[ ]   [ ]   [ ]                        [ ]      [ ]   [ ]

Death Metal - westslope - Apr 10, 2021 - 6:22pm
 
Play the Blues - rhahl - Apr 10, 2021 - 4:50pm
 
Bring Back the New RP Fonts! - Red_Dragon - Apr 10, 2021 - 3:36pm
 
Tech & Science - R_P - Apr 10, 2021 - 2:37pm
 
• • • The Once-a-Day • • •  - sirdroseph - Apr 10, 2021 - 12:01pm
 
New Music - R_P - Apr 10, 2021 - 11:30am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - miamizsun - Apr 10, 2021 - 9:38am
 
Media Bias - sirdroseph - Apr 10, 2021 - 9:13am
 
Today in History - Red_Dragon - Apr 10, 2021 - 6:18am
 
Live Music - sirdroseph - Apr 10, 2021 - 5:53am
 
Taxes, Taxes, Taxes (and Taxes) - rhahl - Apr 10, 2021 - 5:27am
 
Economix - sirdroseph - Apr 10, 2021 - 4:50am
 
A Brave Woman - sirdroseph - Apr 10, 2021 - 4:44am
 
Race in America - sirdroseph - Apr 10, 2021 - 4:22am
 
Freedom of speech? - sirdroseph - Apr 10, 2021 - 4:11am
 
Mixtape Culture Club - KurtfromLaQuinta - Apr 9, 2021 - 9:05pm
 
Poetry Forum - ScottN - Apr 9, 2021 - 8:30pm
 
So, where do you go, what happens? - oldviolin - Apr 9, 2021 - 6:15pm
 
Automotive Lust - R_P - Apr 9, 2021 - 3:07pm
 
MQA Stream Coming to BLUOS - scoots_mcgoo - Apr 9, 2021 - 3:05pm
 
Funny Videos - KurtfromLaQuinta - Apr 9, 2021 - 2:56pm
 
First World Problems - Lindo525 - Apr 9, 2021 - 2:45pm
 
COVID-19 - miamizsun - Apr 9, 2021 - 2:22pm
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - haresfur - Apr 9, 2021 - 12:47pm
 
Immigration - black321 - Apr 9, 2021 - 12:04pm
 
LeftWingNutZ - sirdroseph - Apr 9, 2021 - 10:47am
 
The War On You - sirdroseph - Apr 9, 2021 - 8:44am
 
Things You Thought Today - oldviolin - Apr 9, 2021 - 8:34am
 
Trump - R_P - Apr 9, 2021 - 7:21am
 
Dialing 1-800-Manbird - miamizsun - Apr 9, 2021 - 4:49am
 
Joe Biden - sirdroseph - Apr 9, 2021 - 4:08am
 
What Did You Do Today? - ScottFromWyoming - Apr 8, 2021 - 9:36pm
 
KEEP YOUR MONEY! - haresfur - Apr 8, 2021 - 2:37pm
 
Recommended documentaries - Red_Dragon - Apr 8, 2021 - 2:24pm
 
partial incompatibility with Symantec's Moon Mind2? - BillG - Apr 8, 2021 - 9:51am
 
What Makes You Cry :) ? - miamizsun - Apr 8, 2021 - 7:50am
 
Counting with Pictures - ScottN - Apr 8, 2021 - 5:09am
 
Things that make you go Hmmmm..... - sirdroseph - Apr 8, 2021 - 5:06am
 
True Confessions - oldviolin - Apr 7, 2021 - 10:36pm
 
A designers worst nightmare - kcar - Apr 7, 2021 - 10:00pm
 
Talk Behind Their Backs Forum - geoff_morphini - Apr 7, 2021 - 9:34pm
 
Beer - GeneP59 - Apr 7, 2021 - 10:29am
 
Breaking News - Red_Dragon - Apr 7, 2021 - 10:00am
 
Philosophy (Meaty Metaphysical Munchables!) - cc_rider - Apr 7, 2021 - 8:08am
 
Country Up The Bumpkin - rhahl - Apr 7, 2021 - 6:22am
 
Questions. - R_P - Apr 6, 2021 - 8:07pm
 
Unusual News - haresfur - Apr 6, 2021 - 5:15pm
 
Is there any DOG news out there? - kcar - Apr 6, 2021 - 4:15pm
 
Baseball, anyone? - GeneP59 - Apr 6, 2021 - 2:58pm
 
workplaces that work - sirdroseph - Apr 6, 2021 - 4:05am
 
And the good news is.... - haresfur - Apr 5, 2021 - 8:50pm
 
Name My Band - oldviolin - Apr 5, 2021 - 5:32pm
 
RP via Bluesound - Lagging - jarro - Apr 5, 2021 - 4:33pm
 
In My Room - kcar - Apr 5, 2021 - 2:50pm
 
RP Daily Trivia Challenge - ScottFromWyoming - Apr 5, 2021 - 11:23am
 
Republican Party - Red_Dragon - Apr 5, 2021 - 10:33am
 
Israel - westslope - Apr 5, 2021 - 7:22am
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - R_P - Apr 4, 2021 - 11:09am
 
