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Son Volt — Jukebox of Steel
Album: American Central Dust
Avg rating:
6.6

Your rating:
Total ratings: 494









Released: 2009
Length: 2:51
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Continental motion certainty
The merciful wheels
Where the living are living
On solvents and ashes
Time chain of loneliness
Half tone rebellions
Nomadic upturns and lights
The skeleton key turns the night

Antiheroes to follow too
Bar and string salvation
Throw the calendar away
Gonna find a jukebox of steel

A still life with a bottle
A newspaper and a glass
The carrot dangles and the dance goes on
The bitters circle the drain
Emancipate the commonplace
Ride high the relief roads
Of nightfall and enchanted ends
Revelry in borrowed clothes

Antiheroes to follow too
Bar and string salvation
Throw the calendar away
Gonna find a jukebox of steel
Comments (60)add comment
 pauleywalnuts wrote:
They're no Wilco, but still a great band... {#Wink}
 
Since we already have a Wilco, this is fortunate.
 Tippster wrote:
Of course, otherwise we wouldn't have the Beatles or Rolling Stones, since their early work was derived from 50's Rockabilly and the Blues.  Jeez this "derivative" argument is lame.

I'd argue the Grateful Dead had a hand in developing the Bluegrass/Country to Rock crossover as well.  Workingman's Dead did come out in 1970, after all.

...and Gram Parsons was recording w/the Byrds in parallel to Neil forming Crazy Horse.  Here's a good wiki on Roots Rock: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roots_rock

 
Agreed!  Nothing is lamer than the derivative argument.  A derivation is also not a copy/ripoff of its' inspiration.  As your comment suggests (Stones/Beatles), it can be and often is a starting point for greatness and innovation.
Ha! All their songs tie back to Belleville IL and the nearby flood plains of the Mississippi.  
Something I love about this voice.  But is it borrowed?
My hearing is going or my imagination is on it's own path. I 'thought he sang 'Once I hear a Tupac tune'....which got my attention and made me look at the lyrics, which indicate "Antiheroes to follow too". 
I reallly like this. Like all the guitars.
Like this a lot.Allmusic gives it 4.
Tremendous talent!


It must be beer o'clock, thanks Bill.
 RKeaton wrote:
I could never like anyone who didn't like Son Volt.

 
Oh well.
 expatlar wrote:
Nice to get reminded of this band and to get prompted to go investigate them further. To me, very good music.

 
You won't be disappointed.  I'm a huge fan.  Start with the Trace album.
i am hearing neil young influences. maybe it is just me.
I don't think it's too much of a limb job to compare Uncle Tupelo with Buffalo Springfield. Both boasted first rate songwriters (Farrar and Tweedy; Stills and Young) and musicians, and both broke up bitterly after a very brief and brillian career. Both Farrar and Tweedy, like Stills and Young, have gone on to stellar "solo" careers which are every much as vital as their original group.

This is important because often groups spin off solo acts that don't quite achieve the artistic, if not popular, heights of the original group. I think The Byrds is one example. Yes, McGuinn, Hillman, and Crosby have had respectable solo careers, especially Hillman, but IMHO their group legend dwarfs their solo achievements.

The (Small) Faces is one of those rare exceptions, in which every member went on to an amazing solo career: Steve Marriott, Kenney Jones, Ronnie Lane, and Ian McLagan, who later, except for Marriott, joined forces with Rod Stewart and Ron Wood. Now THAT was a band.

Then again you can have seminal bands of little import that spawn monster solo careers, like Rising Sons did Taj Mahal and Ry Cooder.
play that slide man!  {#Cowboy}
Nice to get reminded of this band and to get prompted to go investigate them further. To me, very good music.
 KurtfromLaQuinta wrote:

I'll first the Byrds.
 

 AndyJ wrote:

Just need a 12-string Martin and a wee touch of reverb...

 
The Byrds distinctive guitar sound was primarily from Roger McGuinn's use of twelve-string Rickenbacker electrics, not Martin acoustics, though I'm sure they had a few of those lying around as well.
 WOW...you certainly articulated a wish I can definitely relate to...  and, GREAT SONG!  That killer twangy hook, that wicked jam returns and lingers, lingers and returns!
—————-
lily34 wrote:
damn. i love this so much. 
makes me wish i could have another "music night" with my ex, to enjoy stuff like this and just talk about music, etc. nothing else. that's what i miss the most. 

damn. i love this so much. 
makes me wish i could have another "music night" with my ex, to enjoy stuff like this and just talk about music, etc. nothing else. that's what i miss the most. 
yes to son volt
 BKardon wrote:
 Just because a band sets the bar, doesn't mean other bands can't come after that.
  Of course, otherwise we wouldn't have the Beatles or Rolling Stones, since their early work was derived from 50's Rockabilly and the Blues.  Jeez this "derivative" argument is lame.

