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Index » Radio Paradise/General » General Discussion » ::Animal Kingdom:: Page: Previous  1, 2, 3 ... , 11, 12, 13  Next
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red5_bc

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Location: I use my lasers only for evil.
Gender: Male


Posted: Jul 10, 2007 - 4:00pm


triskele

triskele Avatar

Location: The Dragons' Roost


Posted: Jul 10, 2007 - 3:50pm



Not really an ANIMAL, per se, but surely not vegetable, nor mineral!

I spent part of my lunchtime with one of these perched in my hand. It was really, truly awesome.

Now, if only I could figure out how to get the pictures I took with my phone out of my phone and onto my computer....
Zissy

Zissy Avatar

Location: 90804
Gender: Female


Posted: Jul 10, 2007 - 2:57pm

Dog nurses kitten found under SUV hood

Mon Jul 9, 10:43 PM ET

By all accounts, Tahoe is a typical kitten: cute, sleepy and hungry. But his eating habits are far from typical, as the stray's been nursing from a 3-year-old dog named Lillie.

Ever since the kitten was found under the hood of Eunice Collins' running Chevrolet Tahoe a few weeks ago, he's been feeding from the unusually cooperative longhaired dachshund. Tahoe feeds in the morning, at night and after naps, purring and pawing at the dog's belly.

"That's not going to happen very often," said veterinarian John Beck, who added that the "kitten got lucky, basically" that he found a dog with those maternal instincts.

Collins said she was confused by the sound of a kitten meowing as she drove her Tahoe.

"I thought I was going crazy," Collins said. "I came to a light and heard it again. So I pulled into a gas station."

Collins took the kitten in and kept him in a bedroom. Four days later, she saw Lillie feeding him.

"I couldn't believe it," she said. "She has just taken Tahoe on as her baby and has been nurturing and taking care of him. They're just very close."

Beck said having Tahoe in the house "induced a false pregnancy, a nursing response."

"It made the hormones needed to produce milk," Beck said. "Now, I'm sure the cat obviously had it in mind the dog was (his) mother."
Zissy

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Location: 90804
Gender: Female


Posted: Jul 10, 2007 - 2:54pm

Bird on fire blamed for 2 acre wildfire

1 hour, 6 minutes ago

A bird that caught fire after being electrocuted at a substation is suspected of igniting a 2 acre wildfire Monday, officials said. Fire personnel weren't able to identify whether the bird was raven or a crow that flew into exposed elements hanging from a high crossbeam on poles.

There were no witnesses, so officials stopped short of saying the flaming bird was at fault.

The bird "got zapped when it hit one of those things they call a terminator," Pitkin County Deputy Joe Bauer said. "Then it fell, probably on fire, right at the base of one of these poles."

Fire crews were able to extinguish the blaze in about an hour.
Zissy

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Location: 90804
Gender: Female


Posted: Jul 9, 2007 - 9:51pm

Rare "Octosquid" Captured in Hawaii
Zissy

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Location: 90804
Gender: Female


Posted: Jun 1, 2007 - 3:02am

Upright walking 'began in trees'
The ancestors of humans began walking upright while they were still living in trees - not out on open land, according to a new theory.

The traditional view is of bipedalism evolved gradually from the four-legged "knuckle-walking" displayed by chimpanzees and gorillas today.

Now, a study published in the journal Science disputes this idea.

The British authors of the study say that upright walking was always a feature of great ape behaviour.

Humans inherited it without ever passing through a knuckle-walking phase.

They believe that knuckle-walking evolved only recently as a way of getting around the forest floor.

Susannah Thorpe, Robin Crompton and Roger Holder came to their conclusions after analysing the movement of wild orangutans, which spend most of their lives in trees.

The big problem is: what was the selective advantage for that first hominid that stood upright?
Daniel Lieberman, Harvard University
They found that orangutans used upright locomotion to fetch food from the small branches of trees and to cross directly from one tree to another.

"Both access to fruits and crossing gaps in the trees would require an ability to navigate very thin, terminal tree branches which are liable to bend under body mass," said Professor Robin Crompton, from the University of Liverpool.

"The logical conclusion from the environmental, fossil, and experimental evidence is that upright, straight-legged walking originally evolved as an adaptation to tree-dwelling."

