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Mellow Mix Fan Club - - Jun 20, 2019 - 10:47am
 
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Thorium Power - miamizsun - Jun 19, 2019 - 7:44am
 
Things I Saw Today... - - Jun 19, 2019 - 4:26am
 
Song Lyrics - sirdroseph - Jun 19, 2019 - 3:07am
 
Index » Regional/Local » USA/Canada » Health Care Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 263, 264, 265  Next
Post to this Topic
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: May 16, 2019 - 3:55am

via andrew hessel:

This is one of the clearest descriptions of advanced genome engineering toolmaking I’ve heard yet, and the potential for treating human disease is massive. Well worth watching.



miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 18, 2019 - 4:35am

via andrew hessel:

Big news. therapies are incredible because they can be so targeted (to the sequence level) plus developed fast and inexpensively. Result is ultraprecision medicine, personalized to the individual. So necessary to beat cancer.

CRISPR has been used to treat US cancer patients for the first time


The gene-editing tool has been used in a trial to enhance the blood cells of two patients with cancer.

The trial: The experimental research, under way at the University of Pennsylvania, involves genetically altering a person’s T cells so that they attack and destroy cancer. A university spokesman confirmed it has treated the first patients, one with sarcoma and one with multiple myeloma.

Slow start: Plans for the pioneering study were first reported in 2016, but it was slow to get started. Chinese hospitals, meanwhile, have launched a score of similar efforts. Carl June, the famed University of Pennsylvania cancer doctor, has compared the Chinese lead in employing CRISPR to a genetic Sputnik.   

Ex vivo: It’s safer and easier to employ the CRISPR technique on cells removed from a patient’s body. That’s the case in the new cancer study, in which doctors collected blood from patients and then genetically engineered the immune cells present in it before returning the cells to the patients. 

The edit: Researchers added one gene to make the T cells attack cancer, but they also used CRISPR to delete a different gene, called PD-1, which can act as a brake on the immune system’s defenses.

Pharmaceutical drugs that inhibit PD-1, known as immunotherapies, have been dramatically effective in treating a few cancers. Now the idea is to install the same capacity directly into the DNA of T cells.

CRISPR wave: The Pennsylvania cancer study is just one of many tests of medical treatments using CRISPR that are on the way. This year, for example, a patient in Europe became the first person to be treated with CRISPR for an inherited disease, beta thalassemia.

Funding: The Penn study is funded by the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, an organization started by Napster cofounder and early Facebook investor Sean Parker, as well as by a startup firm, Tmunity. Parker has likened T cells to “little computers” that can be reprogrammed.

Sign up here for our daily newsletter The Download to get your dose of the latest must-read news from the world of emerging tech.




Red_Dragon

Red_Dragon Avatar



Posted: Apr 17, 2019 - 4:09pm


miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 17, 2019 - 3:26pm

after losing my grandmother to alzheimer’s disease i'd like to see others spared...

Senolytics Show Promise Against Alzheimer’s in Mice

For the past quarter century, scientists battled Alzheimer’s disease under a single guiding principle: that protein clumps—beta-amyloid—deposited outside sensitive brain cells gradually damage neuronal functions and trigger memory loss. The solution seems simple: remove junk amyloid, protect the brain.

They could be completely wrong.

Last month, Alzheimer’s disease defeated another promising near-market drug that tried to prevent or remove amyloid deposits, adding to the disease’s therapeutic “graveyard of dreams.” Although the drug removed toxic amyloid, the patients didn’t get better. The failure is once again spurring scientists to confront an uncomfortable truth: targeting amyloid clumps when patients already show memory symptoms doesn’t work. Wiping out soluble amyloid—fragments of proteins before they aggregate into junk—also dead ends.

It’s time to think outside the box.

Last week in Nature Neuroscience, Dr. Mark Mattson’s team at the National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program added substantial proof that senolytics, the golden child of anti-aging drugs, rescue memory loss in Alzheimer’s disease, at least in mice genetically engineered to accumulate amyloid clumps in their brains.

more


Red_Dragon

Red_Dragon Avatar



Posted: Apr 17, 2019 - 8:04am

 cc_rider wrote:
Oh, a little word of caution about those so-called 'stand-alone emergency rooms' popping up everywhere. It's a racket. I know, you're shocked.

They are not 'Urgent Care' clinics like Minute Clinic or whatever. Those are great for colds, flu, etc.  These 'emergency rooms' are equipped and staffed like, well, an emergency room. Sounds good so far, right? Well, all that really means is they can charge emergency room rates! And it's not usually covered by insurance or Medi-anything. It's a racket designed to gouge people when they're desperate.

