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SeriousLee

SeriousLee Avatar

Location: Dans l'milieu d'deux milles livres


Posted: Nov 10, 2019 - 7:57am

 Isabeau wrote:


 kurtster wrote:
 
 
Our carbon footprint isn't helping, but thanks for the wind speed comments and acknowledging the shifting magnetic poles. People are afraid of acknowledging that would dilute the support of dealing with climate change. It doesn't have to be one or the other. The actual seasons of the year have changed here in south texas, normally, our 'fall' doesn't come until near Christmas, but its already begun. Earlier snows in some parts, even some down here, which is a rarity. The sun is setting in a different place than it did a decade ago. We can still pick up litter, recycle and drive less, but lets acknowledge other factors.



 
I've been saying that for about 10 years up here in Nova Scotia. It's like they shifted by almost a month. Except here, seasons are starting later than usual, whereas you say they are starting about 1 month earlier where you are. Hmmm...
Isabeau

Isabeau Avatar

Location: sou' tex
Gender: Female


Posted: Nov 10, 2019 - 7:49am



 kurtster wrote:
 
Our carbon footprint isn't helping, but thanks for the wind speed comments and acknowledging the shifting magnetic poles. People are afraid of acknowledging that would dilute the support of dealing with climate change. It doesn't have to be one or the other. The actual seasons of the year have changed here in south texas, normally, our 'fall' doesn't come until near Christmas, but its already begun. Earlier snows in some parts, even some down here, which is a rarity. The sun is setting in a different place than it did a decade ago. We can still pick up litter, recycle and drive less, but lets acknowledge other factors.



kurtster

kurtster Avatar

Location: drifting
Gender: Male


Posted: Nov 9, 2019 - 9:02pm

 Isabeau wrote:

As I understand it, PG&E has placed greed above innovation and upgrades to their infrastructure for decades. Agreed on the Santa Ana's, but they said that winds of 80 - 100 mph are stronger and last longer than before. Personally, I don't believe climate change is creating all of the current disasters. There is evidence that the magnetic poles have tilted somewhat from a decade ago - Inuit people are saying the sun and the stars are different, the wind comes from another direction, snow drifts have changed and the sun sets in a different place. Just where I live the sun seems strangely lower on the horizon than previous years. An earth tilt + climate change + greed trumping regulation = Environmental and Economic disasters.

I guess, like ufo's and aliens, no one wants to bring up polar shifts. This planet does wobble ... and its not because they are selling Columbian coffee on one side.
 
I'm surprised no one has jumped on your mention of natural causes for changing climate patterns.  I've mentioned all the things that you have more than a couple of times and I immediately get responses calling me a denier.  Part of why I let this sit for awhile.

Earth’s Magnetic Field Shifts, Forcing Airport Runway Change

And the fields are also dramatically weakening which allows much more radiation to reach deeper into our atmosphere and the surface.

I do agree with your thoughts, all of them except that these stronger winds are something new.  Nope same as they always were.  Just more people in harms way.

 1953 Tilden Park Fire. The spectacular blaze started shortly before 3 PM on Thursday October 22 at the Park’s Mineral Springs Area, seriously burned one park firefighter, and for a time threatened a section of Berkeley as it swept out of control at incredible speed until it was stopped near Big Springs Camp in the park. Gale-like winds snapped a tree limb across high tension wires to set off this 800-acre fire that was pushed by gusts of winds that at time hit 90 miles an hour. It destroyed some 5,000 evergreens, valued at $40 apiece, momentarily trapped several Berkeley firemen and University of California students, and for a time threatened to head for the city by jumping to thick forests of eucalyptus trees on the parks’ western hills. Anxious residents, remembering the disastrous 1923 Berkeley fire 30 years ago, swamped newspaper, police and fire switchboards with inquiries.

I was raised with a heightened awareness of the local fire dangers.  Our last residence in Berkeley was in the burn pattern of the 1923 fire, near the intersection of Cragmont and Shasta Roads.  My Dad spoke frequently of The Wildcat Canyon Fire (1923) and used to do controlled burns around our house.

{#Cheers}
westslope

westslope Avatar

Location: BC sage brush steppe


Posted: Nov 2, 2019 - 9:19am



 Lazy8 wrote:
haresfur wrote:
I know people who hunt feral pigs but I don't think they trust the meat enough to eat them. Goat tacos sound good.

