The f-bomb just ruins this one. She could've gotten the point across without it, and it would have made the song more univerally appealing.  I suspect it was thrown in to be "edgy" and "transgressive"—"Oooooh!  Lookit me!  I'm and independent free-thinking artiste defying bourgeoise convention!  I'm using the word FUCK in my lyrics!  Admire my artistic daring!  (Can I has NEA grant money now?)"

 
I doubt it. I'd bet you spent more time analyzing that line than she did writing it.

 lmic wrote:

I think you pegged it, fredriley. :)
 
Odd.  I thought someone would rise to the defense of Taylor Swift.
 fredriley wrote:
It wasn't kids needing protection against bad language, it was adults who needed protection from kids' language.
 
I think you pegged it, fredriley. :)

 Baby_M wrote:

The f-bomb just ruins this one. She could've gotten the point across without it, and it would have made the song more univerally appealing.  I suspect it was thrown in to be "edgy" and "transgressive"—"Oooooh!  Lookit me!  I'm and independent free-thinking artiste defying bourgeoise convention!  I'm using the word FUCK in my lyrics!  Admire my artistic daring!  (Can I has NEA grant money now?)"

 
Ooooh... insulted your sensibilities did it?  You have the option to turn it off.

Censored Stamp


 tpa29970 wrote:

By "family experience," I mean: "An experience that one shares with one's family."   I'm not using "family" to mean "Family Values."  

To get it out on the table:  This song uses the word "Fuck" quite prominently in its catchy and hummable chorus.    I have nothing against the word "Fuck," and I'm pretty liberal about my teenage sons' language.  But I've got do draw the line somewhere.  My line is somewhere around my nine-year-old daughter cheerfully mopping down the counters singing "...I heard you fuck through the wall..."  

 
The f-bomb just ruins this one. She could've gotten the point across without it, and it would have made the song more univerally appealing.  I suspect it was thrown in to be "edgy" and "transgressive"—"Oooooh!  Lookit me!  I'm and independent free-thinking artiste defying bourgeoise convention!  I'm using the word FUCK in my lyrics!  Admire my artistic daring!  (Can I has NEA grant money now?)"

 tpa29970 wrote:

By "family experience," I mean: "An experience that one shares with one's family."   I'm not using "family" to mean "Family Values."  

To get it out on the table:  This song uses the word "Fuck" quite prominently in its catchy and hummable chorus.    I have nothing against the word "Fuck," and I'm pretty liberal about my teenage sons' language.  But I've got do draw the line somewhere.  My line is somewhere around my nine-year-old daughter cheerfully mopping down the counters singing "...I heard you fuck through the wall..."  

 
All this fuss about one word in regular everyday usage in the English-speaking world. I'm afraid that your 9yo almost certainly uses 'fuck', as well as a heap of other swear words, at school. When I was in high school 30 years ago (sad, I know), our playground vocabulary would have made a trooper blanche. It wasn't kids needing protection against bad language, it was adults who needed protection from kids' language.

It's just a word. Get over it and enjoy the song  :)

 lmic wrote:

{#Question}

Rock, Jazz, and Blues are but 3 genres that have in times past been categorically branded as unfit for the young.
 
By "family experience," I mean: "An experience that one shares with one's family."   I'm not using "family" to mean "Family Values."  

To get it out on the table:  This song uses the word "Fuck" quite prominently in its catchy and hummable chorus.    I have nothing against the word "Fuck," and I'm pretty liberal about my teenage sons' language.  But I've got do draw the line somewhere.  My line is somewhere around my nine-year-old daughter cheerfully mopping down the counters singing "...I heard you fuck through the wall..."  

 tpa29970 wrote:
  And good music should be a family experience! 
 
{#Question}

Rock, Jazz, and Blues are but 3 genres that have in times past been categorically branded as unfit for the young.

 LaurieinTucson wrote:
Bill and Rebecca,
I'm not a prude—really. But I play RP at work. And like you say in the forum disclaimer, "if you wouldn't want your kid or your boss..." Well, I wouldn't want my kid or my boss to hear this song coming from my office.
It also seems immature as a song, anyway.
 
I'm going to second this.   I listen to RP a lot at home on weekends.  I want to share music with my kids.  My 9-year-old daughter gets exposed to Pink Floyd and Neko Case and Patty Griffin instead of Taylor Swift, and I think that's a good thing.  Yay, RP!   There are very few songs on RP that I would not want to play with my daughter in the room.  In fact, I can only think of one.   

I do enjoy the song when I have my headphones on—but it's a little hard to clean the kitchen that way.  And good music should be a family experience! 
I found myself drifting from work into this song.