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Mixtape Culture Club - Lazy8 - Aug 17, 2022 - 8:54am
 
Little known information...maybe even facts - oldviolin - Aug 17, 2022 - 8:48am
 
XPRIZE & Singularity University - miamizsun - Aug 17, 2022 - 8:41am
 
Republican Party - kcar - Aug 17, 2022 - 7:58am
 
Today in History - Red_Dragon - Aug 17, 2022 - 7:15am
 
Wordle - daily game - marko86 - Aug 17, 2022 - 7:11am
 
Annoying stuff. not things that piss you off, just annoyi... - ptooey - Aug 17, 2022 - 7:03am
 
Cheney, Dick - sunybuny - Aug 17, 2022 - 6:22am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - sunybuny - Aug 17, 2022 - 6:08am
 
Russia - miamizsun - Aug 17, 2022 - 5:44am
 
Nuclear power - saviour or scourge? - miamizsun - Aug 17, 2022 - 5:14am
 
Joe Biden - NoEnzLefttoSplit - Aug 16, 2022 - 10:50pm
 
YouTube: Music-Videos - R_P - Aug 16, 2022 - 7:19pm
 
Guns - Red_Dragon - Aug 16, 2022 - 6:28pm
 
The Obituary Page - Antigone - Aug 16, 2022 - 5:33pm
 
Amazon Products (May Contain Spam) - haresfur - Aug 16, 2022 - 4:02pm
 
Democratic Party - Red_Dragon - Aug 16, 2022 - 2:29pm
 
The Hat Project - kcar - Aug 16, 2022 - 2:20pm
 
Climate Change - R_P - Aug 16, 2022 - 10:06am
 
Live FLAC support in Sonos API - alistair.bill - Aug 16, 2022 - 9:33am
 
Trump - kcar - Aug 16, 2022 - 8:59am
 
Ukraine - Red_Dragon - Aug 16, 2022 - 4:37am
 
What Did You Do Today? - Steely_D - Aug 15, 2022 - 7:55pm
 
Fix My Car - Bill_J - Aug 15, 2022 - 7:50pm
 
Breaking News - Red_Dragon - Aug 15, 2022 - 6:42pm
 
Words that should be put on the substitutes bench for a year - oldviolin - Aug 15, 2022 - 9:31am
 
Interesting Words - Steely_D - Aug 15, 2022 - 8:19am
 
• • •  What's For Dinner ? • • •  - Manbird - Aug 14, 2022 - 8:40pm
 
RightWingNutZ - Red_Dragon - Aug 14, 2022 - 3:36pm
 
Photography Forum - Your Own Photos - Manbird - Aug 14, 2022 - 2:14pm
 
COVID-19 - R_P - Aug 14, 2022 - 1:31pm
 
RPeep News You Should Know - islander - Aug 14, 2022 - 1:17pm
 
Automotive Lust - R_P - Aug 14, 2022 - 11:34am
 
• • • BRING OUT YOUR DEAD • • •  - acaciascapes - Aug 14, 2022 - 9:20am
 
260,000 Posts in one thread? - oldviolin - Aug 14, 2022 - 8:44am
 
Counting with Pictures - Proclivities - Aug 14, 2022 - 7:55am
 
DARWIN AWARDS! - POST YOUR NOMINATION! - Coaxial - Aug 13, 2022 - 5:03pm
 
China - R_P - Aug 13, 2022 - 3:29pm
 
Brian Eno - R_P - Aug 13, 2022 - 1:23pm
 
Name My Band - oldviolin - Aug 13, 2022 - 11:15am
 
Radio Paradise NFL Pick'em Group - Coaxial - Aug 13, 2022 - 7:03am
 
Health Care - miamizsun - Aug 13, 2022 - 6:37am
 
Sweet horrible irony. - miamizsun - Aug 13, 2022 - 6:32am
 
What is the meaning of this? - oldviolin - Aug 12, 2022 - 3:33pm
 
Baseball, anyone? - GeneP59 - Aug 12, 2022 - 12:59pm
 
Abiogenesis! - R_P - Aug 12, 2022 - 12:02pm
 
PASS THE BEER - kcar - Aug 12, 2022 - 11:33am
 
It's the economy stupid. - rgio - Aug 12, 2022 - 9:06am
 
What's Precious and Sacred to Islam? - Red_Dragon - Aug 12, 2022 - 8:38am
 
Floyd forum - Proclivities - Aug 12, 2022 - 8:12am
 
So... what's been happening here lately? - sunybuny - Aug 12, 2022 - 5:44am
 
Time to lawyer up! - NoEnzLefttoSplit - Aug 11, 2022 - 10:52pm
 
Upcoming concerts or shows you can't wait to see - Proclivities - Aug 11, 2022 - 10:35am
 
