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Trump - Red_Dragon - Jun 26, 2019 - 5:59am
 
Counting with Pictures - ScottN - Jun 26, 2019 - 5:30am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - Coaxial - Jun 26, 2019 - 5:09am
 
Mixtape Culture Club - sirdroseph - Jun 26, 2019 - 4:11am
 
Android App DLNA - - Jun 26, 2019 - 1:47am
 
Trump Lies - R_P - Jun 25, 2019 - 4:43pm
 
Back to the 70's - JrzyTmata - Jun 25, 2019 - 4:30pm
 
The Groovy Mix - bugslovertoo466 - Jun 25, 2019 - 4:05pm
 
Poetry Forum - Antigone - Jun 25, 2019 - 3:25pm
 
Democratic Party - islander - Jun 25, 2019 - 2:36pm
 
Recipes Shared at Radio Paradise - Proclivities - Jun 25, 2019 - 1:45pm
 
Stupid Questions (and Answers) - Proclivities - Jun 25, 2019 - 1:35pm
 
World Music - R_P - Jun 25, 2019 - 1:26pm
 
Climate Change - R_P - Jun 25, 2019 - 12:30pm
 
Photography Forum - Your Own Photos - oldviolin - Jun 25, 2019 - 11:00am
 
260,000 Posts in one thread? - oldviolin - Jun 25, 2019 - 10:56am
 
Baseball, anyone? - ScottFromWyoming - Jun 25, 2019 - 9:51am
 
Strips, cartoons, illustrations - dischuckin - Jun 25, 2019 - 9:32am
 
President Elizabeth Warren - sirdroseph - Jun 25, 2019 - 7:32am
 
Republican Party - Red_Dragon - Jun 25, 2019 - 7:29am
 
• • • The Once-a-Day • • •  - Red_Dragon - Jun 25, 2019 - 6:20am
 
Today in History - Red_Dragon - Jun 25, 2019 - 6:10am
 
Flat Earth News - Red_Dragon - Jun 24, 2019 - 10:16am
 
Mellow stream - BillG - Jun 24, 2019 - 9:46am
 
Anti-War - black321 - Jun 24, 2019 - 8:33am
 
Anyone have Popcorn Hour? - Proclivities - Jun 24, 2019 - 7:44am
 
ear worm - need help lol - Proclivities - Jun 24, 2019 - 6:53am
 
Tech & Science - black321 - Jun 24, 2019 - 6:32am
 
Beer - sirdroseph - Jun 24, 2019 - 4:55am
 
What happened to the Rockin' & Groovy mixes??? - Roguewarer - Jun 23, 2019 - 3:32pm
 
Iran - R_P - Jun 23, 2019 - 10:58am
 
What Are You Going To Do Today? - Steely_D - Jun 23, 2019 - 10:23am
 
Cool & Interesting Signs, Billboards, etc. as Opposed to ... - SeriousLee - Jun 23, 2019 - 9:57am
 
Immigration - oldviolin - Jun 23, 2019 - 9:53am
 
What are you listening to now? - SeriousLee - Jun 23, 2019 - 9:00am
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - gfischer99 - Jun 23, 2019 - 8:16am
 
Things You Thought Today - Antigone - Jun 23, 2019 - 5:49am
 
Track Transition cutting Out - siskinbob - Jun 23, 2019 - 2:11am
 
What are you doing RIGHT NOW? - oldviolin - Jun 22, 2019 - 10:10pm
 
Favorite wine? - SeriousLee - Jun 22, 2019 - 1:18pm
 
Country Up The Bumpkin - sirdroseph - Jun 22, 2019 - 12:15pm
 
Loudness Wars - islander - Jun 22, 2019 - 9:09am
 
Bob Dylan - sirdroseph - Jun 22, 2019 - 5:02am
 
Gotta Get Your Drink On - SeriousLee - Jun 21, 2019 - 1:51pm
 
New Music - R_P - Jun 21, 2019 - 12:06pm
 
Congress - R_P - Jun 21, 2019 - 11:53am
 
How's the weather? - SeriousLee - Jun 21, 2019 - 9:56am
 
Graphs, Charts & Maps - Proclivities - Jun 21, 2019 - 9:04am
 
Sunrise, Sunset - islander - Jun 21, 2019 - 8:14am
 
Lyrics that strike a chord today... - oldviolin - Jun 21, 2019 - 7:19am
 
What Makes You Laugh? - sirdroseph - Jun 21, 2019 - 5:38am
 
Nuclear power - saviour or scourge? - miamizsun - Jun 21, 2019 - 3:52am
 
New song submissions - Krane - Jun 20, 2019 - 4:37pm
 
Latin Music - rhahl - Jun 20, 2019 - 1:16pm
 
Mellow Mix Fan Club - - Jun 20, 2019 - 10:47am
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - R_P - Jun 20, 2019 - 10:39am
 
