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The Jam — That's Entertainment
Album: The Jam - Greatest Hits
Avg rating:
7.5

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1527









Released: 1991
Length: 3:23
Plays (last 30 days): 1
A police car and a screamin' siren
Pneumatic drill and ripped-up concrete
A baby wailing, a stray dog howling
The screech of brakes and lamplight blinking

That's entertainment
That's entertainment

A smash of glass and the rumble of boots
An electric train and a ripped-up phone booth
Paint-splattered walls and the cry of a tomcat
Lights going out and a kick in the balls

I say that's entertainment
That's entertainment
La la la la la, ah
La la la la la, ah

Days of speed and slow-time Mondays
Pissing down with rain on a boring Wednesday
Watching the news and not eating your tea
A freezing cold flat with damp on the walls

I say that's entertainment
That's entertainment
La la la la la
La la la la la

Waking up at 6 A.M. on a cool warm morning
Opening the windows and breathing in petrol
An amateur band rehearsing in a nearby yard
Watching the telly and thinking 'bout your holidays

That's entertainment
That's entertainment
La la la la la, ah
La la la la la, ah
La la la la la, ah
La la la la la

Waking up from bad dreams and smoking cigarettes
Cuddling a warm girl and smelling stale perfume
A hot summer's day and sticky black tarmac
Feeding ducks in the park and wishing you were far away

That's entertainment
That's entertainment

Two lovers kissing masks a scream of midnight
Two lovers missing the tranquility of solitude
Getting a cab and travelling on buses
Reading the grafitti about slashed-seat affairs

I say that's entertainment
That's entertainment
La la la la la, ah
La la la la la, ah
La la la la la, ah
La la la la la
La la la la la, ah
La la la la la, ah
La la la la la, ah
La la la la la
La la la la la, ah
La la la la la, ah
La la la la la, ah
Comments (226)add comment
'Reading the grafitti about slashed-seat affairs'

should probably be

'Reading the graffiti about slash seats or fares'

as far I can tell - its a reference to graffiti about bus / tube / train fares being too high
I grew up in London to this music. Being violently attacked was not unusual where I lived. This shitty city. That's not entertainment, that's hell. Thank you Paul Weller for singing out loud just how it was in the city back then. BTW. the song is from 1980, not 1991. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/That's_Entertainment_(The_Jam_song)
10 --> 11
The lyrics in this song are just really really great.
 Grayson wrote:


Dear goddess. Is that not EXACTLY like a Scot... still whining, decades later even, that it is/was all Thatcher's fault! And we whine about DJT. His mom was a Scot after all. Where do you think he gets all that... I'm so miserable; everybody hates me and I'm misunderstood so I'm going to just tell more lies; whiny-child crap from. Jeez. 
 
Geez, shows you dont understand about what the song is REALLY about...

But  - and that makes people like you so unsufferable -  you FEEL the NEED to shout your total ignorance out into the world...

And does the world wanna hear it?

NO MATE WE DONT!!!!
 Grayson wrote:


Dear goddess. Is that not EXACTLY like a Scot... still whining, decades later even, that it is/was all Thatcher's fault! And we whine about DJT. His mom was a Scot after all. Where do you think he gets all that... I'm so miserable; everybody hates me and I'm misunderstood so I'm going to just tell more lies; whiny-child crap from. Jeez. 

I'm sorry that your so miserable and everybody hates you. However, I feel no need to justify myself or my nation, I rather leave it to the good sense and decency of the readers of this blog to decide who's responsible for the "whiny-child crap"!
 tiggers wrote:


Excellent post and well put!
 

Dear goddess. Is that not EXACTLY like a Scot... still whining, decades later even, that it is/was all Thatcher's fault! And we whine about DJT. His mom was a Scot after all. Where do you think he gets all that... I'm so miserable; everybody hates me and I'm misunderstood so I'm going to just tell more lies; whiny-child crap from. Jeez. 
 ScottishWillie wrote:

Have you actually listened to the lyrics? The sense of isolation and despair spoke to a generation of us who missed out (and paid for) the Yuppie prosperity boom in Thatcher’s Briton.

