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Artie Shaw — Nightmare
Album: The Essential Artie Shaw
Avg rating:
7.9

Your rating:
Total ratings: 977









Released: 1937
Length: 2:49
Plays (last 30 days): 1
(Instrumental)
Comments (88)add comment
If anxiety was a song, this would be it.
Music, like fine art is timeless..It is a language all its own; spoken to many over the centuries but not 'heard'or understood by all.   Proclivities wrote:

Yes, it is always true that older generations will maintain that everything older is better than the new stuff, and their memories are selective about forgetting the lousy things from the past.  There was plenty of bad music 80 years ago - Al Jolson anyone?
 
 Solanus wrote:

Hopefully none of today's crap will be remembered at all, but there is a ton of other good stuff being put out today (even from new artists) that will make the cut, even 80 years from now. Just keep in mind: so much of the music that was played back then hasn't survived, we only hold up the ones that made it as "evidence".

 
Yes, it is always true that older generations will maintain that everything older is better than the new stuff, and their memories are selective about forgetting the lousy things from the past.  There was plenty of bad music 80 years ago - Al Jolson anyone?
 RazzCat wrote:
Wow!
This is from 80 years ago!
How much of today's crap will be worth remembering in 8 years, never mind 80?...

 
Hopefully none of today's crap will be remembered at all, but there is a ton of other good stuff being put out today (even from new artists) that will make the cut, even 80 years from now. Just keep in mind: so much of the music that was played back then hasn't survived, we only hold up the ones that made it as "evidence".
French joke.
Artichaut - Artie Shaw
 BKardon wrote:
Artie Shaw reminds me of Elaine Benes.

 
I didn't see THAT one coming
Wow!
This is from 80 years ago!
How much of today's crap will be worth remembering in 8 years, never mind 80?...
awesome!
Artie Shaw reminds me of Elaine Benes.
This is amazing! Not sure I've heard this track.
This one has really, really grown on me. Truly a great song.
 ChrisVIII wrote:
This is excellent ! The base of the future James Bond theme ?
 
ChrisVII, you comment is spot on - however I think the cat must have walked on the keyboard when you clicked on the "Post Comment" button?

Our cat walked on my laptop when I was looking at photos on my mobile phone connected by a USB cable and all the photos disappeared! Luckily they had already been uploaded to the cloud or the cat would have got a boot up the backside.
Wow. Just wow. The first time I've heard this, and I get the menace.
This is excellent ! The base of the future James Bond theme ?
{#Propeller}   {#Bounce}  {#Bounce}  {#Bounce} {#Propeller}   {#Sunny}quality classic....
It ain't easy to do with a clarinet what he is doing with a clarinet. Good track.
Simply excellent! 
A classic that deserves more airplay. I like mixing styles in a radio station. That’s why I like your station. Go out there more.
thanks RP. 
very similar to Gershwin's summertime.
Me Likey
This had to be for some noir film soundtrack.  I can see the big blonde on the smoky waterfront now...
 fitzworld wrote:
Why is there so little Artie Shaw on RP? What an amazing piece!

 
dude is easy on the eyes as well as ears. listening to this slow steady enjoyable assault, i have the urge to take up smoking, drinking and other vices again 
Why is there so little Artie Shaw on RP? What an amazing piece!
Only 3, yes only THREE Bill, tracks from Artie in the library {#Rolleyes}  More Artie and more Jazz please {#Jump}
wasn't this the song for Mongo's entrance...


 tovarisch wrote:
I like it but mostly because Artie and band are trying to make a clarinet sound menacing! Not sure it works but I'll give them marks for the attempt

 
Well, the title of the song is, after all, NIGHTMARE. Who has a romantic or bebop nightmare? 
I just don't understand the unfavorable reviews, unless you dislike jazz. I however do not. I get it. I love it.
I like it but mostly because Artie and band are trying to make a clarinet sound menacing! Not sure it works but I'll give them marks for the attempt
PS: We were also pretty good at jamming jazz and the early sounds of "R&R". The only recordings we ever made was when borrowing one of the guys dad's wire recorder. (Another whispered, "What's a wire recorder"). Yeah, I'm that old.
I was a clarinet/sax player in a "swing band" in the late 50's in high school. Shaw was an idol and I tried to follow his style as I tried to follow Benny Goodman's. Thanks for the walk down memory lane. (I hear whispers from youthful minds - "Who?") LOL.
 RedTopFireBelow wrote:
Hey..  this tune certainly is NOT one of my favorites, as a matter of fact, it's pretty terrible however, this tune is precisely why I listen to RP.   I've been exposed to music I likely would never have heard if not for RP's eclectic blend of old and new, weird and traditional, heavy and light.   Music was my first love and thanks to RP, it remains deeply embedded in my heart and forever in my soul.