You're doing it wrong! - miamizsun - Jun 20, 2019 - 9:26am
 
volcano! - miamizsun - Jun 20, 2019 - 9:11am
 
Mystery Topic #10590 - Proclivities - Jun 20, 2019 - 6:45am
 
Name My Band - Red_Dragon - Jun 19, 2019 - 6:56pm
 
Export rated songs playlist - ruby2zday - Jun 19, 2019 - 6:43pm
 
Redundancy - oldviolin - Jun 19, 2019 - 3:15pm
 
Installing Dishwashers is NOT Easy - Or in Our Case, Even... - oldviolin - Jun 19, 2019 - 1:03pm
 
OUR CATS!! - Proclivities - Jun 19, 2019 - 10:40am
 
Thorium Power - miamizsun - Jun 19, 2019 - 7:44am
 
Derplahoma Questions and Points of Interest - Red_Dragon - Jun 19, 2019 - 6:39am
 
Things I Saw Today... - - Jun 19, 2019 - 4:26am
 
Song Lyrics - sirdroseph - Jun 19, 2019 - 3:07am
 
Flower Pictures - yuel - Jun 19, 2019 - 12:29am
 
Way Cool Video - miamizsun - Jun 18, 2019 - 2:54pm
 
Banksy! - - Jun 18, 2019 - 2:37pm
 
Dangerous Bus Stop - - Jun 18, 2019 - 2:10pm
 
Why Everything You Believe Is Immoral, Irresponsible, Irr... - Proclivities - Jun 18, 2019 - 6:41am
 
American Oil Strikes Again - westslope - Jun 18, 2019 - 2:20am
 
HomeKit HomePod AppleTV - gtufano - Jun 18, 2019 - 12:57am
 
Index » Regional/Local » USA/Canada » Evolution! Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 118, 119, 120  Next
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Posted: Jun 7, 2019 - 4:19pm

Closest-known ancestor of today’s Native Americans found in Siberia
Indigenous Americans, who include Alaska Natives, Canadian First Nations, and Native Americans, descend from humans who crossed an ancient land bridge connecting Siberia in Russia to Alaska tens of thousands of years ago. But scientists are unclear when and where these early migrants moved from place to place. Two new studies shed light on this mystery and uncover the most closely related Native American ancestor outside North America.

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Posted: May 23, 2019 - 10:22am

Billion-year-old fossils set back evolution of earliest fungi
sirdroseph

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Posted: May 1, 2019 - 4:14am

 R_P wrote:
Humans Are Still Mating with Neandertals
A Valentine’s Day meditation on why bright women sometimes gravitate to not-so-bright men
(...) But sometimes women marry up (the lady Neandertal bedding H. sapiens), and sometimes women marry down (the “wise one” female falling in love with the Neandertal). Psychologists have terms for this behavior of selecting mates outside one’s own group: “hypergamy” and “hypogamy,” for marrying up or down, respectively, but as with most technical jargon, the scholarly vocab contributes little. The question is, why do women do it?

We needn’t dwell on marrying up—gold digging everyone understands—but marrying down is another matter. What do women see in the dumb but lovable Neandertals they pick today and in the prehistoric mating game 100,000 years ago? This question is especially important now, because women are making the Neandertal choice more now than ever, and the trends are likely to continue into the future. (...)


 
You are underestimating pure physical attraction and ancient echoes of the strong male provider who fights for the tribe and is a protector.  At the beginning of relationships, the physical and chemical component is the driving factor.  In healthy long term relationships, the focus turns to friendship, compatibility, shared values and character.   Naturally you would assume there are no positive aspects for those males who still exhibit those qualities and deem it pure derogatory and irrational for any woman to be attracted to one such as this.  Now, there are also many women who find serial killers attractive, but I do believe that is a different discussion.....
miamizsun

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Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: May 1, 2019 - 4:05am

 R_P wrote:
Humans Are Still Mating with Neandertals
A Valentine’s Day meditation on why bright women sometimes gravitate to not-so-bright men
(...) But sometimes women marry up (the lady Neandertal bedding H. sapiens), and sometimes women marry down (the “wise one” female falling in love with the Neandertal). Psychologists have terms for this behavior of selecting mates outside one’s own group: “hypergamy” and “hypogamy,” for marrying up or down, respectively, but as with most technical jargon, the scholarly vocab contributes little. The question is, why do women do it?

