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Jefferson Airplane — White Rabbit
Album: Surrealistic Pillow
Avg rating:
8.6

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1982








Released: 1967
Length: 2:30
Plays (last 30 days): 1
One pill makes you larger
And one pill makes you small
And the ones that mother gives you
Don't do anything at all
Go ask Alice
When she's ten feet tall

And if you go chasing rabbits
And you know you're going to fall
Tell 'em a hookah-smoking caterpillar
Has given you the call
Call Alice
When she was just small

When the men on the chessboard
Get up and tell you where to go
And you've just had some kind of mushroom
And your mind is moving slow
Go ask Alice
I think she'll know

When logic and proportion
Have fallen sloppy dead
And the White Knight is talking backwards
And the Red Queen's off with her head
Remember what the dormouse said
Feed your head
Feed your head
Comments (269)add comment
I came across these guys playing in a park in Austin during 2007? SxSW. What a glorious day it was.
hypnotizing from the first chord, from the first word coming out of Grace's mouth... Not many psychedelic songs have this strength.
The alternative title should be "We advise you to take drugs."
 treatment_bound wrote:
Just read Paul Kantner died.  2016 sure is off to a sad start for rock and roll deaths.

RIP, Paul.  To me, this song is your group's high water mark, even if you got it from Grace's old band. 
 
and now Marty Balin has left us too.
I ♥  "Hearts"  by Marty
RIP
Fabulous. Takes me back to those wonderful days of the late sixties.
Go ask Alice...I learned to respect m Dad so much more after I learned he had this album and after I understood the meaning of it.  Grace Slick was the s__t...probably Bill's "Neko of the 60's"...Give more props for this song of songs.
Image may contain: 7 people, text
 akaike wrote:
This song blew my mind when I first heard it.  I only wish I could recapture that "Holy $Hi!!" moment when the song ended and all I wanted was to listen to it again.

Other songs that have done that over the years:

I Am A Rock by Simon and Garfunkel
More Than a Feeling by Boston (crazy, I know)...but I was a kid
Black by Pearl Jam

You? 

 
Serenade No 10 In B Flat Major K 361 III Adagio - Mozart
Welcome To The Jungle - Guns n Roses
Blackened - Metallica
Letter To The Present - 2Pac
Jerusalem - Sinead O'Connor
Guaranteed - Eddie Vedder


 akaike wrote:
This song blew my mind when I first heard it.  I only wish I could recapture that "Holy $Hi!!" moment when the song ended and all I wanted was to listen to it again.

Other songs that have done that over the years:

I Am A Rock by Simon and Garfunkel
More Than a Feeling by Boston (crazy, I know)...but I was a kid
Black by Pearl Jam

You? 

 
When my older brother played side 2 of Abbey Road for me.  It was late at night, the house was dark (parents were out), and, yes, I was stoned.
Creem December 1977 Grace Slick.jpg
Happy belated 78th birthday, GS!
SURE it has been said : FEED YOUR HEAD !
I agree, More Than A Feeling... another song that comes to mind is  Tangled Up In Blue - Bob Dylan  it can give me goosebumps!
 
akaike wrote:
This song blew my mind when I first heard it.  I only wish I could recapture that "Holy $Hi!!" moment when the song ended and all I wanted was to listen to it again.

Other songs that have done that over the years:

I Am A Rock by Simon and Garfunkel
More Than a Feeling by Boston (crazy, I know)...but I was a kid
Black by Pearl Jam

You? 

 


Everything older is new again. Classic buzzed out poetry for jurassic fucked up Trump propa-porn. 
When the men on the chessboard
Get up and tell you where to go
 
When logic and proportion
Have fallen sloppy dead 
50 years.
The only version that I like even more that this is the Great Society's live version recorded at The Matrix before Grace bolted for J.A. San Fran-meets-Coltrane.
That's the year we had the last strawberry moon, the summer of love, 1967
A bit of wishful thinking  

              
                                       Honestly,  I couldn't see
                    She's driving a volkswagen, and the man is sleeping.
                     Guess what! the exotic bird on the passanger seat
                         Is only in your head du du du vögel she said.
                                                    Oh

                         I was so glad she'd called me by my name
              All of a sudden, I knew what's meant by mambo talk whisper
                                         Oh  ya ha ah ahhh
 

                     

What a treat to hear this one again.
This was Grace's baby, but Paul, Marty, Jorma and Jack knew just what to do with it!  Paul's vision and passion will forever inspire me!
Just read Paul Kantner died.  2016 sure is off to a sad start for rock and roll deaths.