• • • The Once-a-Day • • •  - oldviolin - Aug 11, 2022 - 10:04am
 
How to Use RP? - kcar - Aug 11, 2022 - 9:53am
 
Got Road Rage? - Red_Dragon - Aug 11, 2022 - 8:12am
 
>>>>>>Knitted - Antigone - Aug 11, 2022 - 2:37am
 
India - Red_Dragon - Aug 10, 2022 - 4:36pm
 
godnarb: the Lunchurch - ScottFromWyoming - Aug 10, 2022 - 11:24am
 
Peace - thisbody - Aug 10, 2022 - 8:59am
 
Derplahoma! - sunybuny - Aug 10, 2022 - 6:02am
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - GeneP59 - Aug 9, 2022 - 4:37pm
 
Museum Of Bad Album Covers - KurtfromLaQuinta - Aug 9, 2022 - 4:19pm
 
MQA Stream Coming to BLUOS - robin2 - Aug 9, 2022 - 11:47am
 
RPeeps who would have a sense of humor if they were not s... - miamizsun - Aug 9, 2022 - 10:14am
 
Things that make you happy - GeneP59 - Aug 9, 2022 - 8:47am
 
unusual time signatures - ScottFromWyoming - Aug 9, 2022 - 8:26am
 
Best/worst white reggae/ska/rcksteady - thisbody - Aug 9, 2022 - 6:54am
 
More reggae, less Marley please - thisbody - Aug 9, 2022 - 6:48am
 
Media Bias - Red_Dragon - Aug 9, 2022 - 6:34am
 
Things Forgotten. - Steely_D - Aug 8, 2022 - 10:24pm
 
Things You Thought Today - oldviolin - Aug 8, 2022 - 7:28pm
 
Talk Behind Their Backs Forum - GeneP59 - Aug 8, 2022 - 9:56am
 
Food - ScottFromWyoming - Aug 8, 2022 - 9:56am
 
John Lennon's Jukebox - thisbody - Aug 8, 2022 - 4:55am
 
Index » Radio Paradise/General » General Discussion » Climate Change Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 114, 115, 116  Next
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R_P

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Posted: Aug 16, 2022 - 10:06am

Every Dollar Spent on This Climate Technology Is a Waste
Subsidies in the climate bill will lock in carbon capture and storage, which will sustain fossil fuels.
These C.C.S. projects are subsidized by Section 45Q of the federal tax code, which now offers companies a tax credit for each metric ton of carbon dioxide injected into the ground. Those enhanced oil recovery subsidies would rise under the new law, from $35 to $60 per ton. The legislation also significantly broadens the number of facilities eligible for tax credits. And those facilities will be able to claim the tax credit through a tax refund. The 45Q program is nominally a program to fight climate change. But since nearly all carbon dioxide injections subsidized by 45Q are for enhanced oil recovery, the 45Q program is actually an oil production subsidy. (...)

These subsidies create a perverse incentive, because for companies to qualify for the subsidies, carbon dioxide must be produced, then captured and buried. This incentive handicaps technologies that reduce carbon dioxide production in the first place, tilting the playing field against promising innovations that avoid fossil fuels in the steel, fertilizer and cement industries while locking in long-term oil and gas use.

Industry campaigns for C.C.S. also have shifted their decades-long disinformation fight: Instead of spreading doubt about climate science, the industry now spreads false confidence about how we can continue to burn fossil fuels while efficiently cutting emissions. For example, Exxon Mobil advertises that it has “cumulatively captured more carbon dioxide than any other company — 120 million metric tons.”

What Exxon Mobil doesn’t say is that this carbon dioxide was already sequestered underground before it “captured” it while producing natural gas and then injected it back into the ground to produce more oil. These advertising campaigns lend support to government programs to directly subsidize C.C.S.

ScottFromWyoming

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Location: Powell
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Posted: Aug 15, 2022 - 10:38am

The Coming California Megastorm

Nice presentation of a new Worst Case Scenario: Those dried-up reservoirs  being overtopped by relentless rainfall...

black321

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Location: An earth without maps
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Posted: Aug 15, 2022 - 10:27am

Big changes are coming for the Colorado River soon—and they could get messy

A climate-induced reckoning is playing out on the Colorado River.