We needn’t dwell on marrying up—gold digging everyone understands—but marrying down is another matter. What do women see in the dumb but lovable Neandertals they pick today and in the prehistoric mating game 100,000 years ago? This question is especially important now, because women are making the Neandertal choice more now than ever, and the trends are likely to continue into the future. (...)


 

hmmm...

i have 280 neanderthal variants

which is more than most people

probably explains a lot

i have no earthly inertly idea what my mate sees in me   

{#Lol}
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Posted: Apr 30, 2019 - 9:59pm

What Do We Really Know About Neanderthals?
Revolutionary discoveries in archaeology show that the species long maligned as knuckle-dragging brutes deserve a new place in the human story

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Posted: Apr 10, 2019 - 7:28pm

New species of ancient human discovered in Philippines cave
Homo luzonensis fossils found in Luzon island cave, dating back up to 67,000 years
A new species of ancient human, thought to have been under 4ft tall and adapted to climbing trees, has been discovered in the Philippines, providing a twist in the story of human evolution.

The specimen, named Homo luzonensis, was excavated from Callao cave on Luzon island in the northern Philippines and has been dated to 50,000-67,000 years ago – when our own ancestors and the Neanderthals were spreading across Europe and into Asia.

Florent Détroit, of the Natural History Museum in Paris and the paper’s first author, said the discovery provided the latest challenge to the fairly straightforward prevalent narrative of human evolution.

It was once thought that no humans left Africa until about 1.5 million years ago, when a large-bodied ancient human called Homo erectus set off on a dispersal that ultimately allowed it to occupy territory spanning Africa and Spain, China and Indonesia.

Then, according to the traditional narrative, after a few hundred-thousand years of not much happening, our own ancestors dispersed from Africa about 50,000 years ago.

“We now know that it was a much more complex evolutionary history, with several distinct species contemporaneous with Homo sapiens, interbreeding events, extinctions,” said Détroit. “Homo luzonensis is one of those species and we will (increasingly see) that a few thousand years back in time, Homo sapiens was definitely not alone on Earth.” (...)
Nature
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Posted: Feb 14, 2019 - 8:49am

Humans Are Still Mating with Neandertals
A Valentine’s Day meditation on why bright women sometimes gravitate to not-so-bright men
(...) But sometimes women marry up (the lady Neandertal bedding H. sapiens), and sometimes women marry down (the “wise one” female falling in love with the Neandertal). Psychologists have terms for this behavior of selecting mates outside one’s own group: “hypergamy” and “hypogamy,” for marrying up or down, respectively, but as with most technical jargon, the scholarly vocab contributes little. The question is, why do women do it?

We needn’t dwell on marrying up—gold digging everyone understands—but marrying down is another matter. What do women see in the dumb but lovable Neandertals they pick today and in the prehistoric mating game 100,000 years ago? This question is especially important now, because women are making the Neandertal choice more now than ever, and the trends are likely to continue into the future. (...)

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Posted: Feb 13, 2019 - 1:11pm

Viewpoint: Why we still underestimate the Neanderthals
ScottFromWyoming

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Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 11, 2019 - 9:34pm



 R_P wrote:
And this was it — the thing that sold me on 23andMe: the chance to determine one’s degree of Neanderthal-ness. Without any consideration of all the possible consequences of submitting one’s DNA to a global database, I ordered two kits, grinning and convinced that my husband’s result would show a statistically significant and above average number of Neanderthal variants in his genome. Since Father’s Day was only a month away, I decided I’d giftwrap the kits upon arrival too. I’d kill two birds with one stone.

When I hit the Confirm Order button on 23andMe’s site, the possibility of any additional genetic discoveries beyond Tomer’s Neanderthal-ness didn’t even occur to me. My brain was seated at the kitchen table, staring at an unused fork, thinking only of how hairy my husband was and that my father-in-law had recently grown even hairier in his senior years — small gray bushes now sprung from his ears and nostrils. I counted hairs. I equated higher hair counts with higher degrees of Neanderthal-ness. And worse, I worried my husband was destined to suffer future hearing loss, just as his father does, and I wondered if these auditory challenges could be blamed on something neurological or on those furry, sound-absorbing, hair-stuffed ears.