RIP, Paul.  To me, this song is your group's high water mark, even if you got it from Grace's old band. 
Jorma Kaukonen (lead guitar) and Jack Casady (bass) became my instant rock idols when I bought this album the first month of its release... and they're still performing together and still making great music as Hot Tuna. Love 'em!
I remember when this first came out as I was mesmerized.  Incredible tune followed by Somebody to Love on the charts from one of the best rock LPs of all time.  My brothers and I would play the song, trying to figure out the lyrics and what it all meant.  We'd play it over and over and over again until we got the lyrics (or at least what thought were the lyrics).  Too young to get the full 'hooka' and 'feed your head' references but I always pause when I hear it as it brings a huge smile to my face (singing along to its unique lyrics/melody).  Grace Slick at her best.  Had a very similar feeling when first hearing A Whiter Shade of Pale.  I knew music was changing for the better.  Then, hearing New York Mining Disaster 1941 just cemented what an incredible year of music from 1967.  Some oldies never die, nor should they.
 akaike wrote:
This song blew my mind when I first heard it.  I only wish I could recapture that "Holy $Hi!!" moment when the song ended and all I wanted was to listen to it again.

Other songs that have done that over the years:

I Am A Rock by Simon and Garfunkel
More Than a Feeling by Boston (crazy, I know)...but I was a kid
Black by Pearl Jam

You? 

 

"Why" by Annie Lennox.
Sitting in the back of a rented minivan in the parking lot of The Fess Parker hotel in Santa Barbara, cleaning lenses, labeling film, and loading cameras on a photo shoot. 
The three of us were silent and still for the whole song, and for several minutes afterward.
I still feel that sensation when that song plays, partly because I've managed to never overplay it. 
Where it all started. Best selling album of the year that included some spectacular albums. Not just drugs but the whole feeling of growing, learning and becoming feeling that hits the 17-22 period of everyone's life. So many books to read. So much wisdom from ages past. So much to learn from one another... Whole album catches that period of life when everything seems possible, befor reality and responsibilities arrive. 

M,y favorite from the album is 'Coming Back to Me" best relationship song that does not make the guy a wimp or woman a witch...

Thank you.

If you look at this really close and cross your eyes a bit, interesting things happen in your phenomenal field.

Image source: https://payload.cargocollective.com/1/0/26269/1286032/itw1.jpg



I remember hearing a story long ago about how there are double and triple meanings to each line. Like:

   And the ones that mother gives you
   Don't do anything at all

Well, there was a well-known San Francisco drug dealer named "Mother." And so on.
Time to retire this song Bill.
EVERYONE IN MY CHURCH    IS DEAD
First heard this on a "sampler" album - "The Rock Machine Turns you On", probably about '66 or '67. Still amazing to this day.
{#Good-vibes}  höre ich immer noch gerne  Ein geiler Song!!
I know heresy is forbidden by the purists here at RP (see the response to Red Light Kings' "Old Man" remix - the scythes were out!), but find the remix to "White Rabbit" by Collide. It plays over the closing credits to one of the Resident Evil movies.
 Misterfixit wrote:


Hah!  She DID have them straightened!  Not to bad looking either for being -- what -- 70-something.  And she is giving the "finger the female way.  Men give it with the first and third fingers curled closely into the palm.

 

That is Grace?

Time is not fair....


Be right back.  Gonna throw this grapefruit into the bathtub.  
LOVE the band - but not this song!
 Misterfixit wrote:
Wonder if Grace ever had her snaggle teeth fixed?  And what happened to one of her kids she named "God"?

Still loving this track after a lot of years.

 

 
She only had one child, China Kantner. The "God" name rumor came from an smart-aleck remark she made to a nurse at the hospital. As for what China is doing, check Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China_Kantner
 meinthecorner wrote:

" The Who's "Stairway to Heaven" "... that would be something!