Thanks RP.. for this less than amazing tune... 
{#Yes}  

 
Exactly
 Dinges,_the_Dude wrote:
Whow, hear this for the first time, but this sounds great, like the sound of a movie with James Steward (Hitchcock)...{#Notworthy}

 
Scorcese used this piece beautifully in "The Aviator" as Howard Hughes sinks into a frightening bout of mental illness. I don't know if the movie was entirely historically accurate but it amazed me that Hughes was able to pull out of that episode and function again. If you read his bio, though, he was racked by intractable pain and numerous obsessions, especially later in life. 
Outstanding. Such menace in the setting and expression in the performance!
 Rotterdam wrote:

Goodness, I just marked it up from a 9 to a 10. Exquisite to my ears. 

 

Absolutely for mine too {#Clap}
Hey..  this tune certainly is NOT one of my favorites, as a matter of fact, it's pretty terrible however, this tune is precisely why I listen to RP.   I've been exposed to music I likely would never have heard if not for RP's eclectic blend of old and new, weird and traditional, heavy and light.   Music was my first love and thanks to RP, it remains deeply embedded in my heart and forever in my soul.

Thanks RP.. for this less than amazing tune... 
{#Yes}  

 helgigermany wrote:
Awful!!
 
Goodness, I just marked it up from a 9 to a 10. Exquisite to my ears. 
Awful!!
 Cynaera wrote:
*sigh*  I grew up with this music. Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, Glenn Miller... Really makes me wish my dad was still alive. I have his clarinet, though - the one he used to play when he was in a big band. There are a couple of broken pieces, but I can't seem to part with it, as if by hanging onto it, I'm hanging onto Dad.  I'll always have a soft spot in my heart for big-band music. {#Sunny}
 

Miss you so much, Cynaera...

love this music...
 
Whow, hear this for the first time, but this sounds great, like the sound of a movie with James Steward (Hitchcock)...{#Notworthy}
 kcar wrote:

Yes, well done. Mostly in the tread-like rhythm section—in the 007 theme, that was the guitar's job. 

Would love to hear RPers' opinion of Artie Shaw a
s a clarinet player—was he the best of his time? Very interesting and rather difficult guy, even by his own admission. Apparently he'd get fed up with touring and literally walk off the bandstand during a performance. He finally just stopped playing at 44—put the clarinet down and never picked it up again. Became a crack shot, though.  
 

Artie's my choice - Benny was fab but Artie had more swing, for me. And anyone who calls Glenn Miller "the Republican of jazz"* is alright with me.

*it wasn't a compliment. 
 Proclivities wrote:

No, it's not "Summertime"; both tunes happen to be in minor keys with similar adornments and turn-arounds though.
 
Funnily enough, I've just heard it for the first time and, without seeing the title, I thought it might be a particularly dark piece that at least referenced Summertime. And on seeing the title I wondered whether "Nightmare" and "Summertime" was referencing irony/irritation/exasperation at the inordinate numbers of covers of Summertime out there.
So cool to hear this, and where else but here on RP!?
 WonderLizard wrote:

Took a lot of guts to say, "Enough!" and walk away. That era's top clarinetists would likely be Shaw, Benny Goodman, Woody Herman, and Barney Bigard (with Ellington). Trying to say which one is "the best" only starts one of those pointless arguments, since they were all imaginative, fiery composers, and technical masters.

Predating that era by a bit is Ross Gorman, who in 1924 created the glissando that opens "Rhapsody in Blue," while with Paul Whiteman's orchestra.
 
Woody Herman was a clarinetist? Did not know that. Never heard of Barney Bigard but that's on me. You're probably quite right about the "best" debate, although similar comparisons go on with electric guitarists in rock. 
 derekd wrote:
Only on RP. Thanks for the incomparable variety found nowhere else but here.
 
Yes, much agreed, Outstanding RP - thank you!!
I have heard "I'm Only Sleeping" followed by "Nightmare" several times on RP over the years...can't we have a good dream for once?
 derekd wrote:
Only on RP. Thanks for the incomparable variety found nowhere else but here.
 
I agree!
Sublime. Artie Shaw got fed up with constant requests for "Begin the Beguine".  He'd be delighted that RP chose another (great) song of his to play on the air. {#Yes}
Only on RP. Thanks for the incomparable variety found nowhere else but here.
 kcar wrote:

Yes, well done. Mostly in the tread-like rhythm section—in the 007 theme, that was the guitar's job. 