I waited patiently and quietly for the kits to arrive, but my curiosity about everything related to genetics expanded in the meantime. I wanted so much to share my excitement with Tomer; admittedly, I also walked around filled with a kind of juvenile yet sadistic glee, and whenever Tomer licked his fingers or spoke with his mouth full of steak, I thought to myself What a Neanderthal!

 

That's pretty funny.

Scott's Neanderthal variants: 309. I'm in the 92nd percentile of 23&me customers. (Down from 96th percentile when I first signed in, so they've had a lot of cavemen sign up or something.)

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Posted: Feb 11, 2019 - 9:24pm


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Posted: Jan 17, 2019 - 9:37am

Fossils discovered at B.C.'s Burgess Shale add branch to tree of life

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Posted: Jan 6, 2019 - 2:26pm

And this was it — the thing that sold me on 23andMe: the chance to determine one’s degree of Neanderthal-ness. Without any consideration of all the possible consequences of submitting one’s DNA to a global database, I ordered two kits, grinning and convinced that my husband’s result would show a statistically significant and above average number of Neanderthal variants in his genome. Since Father’s Day was only a month away, I decided I’d giftwrap the kits upon arrival too. I’d kill two birds with one stone.

When I hit the Confirm Order button on 23andMe’s site, the possibility of any additional genetic discoveries beyond Tomer’s Neanderthal-ness didn’t even occur to me. My brain was seated at the kitchen table, staring at an unused fork, thinking only of how hairy my husband was and that my father-in-law had recently grown even hairier in his senior years — small gray bushes now sprung from his ears and nostrils. I counted hairs. I equated higher hair counts with higher degrees of Neanderthal-ness. And worse, I worried my husband was destined to suffer future hearing loss, just as his father does, and I wondered if these auditory challenges could be blamed on something neurological or on those furry, sound-absorbing, hair-stuffed ears.

I waited patiently and quietly for the kits to arrive, but my curiosity about everything related to genetics expanded in the meantime. I wanted so much to share my excitement with Tomer; admittedly, I also walked around filled with a kind of juvenile yet sadistic glee, and whenever Tomer licked his fingers or spoke with his mouth full of steak, I thought to myself What a Neanderthal!

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Posted: Dec 13, 2018 - 2:43pm

How Neanderthal DNA might have shaped some human brains
Gene variants acquired through interbreeding seem to give some people with European ancestry more elongated brains.

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Posted: Dec 11, 2018 - 12:15pm

Identity of Little Foot fossil stirs controversy

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Posted: Oct 21, 2018 - 12:27pm

There's no such thing as a 'pure' European—or anyone else
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Posted: Oct 17, 2018 - 5:27pm

Why White Supremacists Are Chugging Milk (and Why Geneticists Are Alarmed)
One slide Dr. Novembre has folded into his recent talks depicts a group of white nationalists chugging milk at a 2017 gathering to draw attention to a genetic trait known to be more common in white people than others — the ability to digest lactose as adults. It also shows a social media post from an account called “Enter The Milk Zone” with a map lifted from a scientific journal article on the trait’s evolutionary history.

In most of the world, the article explains, the gene that allows for the digestion of lactose switches off after childhood. But with the arrival of the first cattle herders in Europe some 5,000 years ago, a chance mutation that left it turned on provided enough of a nutritional leg up that nearly all of those who survived eventually carried it. In the post, the link is accompanied by a snippet of hate speech urging individuals of African ancestry to leave America. “If you can’t drink milk,” it says in part, “you have to go back.”

In an inconvenient truth for white supremacists, a similar bit of evolution turns out to have occurred among cattle breeders in East Africa. Scientists need to be more aware of the racial lens through which some of their basic findings are being filtered, Dr. Novembre says, and do a better job at pointing out how they can be twisted.

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Posted: Oct 3, 2018 - 4:44pm

Don't Brag about Your Large Brain, Pres. Trump
Neandertals and other extinct hominin species had big brains, too. It’s not a sign of intelligence
Perhaps then we shouldn’t brag about our large brains, but marvel at the more compact brain we have inherited from ancestors who likely had to work together to survive. Our world faces real problems, and these problems are not going to be solved by one guy with a self-reported large brain. And Trump should consider if he really wants to be included among the large-brained crowd. In 1871, Edward Rulloff’s brain was weighed at Cornell University where it is still on display. Scientists declared it one of the largest ever recorded.

Rulloff was a serial killer.