Selective advantages

They suggest the shift made by our ancestors to a terrestrial lifestyle came about as climate change thinned out their forest habitat.

In response, these ancient ape-like creatures, or hominids, may have abandoned the high canopy for the forest floor. Here, they remained bipedal and began eating food from the ground or from smaller trees.

Professor Crompton explained that orangutans walking upright on springy branches act much like athletes running on springy tracks - they use extended postures of knee and hip to give them straighter legs.

The researchers point out that some of the earliest fossil human ancestors combined lower limbs that were adapted for upright walking with an upper body that seems suited to climbing trees.

There is also evidence these bipedal creatures lived in a closed forest environment, not the savannah habitat that would have required them to routinely move on the ground.

Daniel Lieberman, a biological anthropologist from Harvard University, US, told BBC News: "I think it's a neat paper; it's always terrific when people think creatively about the origins of human bipedalism. But it's not going to be the last word.

"The big problem is - what was the selective advantage for that first hominid that stood upright? We know very little about the context in which that occurred."

Dr Lieberman also questioned the idea that the kind of locomotion displayed by chimps and gorillas must have evolved only recently.

Chimps, gorillas and humans are more closely related to one another than they are to orangutans.

"The relationships between the apes are not in question," he said, "unless all those similarities between chimps and gorillas are independently evolved, then the inference is inescapable that the last common ancestor of chimps and humans must have been like a chimp or gorilla."
Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/science/nature/6709627.stm

Zissy

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Location: 90804
Gender: Female


Posted: May 12, 2007 - 11:43am

manbirdexperiment wrote:








yup I hear ya.
Manbird

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Location: Oroville, Ca
Gender: Male


Posted: May 12, 2007 - 9:58am

Zissy wrote:
Birds 'starve' at S Korea wetland
Tens of thousands of migratory birds are facing starvation in South Korea, the UK-based Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) says.








Zissy

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Location: 90804
Gender: Female


Posted: May 12, 2007 - 6:17am

Birds 'starve' at S Korea wetland
Tens of thousands of migratory birds are facing starvation in South Korea, the UK-based Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) says.

The group says a land reclamation project has destroyed key wetlands used by the birds on their way from Asia to their breeding grounds in the Arctic.

Without the food at the Saemangeum wetlands, on the east coast, many of the birds will not survive the journey.

Two endangered species of wading bird face extinction because of the changes.

There are believed to be fewer than 1,000 mature spoonbilled sandpipers and Nordmann's greenshanks left in the wild.

The RSPB and other wildlife and conservation groups are highlighting the environmental problems at Saemangeum to mark World Migratory Birds Day.

'Motorway service station'

Saemangeum was once an estuarine tidal flat on South Korea's Yellow Sea coast.

What we've lost here is one of the jewels in the crown of wetland habitats
Sarah Dawkins, RSPB

It was an important feeding ground for about 400,000 migrating birds making their way on a 24,000km round-trip between Asia and Alaska and Russia.

But 15 years ago, the government revealed plans for the world's biggest land reclamation project in order to drain the estuary and create fertile paddy fields.

After a succession of legal challenges from conservationists, the 33km sea wall was finally closed a year ago.

Since then, according to the RSPB, the vast wetlands have been replaced by parched earth, shellfish beds and plants have been destroyed, and thousands of birds are starving as a result.

"What we've lost here is one of the jewels in the crown of wetland habitats," Sarah Dawkins, who is monitoring the impact of the sea wall on birds, told the BBC.

"The Yellow Sea is an amazingly important stopover point for birds travelling up from places like New Zealand and Australia to their breeding grounds in the Arctic."

"And Saemangeum was one of the most important areas in the Yellow Sea."

Ms Dawkins said the birds relied on the tidal flats at Saemangeum as somewhere where they could land and "refuel" after a nine-day flight from New Zealand.

"It's a bit like losing a motorway service station and then your car running out of petrol," she explained.

Despite the damage, Ms Dawkins said there was still hope for the wetlands if the two sluice gates built into the sea wall were opened.

"That would restore a few thousand hectares of estuary system within Saemangeum and that would be at least something to help the birds," she said.