What the hell OV? - oldviolin - Apr 4, 2021 - 8:10am
 
RP song titles in cache - conkyjoe - Apr 4, 2021 - 7:37am
 
Photography Forum - Your Own Photos - Blackbirds - Apr 4, 2021 - 6:07am
 
Iphone app "my favourites" - BillG - Apr 3, 2021 - 9:14pm
 
FLAC Streaming - jarro - Apr 3, 2021 - 1:04pm
 
Latin Music - R_P - Apr 3, 2021 - 12:03pm
 
MIXES - miamizsun - Apr 3, 2021 - 6:33am
 
Electronic Music - Manbird - Apr 2, 2021 - 7:44pm
 
Derplahoma! - ScottFromWyoming - Apr 2, 2021 - 1:31pm
 
Best Radio Station in the World - KurtfromLaQuinta - Apr 2, 2021 - 12:54pm
 
Dance with me - NoEnzLefttoSplit - Apr 2, 2021 - 12:45pm
 
Propaganda - ScottFromWyoming - Apr 2, 2021 - 10:39am
 
Get the Quote - black321 - Apr 2, 2021 - 9:04am
 
Iran - Red_Dragon - Apr 2, 2021 - 7:41am
 
Asian Song - sirdroseph - Apr 2, 2021 - 4:48am
 
What's that smell? - kcar - Apr 2, 2021 - 2:16am
 
260,000 Posts in one thread? - Manbird - Apr 1, 2021 - 7:05pm
 
Index » Music » Whatever » Classical Music Page: Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 13, 14, 15, 16, 17  Next
Post to this Topic
BasmntMadman

BasmntMadman Avatar

Location: Off-White Gardens


Posted: Aug 24, 2010 - 2:02pm

 Inamorato wrote:

Yes, although Boccherini is probably beyond the musical ken of most people. It would be easy to trick folks with many composers' names, especially Italians. Here a few that come to mind:

  • Spumoni {#Arrow} Busoni
  • Tortellini {#Arrow} Tortelli or Tartini
  • Zucchini {#Arrow} Puccini
  • Pastrami {#Arrow} Palestrina
  • Alfresco {#Arrow} Frescobaldi


 
And Mozzarella —-> Mozart.  I still think this was a little bit of a "gotcha".   Not that people in general know a lot about classical music or care about it at all.  

Just as long as the local classical FM station still broadcasts; if that stops, then the situation becomes serious.

 

plaice3

plaice3 Avatar

Gender: Female


Posted: Aug 24, 2010 - 11:20am

 Inamorato wrote:

Yes, although Boccherini is probably beyond the musical ken of most people. It would be easy to trick folks with many composers' names, especially Italians. Here a few that come to mind:

  • Spumoni {#Arrow} Busoni
  • Tortellini {#Arrow} Tortelli or Tartini
  • Zucchini {#Arrow} Puccini
  • Pastrami {#Arrow} Palestrina
  • Alfresco {#Arrow} Frescobaldi


 



{#Lol}

Inamorato

Inamorato Avatar

Location: Twin Cities
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 24, 2010 - 11:10am

 BasmntMadman wrote:

That's more than a little unfair, because there was a composer named Luigi Boccherini.  He's not particularly well known, and people must obviously hear the name, then the memory of the name fades, and it's confounded with the similar-sounding Bocconcini.

 

Yes, although Boccherini is probably beyond the musical ken of most people. It would be easy to trick folks with many composers' names, especially Italians. Here a few that come to mind:

  • Spumoni {#Arrow} Busoni
  • Tortellini {#Arrow} Tortelli or Tartini
  • Zucchini {#Arrow} Puccini
  • Pastrami {#Arrow} Palestrina
  • Alfresco {#Arrow} Frescobaldi

BasmntMadman

BasmntMadman Avatar

Location: Off-White Gardens


Posted: Aug 24, 2010 - 9:32am

 Inamorato wrote:

Bocconcini cheese balls mistaken for classical composer

Britons are clueless when it comes to classical music with some mistaking Bocconcini - small Italian cheese balls - for a composer, a survey revealed.