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Posted: Jun 27, 2018 - 3:15pm

The Biological Scars of Separation

(...) Days ago, Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen defended the policy of child separation, stating that “We operate according to some of the highest standards in the country. We provide food, medical, education, and all needs that the child requests” (emphasis added). However, these needs are insufficient, and the one obvious need that will not be met anytime soon is reunification with their parents. Few could deny that parental-child separation inflicts suffering. A year ago, when rumors of the separation policy were leaked, the American Academy of Pediatrics released a statement against it, noting that it would cause additional pain for children:

Pediatricians work to keep families together in times of strife because we know that in any time of anxiety and stress, children need to be with their parents, family members and caregivers. Children are not just little adults and they need loved ones to comfort and reassure them.

Federal authorities must exercise caution to ensure that the emotional and physical stress children experience as they seek refuge in the United States is not exacerbated by the additional trauma of being separated from their siblings, parents or other relatives and caregivers. Proposals to separate children from their families as a tool of law enforcement to deter immigration are harsh and counterproductive. We urge policymakers to always be mindful that these are vulnerable, scared children.”

There is some evidence that these traumatic experiences can have long-term effects. Viet Thanh Nguyen, a professor at the University of Southern California, described his own experience as a 4-year-old child who was separated from his family at the end of the Vietnam War. Nguyen wrote that “Memory for me begins here, howling with fear and pain as I was taken from my mother, too young to understand that I would be returned to her in a few months.” He added that: 

“Being separated from my parents hurt enough for me to remember it vividly more than 40 years later. I can easily imagine the kind of damage a prolonged removal, under much more adverse circumstances, would do to a child. Or to a parent, since I am now the father of a 4-year-old myself. I say I can imagine it, but the pain of losing my son is actually unimaginable.”

Like Nguyen, I don’t think I can fully comprehend how hard it would be to have a child taken from me. On an emotional level, I think the closest word to describe how I would feel would probably be “anguish” for my child’s pain, and probably anger toward the people who caused it. On an intellectual level, I think most of us would probably feel this way, and I think I know why. Forgive me, but I cannot help but to view all of this at least partly from the perspective of a biological anthropologist.

Perhaps this is going back one step too far, but I think it’s important to remember that some of the hallmarks of being human are (1) our obligatory sociality, and (2) the intensity of the parent-child bond. Connections are essential, as none of us is an island. For example, large epidemiological studies show that strong social relationships are a better predictor of longevity among the elderly than whether one is obese or exercises regularly (Holt-Lunstad et al. 2010). Similar patterns have also been found in baboons, where females who had stronger and more stable social bonds lived longer (Silk et al. 2010).

This makes sense, as nearly all primate species are group-living and intensely social. The neurobiologist Matt Lieberman argued that we are “wired to connect” socially because this carried evolutionary benefits that enhanced our ancestors’ chances for survival, and that this goes deep into our primate and mammalian heritage. However, there are also costs to being so heavily invested in others, such as the potential for loneliness, isolation, neglect, ostracization, bullying, rejection, and loss. Furthermore, social pain is real, and it overlaps neurologically with physical pain:

“Throughout our lives, we are destined to experience different forms of social rejection and loss… Such breakups often feel unbearable, and they can dramatically alter how we view ourselves and our lives for a long time after. Our Faustian evolutionary bargain allows us humans to develop slowly out of the womb, to adapt to specific cultures and environments, and to grow the most encephalized brains on the planet. But it requires us to pay for it with the possibility of pain, real pain, every time we connect with another human being who has the power to leave us or withhold love. Evolution made its bet that suffering was an acceptable price to pay for all the rewards of being human.” (...)

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Posted: Jun 20, 2018 - 11:58am

(...) So, territoriality, from an evolutionary standpoint, is about competing for and securing resources essential for our survival and reproduction. This explains much of our negativity against immigrants, who we may think covet or threaten our possessions and privileges, regardless of their ethnic backgrounds. (This is not to mention that many of our common social and economic resources—public schools, housing subsidies, welfare benefits—are supported by money from taxpayers. Our fairness instinct makes us vigilant against free-riders.)
 
(...)
 
The endowment effect explains why we feel we own our society with the culture we are accustomed to, generically known as the American way of life. Such invisible “ownership” makes us inclined to reject other cultural values and practices—dresses, languages, rituals, religious practices—by claiming they are odd, unacceptable, or in conflict with our value system. In contrast, we tend to be more willing to accept people with similar cultural backgrounds. This explains why American society is so much more willing to accept European immigrants. Racial bias aside, the endowment effect also plays a major role. (...)
Apes will be apes.
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Posted: Jun 9, 2018 - 2:49am


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