 
No thanks, I could go without ever hearing any version of "Stairway..." anymore, but Zeppelin's version of "Alone Again, Naturally" is interesting.
 ambrebalte wrote:

Same blowing effect
As for the other songs, Pink Floyd, the first time I listened to "Wish you were here", The Who's "Stairway to Heaven" , "Say it ain't so" by Murray Head I think, Rolling Stones' Angies, Lou Reed's perfect day...oh I realise this list could be endless. These first times all occured in the seventies. Some of them lasted, others didn't as if time erased their power. Or may be going from teen age to adult hood changes the ears? Repetition is a factor too.

I had the same effect with some classical music too Casta Diva by La Callas, Mozart Concerto for Clarinet & Oboe Adagio(Out of Africa made it famous), Astor Piazzola, Coltrane, ...and so MANY more!

Nice call

 
" The Who's "Stairway to Heaven" "... that would be something!
Just saw a rockumentary on The Airplane. I forgot how good they were, Grace and Marty were incredible together. He still tours! I love his voice.
Yes sir it is a great set. Thanks.
Great set Bill! 
 treatment_bound wrote:
    
 Here's what she thinks about your "snaggle teeth" comment.


 

Hah!  She DID have them straightened!  Not to bad looking either for being -- what -- 70-something.  And she is giving the "finger the female way.  Men give it with the first and third fingers curled closely into the palm.
 gillespp wrote:
 They talk way too much on XM and they are really banal.
 
Could not agree MORE!!!  Everytime I hear Ms. LSQ or that darn Duck I want to bonk someone over the head. Mel Karmazin polluted XM with his Clear Channel garbage.    Let's hope the new CEO fixes things soon. 


Flashback!  Love it!


 Misterfixit wrote:
Wonder if Grace ever had her snaggle teeth fixed? 
     
 Here's what she thinks about your "snaggle teeth" comment.

still love it . after how many years?{#Dancingbanana}
Wonder if Grace ever had her snaggle teeth fixed?  And what happened to one of her kids she named "God"?

Still loving this track after a lot of years.

 

Everybody in my church loves this song...
 
 rdo wrote:
 
 

I have been listening for several years, usually during work, and I know exactly what you mean. The first years the playlist for me always sounded fresh and exotic with a great mix of classic and new songs. Now it has become very repetitive for me. When I listen to XM's Loft I am constantly hearing new songs. I only listen to that in the car though. The selections on The Loft are not that great but at least they are new. They talk way too much on XM and they are really banal. I think your critique is helpful and I hope others make this point. RP needs to pick more cuts off more albums, even albums from the past, it doesn't matter. Just as long as I have not heard it before.  I often think we are limited to hearing only what Bill likes. His skill is what makes this a great station but it could be improved by trying out some other songs that he may not like so much and letting us decide via the rating.




 
I've been listing to RP for, what—12 years?—and I can't disagree more. RP is always fresh. In the car, I'd rather the frequent dropouts on RP from the poor cell coverage in the Portland hills than anything on XM, including The Loft. It's missing something essential that is definitely there in RP—no doubt Bill's magic touch.
Amazing how well this song holds up decades later...
 LongGoneDaddy wrote:
"throw the radio in the bathtub when White Rabbit peaks!!"
as your attorney, I'd advise against this.  


 
What a scene
Awesome, one of those songs that always resonates in my head. And Stairway to Heaven is LedZep, not the Who.
" 'But what did the Dormouse say?' one of the jury asked."
" 'That I can't remember', said the Hatter."
... when logic and proportion have fallen sloppy dead.

It took me all of these past 46 years to finally hear this lyric for what it is.

Yes, indeed ...
 ambrebalte wrote:

Same blowing effect
As for the other songs, Pink Floyd, the first time I listened to "Wish you were here", The Who's "Stairway to Heaven" , "Say it ain't so" by Murray Head I think, Rolling Stones' Angies, Lou Reed's perfect day...oh I realise this list could be endless. These first times all occured in the seventies. Some of them lasted, others didn't as if time erased their power. Or may be going from teen age to adult hood changes the ears? Repetition is a factor too.

I had the same effect with some classical music too Casta Diva by La Callas, Mozart Concerto for Clarinet & Oboe Adagio(Out of Africa made it famous), Astor Piazzola, Coltrane, ...and so MANY more!