The Daily Telegraph

Even so, I'll bet that Brits would do better than Americans taking a similar test.

 
That's more than a little unfair, because there was a composer named Luigi Boccherini.  He's not particularly well known, and people must obviously hear the name, then the memory of the name fades, and it's confounded with the similar-sounding Bocconcini.


beamends

beamends Avatar



Posted: Aug 24, 2010 - 6:48am

 Inamorato wrote:

Bocconcini cheese balls mistaken for classical composer

Britons are clueless when it comes to classical music with some mistaking Bocconcini - small Italian cheese balls - for a composer, a survey revealed.

The Daily Telegraph

One in three (33 per cent) have never listened to classical music and three out of four (75 per cent) did not know that Elgar wrote Pomp and Circumstance, the music for Land of Hope and Glory.

More than one in four (27 per cent) did not even know he was a composer. A small number, four per cent, wrongly identified Bocconcini as a composer.

Most people were unable to link composers to their masterpieces, the Reader's Digest survey of 1,516 people found.

Nearly seven in ten (68 per cent) did not know that Tchaikovsky wrote the 1812 Overture.

The Welsh were more likely to own a Vivaldi or a Wagner, with 72 per cent owning at least one classical CD compared with the British average of 59 per cent.

Most people (61 per cent) said they liked classical music either a little or a lot, with the older generation much keener than the younger generation.

Gill Hudson, editor-in-chief of Reader's Digest, said: ''As our survey shows, there's clearly an appetite for classical music.

''But I suspect that a combination of uninspired teaching and the elitism that surrounds much of the genre has alienated many people - hence the lack of knowledge of some of the greatest classical music and composers of all time.

''Yet classical music at its best can be moving, life-enhancing and uplifting - and should be accessible to all. National Classical Music day, anyone?''

 

Even so, I'll bet that Brits would do better than Americans taking a similar test.



 
I say that's definitely the reason - certainly true for me. Two hours music lessons a week (only classical, only theory, with a couple of sea shanty's on 'singing' days) for four years, followed by the likes of Richard Baker on TV and Radio talking utter bollocks put me right off. Still does really - just listen to Classical FM and see how long it takes to develop an urge to smash the radio or do something very unpleasant and excruciatingly painful to the announcer.

Inamorato

Inamorato Avatar

Location: Twin Cities
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 24, 2010 - 6:31am

Bocconcini cheese balls mistaken for classical composer

Britons are clueless when it comes to classical music with some mistaking Bocconcini - small Italian cheese balls - for a composer, a survey revealed.

The Daily Telegraph

One in three (33 per cent) have never listened to classical music and three out of four (75 per cent) did not know that Elgar wrote Pomp and Circumstance, the music for Land of Hope and Glory.

More than one in four (27 per cent) did not even know he was a composer. A small number, four per cent, wrongly identified Bocconcini as a composer.

Most people were unable to link composers to their masterpieces, the Reader's Digest survey of 1,516 people found.

Nearly seven in ten (68 per cent) did not know that Tchaikovsky wrote the 1812 Overture.

The Welsh were more likely to own a Vivaldi or a Wagner, with 72 per cent owning at least one classical CD compared with the British average of 59 per cent.

Most people (61 per cent) said they liked classical music either a little or a lot, with the older generation much keener than the younger generation.

Gill Hudson, editor-in-chief of Reader's Digest, said: ''As our survey shows, there's clearly an appetite for classical music.

''But I suspect that a combination of uninspired teaching and the elitism that surrounds much of the genre has alienated many people - hence the lack of knowledge of some of the greatest classical music and composers of all time.

''Yet classical music at its best can be moving, life-enhancing and uplifting - and should be accessible to all. National Classical Music day, anyone?''

 

Even so, I'll bet that Brits would do better than Americans taking a similar test.