I'd argue the Grateful Dead had a hand in developing the Bluegrass/Country to Rock crossover as well.  Workingman's Dead did come out in 1970, after all.

...and Gram Parsons was recording w/the Byrds in parallel to Neil forming Crazy Horse.  Here's a good wiki on Roots Rock: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roots_rock
I could never like anyone who didn't like Son Volt.
 softjeans wrote:

Amen. (Though I don't know that "everything else" in alt country is derivative — what about Gram Parsons, after all?)

Nonetheless, it's true that Tweedy and gang like Young and Crazy Horse. Tweedy did a live version of Young's pain-filled "The Losing End" that is absolutely great, and shows both great artistry and great admiration.

 
True about Gram Parsons, and it's not as if Neil Young just grabbed that genre out of thin air.  His music was derivative of country music that came before him.  All music (and art) is derivative. 


I can't join the haters of this band. Not my favorite, but it's in the same cubby as Wilco and Old 97s, not far from the spot I hold for Neko Case and Gillian Welch.
 KurtfromLaQuinta wrote:

I'll first the Byrds.

 
Just need a 12-string Martin and a wee touch of reverb...

Time flies when you're having fun!  cohifi wrote:
I like this song.  Funny how it looks like Mr. Tweedy is his drummer to me!
 
(i'm the short one on the right) : -)

 pinklife wrote:

I'll second Whiskeytown.

 
I'll first the Byrds.

They're no Wilco, but still a great band... {#Wink}
 drews wrote:
Following a decent REM track, this is too blatantly REM derivative to be enjoyable (or maybe that was part of the Bill grand plan in some perverse sort of way)
 

Personally, this annoys me just like the Eagles used to irritate me. Ick.
 socalhol wrote:
 MojoJojo wrote:
Nails + chalkboard = Sun Volt

Dufus, faux-folk/grunge, whiny tripe.

Yes, I am in a bad mood, but still...


I'm in a good mood and I'll still agree with you! 

Sun Volt = {#No}
 

Hmmm, don't know Sun Volt, i'm gonna have to look 'em up.

Son Volt though, i like!
Following a decent REM track, this is too blatantly REM derivative to be enjoyable (or maybe that was part of the Bill grand plan in some perverse sort of way)


I like this song.  Funny how it looks like Mr. Tweedy is his drummer to me!
I believe Jay Farrar would openly agree that Crazy Horse are definitive.  There's no denying that Neil Young is maybe the most influential artist of the past 50 years.  Just because a band sets the bar, doesn't mean other bands can't come after that.  I welcome both bands in a big way, and I'd also welcome some DBT on here (something off Pizza Deliverance, perhaps?).
 volnomad wrote:

The admission that you don't like Radiohead speaks volumes...
 

Have to agree with that, you dont like Radiohead.....? maybe you are missing YOUR soul? 
 MojoJojo wrote:
Nails + chalkboard = Sun Volt

Dufus, faux-folk/grunge, whiny tripe.

Yes, I am in a bad mood, but still...


I'm in a good mood and I'll still agree with you! 

Sun Volt = {#No}


 volnomad wrote:

The definitive alt-country band is Neil Young and Crazy Horse. Everything else is just derivative. Uncle Tupelo owes a lot to Young's early work. Check it out.
 
Amen. (Though I don't know that "everything else" in alt country is derivative — what about Gram Parsons, after all?)

Nonetheless, it's true that Tweedy and gang like Young and Crazy Horse. Tweedy did a live version of Young's pain-filled "The Losing End" that is absolutely great, and shows both great artistry and great admiration.

..."The carrot dangles and the dance goes on..."

Yah..  {#Yes}
 volnomad wrote:

The definitive alt-country band is Neil Young and Crazy Horse. Everything else is just derivative. Uncle Tupelo owes a lot to Young's early work. Check it out.
 