The 1,450-mile-long river provides water to over 40 million people and more than five million acres of agriculture across the western United States. But years of punishing drought have reduced its flows to unprecedented levels. In response, the seven states of the Colorado River basin are expected to announce a plan next week to trim between two to four million acre-feet of their water use in the coming year—about a quarter of the total that flows through the river annually these days.


Big changes are coming for the Colorado River soon—and they could get messy (msn.com)




Red_Dragon

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Posted: Aug 11, 2022 - 5:11pm

 R_P wrote:
Arctic Warming Is Happening Faster Than Described, Analysis Shows
The rapid warming of the Arctic, a definitive sign of climate change, is occurring even faster than previously described, researchers in Finland said Thursday.

Over the past four decades the region has been heating up four times faster than the global average, not the two to three times that has commonly been reported. And some parts of the region, notably the Barents Sea north of Norway and Russia, are warming up to seven times faster, they said.

One result of rapid Arctic warming is faster melting of the Greenland ice sheet, which adds to sea-level rise. But the impacts extend far beyond the Arctic, reaching down to influence weather like extreme rainfall and heat waves in North America and elsewhere. By altering the temperature difference between the North Pole and the Equator, the warming Arctic appears to have affected storm tracks and wind speed in North America. (...)



imagine that
R_P

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Posted: Aug 11, 2022 - 5:01pm

Arctic Warming Is Happening Faster Than Described, Analysis Shows
The rapid warming of the Arctic, a definitive sign of climate change, is occurring even faster than previously described, researchers in Finland said Thursday.

Over the past four decades the region has been heating up four times faster than the global average, not the two to three times that has commonly been reported. And some parts of the region, notably the Barents Sea north of Norway and Russia, are warming up to seven times faster, they said.

One result of rapid Arctic warming is faster melting of the Greenland ice sheet, which adds to sea-level rise. But the impacts extend far beyond the Arctic, reaching down to influence weather like extreme rainfall and heat waves in North America and elsewhere. By altering the temperature difference between the North Pole and the Equator, the warming Arctic appears to have affected storm tracks and wind speed in North America. (...)

R_P

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Posted: Aug 3, 2022 - 2:00pm

These hurricane flood maps reveal the climate future for Miami, NYC and D.C.

R_P

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Posted: Jul 29, 2022 - 3:52pm

The future of global catastrophic risk events from climate change
Increasing risks posed by climate change are causing rare extreme events that can kill more than 10 million people or lead to damages of $10 trillion-plus, posing threats of total societal collapse, a U.N. report finds.
Four times since 1900, human civilization has suffered global catastrophes with extreme impacts: World War I (40 million killed), the 1918-19 influenza pandemic (40-50 million killed), World War II (40-50 million killed), and the COVID-19 pandemic (an economic impact in the trillions, and a 2020-21 death toll of 14.9 million, according to the World Health Organization).

These are the only events since the beginning of the 20th century that meet the United Nations’s definition of global catastrophic risk (GCR): a catastrophe global in impact that kills over 10 million people or causes over $10 trillion (2022 USD) in damage. (...)

R_P

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Posted: Jul 24, 2022 - 1:16pm

Do these heat waves mean climate change is happening faster than expected? *
General warming predictions are still on track, but recent heat waves are a stress test for the modeling of extreme events.
R_P

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Posted: Jul 23, 2022 - 1:13pm

Sue someone too?
How the Government Is Failing Americans Uprooted by Calamity
Climate change is creating a growing class of displaced Americans, and the federal government is struggling to decide how to help them.
As the United States struggles to protect its citizens against the worsening effects of climate change, returning survivors to their homes after hurricanes, wildfires and other disasters has emerged as a particular failure. Money, it turns out, is not the problem. Instead, agencies are hamstrung by rules that often make little sense, even to the officials in charge.

The result is a growing class of displaced Americans, a version of domestic climate refugees, scattered across motel rooms and trailer parks, an expanding archipelago of loss.