I've had both and both they're both delicious.

Feral goats and hogs are both really destructive if they get out of control. Overgrazing by goat herders is blamed for the desertification of Sub-Saharan Africa

Ecosystems need predators. In the case of the feral hogs gradually making their way down from Alberta and Saskatchewan I'd be happy to fill that role. 
 

In 1979, a girlfriend from Scottsdale, Az and I did two long backpack trips through the High Atlas mountains in Morocco.  I have Kodak slides of goats climbing 15 to almost 20 feet up trees in order to browse.    The area was beautiful but the overgrazing was evident.  It felt like the Sahara Desert was creeping westward over the Atlas mountains.

This is classic Tragedy of the commons.   Berber mountain folk would work in France, save a lot of money, return home and buy livestock, mostly goats, sometimes sheep.  

Speaking of Nigeria which is mentioned in the article.  One of the bigger shocks I experienced while overlanding Africa, was the contrast between sparsely populated Niger and heavily, densely populated NE Nigeria.  The oil-driven Resource Curse gifted Nigeria out-of-control population growth and is likely a significant driver of violent conflict.   Call it Neo-Malthusian.  

Apologies for the feral pig invasion from Canada's prairie provinces.  I suppose our winters are insufficiently cold.  Europe is much farther advanced in the feral pig invasion and it is not pretty.  Time to offer a bounty to qualified, licensed hunters?   Likely only poison and introduced diseases will eradicate these pests.  The cuteness factor will render radical solutions politically impossible.
Isabeau

Isabeau Avatar

Location: sou' tex
Gender: Female


Posted: Nov 2, 2019 - 7:39am



 kurtster wrote:
As I understand it, PG&E has placed greed above innovation and upgrades to their infrastructure for decades. Agreed on the Santa Ana's, but they said that winds of 80 - 100 mph are stronger and last longer than before. Personally, I don't believe climate change is creating all of the current disasters. There is evidence that the magnetic poles have tilted somewhat from a decade ago - Inuit people are saying the sun and the stars are different, the wind comes from another direction, snow drifts have changed and the sun sets in a different place. Just where I live the sun seems strangely lower on the horizon than previous years. An earth tilt + climate change + greed trumping regulation = Environmental and Economic disasters.

I guess, like ufo's and aliens, no one wants to bring up polar shifts. This planet does wobble ... and its not because they are selling Columbian coffee on one side.


kurtster

kurtster Avatar

Location: drifting
Gender: Male


Posted: Nov 2, 2019 - 4:36am

 Isabeau wrote:


 haresfur wrote:


 ScottFromWyoming wrote:


 miamizsun wrote:
 
I think they're starting to get it. We get it here; we hate the smoke but love the fire (most times). Those "sensitive areas" need goats. And lots of 'em.

 
It's a challenge to keep up with the needed fuel suppression burns. With climate change, the planned burn season is pretty much continuous with the unplanned burn season here. That, and people need to accept the risk of a burn getting out of control. And boy, there is nothing like having your house burn to turn someone anti-government. 

Feral goats are a pain. 
 

Agreed,  CA's topography is difficult for this. Still ... the winds are unprecedented AND the utility did neglect it's infrastructure.
Feral goats and pigs are considered Apocalypse bbq in these parts. Touch my garden and they become taco filling.
 
PG&E has been burning down and blowing up cities and killing people for nearly 100 years going back to the Berkeley Fire in the 20's. 

Monday, September 17, 1923 began like any other day. In her last year at UC Berkeley, Ursula Cheshire likely had breakfast with her sorority sisters at Zeta Tau Alpha house at 1700 Euclid Avenue before walking to classes on campus. But little did she know she would never step foot inside that house again.

As the hours passed, the day grew hot and windy, with low humidity. At noon-time, about three miles north of Berkeley, a gale blew down a high-voltage wire in Wildcat Canyon, starting a grass fire that steadily spread to a grove of eucalyptus trees.

They have had 100 years to figure this out.  In a place that is one of the most regulated in the world.  In an economy that ranks either 5 or 6 in the world as an independent entity.  There is no excuse for this, period.  Many other places have similar geographic conditions to PG&E and they don't don't start fires with their transmission lines when the wind blows.

