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Index » Regional/Local » Africa/Middle East » Afghanistan Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 22, 23, 24  Next
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R_P

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Posted: Jun 27, 2020 - 12:07pm

Russia Secretly Offered Afghan Militants Bounties to Kill U.S. Troops, Intelligence Says
This Russia-Afghanistan Story Is Western Propaganda At Its Most Vile
R_P

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Posted: Feb 29, 2020 - 12:11pm

U.S. Strikes Deal With Taliban to Withdraw Troops From Afghanistan
westslope

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Location: BC sage brush steppe


Posted: Dec 10, 2019 - 1:48pm

The regimes in the late 20th century that enjoyed the most success in coming close to eliminating narcotics production were authoritarian regimes that were generally perceived of as being enemies of the USA.

It is understandable given that the USA is the most drug-addled society in human history.   Americans sure love their drugs.  

I should add that the Soviets got a taste of opiate addiction in the 1980s, didn't they?   Managed to further demoralize Soviet troops in a questionable war.
haresfur

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Location: The Golden Triangle
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 9, 2019 - 6:25pm



 westslope wrote:
Prior the US invasion and occupation, had not the Taliban government succeeded in largely eliminating the poppy trade?
 
But then they needed the cash and revived it

westslope

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Location: BC sage brush steppe


Posted: Dec 9, 2019 - 5:58pm

Prior the US invasion and occupation, had not the Taliban government succeeded in largely eliminating the poppy trade?
haresfur

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Location: The Golden Triangle
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 9, 2019 - 3:21pm



 Coaxial wrote:

Yeah, but the poppies were getting through.
{#Whistle}
 
I think that early on, when the US could get into Taliban areas, they should have sprayed roundup over some poppy fields and then met with the landowners, then gave them enough money to get through the time needed to plant and harvest another crop. Explain that next time it would be soil sterilant and they wouldn't be able to grow anything for 3 years.

Coaxial

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Location: 543 miles west of Paradis,1491 miles eas
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 9, 2019 - 10:09am

 R_P wrote:
The Afghanistan Papers A secret history of the war
At war with the truth
U.S. officials constantly said they were making progress. They were not, and they knew it.
 
Yeah, but the poppies were getting through.{#Whistle}
R_P

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Posted: Dec 9, 2019 - 9:41am

The Afghanistan Papers A secret history of the war
At war with the truth
U.S. officials constantly said they were making progress. They were not, and they knew it.
black321

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Location: An earth without maps
Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 11, 2019 - 6:56am



 R_P wrote:
How US "good guys" wiped out an Afghan family
An airstrike on Masih’s house had killed his wife and all his seven children, alongside four young cousins. His youngest child was just four years old.

In the following weeks, as grief consumed Masih, so did an intense need for answers. Who had killed his family and why?

His journey to find out would last more than eight months, pit him against military and government officials, and see him face obfuscation and denials. It would lead him to work alongside the Bureau and journalists from The New York Times, putting together a puzzle piece by piece. Ultimately it would lead to one definitive conclusion - the US military had dropped the fatal bomb.

His story is one window into the struggles faced by families across Afghanistan every day. Airstrikes are raining down on the country, with US and Afghan operations now killing more civilians than the insurgency for the first time in a decade. But getting confirmation of who has carried out a fatal strike is often impossible. An apology, or any form of public accountability, is even harder to obtain.

The US denied repeatedly that it had bombed Masih’s house, or even that any airstrike in his area had taken place. But using satellite imagery, photos and open source content, we proved that denial false. Following our investigation, the military has now admitted that it did conduct a strike in that location, but it still denies it resulted in civilian deaths.

 

That hurts, terrible. 
NoEnzLefttoSplit

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Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 11, 2019 - 1:22am

 R_P wrote:
How US "good guys" wiped out an Afghan family
An airstrike on Masih’s house had killed his wife and all his seven children, alongside four young cousins. His youngest child was just four years old.

In the following weeks, as grief consumed Masih, so did an intense need for answers. Who had killed his family and why?

His journey to find out would last more than eight months, pit him against military and government officials, and see him face obfuscation and denials. It would lead him to work alongside the Bureau and journalists from The New York Times, putting together a puzzle piece by piece. Ultimately it would lead to one definitive conclusion - the US military had dropped the fatal bomb.