Days of speed and slow-time Mondays
Pissing down with rain on a boring Wednesday
Watching the news and not eating your tea
A freezing cold flat with damp on the walls


Waking up at 6 A.M. on a cool warm morning
Opening the windows and breathing in petrol
An amateur band rehearsing in a nearby yard
Watching the telly and thinking 'bout your holidays


Waking up from bad dreams and smoking cigarettes
Cuddling a warm girl and smelling stale perfume
A hot summer's day and sticky black tarmac
Feeding ducks in the park and wishing you were far away


Two lovers kissing masks a scream of midnight
Two lovers missing the tranquility of solitude
Getting a cab and travelling on buses
Reading the grafitti about slashed-seat affairs


I say that's entertainment
That's entertainment

They so accurately depict a time and a place in my life. I was that man.

You may not have the wit or the life experience to ‘get it’ but my generation certainly did. I enjoy this song as a piece of music but also as a social comment. It is good for the now middle age and middle class person I’ve become to remember what its like for people currently in the “freezing cold flat with damp on the walls”.


 

Excellent post and well put!
Now follow this gem with another Paul Weller jam.

"You Do Something To Me"
I can't think of a reason to give this song anything but a 10.
 
 justin4kick wrote:
I saw Paul Weller last week in Amsterdam. A great concert but unfortunately he played only 1 song by The Jam.

  
poetdancer wrote:

Paul Weller is playing in Berkeley in October, and I was planning on going, hoping he'd play more than one song by the Jam... now I'm reconsidering.

  
I must make myself clear on this one. Go there! You'll be amazed how great his Post Jam work is, especially live.
 hayduke2 wrote:
in nymag.com there's a great series of photos by Janette Beckman, which includes
Paul Weller and Pete Townshend in London, 1980

"Paul Weller always loved Pete Townshend, who was like the first-coming of the mods. This was the first time they met. They're standing outside the The Marquee Club, where The Jam and The Who probably both played. The headline was 'The Punk and the Mod-father.' Old mod meets new mod."

oh yeah, and a super shot of young Adam Ant!!!
Paul Weller and Pete Townshend in London, 1980

 
Extra wicked musicians  : )
 Sam_Chucklestone wrote:
Ditto DaidyBoy, it was the Moss Side riots in Manchester for me about ten years earlier. To see the streets covered in broken bricks and paving slabs next morning was so strange, like a burst pressure cooker.

Notice how the 2011 riots are never spoken about? No enquiry or investigation, just more riot training and kit for the Police. The next round of riots will be even more destructive, the pressure people are under now is far higher and many quite literally have nothing to lose anymore.

This is a great song that has a similar effect on me as on Scottish Willie ...  except I'm still common ;-)

 

For those of us who weren't tuned into those 2011 riots: what was going on? Was there any one reason for them or was it a free-for-all when people realized they could get away with mayhem? American TV news depicted the unrest as kids skylarking and destroying just for the fun of it...
 poetdancer wrote:

Paul Weller is playing in Berkeley in October, and I was planning on going, hoping he'd play more than one song by the Jam... now I'm reconsidering.

 


11.

His work since is great too.
 justin4kick wrote:
I saw Paul Weller last week in Amsterdam. A great concert but unfortunately he played only 1 song by The Jam.

 
Paul Weller is playing in Berkeley in October, and I was planning on going, hoping he'd play more than one song by the Jam... now I'm reconsidering.
I saw Paul Weller last week in Amsterdam. A great concert but unfortunately he played only 1 song by The Jam.
 ScottishWillie wrote:

Have you actually listened to the lyrics? The sense of isolation and despair spoke to a generation of us who missed out (and paid for) the Yuppie prosperity boom in Thatcher’s Briton.

Days of speed and slow-time Mondays
Pissing down with rain on a boring Wednesday
Watching the news and not eating your tea
A freezing cold flat with damp on the walls

Waking up at 6 A.M. on a cool warm morning
Opening the windows and breathing in petrol
An amateur band rehearsing in a nearby yard
Watching the telly and thinking 'bout your holidays

Waking up from bad dreams and smoking cigarettes
Cuddling a warm girl and smelling stale perfume
A hot summer's day and sticky black tarmac
Feeding ducks in the park and wishing you were far away

Two lovers kissing masks a scream of midnight
Two lovers missing the tranquility of solitude
Getting a cab and travelling on buses
Reading the grafitti about slashed-seat affairs

I say that's entertainment
That's entertainment

They so accurately depict a time and a place in my life. I was that man.