Go ahead and blame global warming for all the fires.  But even with renewable electric energy sources, you still have the same power grid to transmit the renewable energy.  PG&E's power grid will start fires regardless of where the power comes from.  Then you get into Sacramento and the people charged with regulating enabling PG&E.

These winds are nothing new.  You can tell how long someone has been in California by the names they use to call the winds.  The older residents call them the Diablo Winds or the Santana's.  The more recent call them the Santa Ana's.  Whatever you call them, they have been around forever and you would think that someone would have designed a power grid to be safe when these winds blow.  This is the 21st Century and the smartest, brightest and richest people in the world can be found in the Deep Blue State of California.
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Nov 1, 2019 - 4:30am

 Lazy8 wrote:
haresfur wrote:
I know people who hunt feral pigs but I don't think they trust the meat enough to eat them. Goat tacos sound good.

I've had both and both they're both delicious.

Feral goats and hogs are both really destructive if they get out of control. Overgrazing by goat herders is blamed for the desertification of Sub-Saharan Africa

Ecosystems need predators. In the case of the feral hogs gradually making their way down from Alberta and Saskatchewan I'd be happy to fill that role. 
 

florida has an issue with sus scrofa too (band name)

our turnpike cuts through some fairly rural areas

i've seen them tooling around the right of way

had both domesticated but only wild hog from an individual's hunt

free range swine is delicious

farmers are trapping them and selling them to a wild meat business

Floridians Turn Nuisance Pigs Into Profitable Pork

 

 


Lazy8

Lazy8 Avatar

Location: The Gallatin Valley of Montana
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 31, 2019 - 7:24pm

haresfur wrote:
I know people who hunt feral pigs but I don't think they trust the meat enough to eat them. Goat tacos sound good.

I've had both and both they're both delicious.

Feral goats and hogs are both really destructive if they get out of control. Overgrazing by goat herders is blamed for the desertification of Sub-Saharan Africa

Ecosystems need predators. In the case of the feral hogs gradually making their way down from Alberta and Saskatchewan I'd be happy to fill that role. 
haresfur

haresfur Avatar

Location: The Golden Triangle
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 31, 2019 - 4:45pm



 Isabeau wrote:


 haresfur wrote:


 ScottFromWyoming wrote:


 miamizsun wrote:
 
I think they're starting to get it. We get it here; we hate the smoke but love the fire (most times). Those "sensitive areas" need goats. And lots of 'em.

 
It's a challenge to keep up with the needed fuel suppression burns. With climate change, the planned burn season is pretty much continuous with the unplanned burn season here. That, and people need to accept the risk of a burn getting out of control. And boy, there is nothing like having your house burn to turn someone anti-government. 

Feral goats are a pain. 
 

Agreed,  CA's topography is difficult for this. Still ... the winds are unprecedented AND the utility did neglect it's infrastructure.
Feral goats and pigs are considered Apocalypse bbq in these parts. Touch my garden and they become taco filling.
 
The aboriginal people in Australia have been setting planned burns for somewhere around 60,000 years. The fire management is starting to learn from them about how to set burns to improve the ecosystem as well as reduce fuel loads. We are lucky where I live that the winters are cool and wet, so they are a good time to burn. 

I know people who hunt feral pigs but I don't think they trust the meat enough to eat them. Goat tacos sound good.

Isabeau

Isabeau Avatar

Location: sou' tex
Gender: Female


Posted: Oct 31, 2019 - 4:21pm



 haresfur wrote:


 ScottFromWyoming wrote:


 miamizsun wrote:
 
I think they're starting to get it. We get it here; we hate the smoke but love the fire (most times). Those "sensitive areas" need goats. And lots of 'em.

 
It's a challenge to keep up with the needed fuel suppression burns. With climate change, the planned burn season is pretty much continuous with the unplanned burn season here. That, and people need to accept the risk of a burn getting out of control. And boy, there is nothing like having your house burn to turn someone anti-government. 

Feral goats are a pain. 
 