His story is one window into the struggles faced by families across Afghanistan every day. Airstrikes are raining down on the country, with US and Afghan operations now killing more civilians than the insurgency for the first time in a decade. But getting confirmation of who has carried out a fatal strike is often impossible. An apology, or any form of public accountability, is even harder to obtain.

The US denied repeatedly that it had bombed Masih’s house, or even that any airstrike in his area had taken place. But using satellite imagery, photos and open source content, we proved that denial false. Following our investigation, the military has now admitted that it did conduct a strike in that location, but it still denies it resulted in civilian deaths.


 
Wikipedia:
war crime is an act that constitutes a serious violation of the laws of war that gives rise to individual criminal responsibility. Examples of war crimes include intentionally killing civilians ... destroying civilian property, ...and seriously violating the principles of distinction and proportionality, and military necessity.

Sounds like someone has a case to answer to before the ICC.. oh, wait.


R_P

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Posted: Jun 10, 2019 - 11:09am

How US "good guys" wiped out an Afghan family
An airstrike on Masih’s house had killed his wife and all his seven children, alongside four young cousins. His youngest child was just four years old.

In the following weeks, as grief consumed Masih, so did an intense need for answers. Who had killed his family and why?

His journey to find out would last more than eight months, pit him against military and government officials, and see him face obfuscation and denials. It would lead him to work alongside the Bureau and journalists from The New York Times, putting together a puzzle piece by piece. Ultimately it would lead to one definitive conclusion - the US military had dropped the fatal bomb.

His story is one window into the struggles faced by families across Afghanistan every day. Airstrikes are raining down on the country, with US and Afghan operations now killing more civilians than the insurgency for the first time in a decade. But getting confirmation of who has carried out a fatal strike is often impossible. An apology, or any form of public accountability, is even harder to obtain.

The US denied repeatedly that it had bombed Masih’s house, or even that any airstrike in his area had taken place. But using satellite imagery, photos and open source content, we proved that denial false. Following our investigation, the military has now admitted that it did conduct a strike in that location, but it still denies it resulted in civilian deaths.

haresfur

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Location: The Golden Triangle
Gender: Male


Posted: Nov 15, 2018 - 1:33pm

 R_P wrote: 
R_P wrote:  
Funny that.
Red_Dragon

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Posted: Nov 15, 2018 - 1:16pm

 R_P wrote: 

R_P

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Posted: Nov 15, 2018 - 12:45pm

The U.S. Never Dropped As Many Bombs On Afghanistan As It Did In 2018

R_P

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Posted: Nov 14, 2018 - 3:36pm

After 17 years, many Afghans blame US for unending war
R_P

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Posted: Sep 12, 2018 - 11:15am

The U.S. Goes to War Against the ICC to Cover Up Alleged War Crimes in Afghanistan
The United States has never been a friend of the International Criminal Court. While relations between the U.S. and the ICC have fluctuated over the course of different administrations, the American government has steadfastly refused to take the step that 124 other states have of ratifying the Rome Statute and thus becoming a member of the international legal body. The ICC’s mandate to investigate war crimes has thus been hampered by the unwillingness of the world’s sole superpower to commit to the organization.

Recent statements from the Trump administration suggest that the United States is now preparing to go to war against the ICC itself, motivated largely by an effort to silence investigations into alleged American war crimes committed in Afghanistan, as well as alleged crimes committed by Israel during the 2014 war in the Gaza Strip. In a speech at a D.C. event held by the Federalist Society on Monday, Donald Trump’s national security adviser John Bolton denounced the ICC as “illegitimate” and expressed his intentions toward the institution in no uncertain terms. “We will not cooperate with the ICC,” Bolton said. “We will provide no assistance to the ICC. We will not join the ICC. We will let the ICC die on its own. After all, for all intents and purposes, the ICC is already dead to us.”

In addition to this death wish against the court, Bolton said that the United States would retaliate against any ICC investigations into U.S. activities by sanctioning the travel and finances of ICC officials, even threatening to prosecute them in American courts.

Because it involves U.S. officials themselves, at the center of the campaign against the ICC is a 2016 report by ICC prosecutors that deals in part with the war in Afghanistan. That report alleges the commission of widespread crimes by the Taliban and Afghan government forces. But the report also makes allegations of serious crimes committed by U.S. military forces and the CIA, including “torture, cruel treatment, outrages upon personal dignity, and rape.”