Yea, you are correct in that they are one of the forebearers of the modern alt-country genre, no doubt. I just love DBT even more than Crazy Horse and yes I think Crazy Horse is great too!{#Cheers}
6 -> 7
nice. slide. guitar.
 sirdroseph wrote:

Now I realize that Uncle Tupelo came much earlier than DBT so chronologically speaking them being first and all I see your point. I just think that DBT is superior to Uncle Tupelo. Well, Hell I just like em a lot better!{#Cowboy}
 
The definitive alt-country band is Neil Young and Crazy Horse. Everything else is just derivative. Uncle Tupelo owes a lot to Young's early work. Check it out.
 Cruzan wrote:


Sounds like this.
"nnneeeeyyyyaaaaaaoooooohhhhhhhhwhhaaaaaaaaaaaaa"

And the intrumental parts all sound the same for each song. Straight ahead and boring. Not a hook or groove to be found.

I have tried, really. I just can't get into the Son Volt, Wilco, etc. stuff at all.

At least it is not as painful as Radiohead.... :-)
 
The admission that you don't like Radiohead speaks volumes...
Nails + chalkboard = Sun Volt

Dufus, faux-folk/grunge, whiny tripe.

Yes, I am in a bad mood, but still...




 bpkengor wrote:
I don't know.  Jay Farrar's voice makes him sound like a complainer/whiner.    Nice enough song, though
 

Sounds like this.
"nnneeeeyyyyaaaaaaoooooohhhhhhhhwhhaaaaaaaaaaaaa"

And the intrumental parts all sound the same for each song. Straight ahead and boring. Not a hook or groove to be found.

I have tried, really. I just can't get into the Son Volt, Wilco, etc. stuff at all.

At least it is not as painful as Radiohead.... :-)


 h8rhater wrote:

DBT is a great band but by NO MEANS are they the definitive band of the alt-country movement.  Those dudes are Southern Rockers all the way.  Besides everyone knows the definitive band of alt-country is Uncle Tupelo (and by association its successors Son Volt and Wilco).  I'd maybe entertain the argument for the Jayhawks or Whiskeytown but DBT... nah.

 
I'll second Whiskeytown.

 sirdroseph wrote:

Now I realize that Uncle Tupelo came much earlier than DBT so chronologically speaking them being first and all I see your point. I just think that DBT is superior to Uncle Tupelo. Well, Hell I just like em a lot better!{#Cowboy}
 
DBT is a great band!  I've been to a lot of shows and they never let down.

 h8rhater wrote:

DBT is a great band but by NO MEANS are they the definitive band of the alt-country movement.  Those dudes are Southern Rockers all the way.  Besides everyone knows the definitive band of alt-country is Uncle Tupelo (and by association its successors Son Volt and Wilco).  I'd maybe entertain the argument for the Jayhawks or Whiskeytown but DBT... nah.

 
Now I realize that Uncle Tupelo came much earlier than DBT so chronologically speaking them being first and all I see your point. I just think that DBT is superior to Uncle Tupelo. Well, Hell I just like em a lot better!{#Cowboy}
YEAH!!! RIGHT ON!!! This is good!!!

9
bouncin' up and down

just saw these guys at the WOW Hall here in

Eugene, Oregon

>^_^<


BTW... RP please play more Drive By Truckers!!
 sirdroseph wrote:
Don't get me wrong; Son Volt is a good band and everything, but how come RP can have all these Jay Farrar and Son Volt songs and not have hardly any Drive By Truckers; THE definitive band of the Alt Country movement?{#Doh}
 
DBT is a great band but by NO MEANS are they the definitive band of the alt-country movement.  Those dudes are Southern Rockers all the way.  Besides everyone knows the definitive band of alt-country is Uncle Tupelo (and by association its successors Son Volt and Wilco).  I'd maybe entertain the argument for the Jayhawks or Whiskeytown but DBT... nah.

Son Volt doesn't have much country essence. Let's try some early Blue Rodeo, say Diamond Mine.


Just caught Jay and the guys live in a tiny little joint.  Awesome.
Don't get me wrong; Son Volt is a good band and everything, but how come RP can have all these Jay Farrar and Son Volt songs and not have hardly any Drive By Truckers; THE definitive band of the Alt Country movement?{#Doh}
 paulmack wrote:


Did you like this one more than Okemah?
 

Dunno...both are pretty good, but this one was really consistently good. Trace is probably my alltime favorite though.
 Bocephus wrote:
Great song...nice to hear on RP. One of the best SV albums in a while.
 

Did you like this one more than Okemah?
Nice add Bill! These guys are still going strong. {#Cool}
Reminds me that I always liked the Uncle Tupelo songs sung by Jay Farrar better (even though I also liked the JT sung songs). This reminds me a bit more of UT than the last couple of Son Volt albums.
I don't know.  Jay Farrar's voice makes him sound like a complainer/whiner.    Nice enough song, though
One of my favorite CD purchases this year.
Great song...nice to hear on RP. One of the best SV albums in a while.