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Index » Regional/Local » USA/Canada » The Chomsky / Zinn Reader Page: Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ... 17, 18, 19  Next
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rexi

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Posted: Jan 16, 2014 - 11:08am

 RichardPrins wrote: 
You should rename this thread 'Ask the Libertarian'  {#Wink}
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Posted: Jan 15, 2014 - 11:15pm

Noam Chomsky | What Is the Common Good?
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Posted: Dec 24, 2013 - 1:17pm


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Posted: Dec 19, 2013 - 11:37pm

Noam Chomsky Continues to Inspire | Common Dreams

(...) His press critiques helped turn me into a media critic, and in 1986 I founded the media watch group FAIR. Chomsky was so influential that I sometimes wonder if FAIR would exist if not for him. He was one of the first people I asked to join our advisory board — he readily said yes, and has supported FAIR ever since. He spoke at the organization’s 25th birthday party in 2011. 

At FAIR, we continually pointed out that – while mainstream media in Europe and across the globe regularly featured Chomsky as an expert on U.S. and Western foreign policy – he was virtually blacklisted by the mainstream media in his own country. (...)


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Posted: Nov 22, 2013 - 5:27pm

Daniel Falcone: Do you find it odd that the country is focusing on a 50th anniversary remembrance of the Kennedy assassination?

Noam Chomsky: Worship of leaders is a technique of indoctrination that goes back to the crazed George Washington cult of the 18th century and on to the truly lunatic Reagan cult of today, both of which would impress Kim Il-sung. The JFK cult is similar.

What does it mean that popular media treat such a date with such unusual honor?

Simply that we live in a deeply indoctrinated society.

Do other countries find it odd that we commemorate such a day?

Others are not all that different, though American patriotic displays do amuse (or surprise, or frighten) the world. In part, it's just confusion. He's very popular among African-Americans; some are unaware of his actual role in the civil rights struggles - which was not pretty. But in part, it's among intellectuals - and JFK understood very well that if you pat them on the head and pretend you love them, you'll get a good image. It worked like a charm.

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Posted: Nov 22, 2013 - 1:02pm

C:

via

Z:

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Posted: Nov 22, 2013 - 9:58am

American Anarchist
Noam Chomsky holds court on his political philosophy and its critique of power.

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Posted: Oct 31, 2013 - 5:27am


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Posted: Oct 23, 2013 - 2:43pm

Chomsky: The Internet is full of people who can’t read and want to talk about sandwiches | The Raw Story {#Cheesygrin}

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Posted: Oct 19, 2013 - 11:52am


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Posted: Oct 18, 2013 - 4:56pm


miamizsun

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Posted: Oct 11, 2013 - 4:02pm

 RichardPrins wrote:
 miamizsun wrote:
obviously science fiction can be a broad subject, however i'm disappointed in chomsky's lack of enthusiasm (or almost disdain) for "hard leaning" science fiction

xprize and singularity u are cutting edge visionary stuff

or am i just misinterpreting this interview?
  1. He very likely does not read any science fiction, but of course knows what it is. In a recent interview someone mentioned/referenced, if I remember correctly, Frederick Pohl, and he said he had no idea who this was. Science fiction probably doesn't interest him, mainly because he's obviously interested in other subjects. That's about choices and priorities, as this talk points out as well.
  2. XPrize, so far, simply seems to be about the commercialization of previous efforts, which isn't all that cutting edge or radical. It is simply an iteration of technological progress.
  3. Singularity related visions/predictions, as he points out, are merely speculative, hence the comparison to science fiction (which is a form of speculative fiction). I'd go a bit further by saying a lot of it is just hype by so-called "futurologists". I like to call them technutopians, or technocratic utopians. An example of that would be that by 2030 or something, because of Moore's law, we will be able to upload our brains to a computer.
  4. Also some of these technutopians appear to be wilfully ignorant of ethical considerations, by simply denying those ethical considerations exist. A recent example, which I saw, is that fully autonomous cars do not require any changes to legal frameworks.

The interesting thing is that when predictions are benevolent we tend to buy into them (wishful thinking), while when predictions are dire we go into denial. We are not nearly as rational as we'd like to think we are.

Chomsky, in this case, cuts through the hype and focuses on the real challenges.

So it isn't so much about "hard leaning science fiction" in itself, which some of us can choose to enjoy as entertainment or thought-provoking material. Others have no use for that.



 
got it

one thing i will say is that there are quite a few people who frame this as a little more fiction than science

xprize in its short history has produced some great results and the projects that they have going now are outstanding

i believe they're on the right track by challenging/incentivizing competitive teams of people to use creative thought, technology and the power of crowd sourcing

inspiring and teaching people exponential thought is exciting stuff

regards
NoEnzLefttoSplit

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Posted: Oct 11, 2013 - 3:34pm

 RichardPrins wrote:
...we will be able to upload our brains to a computer...

 
the poor computer.
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Posted: Oct 11, 2013 - 3:27pm

 miamizsun wrote:
obviously science fiction can be a broad subject, however i'm disappointed in chomsky's lack of enthusiasm (or almost disdain) for "hard leaning" science fiction

xprize and singularity u are cutting edge visionary stuff

or am i just misinterpreting this interview?
  1. He very likely does not read any science fiction, but of course knows what it is. In a recent interview someone mentioned/referenced, if I remember correctly, Frederick Pohl, and he said he had no idea who this was. Science fiction probably doesn't interest him, mainly because he's obviously interested in other subjects. That's about choices and priorities, as this talk points out as well.
  2. XPrize, so far, simply seems to be about the commercialization of previous efforts, which isn't all that cutting edge or radical. It is simply an iteration of technological progress.
  3. Singularity related visions/predictions, as he points out, are merely speculative, hence the comparison to science fiction (which is a form of speculative fiction). I'd go a bit further by saying a lot of it is just hype by so-called "futurologists". I like to call them technutopians, or techno(cratic) utopians. An example of that would be that by 2030 or something, because of Moore's law, we will be able to upload our brains to a computer.
  4. Also some of these technutopians appear to be wilfully ignorant of ethical considerations, by simply denying those ethical considerations exist. A recent example, which I saw, is that fully autonomous cars do not require any changes to legal frameworks.

