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Index » Music » Whatever » The Legacy of Woodstock Page: Previous  1, 2, 3
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billyc

billyc Avatar

Location: tantra lounge,ohio
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 14, 2009 - 3:47pm

watkins glen was 1971 or 72. it also closed nys thruway and st rt 17. it was held at watkins glen racetrack where formula 1 cars raced in watkins glen ny. i lived in ithaca ,ny approx 20 miles away.
musik_knut

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Location: Third Stone From The Sun
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 14, 2009 - 3:15pm

I couldn't get out of work *loading/unloading trucks*...so I missed Woodstock...
triskele

triskele Avatar

Location: The Dragons' Roost


Posted: Aug 14, 2009 - 3:10pm

billyc wrote:
only 13 when woodstock happened , but did go to summer jam @ watkins glen - the dead,allman bros., and the band.... and bigger than woodstock .


i was only 7 in 1969...and wasn't allowed to attend my first "rock concert" until i was 16——so i missed all of those famous fests! but have always wished i'd been there....especially woodstock.

billyc

billyc Avatar

Location: tantra lounge,ohio
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 14, 2009 - 3:01pm

only 13 when woodstock happened , but did go to summer jam @ watkins glen - the dead,allman bros., and the band.... and bigger than woodstock .
triskele

triskele Avatar

Location: The Dragons' Roost


Posted: Aug 14, 2009 - 2:44pm

just heard a previously unreleased recording of janis doing "piece of my heart" at woodstock....smokin' hot.....loved it.
jagdriver

jagdriver Avatar

Location: Now with a New York state of mind
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 14, 2009 - 9:47am

 jadewahoo wrote:
Mugs, thanks for starting this thread. I have jsut posted a memoir of my time and involvement with Woodstock over in the Journals: Woodstock, 40 years On... In addition to it being a glimpse into the cultural realities of the time, it may also help to clear up some misconceptions about just what went on at Woodstock. Do read the fair warning note at the top of the entry.

 
This is an interesting read; thanks for posting it, Jade.

There is also an interesting rebroadcast of an interview with two of the original promoters (John Roberts and Joel Rosenman) on NPR's "Fresh Air" this morning. I'm listening in real-time as I post this, but you'll be able to stream it from their site after 5:00 pm today Eastern time.

Over at my blog (dormant at this time), I still have an interview and back story there about Eddie Kramer, who did all of the original recording (and rerecording) of the festival. Eddie is the whiz also responsible for all of Hendrix' recordings, along with that of other artists.

diggard

diggard Avatar

Location: netherlands
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 14, 2009 - 3:20am

 Mugro wrote:
I just finished reading Michael Lang's "Road to Woodstock". It was a fascinating read. As many of you already know, Michael Lang was one of the organizers of the Woodstock festival. He just came out with a book about the organization of the event, and it was quite interesting.

I am fascinated by all things Woodstock. I was born a mere three weeks prior to Woodstock (on the day that the Apollo 11 members returned to earth after their journey to the moon), so I wasn't there, but for my entire life I have been hearing about Woodstock.

It is my personal opinion that popular rock music reached its zenith during the late 60s and early 70s, and that Woodstock was the peak of that zenith. I have always fantasized about being at Woodstock, and attended the 1994 festival and had the time of my life. The Woodstock film is on my personal top ten movie list and I watch it frequently when I want to be inspired about what music and life can really aspire to.

That being said, after reading the Lang book, I was left with a feeling that maybe the baby boom generation that put this festival on and made it a cultural legend was really just being narcissistic about the whole thing. Ok, it was the zenith of pop music and culture, but did it REALLY rival the civil rights movement in significance? Maybe my mood here was created by Lang's narcissism and not that of the participants.

I am disturbed by my recent revelations and wish for my idealistic view of Woodstock to return. Please, all you aging hippies, enlighten me! Tell me why Woodstock is relevant today and tell me why this festival changed the United States and the world?!

I am hoping that this new forum will promote a discussion about Woodstock and it's legacy. I am not posting this to rain on anyone's parade, and my post is NOT a political statement. I really just want to hear different views from fellow RPeeps about what Woodstock means to YOU. Personal stories about being at Woodstock would be a bonus!