"The birds are still here. They're still coming."

"I think we really do need to still try to save some of their habitat."

Ms Dawkins also said it was critically important to mount a global effort to safeguard other estuaries around Saemangeum, one of which the government is planning to reclaim.
Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/asia-pacific/6649233.stm

Zissy

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Location: 90804
Gender: Female


Posted: May 11, 2007 - 6:05pm

Tiny marsupial records DNA first
The grey, short-tailed opossum has become the first marsupial to have its DNA read through by scientists.

The creature is commonly used in labs as an experimental "model" in which to study the causes of human disease, such as cancer and neurological problems.

Knowing its genome will boost those efforts, and give new insight into the different evolutionary paths taken by marsupial and placental mammals.

Details of the work appear in the journals Nature and Genome Research.

The study is part of a grand scheme to compare the biochemistry of a range of animals with that of Homo sapiens , to understand better how the human body is built and maintained, and how all species differ from one another.

"The idea is to obtain genome sequence information from organisms that are appropriately spaced relative to us on the tree of life," explained Adam Felsenfeld, from the US National Human Genome Research Institute.

"For example, by lining up the sequences it is possible to detect regions of the genome that have not changed, so are conserved and perhaps important; or, alternatively, regions that are changing very rapidly."

'Dirty' trick

In the wild, the opossum Monodelphis domestica is found in the trees of South America.

It was chosen as a subject to have its full complement of DNA (its genome) decoded because of its current importance to science.

Its small size, ease of breeding and large litters have made the creature the predominant marsupial for laboratory study worldwide.


MONODELPHIS DOMESTICA DNA
The double-stranded DNA molecule is held together by four chemical components scientists refer to as bases
Adenine (A) bonds with thymine (T); cytosine(C) bonds with guanine (G)
Groupings of these "letters" form the "code of life"; there are about 3.4 billion base-pairs in the opossum genome
Written in this DNA sequence are about 18-20,000 genes
Genes are starting templates used by cells to make proteins; the sophisticated molecules that build and maintain the body
Marsupial mammals (kangaroos, wallabies, etc) are closely related to the placental mammals (humans, mice, etc) - but not that close. They last shared a common ancestor about 180 million years ago and have arrived at very different reproductive solutions - with marsupials rearing their young externally, sometimes in a pouch.

"This marsupial is a bit different in that the young are not kept in a pouch; they just dangle off the teats," observed Jenny Graves from the Australian National University.

This open arrangement makes the study of early developmental processes much simpler, and should give scientists clues as to how they perform a number of very clever biological tricks.

For example, when newborns crawl to their mother's teats, they are little more than a mouth and gut. They have no functioning immune system but are still able to survive in an open, "dirty" environment. Looking at the genes should help scientists work out how this is possible.

Research has also shown that newborns can regrow their spinal cords, even if they are completely severed.

"The genome hasn't told us exactly how they do that but the genome provides us with a blueprint for further study and for being able to apply some of that knowledge to humans," commented Chris Gunter, a senior biology editor at Nature.

New jumps

The decoding work, led by the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in Cambridge, Massachusetts, reveals the opossum to have between 18,000 and 20,000 protein-coding genes.

The number is a little short of what is seen in a placental mammal like a human - but broadly similar.

The big difference, scientists say, is in the DNA sequences that are responsible for regulation of the genes - controlling when and where in cell processes they become active.

"Twenty percent of all the regulatory instructions in the human genome were invented after we parted ways with the marsupial," explained Eric Lander, the director of the Broad Institute.

"Evolution is tinkering much more with the controls than with the genes themselves."

Many of these innovative DNA instructions were derived from so-called "jumping genes", or transposons - small pieces of genetic code that hop around the genome and were previously thought to have no function.

"Transposons have a restless lifestyle, often shuttling themselves from one chromosome to another," said Broad researcher Tarjei Mikkelsen.

"It is now clear that in their travels, they are disseminating crucial genetic innovations around the genome."
Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/science/nature/6640271.stm
Zissy

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Location: 90804
Gender: Female


Posted: May 11, 2007 - 6:03pm

sharkartist wrote:
Is Marlon Perkins in here somewhere?


yeah two doors down on the left.
sharkartist

sharkartist Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: May 10, 2007 - 6:41pm

Is Marlon Perkins in here somewhere?
Zissy

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Location: 90804
Gender: Female


Posted: May 10, 2007 - 6:15pm


A nine-year-old boy has hatched a chick from a box of free-range eggs which his mother bought in a Suffolk supermarket.