R_P

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Posted: Jul 21, 2022 - 3:20pm

Climate Deniers and the Language of Climate Obstruction
From narratives about fossil fuels as a solution to climate advocates as out of touch with reality, here’s how the fossil fuel industry and its allies are weaponizing words to delay climate action.
R_P

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Posted: Jul 20, 2022 - 1:39pm

Delay as the New Denial: The Latest Republican Tactic to Block Climate Action
The party has largely moved beyond denying the existence of climate change but continues to oppose dramatic action to halt it, worried about the short-term economic consequences.
ColdMiser

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Posted: Jul 20, 2022 - 6:28am

 R_P wrote:
If the Great Salt Lake, which has already shrunk by two-thirds, continues to dry up, here’s what’s in store *:

The lake’s flies and brine shrimp would die off — scientists warn it could start as soon as this summer — threatening the 10 million migratory birds that stop at the lake annually to feed on the tiny creatures. Ski conditions at the resorts above Salt Lake City, a vital source of revenue, would deteriorate. The lucrative extraction of magnesium and other minerals from the lake could stop.

Most alarming, the air surrounding Salt Lake City would occasionally turn poisonous. The lake bed contains high levels of arsenic and as more of it becomes exposed, wind storms carry that arsenic into the lungs of nearby residents, who make up three-quarters of Utah’s population.

“We have this potential environmental nuclear bomb that’s going to go off if we don’t take some pretty dramatic action,” said Joel Ferry, a Republican state lawmaker and rancher who lives on the north side of the lake.

As climate change continues to cause record-breaking drought, there are no easy solutions. Saving the Great Salt Lake would require letting more snowmelt from the mountains flow to the lake, which means less water for residents and farmers. That would threaten the region’s breakneck population growth and high-value agriculture — something state leaders seem reluctant to do. (...)


So where is Mitt in all this? I guess he can afford his own Brine Shrimp and doesn't care.


R_P

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Posted: Jul 19, 2022 - 12:35pm

If the Great Salt Lake, which has already shrunk by two-thirds, continues to dry up, here’s what’s in store *:

The lake’s flies and brine shrimp would die off — scientists warn it could start as soon as this summer — threatening the 10 million migratory birds that stop at the lake annually to feed on the tiny creatures. Ski conditions at the resorts above Salt Lake City, a vital source of revenue, would deteriorate. The lucrative extraction of magnesium and other minerals from the lake could stop.

Most alarming, the air surrounding Salt Lake City would occasionally turn poisonous. The lake bed contains high levels of arsenic and as more of it becomes exposed, wind storms carry that arsenic into the lungs of nearby residents, who make up three-quarters of Utah’s population.

“We have this potential environmental nuclear bomb that’s going to go off if we don’t take some pretty dramatic action,” said Joel Ferry, a Republican state lawmaker and rancher who lives on the north side of the lake.

As climate change continues to cause record-breaking drought, there are no easy solutions. Saving the Great Salt Lake would require letting more snowmelt from the mountains flow to the lake, which means less water for residents and farmers. That would threaten the region’s breakneck population growth and high-value agriculture — something state leaders seem reluctant to do. (...)

NoEnzLefttoSplit

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Posted: Jul 19, 2022 - 8:40am

 rgio wrote:

Agree with your comments...but here's the issue for coal... 2022 global employment stats by industry...

Global Consumer Electronics Manufacturing 17,430,9422.
Global Commercial Real Estate 17,164,7103.
Global Fast Food Restaurants 13,458,1464.
Global HR & Recruitment Services 11,988,3765.
Global Apparel Manufacturing 9,675,6726.
Global Hotels & Resorts 9,517,4627.

Global Coal Mining 8,918,4898.

Global Tourism 8,684,6449.
Global Commercial Banks 8,076,79610.
Global Auto Parts & Accessories Manufacturing 8,060,047

9M people and all of those who know/depend on them is a lot.



sure, but coal wouldn't be the first industry to become obsolete. And there are a lot of jobs going out there at the moment.
rgio

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Posted: Jul 19, 2022 - 8:20am

 NoEnzLefttoSplit wrote:


Pretty damning judgment on German policies, but he is certainly right on the geography matters point. I am kind of hoping that the widespread fear of nuclear in Germany diminishes this year as we come up against hard realities. Coal is literally the pits. 

Agree with your comments...but here's the issue for coal... 2022 global employment stats by industry...

Global Consumer Electronics Manufacturing 17,430,9422.
Global Commercial Real Estate 17,164,7103.
Global Fast Food Restaurants 13,458,1464.
Global HR & Recruitment Services 11,988,3765.
Global Apparel Manufacturing 9,675,6726.
Global Hotels & Resorts 9,517,4627.

Global Coal Mining 8,918,4898.

Global Tourism 8,684,6449.
Global Commercial Banks 8,076,79610.
Global Auto Parts & Accessories Manufacturing 8,060,047

9M people and all of those who know/depend on them is a lot.