Three days of peace and love. And music. I can definitely dig THAT.

 
hi mugro im from 64  and i guess a civil war wasn't the plan so peace and love are no match for stupid kapitalism or so system come on
so come on mr.President (give dead heads a chance)  {#Chillpill}hihi
jadewahoo

jadewahoo Avatar

Location: Puerto Viejo, Costa Rica
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 14, 2009 - 2:12am

Mugs, thanks for starting this thread. I have jsut posted a memoir of my time and involvement with Woodstock over in the Journals: Woodstock, 40 years On... In addition to it being a glimpse into the cultural realities of the time, it may also help to clear up some misconceptions about just what went on at Woodstock. Do read the fair warning note at the top of the entry.
Mugro

Mugro Avatar

Location: 1,000 shades of green (Ireland)


Posted: Aug 13, 2009 - 7:03am

 jagdriver wrote:
 steeler wrote:
Edit:  Another thought:  I think, possibly, that Woodstock represents a merger of our fascination with "pop" culture and the way we live and structure our lives. In some respects, it was the culmination of an era in which we essentially elevated our individual interests and pursuits to a higher plain in terms of everyday significance.  We began to speak in terms of The Beatles transforming the way we wore our hair and the clothes we chose to wear and even the way we perceived the world, or should perceive the world .  The lasting impact, if you will, can be seen today, and it may be negative.  The elevation of "pop" culture has no bounds.  We think more about "Harry Potter" than we do about everyday realities. We want to be "rock stars."  Perhaps. Just thinking out loud.  

Interesting thoughts, Steeler. I'm of two minds (not all that unusual).

I had been doing a lot research for my blog (which I suspended a couple of weeks ago) about music and the '60s countercultural movement in which many us took part. Part of my writing included a look back at my brief involvement with MC5 manager and White Panther Party founder, John Sinclair, with whom I had recently been corresponding again. (JS being in the Michigan State Penitentiary at the time of Woodstock, you'll recall Abbie Hoffman attempting to take control of Pete Townshend's mic to state John's case before the crowd. For this, Townshend overreacted by bashing Hoffman's head with his guitar.) While I certainly thought it was very cool for "the 5" to play in my high school gym (with Sinclair handing out cinnamon sticks), my later reading and reflection about those days has led me to have second thoughts regarding promotion of those days as being "groovy." Let me explain why.

If you'll remember back to the bad taste his visit to San Francisco left in George Harrison's mouth, I find myself leaning in that direction after a couple of program viewings:

  • The first was a PBS American Experience episode, Summer of Love, chronicling that very brief window of time. This helped me understand what Harrison may have been feeling during his visit.

  • Next up was a trailer for an upcoming film about Detroit's Grande Ballroom, in which Ted Nugent single-handedly spoils the image I had long held in my head in relation to the concerts I saw there.

  • The last was my recent viewing of Gimme Shelter, culminating in the free concert at Altamont where the Hells Angels were brought in as "security" and ultimately killed a man in front of the stage. Both Mick Jagger and Grace Slick made what I felt were embarassing attempts to get things back under control.
Speaking of embarassment (which is really regret), I was reminded of my stoned out, drunken teenaged self during that same time period when I could have been taking advantage of all of the terrific opportunities that were laid out before me. Like a guy who was my best friend in sixth grade who, three years later, ended up in the psych ward after buying and taking some PCP, I could very easily have been him. A lot of us could. Unlike Mssr. Harrison, how in the world could I be assured, especially living in Michigan at the time, that that tab of four-way was from Owsley's lab?

I loved what the music and art of the period (which I still greatly admire) — as well as my own personal freedom — did for my brain's right hemisphere. I think this may be what we all continue to celebrate here at RP. Like many of you who will read this, I, too, felt that exuberance and bliss that many of us experienced back then at Woodstock or similar events(1), only to be faced with the reality of this world — some sooner (e.g. Vietnam), some later. Yes, there was a lot of fun had then, and fun yet to be had at musical events yet to be attended, but I for one would not want to return to that time and relive it, at least not in the same way.

> Jag

(1) I was on the film crew for the Goose Lake International Music Festival in 1972 (Wikipedia erroneously has it two years earlier), which featured Savoy Brown, Jethro Tull, Rod Stewart and the Faces, Joe Cocker, Ten Years After, Mountain, Chicago Transit Authority, Bob Seger, John Sebastian, Alice Cooper, James Gang, Stooges (with Iggy Pop), MC5, Brownsville Station, Flying Burrito Brothers, and several other groups.

 

Interesting comments.