NoEnzLefttoSplit

NoEnzLefttoSplit Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Jul 16, 2010 - 12:11pm

Heard a couple of new pieces performed by the Stuttgart Ballet day before yesterday:

Esa-Pekka Salonnen "Foreign Bodies"  which I liked. Very reminscent of Shostakovich
and
Milko Lazar "Pocket Concerto" which I am trying to find a copy of and enjoyed immensely.
(Ballet was mind-boggling good too)
Inamorato

Inamorato Avatar

Location: Twin Cities
Gender: Male


Posted: Jul 16, 2010 - 6:49am

Sir Charles Mackerras, Elegant Conductor, Dies at 84

By ALLAN KOZINN, The New York Times

Sir Charles Mackerras, an Australian conductor who played a crucial role in establishing Janacek’s operas in the West; made important discoveries about vocal ornamentation in Mozart operas; and was an elegant conductor of Gilbert and Sullivan’s operettas and Mozart, Mendelssohn and Brahms symphonies, died on Wednesday in London, where he lived. He was 84.

His death was announced by his management agency, Askonas Holt of London.

Mr. Mackerras (pronounced mc-CARE-ess) was known for performances that were revelatory not only because of their clarity and precision, their astutely judged balances and their consideration of period style, but also because they invariably sounded so deeply felt. He seemed to have an unerring instinct for the right string weights and inflections in Classical and early Romantic works, the right ornaments in Baroque music and the right sense of earthy realism in contemporary scores.

(Full obituary)

 

I just bought his new recording of Dvořák's Symphonic Poems made with the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra. Rest in peace, Sir Charles.


jagdriver

jagdriver Avatar

Location: Now with a New York state of mind
Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 24, 2010 - 12:31pm

 Manbird wrote:
 
SCORE!
I just ordered Terry Riley: Requiem for Adam / The Philosopher's Hand for 2 bucks at amazon.com!

(Happy 75th birthday to Terry Riley)
 

 
{#Clap}

Manbird

Manbird Avatar

Location: Oroville, Ca
Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 24, 2010 - 12:29pm

 
SCORE!
I just ordered Terry Riley: Requiem for Adam / The Philosopher's Hand for 2 bucks at amazon.com!

(Happy 75th birthday to Terry Riley)
 


BasmntMadman

BasmntMadman Avatar

Location: Off-White Gardens


Posted: Dec 11, 2009 - 10:26am

 jagdriver wrote:


A great piece, indeed {#Arrowu}.

And there's an interesting article about Handel's Messiah in this month's Smithsonian.

 
Handel?  I dig hallucinatory visions of luminous supernatural beings.



The Joan Sutherland version doesn't let me embed {#Arghhh}

The Messiah is a little overplayed, but fortunately it's so large that there are many undiscovered sections of it.  For example the Pastorale Simfonia is a wonderful, slightly mysterious piece.

The Smithsonian article gives interesting insight to Handel's life and times.  The description of two divas getting into a fight onstage during a performance and the audience egging them on was hilarious.  



jagdriver

jagdriver Avatar

Location: Now with a New York state of mind
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 11, 2009 - 9:12am

 BasmntMadman wrote:
 Hairfarmer wrote:

Ahhh Igor.

If I ever had access to time machine, the first time and place I'd go to is the premiere of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring.

 

A great piece, indeed {#Arrowu}.

And there's an interesting article about Handel's Messiah in this month's Smithsonian.
BasmntMadman

BasmntMadman Avatar

Location: Off-White Gardens


Posted: Dec 11, 2009 - 9:10am

 Hairfarmer wrote:

Ahhh Igor.

If I ever had access to time machine, the first time and place I'd go to is the premiere of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring.


Inamorato

Inamorato Avatar

Location: Twin Cities
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 11, 2009 - 8:22am

If the New York Phil can benefit from using Alec Baldwin as an announcer, then good on them.

 

Serious Music? He Loves It. No, Seriously.

By DANIEL J. WAKIN, The New York Times

In a cramped studio with walls draped by cables, the words dribbled off the announcer’s tongue in a serene classical music burble.

“That was the ‘Mother Goose’ Suite, music by Maurice Ravel” — slight lift and pause here — “performed by the New York Philharmonic.” The cadence was cultured, the subject matter refined. But that gravelly baritone sounded oddly out of place. Somehow it belonged to, what? Hollywood? Maybe a madcap situation comedy? “Saturday Night Live” even?

Indeed, the man in that little room was Alec Baldwin, the actor with a restless and tabloid-turbulent career that encompasses all three realms. His latest guise is pitchman for high art, as in Mahler, Tchaikovsky and Beethoven. This season Mr. Baldwin became the official announcer of the New York Philharmonic’s weekly radio broadcasts.

His involvement reflects an unusual dimension for a Hollywood figure and one that may come as a surprise to many: a passion for classical music that allows him to talk as comfortably about orchestral repertory as he does about movie shoots and television syndication.