If you're seriously injured, the ambulance will not take you to one of those, it'll go to a real emergency room affiliated with a hospital system. That is, until these 'emergency rooms' get into the ambulance business, which I expect any day now...
c.

 
The oncology practice where P's was treated was bought by a hospital group. They made a bunch of upgrades to the facility that resulted in it actually being re-classified as a hospital. This enabled them to charge hospital rates. Her doc bailed after a few months and started his own practice.


cc_rider

cc_rider Avatar

Location: Bastrop
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 17, 2019 - 7:46am

Oh, a little word of caution about those so-called 'stand-alone emergency rooms' popping up everywhere. It's a racket. I know, you're shocked.

They are not 'Urgent Care' clinics like Minute Clinic or whatever. Those are great for colds, flu, etc.  These 'emergency rooms' are equipped and staffed like, well, an emergency room. Sounds good so far, right? Well, all that really means is they can charge emergency room rates! And it's not usually covered by insurance or Medi-anything. It's a racket designed to gouge people when they're desperate.

If you're seriously injured, the ambulance will not take you to one of those, it'll go to a real emergency room affiliated with a hospital system. That is, until these 'emergency rooms' get into the ambulance business, which I expect any day now...
c.
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 17, 2019 - 5:57am

interesting updates on some heath sciences (plus a lot of other good stuff too)



miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 11, 2019 - 3:02pm

fantastic animation  



miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 27, 2019 - 9:12am

 kcar wrote:

 
 
This is very cool but I'm not sure that as this therapy in current form will ever offer affordable treatment to the general population. This therapy as I understand it requires analysis of a tumor's genetic code and pinpointing genetic vulnerabilities that, if attacked by T-cells or other agents of the immune system, would cause tumor cells to die. You also have to genetically modify T-cells to attack the tumor's genetic vulnerabilities—and you have to do that on a massive scale. From what I've read, you have to create a replacement number of modified T-cells and then wipe out the patient's immune system through chemo or radiation. You then introduce the modified T-cells so that they can attack the tumor cells. Even then this approach is applicable in about 30-40% of cancer cases.
 
Right now AFAIK this approach still cannot be used on solid tumors although researchers are trying to adapt it for such cases. I came across an article about this treatment in technologyreview.com around 3:30 am one night and spent the next 90 minutes trying to get a quick grasp of it with links to more technical articles for an email to send to my brother, whose wife was dealing with a rare and aggressive solid-tumor cancer in advanced stage. He talked to his wife's oncologist, who felt that the treatment couldn't help Catherine in part because solid tumors often have more than one genetic code in their mass, thus requiring a search for more than one set of vulnerabilities. Solid tumors also are effective at resisting penetration by therapeutic agents.
 
This therapy is very expensive and dangerous even if the patient is a good candidate. I don't know how you can create a relatively inexpensive and safe way of wiping out people's immune systems. Hopefully cancer research can find a less destructive and dangerous way of genetically altering people's T-cells.


 

that gadget is more of a quick diagnostic tool

here's another article that shines a little light on potential use(s)

The device could make genetic testing easier and more accessible.

Standardized Testing

To help make genetic screening easier and more accessible, scientists built a handheld device that uses CRISPR gene-editing technology to scan for mutations much more easily than existing labs can.

The device, which Keck Graduate Institute bioengineer Kiana Aran told Futurism looks a bit like a blood glucose monitor, can analyze a purified DNA sample for signs of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in a matter of 15 minutes — a major improvement compared to conventional wait times of several weeks.




kurtster

kurtster Avatar

Location: drifting
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 26, 2019 - 1:12pm

 Lazy8 wrote:
Requires (free) registration.

Eye Exam Detects Signs of Alzheimer's Disease

By Linda Carroll
March 13, 2019
(Reuters Health) - Using an ultrasensitive scanning technique, researchers can detect signs of Alzheimer's disease in the tiny blood vessels at the back of the eye, according to a new report.

Duke University researchers found that these small retinal blood vessels were altered in patients with Alzheimer's disease, but in not in those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or those with no signs of mental decline.

"Among the folks who had Alzheimer's there was a significant reduction in the density of the blood vessels in the superficial layer of the retina compared to controls and those with mild cognitive impairment," said Dr. Dilraj Grewal, an associate professor of ophthalmology at the Duke Eye Center. "We also found a reduction in the thickness of (of a specific layer of the retina) in Alzheimer's patients compared to controls and those with mild cognitive impairment."