You may not have the wit or the life experience to ‘get it’ but my generation certainly did. I enjoy this song as a piece of music but also as a social comment. It is good for the now middle age and middle class person I’ve become to remember what its like for people currently in the “freezing cold flat with damp on the walls”.

Thanks Willie. I am enlightened. I had never thought to read the lyrics. I just liked the song. I won't hear it the same way again.

 


 ScottishWillie wrote:

....

They so accurately depict a time and a place in my life. I was that man.

You may not have the wit or the life experience to ‘get it’ but my generation certainly did. I enjoy this song as a piece of music but also as a social comment. It is good for the now middle age and middle class person I’ve become to remember what its like for people currently in the “freezing cold flat with damp on the walls”.



 
Well said, friend.  We watched (or experienced) the carnage first hand.  Many didn't survive it intact.

I was a student in Trafalgar Square when the Poll Tax riot kicked off.  That's entertainment, all right.
WHOO HOO!!!{#Dancingbanana_2}
 dragon1952 wrote:
I just can't see anyone actually looking forward to  hearing this "song". That's entertainment, that's entertainment now...blah, blah, fucking blah over and over. Some people are easily "entertained"
 

Have you actually listened to the lyrics? The sense of isolation and despair spoke to a generation of us who missed out (and paid for) the Yuppie prosperity boom in Thatcher’s Briton.

Days of speed and slow-time Mondays
Pissing down with rain on a boring Wednesday
Watching the news and not eating your tea
A freezing cold flat with damp on the walls

Waking up at 6 A.M. on a cool warm morning
Opening the windows and breathing in petrol
An amateur band rehearsing in a nearby yard
Watching the telly and thinking 'bout your holidays

Waking up from bad dreams and smoking cigarettes
Cuddling a warm girl and smelling stale perfume
A hot summer's day and sticky black tarmac
Feeding ducks in the park and wishing you were far away

Two lovers kissing masks a scream of midnight
Two lovers missing the tranquility of solitude
Getting a cab and travelling on buses
Reading the grafitti about slashed-seat affairs

I say that's entertainment
That's entertainment

They so accurately depict a time and a place in my life. I was that man.

You may not have the wit or the life experience to ‘get it’ but my generation certainly did. I enjoy this song as a piece of music but also as a social comment. It is good for the now middle age and middle class person I’ve become to remember what its like for people currently in the “freezing cold flat with damp on the walls”.


Das...intertainmunt.
{#Clap}{#Clap}{#Clap}{#Clap}{#Clap}{#Clap}{#Clap}{#Clap}{#Clap}{#Clap}
Whoa, just totally MADE my day; where else would I ever hear this streaming while at work on a random and otherwise dull Wednesday...so so good.
Play the live version from Dig the New Breed.

 
 Emwolb wrote:
Good song but I prefer Morrissey's version
 
Or the acoustic version w/ 1 of the Oasis Gallagher brothers: all 10's
 hayduke2 wrote:
in nymag.com there's a great series of photos by Janette Beckman, which includes
Paul Weller and Pete Townshend in London, 1980

"Paul Weller always loved Pete Townshend, who was like the first-coming of the mods. This was the first time they met. They're standing outside the The Marquee Club, where The Jam and The Who probably both played. The headline was 'The Punk and the Mod-father.' Old mod meets new mod."

oh yeah, and a super shot of young Adam Ant!!!

Paul Weller and Pete Townshend in London, 1980

 
Brilliant photo. 

The notion of Townsend as the first mod rocker seems so at odds with "Tommy", but AFAIK Weller knew what he was talking about. Paul's gone through some serious stylistic changes of his own, but I love this song. 

Adam Ant—wow, talk about a trip down memory lane.  
 dragon1952 wrote:
I just can't see anyone actually looking forward to  hearing this "song". That's entertainment, that's entertainment now...blah, blah, fucking blah over and over. Some people are easily "entertained"

 
Maybe to you 'irony' is something a blacksmith does...
I just can't see anyone actually looking forward to  hearing this "song". That's entertainment, that's entertainment now...blah, blah, fucking blah over and over. Some people are easily "entertained"
 DaidyBoy wrote:
Always loved  Bruce Foxton's bass work for The Jam and Stiff Little Fingers, but he never gets mentioned.  Cheers, mate!!  Rattled my windows many times.