Nice call
 
Bohemian Rhapsody, Sultans of Swing, lust for life, common people, it's a long way to the top... 
 akaike wrote:
This song blew my mind when I first heard it.  I only wish I could recapture that "Holy $Hi!!" moment when the song ended and all I wanted was to listen to it again.

(...)

You? 
 
Same blowing effect
As for the other songs, Pink Floyd, the first time I listened to "Wish you were here", The Who's "Stairway to Heaven" , "Say it ain't so" by Murray Head I think, Rolling Stones' Angies, Lou Reed's perfect day...oh I realise this list could be endless. These first times all occured in the seventies. Some of them lasted, others didn't as if time erased their power. Or may be going from teen age to adult hood changes the ears? Repetition is a factor too.

I had the same effect with some classical music too Casta Diva by La Callas, Mozart Concerto for Clarinet & Oboe Adagio(Out of Africa made it famous), Astor Piazzola, Coltrane, ...and so MANY more!

Nice call
This song is very short and totally magical and can not get tired of it. I guess they made it on some magical thing too :).
This song blew my mind when I first heard it.  I only wish I could recapture that "Holy $Hi!!" moment when the song ended and all I wanted was to listen to it again.

Other songs that have done that over the years:

I Am A Rock by Simon and Garfunkel
More Than a Feeling by Boston (crazy, I know)...but I was a kid
Black by Pearl Jam

You? 
 Mandible wrote:

A friend told me this is about MK Ultra

 
KU/MOTHER and AE/RIFLE
 johnjconn wrote:


I wonder what she's taking to celebrate?
 
Funniest post in ages!

Leave it to a Chicagoan to cut to the core with humor.  (Yes, I'm a native.)
At their best!
Wore out the grooves on this album.
Dated.
 

godspeed wrote:
Timeless Classic!
 


According to the newspaper Grace Slick turned 73 on two days ago. (October 30th.)  Belated Happy Birthday!

 Thanks, JJ, this
gave me a good laugh on this drizzly day...
JalapenoJoe wrote:
Wet Rabbit
I see your White Rabbit and raise you a Wet Rabbit.
 

Wet Rabbit
I see your White Rabbit and raise you a Wet Rabbit.
as a bonus the vinyl has that tube dynamic range and grain-less sound that lets you turn it up and up w/o distortion
Timeless Classic!
"throw the radio in the bathtub when White Rabbit peaks!!"
as your attorney, I'd advise against this.  

Updated to a 10 - perfect!
Ageless ... musically and lyrically ... b.r.a.v.o. {#Clap}
 

 Jim Marshall - Grace and Janis -  by johningham42
https://www.flickr.com/photos/48693130@N03/

Copyright All rights reserved

.
 


 Tippster wrote:
I'd also like to ask you when the last time was that the US military actually defended against an attack on the USA from an outside force.  Some say its the current War on Terror, but that's a rather shallow argument.  I think it was the war of 1812.
 
Just to nitpick, the War of 1812 was initiated by the US so arguably one might have to go back even further. Although, the fighting did happen on North American soil and obviously there were military attacks on the US over the course of events.

Still, I agree with the overall thrust of your post. Interesting insight re: freedoms.
I got this album for my 16th birthday
IMPORTANT BAND,....first!
It would be good to hear something different from JA.  Something like Rejoyce, maybe.
Remember what the doormouse said........."with good music".

Everybody in my hotel room loves this song...
 
 MiracleDrug wrote:

no, the freedoms you enjoy are courtesy of a lot of brave men and women fighting and dying actually...

 
They may defend them, brother, but they're certainly not giving them to me.

I'd also like to ask you when the last time was that the US military actually defended against an attack on the USA from an outside force.  Some say its the current War on Terror, but that's a rather shallow argument.  I think it was the war of 1812.

I think we've evolved as a society since then, thanks to the non-specific nature of the Constitution.  That's the true genius of the founders - not pidgeonholing us into a specific vision of how things should be, but a framework to keep us free no matter how much we discover.

 MiracleDrug wrote:

no, the freedoms you enjoy are courtesy of a lot of brave men and women fighting and dying actually...
 