Agreed,  CA's topography is difficult for this. Still ... the winds are unprecedented AND the utility did neglect it's infrastructure.
Feral goats and pigs are considered Apocalypse bbq in these parts. Touch my garden and they become taco filling.
haresfur

haresfur Avatar

Location: The Golden Triangle
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 31, 2019 - 2:48pm



 ScottFromWyoming wrote:


 miamizsun wrote:

California’s Must Choose Between Uncontrolled or Controlled Fires

 
Florida had over 2 million acres of prescribed (aka controlled) burns in 2017 and California had 87,000 acres of controlled burns in 2018.

Georgia has 1.25 million acres of controlled burns and Alabama had 944,000 acres of controlled burns.

California had 1.9 million acres of forests burned from wildfires in 2018 against the 87,000 acres burned in controlled fires.


UC Berkeley fire ecologist Brandon Collins brought me here to show me the consequence of decades of fire suppression combined with climate change. This forest would usually burn nine times over the course of 100 years, but no fire had blazed here since at least 1908. “Without fire, you’re going to have these dense stands no matter what,” Collins says.
In 2014, the King Fire hit this unnaturally overgrown forest, leaping into the canopy and racing across a vast landscape. Limited patches of high-intensity fire would be natural in these forests. But in 47 percent of the 97,717 acres burned in the King Fire, the blaze was so hot that it killed nearly all of the trees.

About 18.6 million trees died in 2018, mainly the result of dehydration and beetle infestation, according to new estimates from the U.S. Forest Service. That pushes the total number of dead since 2010, shortly before the five-year drought began, to 147 million.


California needs to burn 2-5 million acres a year. This should be controlled burns instead of wildfires.

This level of burning needs to be near the historic levels. Almost the entire 33 million acres of forests needs to be burned every 10-20 years. More sensitive areas near populations need to be thinned and managed without fire.


 
I think they're starting to get it. We get it here; we hate the smoke but love the fire (most times). Those "sensitive areas" need goats. And lots of 'em.

 
It's a challenge to keep up with the needed fuel suppression burns. With climate change, the planned burn season is pretty much continuous with the unplanned burn season here. That, and people need to accept the risk of a burn getting out of control. And boy, there is nothing like having your house burn to turn someone anti-government. 

Feral goats are a pain. 
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 31, 2019 - 2:07pm

 ScottFromWyoming wrote:
I think they're starting to get it. We get it here; we hate the smoke but love the fire (most times). Those "sensitive areas" need goats. And lots of 'em.
 

i've said that too

as a child we would tie them to fence rows

they cleaned them like machines

never underestimate a goat
ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 31, 2019 - 1:59pm



 miamizsun wrote:

California’s Must Choose Between Uncontrolled or Controlled Fires

 
Florida had over 2 million acres of prescribed (aka controlled) burns in 2017 and California had 87,000 acres of controlled burns in 2018.

Georgia has 1.25 million acres of controlled burns and Alabama had 944,000 acres of controlled burns.

California had 1.9 million acres of forests burned from wildfires in 2018 against the 87,000 acres burned in controlled fires.


UC Berkeley fire ecologist Brandon Collins brought me here to show me the consequence of decades of fire suppression combined with climate change. This forest would usually burn nine times over the course of 100 years, but no fire had blazed here since at least 1908. “Without fire, you’re going to have these dense stands no matter what,” Collins says.
In 2014, the King Fire hit this unnaturally overgrown forest, leaping into the canopy and racing across a vast landscape. Limited patches of high-intensity fire would be natural in these forests. But in 47 percent of the 97,717 acres burned in the King Fire, the blaze was so hot that it killed nearly all of the trees.

About 18.6 million trees died in 2018, mainly the result of dehydration and beetle infestation, according to new estimates from the U.S. Forest Service. That pushes the total number of dead since 2010, shortly before the five-year drought began, to 147 million.


California needs to burn 2-5 million acres a year. This should be controlled burns instead of wildfires.

This level of burning needs to be near the historic levels. Almost the entire 33 million acres of forests needs to be burned every 10-20 years. More sensitive areas near populations need to be thinned and managed without fire.


 
I think they're starting to get it. We get it here; we hate the smoke but love the fire (most times). Those "sensitive areas" need goats. And lots of 'em.

miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 31, 2019 - 1:47pm

California’s Must Choose Between Uncontrolled or Controlled Fires

 

Florida had over 2 million acres of prescribed (aka controlled) burns in 2017 and California had 87,000 acres of controlled burns in 2018.