Would love to hear RPers' opinion of Artie Shaw a
s a clarinet player—was he the best of his time? Very interesting and rather difficult guy, even by his own admission. Apparently he'd get fed up with touring and literally walk off the bandstand during a performance. He finally just stopped playing at 44—put the clarinet down and never picked it up again. Became a crack shot, though.  
 
Took a lot of guts to say, "Enough!" and walk away. That era's top clarinetists would likely be Shaw, Benny Goodman, Woody Herman, and Barney Bigard (with Ellington). Trying to say which one is "the best" only starts one of those pointless arguments, since they were all imaginative, fiery composers, and technical masters.

Predating that era by a bit is Ross Gorman, who in 1924 created the glissando that opens "Rhapsody in Blue," while with Paul Whiteman's orchestra.
 lsfeder wrote:
Anyone else here notice the subtle 007 theme in the background?  Could this be the original influence for the infamous bond music?
 
Yes, well done. Mostly in the tread-like rhythm section—in the 007 theme, that was the guitar's job. 

Would love to hear RPers' opinion of Artie Shaw a
s a clarinet player—was he the best of his time? Very interesting and rather difficult guy, even by his own admission. Apparently he'd get fed up with touring and literally walk off the bandstand during a performance. He finally just stopped playing at 44—put the clarinet down and never picked it up again. Became a crack shot, though.  
 drsteevo wrote:
First time I heard this was when I saw the movie "The Aviator" - perfect use of a song in a movie.
 
I have not heard this before.  Thanks Again RP.  I also really like all the cool images RP listeners have contributed to this amazing Radio Station,   Rock On
First time I heard this was when I saw the movie "The Aviator" - perfect use of a song in a movie.

 Cynaera wrote:
*sigh*  I grew up with this music. Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, Glenn Miller... Really makes me wish my dad was still alive. I have his clarinet, though - the one he used to play when he was in a big band. There are a couple of broken pieces, but I can't seem to part with it, as if by hanging onto it, I'm hanging onto Dad.  I'll always have a soft spot in my heart for big-band music. {#Sunny}
 

Me too .. I still have my dad's German-style double bass bow with real horsehair — about 100 years old I think.

1937! Modern movie Bond-themes loose it all positions. The best mark.
That's some of the filthiest darkness I've heard...Love it.  Sitting in my studio and that song just grabbed me and cunningly coaxed me into a different direction.
Wow. That was awesome.
 AvoidingWork wrote:

I'm sure the club is larger than we think.  
I was raised on big band, dixieland, marching brass bands, classical and a few other genres.  I think that's why RP has such appeal for me. I have some of my Dad's collection but it's on reel to reel and LP and I don't have a system to play it.  
I'm going to digress a bit as I'm feeling nostalgic, please forgive me.
He had a state of the art system for 1969.  Two tape decks, turn table, AM/FM/SW radio, three channel pre-amps,  and a couple of other electronic items I forget the names of.  All tubes and It as all housed in a cabinet 6 ft high, 5 ft wide and 2 ft deep.  The speakers were in cabinets 4 ft high by 2 ft.  My Mom called it "The Monster".  I used to get in the cabinet and flip switches and turn dials and pretend I was a mad scientist working on controlling the world. 
He had one chair placed in optimal position to get the stereo effect.  Do you remember that commercial with the guy sitting in front of the big speakers JBL I think, and the glass of wine starts to slide off the little table. It was a little like that. 
Sometimes on Saturday morning, Dad would put on the changing of the guard at Buckingham Palace and crank up the volume until things started rattling off the shelves.  I can still hear the horses hove's clatter against the cobble stones as the moved from left to right and the Sargent Major's voice yelling out the commands.  Then the royal band would kick in.  Even a pillow pulled over your head couldn't keep out the sound.  Yep, time to get up.
...
Thanks for letting me take a little trip.
Doug 
  Good one.
You should try to get that equipment fired up again.
The commercial was for Memorex cassette tapes.


 Rooney wrote:


and I thought I was the only one.  I have quite a collection myself.  My Mom, at 90 keeps the music alive for me.
I will always love Big Band.
 