 
Indeed, the bass and acoustic guitars carry the time on this one. Indeed convincing Foxton to switch to bass was one of Weller's shrewder ideas.
A throwaway. The point was made about 20 seconds into this song. I like other tunes by The Jam far more than this one.
 Not to quibble, but the original Mods UK band were a little combo called the High Numbers, they got more pub when the changed their name to The Who, Even Paul Weller would tell you that.
eddyrixhon wrote:
wow ! original MODS UK band ! Paul weller was nice in it !
good choice RP ! thanks !
 

 


What kind of radio station follows The Band with The Jam? That's entertainment!
Always loved  Bruce Foxton's bass work for The Jam and Stiff Little Fingers, but he never gets mentioned.  Cheers, mate!!  Rattled my windows many times.
Agreed !
 

The_Walrus wrote:
Awesome band, awesome song. Early eighties England in three minutes

 


 Emwolb wrote:
Good song but I prefer Morrissey's version
 

I was just discussing the Morrissey version with a friend recently. His style of melancholy doesn't mesh well with Weller's, IMO. When Weller gets angry, Moz just gets dramatic... : )
 treatment_bound wrote:

I'd ask 'em if I could bum a smoke, but they look like they'd kick the crap out me without wrinkling their suits, and then drive their bikes
 right over my head.
 




  

well, that's entertainment.

Mods rule!
Pure BLISS.......{#Daisy}
Awesome band, awesome song. Early eighties England in three minutes
I could die happy if I could write a song as half as good as this.... {#Cheers}
 melzabutch wrote:


 
I'd ask 'em if I could bum a smoke, but they look like they'd kick the crap out me without wrinkling their suits, and then drive their bikes
 right over my head.
 



wow ! original MODS UK band ! Paul weller was nice in it !
good choice RP ! thanks !
 
Good song but I prefer Morrissey's version

I could say that I like Paul Weller, and maybe even the Jam, but...Ho hum, this song just does not do it for me{#No}



Fortunate to have gone to school in UK in the 80's to catch this band in concert.


in nymag.com there's a great series of photos by Janette Beckman, which includes
Paul Weller and Pete Townshend in London, 1980

"Paul Weller always loved Pete Townshend, who was like the first-coming of the mods. This was the first time they met. They're standing outside the The Marquee Club, where The Jam and The Who probably both played. The headline was 'The Punk and the Mod-father.' Old mod meets new mod."

oh yeah, and a super shot of young Adam Ant!!!
Paul Weller and Pete Townshend in London, 1980
{#Bananajam}{#Dancingbanana_2}
 kcar wrote:
Captures a time and place so well...no matter where you lived and when. 

How the hell did Paul Weller go from this to Style Council?!? 

 
I guess a lot of things changed for him in three years or so, but it didn't seem like a jarring transition at the time (to me).
Fine British pop - definitely captures a time and place.

One of my favorite bands from this era that has stood the test of time.
Captures a time and place so well...no matter where you lived and when. 

How the hell did Paul Weller go from this to Style Council?!? 
 gemtag wrote:
This is a kick in the balls, in a good way....

  There's a good way ? Certainly not on the receiving end of one ..
That's NOT entertainment  !!!
I'm workin' late and Bill is rockin'.

Needless to say, I'm not getting as much done as I'd like.{#Dancingbanana}

Aw, well... the economy is in the tank, anyway. 
obviously, as i've said, i love this tune. this recording of it seems muffled. maybe it's me. but, i agree - from the other album, it is a bit more there.
 
Stingray wrote:
Never liked them!
 

Not even Town Called Malice ?     Number one in the UK for a while.


Never liked them!
 rotten wrote:
Great song from the Jam, but the demo version from "Snap" is far superior to this version from "Sound Affects".
 

imo definitly right!
 coloradojohn wrote:
I will always feel thankful to Pete Townshend for reminding us in the late '70s and early '80s in our own already rather brain-dead and Profit-Driven media how we should be paying more and truly due attention to up and coming rockers The Jam and The Clash and all the stuff I was glad to get the scoop on and a tasty bite of then and really only still hear on RP anymore and thank God for that!
 