NoEnzLefttoSplit

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Posted: Jul 19, 2022 - 7:07am

 miamizsun wrote:

this could have worked in several forums/threads
this one was on the raft




Pretty damning judgment on German policies, but he is certainly right on the geography matters point. I am kind of hoping that the widespread fear of nuclear in Germany diminishes this year as we come up against hard realities. Coal is literally the pits. 
There are a lot of local solutions and much better building technology (which he didn't touch on). A lot of new houses have a zero energy budget, yes, even here in Germany. Ours is new but not zero but we can live pretty comfortably on 10000 kWh p.a. (includes heating and powering all our appliances) which is in the ball park of a decent wind generator or two (helps that we live on the top of an exposed hill).
edit: btw we don't need AC here, even today (99°F outside) as our house has a green roof and 8" of insulation in the cladding. 

miamizsun

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Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Jul 19, 2022 - 6:21am

this could have worked in several forums/threads
this one was on the raft


NoEnzLefttoSplit

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Posted: Jul 19, 2022 - 3:15am

 steeler wrote:

Agreed. Those who have been fighting against any transition away from fossil fuels, or dragging their feet on it, have no credibility when talking about the proper speed of the transition. Those who are climate change deniers/skeptics would not see any urgency to making the transition — assuming they see any reason at all for doing so. 



taking a local sample of neighbours, it looks like the war in Ukraine has given renewables a huge shot in the arm. Most of us are reliant on gas-fired heating and are hurriedly looking at what alternatives we have to have a modicum of warmth this coming winter in case the gas lines are shut down. Lots of solar/wind combinations getting installed around here. No one gives a shit anymore about whether the solution is economic. We just want a solution so we don't freeze. 
steeler

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Location: Perched on the precipice of the cauldron of truth


Posted: Jul 18, 2022 - 8:00pm

 haresfur wrote:

So after over a decade of opposing doing anything at any pace to address climate change because of being a denier skeptic, now we can't do anything because it would be too fast. That type of thinking is responsible for the current situation. We could have managed the change before we were fucked. 

Every country can figure out a way to say that they aren't the real problem. Australia claims correctly that our greenhouse gas emissions are minor compared to other countries. Never mind that our per capita emissions are about the highest in the world. No, one person turning down a thermostat won't get to the desired result sooner, but everyone doing a little bit will reduce the emissions so reduce the rate of increase until the world gets it shit together. And it isn't only about the actual production rate change - part of the inefficiency is having to size power plants for peak usage and cutting the peaks is important. Not being able to meet a target is no excuse for not reducing emissions.

It really pisses me off to see the moving narrative of people who want to push out dealing with the problem. The former Australian government pushed the time frame for meeting emission targets way out into the future. That sucked but then they didn't even start doing anything to meet that time frame. So the target was total bullshit designed to keep from having to do anything to transition away from fossil fuels.


Agreed. Those who have been fighting against any transition away from fossil fuels, or dragging their feet on it, have no credibility when talking about the proper speed of the transition. Those who are climate change deniers/skeptics would not see any urgency to making the transition — assuming they see any reason at all for doing so. 

haresfur

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Posted: Jul 18, 2022 - 7:51pm

 kurtster wrote:
It doesn't matter if Climate Change is real or if it is a hoax. We can only get so far so fast, safely. This is the same kind of thinking that if I set the thermostat lower it will get to the desired less cooler temp sooner.

So after over a decade of opposing doing anything at any pace to address climate change because of being a denier skeptic, now we can't do anything because it would be too fast. That type of thinking is responsible for the current situation. We could have managed the change before we were fucked. 

Every country can figure out a way to say that they aren't the real problem. Australia claims correctly that our greenhouse gas emissions are minor compared to other countries. Never mind that our per capita emissions are about the highest in the world. No, one person turning down a thermostat won't get to the desired result sooner, but everyone doing a little bit will reduce the emissions so reduce the rate of increase until the world gets it shit together. And it isn't only about the actual production rate change - part of the inefficiency is having to size power plants for peak usage and cutting the peaks is important. Not being able to meet a target is no excuse for not reducing emissions.

It really pisses me off to see the moving narrative of people who want to push out dealing with the problem. The former Australian government pushed the time frame for meeting emission targets way out into the future. That sucked but then they didn't even start doing anything to meet that time frame. So the target was total bullshit designed to keep from having to do anything to transition away from fossil fuels.

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