I have found it interesting to read about Abbie Hoffman in particular. The whole fiasco surrounding the Chicago 7 case and Abbie's attempts to derail the Woodstock festival are disturbing. Michael Lang and the other organizers made a conscious effort to make Woodstock apolitical. The "nothing but peace and love" part was not just a slogan. Lang wanted politics to stay out of the three day event. He wanted everyone to just come together and enjoy each other and the music, and actually put this issue to a vote with Hoffman's Movement prior to the event. Despite this, Hoffman (while tripping on acid) demanded to commandeer the microphone at Woodstock (as you state in your post) to talk about Sinclair's jailing.

When reading about these times, it seems like some of the counterculture "movement" were quite immature and did not know what the hell they were doing. I guess you could say that about any generation or any movement though, right?

I definitely applaud the "movers and shakers" of the 60s for moving our cultural thought forward and for expanding how we see ourselves and the world. That is something that has lasted to this day.  


jagdriver

jagdriver Avatar

Location: Now with a New York state of mind
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 12, 2009 - 9:43am

 steeler wrote:
Edit:  Another thought:  I think, possibly, that Woodstock represents a merger of our fascination with "pop" culture and the way we live and structure our lives. In some respects, it was the culmination of an era in which we essentially elevated our individual interests and pursuits to a higher plain in terms of everyday significance.  We began to speak in terms of The Beatles transforming the way we wore our hair and the clothes we chose to wear and even the way we perceived the world, or should perceive the world .  The lasting impact, if you will, can be seen today, and it may be negative.  The elevation of "pop" culture has no bounds.  We think more about "Harry Potter" than we do about everyday realities. We want to be "rock stars."  Perhaps. Just thinking out loud.  

Interesting thoughts, Steeler. I'm of two minds (not all that unusual).

I had been doing a lot research for my blog (which I suspended a couple of weeks ago) about music and the '60s countercultural movement in which many us took part. Part of my writing included a look back at my brief involvement with MC5 manager and White Panther Party founder, John Sinclair, with whom I had recently been corresponding again. (JS being in the Michigan State Penitentiary at the time of Woodstock, you'll recall Abbie Hoffman attempting to take control of Pete Townshend's mic to state John's case before the crowd. For this, Townshend overreacted by bashing Hoffman's head with his guitar.) While I certainly thought it was very cool for "the 5" to play in my high school gym (with Sinclair handing out cinnamon sticks), my later reading and reflection about those days has led me to have second thoughts regarding promotion of those days as being "groovy." Let me explain why.

If you'll remember back to the bad taste his visit to San Francisco left in George Harrison's mouth, I find myself leaning in that direction after a couple of program viewings:

  • The first was a PBS American Experience episode, Summer of Love, chronicling that very brief window of time. This helped me understand what Harrison may have been feeling during his visit.

  • Next up was a trailer for an upcoming film about Detroit's Grande Ballroom, in which Ted Nugent single-handedly spoils the image I had long held in my head in relation to the concerts I saw there.

  • The last was my recent viewing of Gimme Shelter, culminating in the free concert at Altamont where the Hells Angels were brought in as "security" and ultimately killed a man in front of the stage. Both Mick Jagger and Grace Slick made what I felt were embarassing attempts to get things back under control.
Speaking of embarassment (which is really regret), I was reminded of my stoned out, drunken teenaged self during that same time period when I could have been taking advantage of all of the terrific opportunities that were laid out before me. Like a guy who was my best friend in sixth grade who, three years later, ended up in the psych ward after buying and taking some PCP, I could very easily have been him. A lot of us could. Unlike Mssr. Harrison, how in the world could I be assured, especially living in Michigan at the time, that that tab of four-way was from Owsley's lab?

I loved what the music and art of the period (which I still greatly admire) — as well as my own personal freedom — did for my brain's right hemisphere. I think this may be what we all continue to celebrate here at RP. Like many of you who will read this, I, too, felt that exuberance and bliss that many of us experienced back then at Woodstock or similar events(1), only to be faced with the reality of this world — some sooner (e.g. Vietnam), some later. Yes, there was a lot of fun had then, and fun yet to be had at musical events yet to be attended, but I for one would not want to return to that time and relive it, at least not in the same way.