As much as I always enjoyed Mr. Townshend's work, I didn't rely on him to tell me about the great changes and innovations in music from the mid-1970s forward, it was a good acknowledgement on his part, though.
I will always feel thankful to Pete Townshend for reminding us in the late '70s and early '80s in our own already rather brain-dead and Profit-Driven media how we should be paying more and truly due attention to up and coming rockers The Jam and The Clash and all the stuff I was glad to get the scoop on and a tasty bite of then and really only still hear on RP anymore and thank God for that!
I love the cleansing anger of this song!  A great anthem for the British 80's but also for today everywhere.
Great song from the Jam, but the demo version from "Snap" is far superior to this version from "Sound Affects".
A classic and always entertaining even after all these years!
Love it!
YEAH - that's entertainment...

This is a kick in the balls, in a good way....
Can't say it enough - the few, the proud, the godlike - 10++
Yes, I believe this is a perfect 10!
Cheers
 Dakota wrote:
I don't think this is the demo version, or at least there are various demo versions floating around.  Demo version on Snap! (which I have) sounds better, in my opinion.  It's simpler, more stripped down, without the synthesizer sounds overlayed. 
 
Could be the basic vocals and acoustic guitar are from the demo. They may have added other tracks to the demo in the studio.

Thank you RP - one of the best songs of all time - a rare 10+
The fact that THIS entertainment has been free for a long time convinced me to make a donation. Thanks for the service—and for The Jam.
 peter_james_bond wrote:
Trivia - What you are hearing is the demo version. They couldn't better the demo in the studio so the band simply used the demo on the album. {#Cool}
 
Did not know that, but it makes a ton of sense.  Weller claims to have written this song in 15 minutes after coming home drunk one night.  Easily one of their best.  Billy Bragg does a nice cover as well.  
I don't think this is the demo version, or at least there are various demo versions floating around.  Demo version on Snap! (which I have) sounds better, in my opinion.  It's simpler, more stripped down, without the synthesizer sounds overlayed.  

 peter_james_bond wrote:
Trivia - What you are hearing is the demo version. They couldn't better the demo in the studio so the band simply used the demo on the album. {#Cool}
 


I went crazy and laid down the biggest single sum I ever threw on a counter for a mint copy of "In the City" vinyl. An excellent band.
 fredriley wrote:

That comment alone could be deconstructed in more ways than a pomegranate has pips. FYI, this "wimp-rock" band was as big as The Clash in the 80s, with Paul Weller seen in the same league as Joe Strummer, as working-class heroes who spoke of the time and spoke for many of those of us in the working class who were getting it up the @rse from the Thatcher counter-revolution. This song is evocative, and descriptive, of its time and is as much social document as song.

Paul Weller himself has gone a bit far up his own @arse for my liking as a solo artist, but that so often happens with young, angry artists who become famous and become themselves the establishment. Even Joe Strummer admitted that he "sold out". So it goes.
 
Alas, all too true.

But, you know, you could make a good mix CD of all the songs, such as this one, that makes you want to go downtown and throw bricks through the windows of all the banks, stock market offices, and other lawyer emporiums.

The Who's "Summertime Blues" off "Live at Leeds," for instance. And, of course, John Lennon's "Working Class Hero." 

Maybe it's the fact that we just got a memo that the budget for office supplies has been cut to zero, so we need to bring in pens and note paper from home, and all the while our lords and masters are going on a "planning retreat" that just happens to be taking place at a 4-star golf resort, or maybe it's the 6th day of 100-degree heat here in NC, but I'm looking a little more lovingly at those bricks this morning. 
Thanks to the Stranger than Fiction soundtrack for introducing me to this one. Good song.
 fredriley wrote:
FYI, this "wimp-rock" band was as big as The Clash in the 80s
 
truth.

I was a teenager living in Ottawa in the 80s and these guys were easily competing for the top of my list.

Ottawa's a nice tourist city now but it was a dumpy post-industrial city then. Literally, the city's only strip club closed due to lack of business.