“There’s something serious” about classical music, he said in an interview after a three-hour recording session at Avery Fisher Hall this month. “There’s something beautiful. There’s something that’s really carefully rendered, that I want to be a part of, no matter what my contribution is.”

“I’m not a member of the New York Philharmonic,” he added, searching for an analogy for his role. Then it came: “I feel like I’m the batboy on the Yankees.”

(Full story)

Alec Baldwin at a concert at Avery Fisher Hall last January


Inamorato

Inamorato Avatar

Location: Twin Cities
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 19, 2009 - 7:14am

What killed Mozart? Strep, study suggests

Composer may have developed deadly complications from common infection

msnbc.com news services

What killed Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart so suddenly in 1791? Was the 35-year-old composer poisoned? Could it have been kidney failure? A parasite? 

A report in Tuesday's Annals of Internal Medicine, a medical journal published in Philadelphia, suggests it might have been something far more common: a strep infection. 

Researchers looked at death records in Vienna in the months surrounding his death. The data suggests that there was a minor strep epidemic around that time, and some of Mozart's symptoms, including swelling and fever, could have come from strep. 

Since the composer's death in 1791, there have been various theories about the cause of his untimely end, from intentional poisoning, to rheumatic fever, to trichinosis, a parasitic disease caused by eating raw or undercooked pork. A more than 200-year-old rumor suggests composer Antonio Salieri poisoned Mozart. The rumor has been widely discredited. 

On his death certificate it was officially recorded that the cause of death was hitziges Frieselfieber, or "heated miliary fever," referring to a rash that looks like millet seeds.

But researchers from the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands said studies on his death have generally been based on less-than-reliable evidence, like accounts from people who witnessed Mozart's final days, written decades after his death.

Their new study was based on information from official death registers for Vienna in the winter of 1791 that places Mozart's death in a wider context. 

"Our findings suggest that Mozart fell victim to an epidemic of strep throat infection that was contracted by many Viennese people in Mozart's month of death, and that Mozart was one of several persons in that epidemic that developed a deadly kidney complication," researcher Richard Zegers, of the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, told Reuters Health.

Zegers and his colleagues said this "minor epidemic" of step throat, or streptococcal pharyngitis, may have begun in the city's military hospital.

According to witness accounts, Mozart fell ill with an "inflammatory fever," which is consistent with strep throat, Zegers and his colleagues wrote in their report.

The composer, who wrote more than 600 works during his life, eventually developed severe swelling, "malaise," back pain and a rash, consistent with a strep infection leading to kidney inflammation known as glomerulonephritis.

Zegers said it was also possible that Mozart had scarlet fever, which, like strep throat, can be caused by infection with streptococcal bacteria, but this was less likely because witnesses said Mozart developed a rash near the end of his illness and with scarlet fever, the rash appears early on.


Manbird

Manbird Avatar

Location: Oroville, Ca
Gender: Male


Posted: May 1, 2009 - 9:44am


Krzysztof Penderecki Conducts 

Shostakovich
 

Inamorato

Inamorato Avatar

Location: Twin Cities
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 29, 2009 - 6:34pm

 maryte wrote:

Criminy!  Now *I'll* have to call in sick too! 
 
Now that's what I call sympathetic illness! {#Wink}

maryte

maryte Avatar

Location: Blinding You With Library Science!
Gender: Female


Posted: Jan 29, 2009 - 6:26pm

 Inamorato wrote:

In recompense, allow me to suggest acute satyriasis or Portnoy's Complaint as alternate maladies.
 
Criminy!  Now *I'll* have to call in sick too! 

Inamorato

Inamorato Avatar

Location: Twin Cities
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 29, 2009 - 6:23pm

 dionysius wrote:


Now I will have to use a different excuse to call in sick to work. Thanks a lot, Inamorato.

 
In recompense, allow me to suggest acute satyriasis or Portnoy's Complaint as alternate maladies.

dionysius

dionysius Avatar

Location: The People's Republic of Austin
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 29, 2009 - 1:40pm

 Inamorato wrote:

Cello scrotum — the truth at last

LONDON (Reuters) - "Cello scrotum," a nasty ailment allegedly suffered by musicians, does not exist and the condition was just a hoax, a senior British doctor has admitted.

 

Now I will have to use a different excuse to call in sick to work. Thanks a lot, Inamorato.
Page: Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 13, 14, 15, 16, 17  Next