> Jag

(1) I was on the film crew for the Goose Lake International Music Festival in 1972 (Wikipedia erroneously has it two years earlier), which featured Savoy Brown, Jethro Tull, Rod Stewart and the Faces, Joe Cocker, Ten Years After, Mountain, Chicago Transit Authority, Bob Seger, John Sebastian, Alice Cooper, James Gang, Stooges (with Iggy Pop), MC5, Brownsville Station, Flying Burrito Brothers, and several other groups.

steeler

steeler Avatar

Location: Perched on the precipice of the cauldron of truth


Posted: Aug 12, 2009 - 7:30am

 Mugro wrote:
II still think that the IDEA of Woodstock is the LEGACY of Woodstock, not necessarily the reality of it. And don't get me wrong, the "idea" of Woodstock is definitely a wonderful thing.

 

I think this is the crux of it. 

It was just a concert, so, no, it did not rival the Civil Rights Movement in terms of lasting impact. Nor does it rival the protests of the Vietnam war.  Nor Watergate  

That said, idealism is important, and Woodstock — the event itself, but really more the aftermath of it — has that in spades.  The lore lives on and on. It is now a milestone for a generation (maybe 2), but I believe it will live on after that generation has passed.

The questions you have asked are interesting. Why, indeeed, does it live on, and what does it actually represent?  It obviously is more than just a cultural marker.      
.
Edit:  Another thought:  I think, possibly, that Woodstock represents a merger of our fascination with "pop" culture and the way we live and structure our lives. In some respects, it was the culmination of an era in which we essentially elevated our individual interests and pursuits to a higher plain in terms of everyday significance.  We began to speak in terms of The Beatles transforming the way we wore our hair and the clothes we chose to wear and even the way we perceived the world, or should perceive the world .  The lasting impact, if you will, can be seen today, and it may be negative.  The elevation of "pop" culture has no bounds.  We think more about "Harry Potter" than we do about everyday realities. We want to be "rock stars."  Perhaps. Just thinking out loud.  

        

Mugro

Mugro Avatar

Location: 1,000 shades of green (Ireland)


Posted: Aug 12, 2009 - 7:16am

I found it interesting in Lang's book that the whole notion of a "free concert" only developed as a result of several factors:

1. Lack of preparation. Woodstock Ventures was preselling tickets and planned to erect ticket booths and fences to sell tickets on the day of the event and prevent those without tickets from gaining access. They ran out of time to implement these plans, however, because their original concert site was changed from Wallkill, NY to Max's farm with less than a month to go before the event. Thus, the ticket booths got stuck in traffic on flatbeds and the fences were never fully installed. It was all they could do to get the stage ready in time for the show.

2. Sheer volume of concertgoers. The festival organizers were planning on 200,000 people over the entire three day event. Not 500,000 or so all at once!!

3.  Politics. Abbie Hoffman and his group of political anarchists were demanding bribes and extortion from the organizers in consideration for not causing riots. They ended up receiving over $10,000 from Woodstock Ventures in said bribe money, but there were still those who were demanding that the concert be free. Lang only gave into this notion once he realized that he could not stop people from coming in for free anyway.

The notion of a "free concert" was to plague the music festival business for years to come. One of the reasons that Altamont was so violent was because of the same political agitation. If you watch the documentary "Gimme Shelter" you will see festival goers bitterly calling upon the organizers to make the concert free. Same with the travelling Canadian festival featuring the Grateful Dead and others which took place a year or two later.

Woodstock was unique in terms of being a nonviolent event. The festivals that followed were not so lucky.

I still think that the IDEA of Woodstock is the LEGACY of Woodstock, not necessarily the reality of it. And don't get me wrong, the "idea" of Woodstock is definitely a wonderful thing.
jagdriver

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Location: Now with a New York state of mind
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 12, 2009 - 5:57am

X-post from yesterday:

Taking Woodstock

http://www.filminfocus.com/focusfeatures/film/taking_woodstock/

Could be fun......

oldviolin

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Location: esse quam videri
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 12, 2009 - 5:51am


sirdroseph

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Location: Yes
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 12, 2009 - 5:07am

I agree Woodstock was an amazing event that crystallized the societal liberation movement of the 60s, but I am glad that I wasn't there, I am way too much of a hygiene freak!{#Roflol}
javahnagila

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Location: Spaced Coast of Florida
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 11, 2009 - 11:31pm

Can't wait  to read Lang's book....just finished Pete Fornatale's BACK TO THE GARDEN

I'm doing a 3 Day special on my radio show beginning Monday night, and my friend is doing on one Sunday morning:

Fred Migliore's FM Odyssey's "40th Anniversary of Woodstock" Radio Special
With Legendary N.Y. DJ Pete Fornatale

Featuring interviews with concert producers & headliners, and great music!
Sunday, August 16th 10am-1pm
89.5 WFIT in Melbourne
LISTEN ON-LINE!: www.wfit.org



"Java" John's "3 Days of Peace, Love, Music, and Interviews - WOODSTOCK at 40"
Java John Celebrates the 1st Anniversary of his program AN ACOUSTIC RECORD at WFIT
by commemorating the 40th Anniversary of WOODSTOCK.