I had a job in the downtown and I knew the homeless and the drunks on first name basis. The Jam absolutely hit a home run on this song so far as I was concerned at the time.

I rate it a 10. 
 PA1749 wrote:
This song got me clapping my feet!
 
{#Clap}{#Roflol}{#Clap}{#Roflol}{#Clap}
This song got me clapping my feet!
mgkiwi wrote:
Stonking tune from a great original band with a musical genius! Saw them back in 77 at the Greyhound in Groydon when they were starting out - little did we know then!
sorry - did you say Stonking? Oh, my.

 Art_Carnage wrote:
The funniest thing about this is the band name. What could possibly be less like a "jam" than this piece of lame wimp-rock? I would love to have been in on the band meeting when they came up with that name. "Hey guys! I got the perfect name, that in no way would it ever be possible for people in the future to see it as incredibly cheesy and unfortunately, sadly, ironic - The Jam!"
 
Hey Art I know of at least three or four net radio places where you can get all the Aldo Nova you like, bro.

THIS is entertainment!  


 Art_Carnage wrote:
The funniest thing about this is the band name. What could possibly be less like a "jam" than this piece of lame wimp-rock? I would love to have been in on the band meeting when they came up with that name. "Hey guys! I got the perfect name, that in no way would it ever be possible for people in the future to see it as incredibly cheesy and unfortunately, sadly, ironic - The Jam!"
 
That comment alone could be deconstructed in more ways than a pomegranate has pips. FYI, this "wimp-rock" band was as big as The Clash in the 80s, with Paul Weller seen in the same league as Joe Strummer, as working-class heroes who spoke of the time and spoke for many of those of us in the working class who were getting it up the @rse from the Thatcher counter-revolution. This song is evocative, and descriptive, of its time and is as much social document as song.

Paul Weller himself has gone a bit far up his own @arse for my liking as a solo artist, but that so often happens with young, angry artists who become famous and become themselves the establishment. Even Joe Strummer admitted that he "sold out". So it goes.


 mgkiwi wrote:
Stonking tune from a great original band with a musical genius! Saw them back in 77 at the Greyhound in Groydon when they were starting out - little did we know then!
 
Oh my. The Greyhound? 77? I was there! That takes me back somewhat. . . beer soaked floors, loons, long hair, head in the speakers. 

Those were the days. . . sigh. . .  
Takes me back!
Stonking tune from a great original band with a musical genius! Saw them back in 77 at the Greyhound in Groydon when they were starting out - little did we know then!
some English Beat would follow this one nicely
Nice!
 treatment_bound wrote:

Thanks for the support.  I've been lobbying for this for about 4 1/2 years now, and have only seen "The Butterfly Collector" added to the three cuts that were being played when I first joined the fun here.

We could start the additions with "Start!", the leadoff cut on Sound Affects.  That would surely kick off a lively discussion as to whether or not that riff is a tribute to or a rip-off of George's "Taxman" on Revolver.

 
It's pretty obviously a tribute or homage.  I don't think Paul Weller would have expected no one to have noticed the similarity.  Do you really think he thought: "Oh, no one will remember this tune - it was recorded by a now-obscure band called 'The Beatles' - we'll fool everyone."


Always loved this song.  A refreshing and melodic change from The Jam's more hard core tunes.  Makes me think of post-party wind down on a hot summer's night in McLean, VA.


The genius of this particular track is IMHO the instrumentation—two acoustic guitars and an electric bass—the AMG song review sez there are also shakers, but they're barely noticable. Oh, there's some backward electric guitar scrawl in the middle 8 that I think was/is misplaced, but otherwise a fine example of the infinite diversity of rock'n'roll.
 Art_Carnage wrote:
The funniest thing about this is the band name. What could possibly be less like a "jam" than this piece of lame wimp-rock? I would love to have been in on the band meeting when they came up with that name. "Hey guys! I got the perfect name, that in no way would it ever be possible for people in the future to see it as incredibly cheesy and unfortunately, sadly, ironic - The Jam!"
 
Well, the eat a lot of jam on toast there—-also, they probably have a lot of traffic jams. Maybe they meant it that way?