ACTUALLY, the freedoms I enjoy are those that the trade unions, and other non governmental organisations have fought and died for. The men and women dying on the battlefields are, all too sadly, fighting for something else.
This seems to be exactly what I needed to hear this morning...which probably says quite a lot about my current state of mind, if only I was able to understand myself.
 MiracleDrug wrote:

no, the freedoms you enjoy are courtesy of a lot of brave men and women fighting and dying actually...

 

{#Eh}
{#Good-vibes}
This song is short (enough time to go to the bathroom for those who are tired of it) and a timeless classic and hope RP plays it forever, never get tired of the song and sing it with Grace everytime. Rock-on Airplane!
 kcar wrote:

Ermm...not to be too obnoxious, but the Summer of Love grooviness didn't last all that long in SF, from what I've seen of the area in documentaries. Haight-Ashbury got overrun by drugs, crime and homeless kids very quickly. By the fall of '67, the scene was pretty ugly. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summer_of_Love#Event

I'm sure that while it was still fairly small, that impromptu gathering was pretty cool. I'm all for social experimentation and personal exploration. I just think that it's self-limiting to glorify the past. We don't have time machines but we do have the power to create our own small Summer of Loves now.

I've never quite understood Jefferson Airplane. For a while they stood for rebellion against conformist society and a call for personal freedom, but the band got stuck on drugs, personally and musically. And then it eventually turned into Jefferson Starship, which almost everyone I knew hated as a cheesy, schlocky sell-out. 

Let's hope that HISTORY can proof (one day) what the Hippies have done for the freedom most of us can enjoy nowadays.

I hope the same sort of thing. I met a guy who'd lived pretty intensely during those days as a hippie and he was grumbling that his generation had blown it, that they had had a chance to change society but had gotten side-tracked on drugs and self-absorption. I asked him to tell me what success would have looked like. Really, what power structures and institutions were they going to replace? You don't wish away capitalism or magically reform even a constitutional republic or change social norms.

But you can, as hippies did, protest an unjust and useless war, helping to end it. You also push for environmental protection and preservation as they did—thanks to the hippie movement we got the EPA and green consciousness. The children of the 60s also helped get Nixon out of power by a just and peaceful process. They also got people to look at their own feelings and worth outside of the traditional structures of school, work, marriage and church. They also helped the Civil Rights movement succeed—a huge positive change in American society. 

People sneer at hippies and the 60s optimism. I look at it this way: if you could bypass the craziness of that decade and all the counter-culture movement, would you really be happy with having to live like Don Draper and his crew in the world of "Mad Men"? 

Not for me.
 

 
no, the freedoms you enjoy are courtesy of a lot of brave men and women fighting and dying actually...

 SinisterDexter wrote:
Thank goodness the original is playing - not some bizarre remake.
 
Couldn't agree more!
Drugs anyone?
Morrison, Jones, Hendrix, Joplin, and so on.
Sex and drugs and Rock & Roll

I wonder if I started to sing this outloud from cube...would I be walked out?  LOL


 mayorr7 wrote:
Most of the comments on this song seem to relate to political and lifestyle commentary which is all well and fine in a town hall meeting, but this is a music station and I'd like to discuss the musical merits. Good to great song....but I am so tired of hearing this song, particularly on the blessedly divergent playlist that is Radio Paradise. I have noticed over the several years that I have been listening (and recently supporting) Radio Paradise that it sometimes can glom on to a select group  of artists (porcupine tree, dandy warhols, guster) and songs (list is too long to get into, altho I will mention nitin sawhney) and just won't let them go. That's what they do on commercial top 40 stations, please not here. For the artists, sure get into the deep cuts, just not the same ones (even though they are great). There are so many other artist that fall in with the RP metric and musical mission statement that I never understand why we don't hear even more variety. I vote for expansive variety over repetitious comfort. But the people spoke on this one and gave it an 8.6, so maybe I'm out of sync with the prevailing wishes of the listeners. Anyway RP, your the best out there, so these are just the opinions of one listener trying to make it better for himself. You've brought so much new music into my life (I now love all the groups I singled out above) and look forward to what will come in the future.