The findings were reported March 11 online in Ophthalmology Retina, a publication of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.


 
This is really cool.  The eye is hard wired directly to the brain and thus reveals many clues to our physical condition.  The eye works in both directions.  It is not an input only device.

Lazy8

Lazy8 Avatar

Location: The Gallatin Valley of Montana
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 26, 2019 - 12:59pm

Requires (free) registration.

Eye Exam Detects Signs of Alzheimer's Disease

By Linda Carroll
March 13, 2019
(Reuters Health) - Using an ultrasensitive scanning technique, researchers can detect signs of Alzheimer's disease in the tiny blood vessels at the back of the eye, according to a new report.

Duke University researchers found that these small retinal blood vessels were altered in patients with Alzheimer's disease, but in not in those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or those with no signs of mental decline.

"Among the folks who had Alzheimer's there was a significant reduction in the density of the blood vessels in the superficial layer of the retina compared to controls and those with mild cognitive impairment," said Dr. Dilraj Grewal, an associate professor of ophthalmology at the Duke Eye Center. "We also found a reduction in the thickness of (of a specific layer of the retina) in Alzheimer's patients compared to controls and those with mild cognitive impairment."

The findings were reported March 11 online in Ophthalmology Retina, a publication of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

pigtail

pigtail Avatar

Location: Southern California
Gender: Female


Posted: Mar 26, 2019 - 9:37am



 Isabeau wrote:


 buzz wrote:

wouldnt you heart rate and blood pressure vary according to whether you are having a hard time or an easy time? walked or ran to the bathroom? how smart is this toilet? can it be hacked? 
{#Ask}
 inquiring minds want to know. and so do i. 
{#Stupid}
 
 

Nope. Nada. No Way. Don't need to find me pucker on celebrityanuses.com  

 

If only Elvis were still alive.  He coulda been saved!
kcar

kcar Avatar



Posted: Mar 25, 2019 - 9:52pm

 miamizsun wrote:
the road to diagnosis at stage zero?

fast and near free?

let's hope so

Nanosens CRISPR-Chip video from Nanosens Innovations Inc. on Vimeo.



 
 
 
This is very cool but I'm not sure that as this therapy in current form will ever offer affordable treatment to the general population. This therapy as I understand it requires analysis of a tumor's genetic code and pinpointing genetic vulnerabilities that, if attacked by T-cells or other agents of the immune system, would cause tumor cells to die. You also have to genetically modify T-cells to attack the tumor's genetic vulnerabilities—and you have to do that on a massive scale. From what I've read, you have to create a replacement number of modified T-cells and then wipe out the patient's immune system through chemo or radiation. You then introduce the modified T-cells so that they can attack the tumor cells. Even then this approach is applicable in about 30-40% of cancer cases.
 
Right now AFAIK this approach still cannot be used on solid tumors although researchers are trying to adapt it for such cases. I came across an article about this treatment in technologyreview.com around 3:30 am one night and spent the next 90 minutes trying to get a quick grasp of it with links to more technical articles for an email to send to my brother, whose wife was dealing with a rare and aggressive solid-tumor cancer in advanced stage. He talked to his wife's oncologist, who felt that the treatment couldn't help Catherine in part because solid tumors often have more than one genetic code in their mass, thus requiring a search for more than one set of vulnerabilities. Solid tumors also are effective at resisting penetration by therapeutic agents.
 
This therapy is very expensive and dangerous even if the patient is a good candidate. I don't know how you can create a relatively inexpensive and safe way of wiping out people's immune systems. Hopefully cancer research can find a less destructive and dangerous way of genetically altering people's T-cells.

miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 25, 2019 - 11:15am

the road to diagnosis at stage zero?

fast and near free?

let's hope so

Nanosens CRISPR-Chip video from Nanosens Innovations Inc. on Vimeo.


miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 25, 2019 - 4:22am

i like where this is going

Watch genetically modified T-cells kill cancer cells


haresfur

haresfur Avatar

Location: The Golden Triangle
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 6, 2019 - 3:17pm



 Isabeau wrote:


 buzz wrote:

wouldnt you heart rate and blood pressure vary according to whether you are having a hard time or an easy time? walked or ran to the bathroom? how smart is this toilet? can it be hacked? 
{#Ask}
 inquiring minds want to know. and so do i. 
{#Stupid}
 
 

Nope. Nada. No Way. Don't need to find me pucker on celebrityanuses.com  

 


Isabeau

Isabeau Avatar

Location: sou' tex
Gender: Female


Posted: Feb 6, 2019 - 2:43pm



 buzz wrote:

wouldnt you heart rate and blood pressure vary according to whether you are having a hard time or an easy time? walked or ran to the bathroom? how smart is this toilet? can it be hacked? 
{#Ask}
 inquiring minds want to know. and so do i. 
{#Stupid}
 
 

Nope. Nada. No Way. Don't need to find me pucker on celebrityanuses.com  
buzz

buzz Avatar

Location: up the boohai


Posted: Feb 5, 2019 - 3:40pm

 miamizsun wrote:
because someone has to give a poop...