I'm sure the club is larger than we think.  
I was raised on big band, dixieland, marching brass bands, classical and a few other genres.  I think that's why RP has such appeal for me. I have some of my Dad's collection but it's on reel to reel and LP and I don't have a system to play it.  
I'm going to digress a bit as I'm feeling nostalgic, please forgive me.
He had a state of the art system for 1969.  Two tape decks, turn table, AM/FM/SW radio, three channel pre-amps,  and a couple of other electronic items I forget the names of.  All tubes and It as all housed in a cabinet 6 ft high, 5 ft wide and 2 ft deep.  The speakers were in cabinets 4 ft high by 2 ft.  My Mom called it "The Monster".  I used to get in the cabinet and flip switches and turn dials and pretend I was a mad scientist working on controlling the world. 
He had one chair placed in optimal position to get the stereo effect.  Do you remember that commercial with the guy sitting in front of the big speakers JBL I think, and the glass of wine starts to slide off the little table. It was a little like that. 
Sometimes on Saturday morning, Dad would put on the changing of the guard at Buckingham Palace and crank up the volume until things started rattling off the shelves.  I can still hear the horses hove's clatter against the cobble stones as the moved from left to right and the Sargent Major's voice yelling out the commands.  Then the royal band would kick in.  Even a pillow pulled over your head couldn't keep out the sound.  Yep, time to get up.
...
Thanks for letting me take a little trip.
Doug 
Anyone else here notice the subtle 007 theme in the background?  Could this be the original influence for the infamous bond music?
 Cynaera wrote:
*sigh*  I grew up with this music. Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, Glenn Miller... Really makes me wish my dad was still alive. I have his clarinet, though - the one he used to play when he was in a big band. There are a couple of broken pieces, but I can't seem to part with it, as if by hanging onto it, I'm hanging onto Dad.  I'll always have a soft spot in my heart for big-band music. {#Sunny}
 

and I thought I was the only one.  I have quite a collection myself.  My Mom, at 90 keeps the music alive for me.
I will always love Big Band.
Like it! Reminds me of those good old black-and-white movies with e.g. Humphrey Bogart, Bergman, James Stewart etc.
*sigh*  I grew up with this music. Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, Glenn Miller... Really makes me wish my dad was still alive. I have his clarinet, though - the one he used to play when he was in a big band. There are a couple of broken pieces, but I can't seem to part with it, as if by hanging onto it, I'm hanging onto Dad.  I'll always have a soft spot in my heart for big-band music. {#Sunny}
I love RP - amazing variety of grown up music
 michael_a_k wrote:

Hmm. I know this song by the name Summertime.... funny it should sound dark.
 
No, it's not "Summertime"; both tunes happen to be in minor keys with similar adornments and turn-arounds though.


 ginniet wrote:
This is why I love RP!  Where else can you hear an Artie Shaw song between one by Neil Young and one by The Beatles?  I've never heard this before!
 

Hi, Ginnie!  Notice that all three tunes feature sleeping ("Like a Hurricane" says, "You are just a dreamer, but I am just a dream..."

Gotta love RP.
Love it!  Never hear a lot of Shaw on the radio today.  Another good reason RP is so great.
 lmic wrote:
Loved all his commentary in Ken Burns's Jazz. Awesome music, awesome dude.
 
Ditto that. A true performer, but a humble human, unlike many of today's "musicians"

This guy is why I love RP!  And I don't even know him{#Music}
great music never goes out of style...!
I'd forgotten all about this song - used to have it on reel to reel decades ago {#Music}

Yeah.
Stefen wrote:
Is there such a thing as a cool requiem?
Never heard one that wasn't, courtesy of gravitas.

This is why I love RP!  Where else can you hear an Artie Shaw song between one by Neil Young and one by The Beatles?  I've never heard this before!
He's got a little Scheherazade going there in the clarinet solo.  Nice piece.
awesome. nice choice.
Loved all his commentary in Ken Burns's Jazz. Awesome music, awesome dude.
Is there such a thing as a cool requiem?
There was nothing like the Big Band era for the music they poured out. Just listen to the composition of theses songs. I'm glad that this was the music my parents grew up with and I had the opportunity to listen to as well.{#Dance}

Ahhhhhhh, good stuff man! Reminds me of Rod Serling!{#Meditate}
 cvandoren wrote:
Nightmare is a good name - unusual dark theme for a song like this.
 
Hmm. I know this song by the name Summertime.... funny it should sound dark.


Nightmare is a good name - unusual dark theme for a song like this.
i quite like this, however i am trying to hear past the monotonous death march beat in the background.
Here did all the clarinet players go
annoying jazz
Artie Shaw is a GOD! This would be rated 10000 if it went that high!
{#Notworthy}
sounds like what my dad would 'jam' to
It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing.
thanks more swing bill! {#Clap}
Alright! The first Artie Shaw on RP!