  
 

I have been listening for several years, usually during work, and I know exactly what you mean. The first years the playlist for me always sounded fresh and exotic with a great mix of classic and new songs. Now it has become very repetitive for me. When I listen to XM's Loft I am constantly hearing new songs. I only listen to that in the car though. The selections on The Loft are not that great but at least they are new. They talk way too much on XM and they are really banal. I think your critique is helpful and I hope others make this point. RP needs to pick more cuts off more albums, even albums from the past, it doesn't matter. Just as long as I have not heard it before.  I often think we are limited to hearing only what Bill likes. His skill is what makes this a great station but it could be improved by trying out some other songs that he may not like so much and letting us decide via the rating.



 Stingray wrote:
<...>

It's a paradox that Jefferson Airplane - and all they stood and stand for -
are a product of the very country that bred shady characters like
BUSH, CHENEY, WOLFOWITZ and the likes...!
 
The gap can be even wider, as my provenance proves: for I come from the country that brought forth Goebbels, Mengele, Goering etc., regardless of Beethoven, Einstein or Mann, to name just a few.

Very nice!
Riveted back into the nostalgia. I was a freshman at a small Catholic college in Worcester, MA when me and some others got the Airplane to come there in winter of 69. It freaked out the Assumptionist brothers for sure. This song is an anthem for me.
 mayorr7 wrote:
Most of the comments on this song seem to relate to political and lifestyle commentary which is all well and fine in a town hall meeting, but this is a music station and I'd like to discuss the musical merits. Good to great song....but I am so tired of hearing this song, particularly on the blessedly divergent playlist that is Radio Paradise. I have noticed over the several years that I have been listening (and recently supporting) Radio Paradise that it sometimes can glom on to a select group  of artists (porcupine tree, dandy warhols, guster) and songs (list is too long to get into, altho I will mention nitin sawhney) and just won't let them go. That's what they do on commercial top 40 stations, please not here. For the artists, sure get into the deep cuts, just not the same ones (even though they are great). There are so many other artist that fall in with the RP metric and musical mission statement that I never understand why we don't hear even more variety. I vote for expansive variety over repetitious comfort. But the people spoke on this one and gave it an 8.6, so maybe I'm out of sync with the prevailing wishes of the listeners. Anyway RP, your the best out there, so these are just the opinions of one listener trying to make it better for himself. You've brought so much new music into my life (I now love all the groups I singled out above) and look forward to what will come in the future.

 
And the musical merits of the song? (Beyond "Good to great," that is.)
Most of the comments on this song seem to relate to political and lifestyle commentary which is all well and fine in a town hall meeting, but this is a music station and I'd like to discuss the musical merits. Good to great song....but I am so tired of hearing this song, particularly on the blessedly divergent playlist that is Radio Paradise. I have noticed over the several years that I have been listening (and recently supporting) Radio Paradise that it sometimes can glom on to a select group  of artists (porcupine tree, dandy warhols, guster) and songs (list is too long to get into, altho I will mention nitin sawhney) and just won't let them go. That's what they do on commercial top 40 stations, please not here. For the artists, sure get into the deep cuts, just not the same ones (even though they are great). There are so many other artist that fall in with the RP metric and musical mission statement that I never understand why we don't hear even more variety. I vote for expansive variety over repetitious comfort. But the people spoke on this one and gave it an 8.6, so maybe I'm out of sync with the prevailing wishes of the listeners. Anyway RP, your the best out there, so these are just the opinions of one listener trying to make it better for himself. You've brought so much new music into my life (I now love all the groups I singled out above) and look forward to what will come in the future.

Thank goodness the original is playing - not some bizarre remake.

A friend told me this is about MK Ultra


Still get chills!
 kcar wrote:

Ermm...not to be too obnoxious, but the Summer of Love grooviness didn't last all that long in SF, from what I've seen of the area in documentaries. Haight-Ashbury got overrun by drugs, crime and homeless kids very quickly. By the fall of '67, the scene was pretty ugly. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summer_of_Love#Event

I'm sure that while it was still fairly small, that impromptu gathering was pretty cool. I'm all for social experimentation and personal exploration. I just think that it's self-limiting to glorify the past. We don't have time machines but we do have the power to create our own small Summer of Loves now.

I've never quite understood Jefferson Airplane. For a while they stood for rebellion against conformist society and a call for personal freedom, but the band got stuck on drugs, personally and musically. And then it eventually turned into Jefferson Starship, which almost everyone I knew hated as a cheesy, schlocky sell-out. 

Let's hope that HISTORY can proof (one day) what the Hippies have done for the freedom most of us can enjoy nowadays.