Georgia has 1.25 million acres of controlled burns and Alabama had 944,000 acres of controlled burns.

California had 1.9 million acres of forests burned from wildfires in 2018 against the 87,000 acres burned in controlled fires.

UC Berkeley fire ecologist Brandon Collins brought me here to show me the consequence of decades of fire suppression combined with climate change. This forest would usually burn nine times over the course of 100 years, but no fire had blazed here since at least 1908. “Without fire, you’re going to have these dense stands no matter what,” Collins says.
In 2014, the King Fire hit this unnaturally overgrown forest, leaping into the canopy and racing across a vast landscape. Limited patches of high-intensity fire would be natural in these forests. But in 47 percent of the 97,717 acres burned in the King Fire, the blaze was so hot that it killed nearly all of the trees.

About 18.6 million trees died in 2018, mainly the result of dehydration and beetle infestation, according to new estimates from the U.S. Forest Service. That pushes the total number of dead since 2010, shortly before the five-year drought began, to 147 million.

California needs to burn 2-5 million acres a year. This should be controlled burns instead of wildfires.

This level of burning needs to be near the historic levels. Almost the entire 33 million acres of forests needs to be burned every 10-20 years. More sensitive areas near populations need to be thinned and managed without fire.


KurtfromLaQuinta

KurtfromLaQuinta Avatar

Location: Really deep in the heart of South California
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 20, 2018 - 2:53pm

 oldviolin wrote:

Kon-Tiki huh? I knew you were cool...

 
Double take.
oldviolin

oldviolin Avatar

Location: esse quam videri
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 20, 2018 - 2:37pm

 ScottFromWyoming wrote:

I'll bet I can find ours over at my dad's house. We used to love setting that up. I think we did at Christmas originally, but usually it just sat year round in the basement play room. Always out in the middle of the room, never up against the wall (see photo ), with a couple of bean bag chairs near it. It sort of served as a room divider, my sister's crap was on the other side.  The light bulb fixture was taken out of it pretty quickly because we'd left it on a few too many times and the cardboard was scorched. I read Kon-Tiki and Watership Down and Centennial and 100 other books with that in my peripheral vision.

 
Kon-Tiki huh? I knew you were cool...


ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 20, 2018 - 12:36pm

 oldviolin wrote:

Kon-Tiki huh? I knew you were cool...

 

 
Double-cool
 
They made a movie out of that a few years ago that got no press at all, and I see it grossed (only) 1.5 million. I thought it was well done.
oldviolin

oldviolin Avatar

Location: esse quam videri
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 20, 2018 - 11:42am

 ScottFromWyoming wrote:

I'll bet I can find ours over at my dad's house. We used to love setting that up. I think we did at Christmas originally, but usually it just sat year round in the basement play room. Always out in the middle of the room, never up against the wall (see photo ), with a couple of bean bag chairs near it. It sort of served as a room divider, my sister's crap was on the other side.  The light bulb fixture was taken out of it pretty quickly because we'd left it on a few too many times and the cardboard was scorched. I read Kon-Tiki and Watership Down and Centennial and 100 other books with that in my peripheral vision.

 
Kon-Tiki huh? I knew you were cool...


oldviolin

oldviolin Avatar

Location: esse quam videri
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 20, 2018 - 11:40am

 ScottFromWyoming wrote:

I'll bet I can find ours over at my dad's house. We used to love setting that up. I think we did at Christmas originally, but usually it just sat year round in the basement play room. Always out in the middle of the room, never up against the wall (see photo ), with a couple of bean bag chairs near it. It sort of served as a room divider, my sister's crap was on the other side.  The light bulb fixture was taken out of it pretty quickly because we'd left it on a few too many times and the cardboard was scorched. I read Kon-Tiki and Watership Down and Centennial and 100 other books with that in my peripheral vision.

 
Kon-Tiki huh? I knew you were cool...

 
Red_Dragon

Red_Dragon Avatar



Posted: Mar 20, 2018 - 11:09am

 ScottFromWyoming wrote:

Oh yeah, the precursor to those infrared heaters that do jack shit. At least that thing gave off 60W of heat.

 
Jack would prefer to be left out of the discussion.
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