The interesting thing is that when predictions are benevolent we tend to buy into them (wishful thinking), while when predictions are dire we go into denial. We are not nearly as rational as we'd like to think we are.

Chomsky, in this case, cuts through the hype and focuses on the real challenges.

So it isn't so much about "hard leaning science fiction" in itself, which some of us can choose to enjoy as entertainment or thought-provoking material. Others have no use for that.


miamizsun

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Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 11, 2013 - 2:15pm

 RichardPrins wrote:


 
i really like nikola's interviews, awesome guy

obviously science fiction can be a broad subject, however i'm disappointed in chomsky's lack of enthusiasm (or almost disdain) for "hard leaning" science fiction

xprize and singularity u are cutting edge visionary stuff

or am i just misinterpreting this interview?

regards


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Posted: Oct 9, 2013 - 11:52pm

Chomsky Interview: All superpowers feel exceptional, inflate security myth for ‘frightened population’ — RT Op-Edge/Video
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Posted: Oct 6, 2013 - 10:49am

Noam Chomsky: The Obama Doctrine

(...) At the fringes, some observers reject the shared assumptions, bringing up the historical record: for example, the fact that "for nearly seven decades" the United States has led the world in aggression and subversion - overthrowing elected governments and imposing vicious dictatorships, supporting horrendous crimes, undermining international agreements and leaving trails of blood, destruction and misery.

To these misguided creatures, Morgenthau provided an answer. A serious scholar, he recognized that America has consistently violated its "transcendent purpose."

But to bring up this objection, he explains, is to commit "the error of atheism, which denies the validity of religion on similar grounds." It is the transcendent purpose of America that is "reality"; the actual historical record is merely "the abuse of reality."

In short, "American exceptionalism" and "isolationism" are generally understood to be tactical variants of a secular religion, with a grip that is quite extraordinary, going beyond normal religious orthodoxy in that it can barely even be perceived. Since no alternative is thinkable, this faith is adopted reflexively.

Others express the doctrine more crudely. One of President Reagan's U.N. ambassadors, Jeane Kirkpatrick, devised a new method to deflect criticism of state crimes. Those unwilling to dismiss them as mere "blunders" or "innocent naivete" can be charged with "moral equivalence" - of claiming that the U.S. is no different from Nazi Germany, or whoever the current demon may be. The device has since been widely used to protect power from scrutiny.

Even serious scholarship conforms. Thus in the current issue of the journal Diplomatic History, scholar Jeffrey A. Engel reflects on the significance of history for policy makers.

Engel cites Vietnam, where, "depending on one's political persuasion," the lesson is either "avoidance of the quicksand of escalating intervention {isolationism} or the need to provide military commanders free rein to operate devoid of political pressure" - as we carried out our mission to bring stability, equality and freedom by destroying three countries and leaving millions of corpses. (...)

Those still deluded by "abuse of reality" - that is, fact - might recall that the Sunni-Shiite violence resulted from the worst crime of aggression of the new millennium, the U.S. invasion of Iraq. And those burdened with richer memories might recall that the Nuremberg Trials sentenced Nazi criminals to hanging because, according to the Tribunal's judgment, aggression is "the supreme international crime differing only from other war crimes in that it contains within itself the accumulated evil of the whole."

The same lament is the topic of a celebrated study by Samantha Power, the new U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. In "A Problem from Hell: America in the Age of Genocide," Power writes about the crimes of others and our inadequate response.

She devotes a sentence to one of the few cases during the seven decades that might truly rank as genocide: the Indonesian invasion of East Timor in 1975. Tragically, the United States "looked away," Power reports.

Daniel Patrick Moynihan, her predecessor as U.N. ambassador at the time of the invasion, saw the matter differently. In his book "A Dangerous Place," he described with great pride how he rendered the U.N. "utterly ineffective in whatever measures it undertook" to end the aggression, because "the United States wished things to turn out as they did."

And indeed, far from looking away, Washington gave a green light to the Indonesian invaders and immediately provided them with lethal military equipment. The U.S. prevented the U.N. Security Council from acting and continued to lend firm support to the aggressors and their genocidal actions, including the atrocities of 1999, until President Clinton called a halt - as could have happened anytime during the previous 25 years.

But that is mere abuse of reality. (...)


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Posted: Oct 4, 2013 - 11:26pm


Monkeysdad

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Posted: Sep 28, 2013 - 4:22pm

 RichardPrins wrote: 
no. Having won the Peace Prize and escalating the use of drones as he has makes him far, far worse than his predecessor. It makes him a disgusting hypocrite.
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Posted: Sep 28, 2013 - 3:56pm

 Monkeysdad wrote:
Yep. Never ceases to amaze me. President Barack Obama, Ladies and Gentlemen,...Nobel Peace prize winner of 2009. 

I feel safer with his finger on the button, how about you?!
 
It most certainly isn't any better than his predecessor.
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