I hope the same sort of thing. I met a guy who'd lived pretty intensely during those days as a hippie and he was grumbling that his generation had blown it, that they had had a chance to change society but had gotten side-tracked on drugs and self-absorption. I asked him to tell me what success would have looked like. Really, what power structures and institutions were they going to replace? You don't wish away capitalism or magically reform even a constitutional republic or change social norms.

But you can, as hippies did, protest an unjust and useless war, helping to end it. You also push for environmental protection and preservation as they did—thanks to the hippie movement we got the EPA and green consciousness. The children of the 60s also helped get Nixon out of power by a just and peaceful process. They also got people to look at their own feelings and worth outside of the traditional structures of school, work, marriage and church. They also helped the Civil Rights movement succeed—a huge positive change in American society. 

People sneer at hippies and the 60s optimism. I look at it this way: if you could bypass the craziness of that decade and all the counter-culture movement, would you really be happy with having to live like Don Draper and his crew in the world of "Mad Men"? 

Not for me.
 

 
A friend of mine researched the Haight-Asbury / Summer of Love scene extensively while preparing a novel set in the period. She too said that the blissful peace & love image that we all have was indeed short-lived. Not that it was a myth, just that it didn't last long.
In any event, I just wanted to say thanks for your thoughtful post, kcar.
White Rabbit was the Airplane's high-water mark, IMO, while the Starship's "We Built this City" gets my vote for the worst song of all time.


 Stingray wrote:
Hearing this - and other stuff from them - I can PERFECTLY imagine
how it must have been back in those glorious days in SF.
I gave one toe could I go back there in a time-machine for at least
one night (and the following day).

Let's hope that HISTORY can proof (one day) what the Hippies have
done for the freedom most of us can enjoy nowadays.

It's a paradox that Jefferson Airplane - and all they stood and stand for -
are a product of the very country that bred shady characters like
BUSH, CHENEY, WOLFOWITZ and the likes...!
 
Ermm...not to be too obnoxious, but the Summer of Love grooviness didn't last all that long in SF, from what I've seen of the area in documentaries. Haight-Ashbury got overrun by drugs, crime and homeless kids very quickly. By the fall of '67, the scene was pretty ugly. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summer_of_Love#Event

I'm sure that while it was still fairly small, that impromptu gathering was pretty cool. I'm all for social experimentation and personal exploration. I just think that it's self-limiting to glorify the past. We don't have time machines but we do have the power to create our own small Summer of Loves now.

I've never quite understood Jefferson Airplane. For a while they stood for rebellion against conformist society and a call for personal freedom, but the band got stuck on drugs, personally and musically. And then it eventually turned into Jefferson Starship, which almost everyone I knew hated as a cheesy, schlocky sell-out. 

Let's hope that HISTORY can proof (one day) what the Hippies have done for the freedom most of us can enjoy nowadays.

I hope the same sort of thing. I met a guy who'd lived pretty intensely during those days as a hippie and he was grumbling that his generation had blown it, that they had had a chance to change society but had gotten side-tracked on drugs and self-absorption. I asked him to tell me what success would have looked like. Really, what power structures and institutions were they going to replace? You don't wish away capitalism or magically reform even a constitutional republic or change social norms.

But you can, as hippies did, protest an unjust and useless war, helping to end it. You also push for environmental protection and preservation as they did—thanks to the hippie movement we got the EPA and green consciousness. The children of the 60s also helped get Nixon out of power by a just and peaceful process. They also got people to look at their own feelings and worth outside of the traditional structures of school, work, marriage and church. They also helped the Civil Rights movement succeed—a huge positive change in American society. 

People sneer at hippies and the 60s optimism. I look at it this way: if you could bypass the craziness of that decade and all the counter-culture movement, would you really be happy with having to live like Don Draper and his crew in the world of "Mad Men"? 

Not for me.
 

 Deadwing wrote:

Unless you grew up in the 1780's and drank massive amounts of wine you don't understand Mozart.

Jackass

{#Cheers}
 
Comment of the day for me...

 dcjohnson77 wrote:
Unless you grew up in the 60's and dropped acid while listening to this song, you have no idea what it means
 
Unless you grew up in the 1780's and drank massive amounts of wine you don't understand Mozart.