The funniest thing about this is the band name. What could possibly be less like a "jam" than this piece of lame wimp-rock? I would love to have been in on the band meeting when they came up with that name. "Hey guys! I got the perfect name, that in no way would it ever be possible for people in the future to see it as incredibly cheesy and unfortunately, sadly, ironic - The Jam!"
 treatment_bound wrote:

Thanks for the support.  I've been lobbying for this for about 4 1/2 years now, and have only seen "The Butterfly Collector" added to the three cuts that were being played when I first joined the fun here.

We could start the additions with "Start!", the leadoff cut on Sound Affects.  That would surely kick off a lively discussion as to whether or not that riff is a tribute to or a rip-off of George's "Taxman" on Revolver.

 
Not sure that there's a debate on that: I'm pretty sure Weler copped to that as a "tribute".

Trivia - What you are hearing is the demo version. They couldn't better the demo in the studio so the band simply used the demo on the album. {#Cool}

3—>2. Not very good entertainment.
YAAAYYY!! THE GLORIES OF EVERYDAY LIFE!!!{#Mrgreen}
 Albert1967 wrote:

Agreed!

One of my fav RP afternoons so far. Thanx Bill! 
 
Thanks for the support.  I've been lobbying for this for about 4 1/2 years now, and have only seen "The Butterfly Collector" added to the three cuts that were being played when I first joined the fun here.

We could start the additions with "Start!", the leadoff cut on Sound Affects.  That would surely kick off a lively discussion as to whether or not that riff is a tribute to or a rip-off of George's "Taxman" on Revolver.

Everybody sing along:

"That's.......the most annoying chorus ever."

accoustic can be rockin' as hell ;-)
best jam-song imho
 treatment_bound wrote:

Can we please get RP to add a few more Jam cuts? 

 
Agreed!

One of my fav RP afternoons so far. Thanx Bill! 

Can we please get RP to add a few more Jam cuts? 


marvelous, Weller and Co at their best
 copymonkey wrote:

Well you ARE in Canada. Didn't you guys invent 'hockey-hair'? We just stole it and renamed it "mullet".

 
Why do you call it a mullet?  It doesn't look like a fish-head!!


Captured the time and the then politics in the UK very well.  Took me back.  Weller always a good tunesmith.   Ironically he is more stuck in a rut with his later material.   He disbanded the Jam at their peak, which was the right thing to do. 
 rosedraws wrote:
I adore this song... but I don't know why.
 
Because it is good entertainment

What blasphemy am I reading about the Modfather?

How dare you all insult one of the most influential artists of the last 30 years. 
Poster on my boysroom wall.
I adore this song... but I don't know why.
 badgerv wrote:
This is NOT entertainment... for some reason I can't stand this song.  Maybe it's the band name?
 
It's not the name for me, it's the stupid, repetitive vocals. I don't give a rat's ass for the "historical" value of the band. This song sucks! {#Moon}
 jagdriver wrote:
{#Dancingbanana} Such a happy song!
 
A smash of glass and a rumble of boots -
An electric train and a ripped up 'phone booth -
Paint splattered walls and the cry of a tomcat -
Lights going out and a kick in the balls - That's Entertainment.


Still sounds pretty fresh for a 30 year old song.

This is what I call entertainment...
{#Dancingbanana} Such a happy song!
That's intertainment!
10 - Modlike.
I've seen this song in Scotland performed by a band called "The Casbah Club" with band members from Big Country, The Who and The Jam.

It was sung by the bassist Bruce Foxton
 

This is NOT entertainment... for some reason I can't stand this song.  Maybe it's the band name?
Okay... so I really like this song, and always have, but something struck me today that I never noticed before...
 
During the opening riff, I swear it reminded me of Meatloaf singing "Hot Patootie" from "Rocky Horror Picture Show."  
 kaybee wrote:
I love his accent.  You know he's lived in that environment.  By the way, I'm dating myself but I think the guy in the middle has cool hair.

 
Well you ARE in Canada. Didn't you guys invent 'hockey-hair'? We just stole it and renamed it "mullet".

 peter_james_bond wrote:
Now this is entertaining! => 10!
 
10-4!

8 ==> 9

Now this is entertaining! => 10!
 lily34 wrote:
MY FAV!

gotta hear this more often. takes me to a good place.
 
Good taste, indeed. This rocks!