The chick, named Celia, hatched three weeks after Miles Orford, of Great Ashfield, placed six free-range Cotswold Legbar eggs in an incubator.

His mother, Sarah Orford, said: "We've tried the same experiment with quail and duck eggs.

"None of the quail eggs hatched. We're still waiting to see what happens with the duck eggs."

Mrs Orford bought the eggs from her local Waitrose store.

"We read about someone who had done it with duck eggs and thought we'd experiment," she said.

"I have to say I was somewhat surprised. It's very interesting."

A fresh egg

How the egg came to be fertilised is not known.

Free-range egg farmer, Phillip Greenacre, told BBC news: "Well it could have happened by a rogue bird from a neighbouring farm or more likely a bird from within the farm that didn't get sexed properly."

Francine Raymond, of the Henkeepers' Association, said the average person wouldn't be able to tell the difference between a fertilised and non-fertilised egg.

She told BBC news: "After about three weeks you wouldn't be able to hatch it - it was obviously a fresh egg."

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/uk_news/england/suffolk/6643407.stm
Zissy

Zissy Avatar

Location: 90804
Gender: Female


Posted: Mar 25, 2007 - 5:41pm

triskele wrote:
I found perverse pleasure today, as I drove past an estate in one of the richest suburbs in the country (where the house servants drive luxury cars).

One of those places I like to call a McPalace, or a McMansion.

With the gate, and the servant quarters and all of that.

There was a skinny coyote eating a downed Canada goose, right there on the manicured lawn, out in the open.

It was a joy to behold. Nature triumphs over human excess.



triskele

triskele Avatar

Location: The Dragons' Roost


Posted: Mar 25, 2007 - 3:04pm

I found perverse pleasure today, as I drove past an estate in one of the richest suburbs in the country (where the house servants drive luxury cars).

One of those places I like to call a McPalace, or a McMansion.

With the gate, and the servant quarters and all of that.

There was a skinny coyote eating a downed Canada goose, right there on the manicured lawn, out in the open.

It was a joy to behold. Nature triumphs over human excess.
Zissy

Zissy Avatar

Location: 90804
Gender: Female


Posted: Mar 24, 2007 - 9:39pm

The Pure Breed Revolution
Zissy

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Location: 90804
Gender: Female


Posted: Feb 27, 2007 - 6:59pm

Official: Killer jaguar has mean brother

DENVER, Colorado (AP) -- A Bolivian-born jaguar named Jorge that killed a Denver zookeeper was well-behaved as a young cat but his twin was so mean that his handlers named him Osama, a Bolivian zoo official said Monday.

click on title for the rest of the story.
Zissy

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Location: 90804
Gender: Female


Posted: Feb 27, 2007 - 11:58am

phineas wrote:

Thanks for the link, Zis. There's some remarkable footage there.

Happened to watch a PBS piece tonight with one of the kids on "red devils", large squid (3-4 feet long) in the Gulf of California. The way they change colour is astounding!


they are amazing creatures. :)
Zissy

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Location: 90804
Gender: Female


Posted: Feb 27, 2007 - 11:57am

Kasem: Road projectthreat to wild animals

The Natural Resources and Environment Minister Kasem Snidvongs wants the Highways Department to scrap the planned expansion of a road running through the Dong Phayayen-Khao Yai forest complex, a World Heritage Site. The minister said the road widening project was unnecessary and would only endanger rare wildlife in the sanctuary.
phineas

phineas Avatar



Posted: Feb 24, 2007 - 11:28pm

Zissy wrote:


Monster-size, deep-sea squid that use their glowing arms to blind and stun their prey have been filmed in the wild for the first time, scientists say.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/02/070214-giant-squid.html

Thanks for the link, Zis. There's some remarkable footage there.

Happened to watch a PBS piece tonight with one of the kids on "red devils", large squid (3-4 feet long) in the Gulf of California. The way they change colour is astounding!
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