Jackass

{#Cheers}
 Stingray wrote:
It's a paradox that Jefferson Airplane - and all they stood and stand for -
are a product of the very country that bred shady characters like
BUSH, CHENEY, WOLFOWITZ and the likes...!
 
That's actually pretty well said. 

If those three had listened to some JA while in their formative years, the last 10 years in the US might not have been the decent into Hell it has been. 

Of course, they wouldn't have listened to it.  They much prefer the music of screaming babies and dying cats.  Even Satanic death metal isn't evil enough for them.

Oh, and Cheney was never bred.  He was constructed out of rusty pipes, animal bones, rotten eggs, and the Dark Side of the Force. 


Hearing this - and other stuff from them - I can PERFECTLY imagine
how it must have been back in those glorious days in SF.
I gave one toe could I go back there in a time-machine for at least
one night (and the following day).

Let's hope that HISTORY can proof (one day) what the Hippies have
done for the freedom most of us can enjoy nowadays.

It's a paradox that Jefferson Airplane - and all they stood and stand for -
are a product of the very country that bred shady characters like
BUSH, CHENEY, WOLFOWITZ and the likes...!
please NOOOO!!  it's 2011!!!!!!!  noooo more jefferson airplane!!!!!
where is my heaaaaadddd mannnn?? {#Stop}
{#Puke}
 daveshel4 wrote:
That must have taken a while to do.
 
Four long decades, man...
Can't hear this song without thinking of the bathtub scene in "Fear and Loathing...".  And that's a good thing.  : )
 fredriley wrote:
This song never fails to give me goose pimples. It's as powerful, to me, as when I first heard it decades ago. This would appear on my all-time Top 20 without question. 10 from the Nottingham jury.
 
I can remember exactly where I was and what I was doing the first time that I heard this song...great memories.


 Otomi wrote:
what a long, long, and incredibly bizarre trip it's been, man...
 

That must have taken a while to do.
 LondonRabbit wrote:
Good to hear the original and best! 
 

I was just thinking, "thank goodness it's the real one!"
Good to hear the original and best! 

Grace Slick - El Diablo

Grace Slick, (born Grace Barnett Wing on October 30, 1939) is an American singer and songwriter, who was one of the lead singers of the rock groups Jefferson Airplane, Jefferson Starship, Starship, and was a solo artist, for nearly three decades, from the mid-1960s to the mid-1990s. Slick was an important figure in the 1960s psychedelic rock genre, and is known for her witty, often acid-tongued, thought-provoking lyrics.

El Diablo I can feel your power in my soul
Dancing like your puppet though I try to break your hold
Half succeeding still I find I'm healing quickly
You'll not trick me one more time

El Diablo you are like a fountain blowing dust
Peddler of delusion, dire confusion and disgust
As you hook your mark with joyous heart you up the price
Take your pleasure elsewhere cast your gaze not on my life

El Diablo I can feel your power in my soul
Dancing like your puppet though I try to break your hold
Half succeeding still I find I'm healing quickly
You'll not trick me one more time

El Diablo I can hear you calling in the night
Pass me by in silence I'll not follow you tonight
Beat your breast like thunder vent your anger with a howl
You'll not pull me under I'll not tremble at your growl


 fredriley wrote:
This song never fails to give me goose pimples. It's as powerful, to me, as when I first heard it decades ago. This would appear on my all-time Top 20 without question. 10 from the Nottingham jury.
 
No doubt about it Fred, this is an iconic piece.  I've just upped it from 9 to 10.


This song never fails to give me goose pimples. It's as powerful, to me, as when I first heard it decades ago. This would appear on my all-time Top 20 without question. 10 from the Nottingham jury.
 ubuntourist wrote:

As much as I love this song, nothing can make me forgive "Starship".

 
On second thought, you are right.

I'm sure I'll get flamed for it, but I really do like the new Emiliana Torrini version of this just as much as this... Sure Grace's voice is kinda hard to top, but as for the rest of the music, the newer version does it much better...
The original is so much better


I don't think I've ever liked this song. Must be something wrong with me, it is a pretty standard hit. Oh well, volume = 0. See you all in a few.
Great, classic song but I feel RP is moving this into heavy rotation: instead, bring on the newer stuff.