Monitoring Heart Health, One Toilet Seat at a Time

This smart seat keeps tabs on your heart while you take care of business



Time and again, studies show that people are not good at consistently taking medication, following health care plans, or regularly recording health information, even when our doctor tells us to. 

And that’s a big problem in health care. In fact, the World Health Organization says that getting people to adhere to medical interventions could have a greater impact on world health than any specific medical treatment. 

Now, a team at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) in New York has come up with a clever way to get patients with heart failure to track their heart health—let a toilet do it for them. 

Sensors in a new battery-powered, cloud-connected toilet seat track blood pressure, blood oxygen levels, and other heart data as accurately as hospital-grade monitoring equipment in a small group of patients, according to a study in the January issue of the journal JMIR mHealth and uHealth.

The idea of a “smart toilet” isn’t new—Google has a patent on a health-tracking toilet and Japanese manufacturers Toto and Matsushita (now part of Panasonic) have each developed Wi-Fi–connected toilets—but most health-related toilet technologies focus on urine and stool analysis inside the bowl, rather than tracking vital signs using sensors in the seat.



 
wouldnt you heart rate and blood pressure vary according to whether you are having a hard time or an easy time? walked or ran to the bathroom? how smart is this toilet? can it be hacked? 
{#Ask} inquiring minds want to know. and so do i. {#Stupid} 
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 5, 2019 - 3:13pm

because someone has to give a poop...

Monitoring Heart Health, One Toilet Seat at a Time

This smart seat keeps tabs on your heart while you take care of business



Time and again, studies show that people are not good at consistently taking medication, following health care plans, or regularly recording health information, even when our doctor tells us to. 

And that’s a big problem in health care. In fact, the World Health Organization says that getting people to adhere to medical interventions could have a greater impact on world health than any specific medical treatment. 

Now, a team at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) in New York has come up with a clever way to get patients with heart failure to track their heart health—let a toilet do it for them. 

Sensors in a new battery-powered, cloud-connected toilet seat track blood pressure, blood oxygen levels, and other heart data as accurately as hospital-grade monitoring equipment in a small group of patients, according to a study in the January issue of the journal JMIR mHealth and uHealth.

The idea of a “smart toilet” isn’t new—Google has a patent on a health-tracking toilet and Japanese manufacturers Toto and Matsushita (now part of Panasonic) have each developed Wi-Fi–connected toilets—but most health-related toilet technologies focus on urine and stool analysis inside the bowl, rather than tracking vital signs using sensors in the seat.


miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 5, 2019 - 4:16am



 Steely_D wrote:


 miamizsun wrote:
here's a six part series of visualizations...

 

I think the next healthcare giant begins their care with "Everyone gets their healthcare through video visits or telephone appointments by default - and now let's define those situations that are exceptions to that baseline."

So many people just have a quick question about a rash or a swelling or a medication or a lab result. In antiquated Fee-for-service medicine, the doctor made money every time the patient had to come in.

In future, the docs should be salaried like at Kaiser Permanente, and then their goal isn't to drive revenue via labs or visits, but to simply deliver high quality health care. That's done with a national health insurance system (which eliminates the separate VA, Occ Med, and the County systems - think of the savings) that covers all citizens.

That decreases unnecessary ER visits for non-emergent problems, encourages people to get help sooner rather than later - returning them to or keeping them on the job better.

Folks ask me how to fix the system. I'm not kidding when I say nuke it from orbit. So, although I don't care much for Kamala Harris yet, I appreciate her willingness to say the same. Healthcare for all? That would ruin the insurance system! Her response was basically: "so?"
 

there's the science, which is really making great strides (digitizing biology is very exciting to say the least)

also according to SU Exponential Medicine, some of the government/FDA are finally coming around

they realize that other countries are science friendly and that development and capture, esp IP will happen elsewhere

my concern is that the distribution/availability will be leveraged by double-speak politicians for special interests/groups

i don't have a lot of faith in harris, she seems very willing to change positions if it benefits her brand

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