 Special Guest Interviews include:
WAVY GRAVY  (Hog Farm/ Stage announcer),
CHIP MONCK (lighting director/Stage Announcer,
HENRY DILTZ (official Concert Photographer),
ARNOLD SKOLNICK (Woodstock Logo/Poster Designer)
PETER MAX, 
EDGAR WINTER (shared stage with brother Johnny),
JOANNE HAGUE (author WOODSTOCK: Peace Music and Memories)
FRED MIGLIORE (syndicated FM ODYSSEY D.J., and good friend) fresh from The Woodstock 40th Concert in NY!
...and more!

Plus lots of music by (nearly) all the Woodstock artists, including lots of brand new, previously unreleased Woodstock music!
Mondays -
August 17th, 24th, and 31st at 10pm

89.5 WFIT in Melbourne
LISTEN ON-LINE!: www.wfit.org


schtan

schtan Avatar

Location: culver city CA


Posted: Aug 11, 2009 - 10:42pm

http://www.thesoundla.com/

this friday at 10 am PDT and 10 pm PDT ... 10 great woodstock songs
this sunday ... on peace , love and sunday morning , 8 am till noon PDT , the spirt of woodstock
this sunday at 6 pm PDT ... grace slick will be the guest dj playing what she wants ... should be cool

http://www.thesoundla.com/?nid=105&sid=486 ... there is a woodstock podcast ... 2 minutes long
dionysius

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Location: The People's Republic of Austin
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 11, 2009 - 9:23pm

Innocence = naiveté perhaps, but exuberance, yes! Woodstock was young America at the time blowing free. We need us one of those, now.
maryte

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Location: Blinding You With Library Science!
Gender: Female


Posted: Aug 11, 2009 - 7:45pm

J, for me, what Woodstock represents is similar to what we have here at RP:  music and love of music bring people together for reasons they can only begin to guess at.  As much as I love ACL Fest, I recognize that it's a business endeavour.  I wish all music festivals today could be as simple as Woodstock, but I know that without Woodstock, it's unlikely any of today's festivals would have happened (or at least not to the same degree).


Mugro

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Location: 1,000 shades of green (Ireland)


Posted: Aug 11, 2009 - 7:10pm

I just finished reading Michael Lang's "Road to Woodstock". It was a fascinating read. As many of you already know, Michael Lang was one of the organizers of the Woodstock festival. He just came out with a book about the organization of the event, and it was quite interesting.

I am fascinated by all things Woodstock. I was born a mere three weeks prior to Woodstock (on the day that the Apollo 11 members returned to earth after their journey to the moon), so I wasn't there, but for my entire life I have been hearing about Woodstock.

It is my personal opinion that popular rock music reached its zenith during the late 60s and early 70s, and that Woodstock was the peak of that zenith. I have always fantasized about being at Woodstock, and attended the 1994 festival and had the time of my life. The Woodstock film is on my personal top ten movie list and I watch it frequently when I want to be inspired about what music and life can really aspire to.

That being said, after reading the Lang book, I was left with a feeling that maybe the baby boom generation that put this festival on and made it a cultural legend was really just being narcissistic about the whole thing. Ok, it was the zenith of pop music and culture, but did it REALLY rival the civil rights movement in significance? Maybe my mood here was created by Lang's narcissism and not that of the participants.

I am disturbed by my recent revelations and wish for my idealistic view of Woodstock to return. Please, all you aging hippies, enlighten me! Tell me why Woodstock is relevant today and tell me why this festival changed the United States and the world?!

I am hoping that this new forum will promote a discussion about Woodstock and it's legacy. I am not posting this to rain on anyone's parade, and my post is NOT a political statement. I really just want to hear different views from fellow RPeeps about what Woodstock means to YOU. Personal stories about being at Woodstock would be a bonus!

Three days of peace and love. And music. I can definitely dig THAT.
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