R_P

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Posted: May 24, 2018 - 10:28am

Afghanistan stabilization effort failing after 17 years of U.S. work, watchdog report says
The U.S. government’s 17-year effort to stabilize parts of war-torn Afghanistan has mostly failed, according to a report released Thursday by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction.

The damning report finds that much of the $4.7 billion spent on programs to stabilize areas cleared of insurgents has been largely wasted — some of it siphoned off by corrupt officials, some of it paying for projects that did more harm than good. All told, the U.S. government has appropriated about $126 billion to rebuild the country, most of it to train and equip security forces.

“The large sums of stabilization dollars the United States devoted to Afghanistan in search of quick gains often exacerbated conflicts, enabled corruption, and bolstered support for insurgents,” the report states.

After toppling the ruling Taliban in Afghanistan in 2001, U.S., allied and Afghan forces there have sought to establish a stable country that could prevent insurgents from harboring al-Qaeda terrorists. The report released Thursday follows another issued this week by the Pentagon’s inspector general that found little progress in providing security for the Afghan people. (...)


R_P

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Posted: Mar 22, 2018 - 10:18am

Mobbed Up
How America boosts the Afghan opium trade

Lance Bunch has had an impressive year. In July 2017, he gained a coveted star, having been promoted to brigadier general while serving as the principal military assistant to James Mattis, the secretary of defense. His job put him at the epicenter of all US national security issues — and among the most pressing for Mattis at that moment was Afghanistan.

The prepresidential Donald Trump had repeatedly questioned the need for US forces to stay in the country. The military leadership felt otherwise, and once Trump was elected, they argued that he should send more troops and hang on for the long haul. This meant beating back efforts by Steve Bannon to hold Trump to his earlier isolationist instincts. H. R. McMaster, the national security adviser, reportedly even showed the president a Seventies-era photo of miniskirted women in Kabul as indication that the Afghans were not beyond redemption. Ultimately, the generals carried all before them. Late in August, Trump announced, implausibly, that he had “studied Afghanistan in great detail and from every conceivable angle” and concluded that the top brass should have the open-ended commitment they demanded. (...)


Red_Dragon

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Posted: Aug 4, 2016 - 10:11am

...apparently still has a tourism industry
R_P

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Posted: Jun 11, 2016 - 1:24pm

Deeper and Deeper into War: Obama Authorizes More Military Force in Afghanistan

Despite a vow to withdraw thousands of U.S. troops from Afghanistan by 2017, President Barack Obama this week veered the opposite direction, widening the U.S. military's role in the entrenched, 15-years-long conflict.

The Washington Post reported on Thursday evening that the Obama administration's new measures "authorize U.S. troops, stationed in Afghanistan on a dual training and counterterrorism mission, to begin accompanying conventional local forces on the battlefield in a way that now occurs only with elite Afghan forces."

On Friday, AP noted that the new authorization will also "expand the military's authority to conduct airstrikes against the Taliban."

This week's expansion of the war in Afghanistan follows Obama's decision in September to send Special Forces back into combat in the war-torn nation to fight the re-emergence of the Taliban—less than a year after the president declared the war in Afghanistan over. (The United States also continues to unleash civilian-killing drone strikes on the beleaguered Afghan population.)

An anonymous senior Defense official attempted to defend the decision from critics in an interview with the Post, saying that Obama's authorizations will "maximize the use and effectiveness of our troops supporting the Afghan forces in those select instances in which their engagement can enable strategic effects on the battlefield."

"How widely commanders apply the 'strategic effect' measure will determine the extent to which the authorities thrust the United States back into operations like those it conducted before Obama ended formal combat operations at the close of 2014," the newspaper noted.

Moreover, "it's not clear what effect a small force in Afghanistan, even with new operational authorities, can have in the country’s vast and complex battlefield," the Post wrote. "So far, 2016 has provided no sustained break, with heavy fighting in Helmand and a series of terrorist attacks in Kabul. Even after the United States conducted a strike that officials believe killed former Taliban leader Akhtar Mohammad Mansour in Pakistan, officials expect a punishing fighting season this summer."

Peace-minded progressives decried President Obama's decision and the never-ending war on Twitter: (...)


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