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Black lives matter .... to white police? - kurtster - May 9, 2021 - 3:48pm
 
Race in America - Coaxial - May 9, 2021 - 1:39pm
 
How's the weather? - JrzyTmata - May 9, 2021 - 10:58am
 
Got Road Rage? - Red_Dragon - May 9, 2021 - 8:08am
 
Surfing! - Proclivities - May 9, 2021 - 6:51am
 
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Photos you have taken of your walks or hikes. - KurtfromLaQuinta - May 8, 2021 - 8:53pm
 
how do you feel right now? - GeneP59 - May 8, 2021 - 3:44pm
 
Automobile Repair - westslope - May 8, 2021 - 9:52am
 
Tomato Gardens - GeneP59 - May 8, 2021 - 9:32am
 
The war on funk is over! - miamizsun - May 8, 2021 - 8:23am
 
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ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 8:59pm



 Coaxial wrote:
 

Yeah it took us a few days  to realize it was going to be the last one. Paid FULL RETAIL too. :lol:
Coaxial

Coaxial Avatar

Location: 543 miles west of Paradis,1491 miles eas
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 6:24pm

 ScottFromWyoming wrote:


 black321 wrote:


 ScottFromWyoming wrote:


 haresfur wrote:


 ScottFromWyoming wrote:
My sister and I own the building that our parents bought and operated a bicycle shop out of for many years, and then the new owner of the bike shop just closed his doors in December. So now we're looking for tenants. Some folks recently moved here from Ohio and think our town needs a bakery. They've never run a business before; he's an avid home baker and she's worked in institutional kitchens (hospitals, schools) so anyway I spent the afternoon-to-midnight reviewing their business plan and making notes. It's partly "you need to get us this information before we'll rent to you/allow you begin remodeling" and partly "oh, honey, this is not realistic market research." 

I'd love for them to make a go of it, but I don't think I want anyone to be plastering "bankrupt" notices on the door in a year, either. And leave me to restore the building after it's been outfitted to have fryers and hoods in it. Oy. But I'm trying to nudge them into making good decisions without saying "you can't do that here."
 
Sounds like a bit of a risk, but good quality baked goods seem to be popular now. The question is whether they can make them commercially (think consistency) and whether people in the town are willing to pay for quality. A bakery/cafe just opened here and sells croissants for something like $12. Seems really steep to me but they are busy. How much of the equipment will go to you if they fail? 

 

We'd put it in the contract that they can/must take most of it. There would be some exhaust fans installed in an exterior wall; those would have to stay. One part of their business plan is really intriguing to me and wouldn't expose them or us to so much risk, but they want to take on baking. The business plan doesn't state what they think their costs will be or what they think the prices will be, but they do hope to "start" with an average 100 customers at an average of $10 each. I want to rent the place, I want a good bakery in town, I want them to succeed. I just don't think this is gonna fly and I don't want to be the landlord that was the problem... "we could have made it but the rents were so high..." etc.
 
Did you taste?
Retail is all about the quality....how you position above the mass/online competitor.
If it tastes no better than a safeway donut, why bother?

Surprised the bike shop closed...bike sales have been through the roof during the pandemic.

 

I have not tasted these but he's doing a yeast recipe donut which already sets it apart from the grocery store.

The bike shop was heading toward retirement already, and he preordered a smaller number of bikes during January... those are scheduled several months out. By March, the pandemic hit, so they said they'd be late getting orders shipped and allowed dealers to opt out or modify their pre-orders. Which he did. Then when he sold out immediately, they declined to sell him any more bikes unless he got a full container (many more bikes than he could possibly take in in one shipment) so he declined. Hindsight knows he could have had the best year in history, since there were no bikes available within 1000 miles of us this summer (Specialized brand, anyway). My son's bike was stolen in June (also a big spike in that activity) and we waited patiently for more to arrive but none ever did. By mid-summer it was clear that he was just going to spool it up. He was very busy repairing bikes that were last ridden during the Reagan years anyway, so new sales weren't critical.

In October, a bike that he'd special ordered in February arrived. He almost refused the shipment because the buyer had found something somewhere else, but decided to put it on the floor anyway. My wife happened to stop in to see if they had any tire pumps remaining since ours was shot, and happened to ask if any bikes came in. Well it just so happens...

After almost 50 years, and completely by random happenstance, the last bicycle sold by Larsen's Bicycles was to the grandson of the people who started the shop.
 
Buzz must be pretty proud of that fact.{#Good-vibes}
haresfur

haresfur Avatar

Location: The Golden Triangle
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 3:53pm



 rgio wrote:


 

 
Youtube and the internet....lessons and sales for almost nothing.

Your comment made me think of this as proof anything (good) can take off on the internet.... Rancho Gordo

 
Been watching Steve's Rancho Gordo business take off over a few years on my foodie site. Then it went nuts with some pandemic publicity. The waiting list for his bean club is up to something like 11,000. I would dearly love one of his bean pots.
ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 12:13pm



 rgio wrote:


Your comment made me think of this as proof anything (good) can take off on the internet.... Rancho Gordo

 
Exactly. I sort of think they don't have that kind of Napa panache but with the huge surge in cooking at home, I think they should jump in with both feet. We'll see...

ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 12:11pm



 black321 wrote:


suppose you also need to weigh retail leases are a buyers market in most towns...given all the failures. 


 

Our town, especially. Lots of lawyers and hair salons on the main street these days. Only one hardware store, and a drugstore, otherwise not much traditional retail. A realtor has offered to buy it (no price stated) to put in some general retail downstairs and Air B&B upstairs. That's kind of an interesting idea, but it would require some serious remodeling. Could out-earn the professional offices that are up there now though. I assume it's a lowball offer; so we're just filing that idea away for now. Might come to that though.
black321

black321 Avatar

Location: An earth without maps
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 11:58am



 ScottFromWyoming wrote:




I have not tasted these but he's doing a yeast recipe donut which already sets it apart from the grocery store.

The bike shop was heading toward retirement already, and he preordered a smaller number of bikes during January... those are scheduled several months out. By March, the pandemic hit, so they said they'd be late getting orders shipped and allowed dealers to opt out or modify their pre-orders. Which he did. Then when he sold out immediately, they declined to sell him any more bikes unless he got a full container (many more bikes than he could possibly take in in one shipment) so he declined. Hindsight knows he could have had the best year in history, since there were no bikes available within 1000 miles of us this summer (Specialized brand, anyway). My son's bike was stolen in June (also a big spike in that activity) and we waited patiently for more to arrive but none ever did. By mid-summer it was clear that he was just going to spool it up. He was very busy repairing bikes that were last ridden during the Reagan years anyway, so new sales weren't critical.

In October, a bike that he'd special ordered in February arrived. He almost refused the shipment because the buyer had found something somewhere else, but decided to put it on the floor anyway. My wife happened to stop in to see if they had any tire pumps remaining since ours was shot, and happened to ask if any bikes came in. Well it just so happens...

After almost 50 years, and completely by random happenstance, the last bicycle sold by Larsen's Bicycles was to the grandson of the people who started the shop.
 
guess if it had to end, pretty cool way for the history of the bike shop to end.
suppose you also need to weigh retail leases are a buyers market in most towns...given all the failures. 


rgio

rgio Avatar

Location: West Jersey
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 10:36am



 ScottFromWyoming wrote:


 rgio wrote:


 ScottFromWyoming wrote:
My sister and I own the building that our parents bought and operated a bicycle shop out of for many years, and then the new owner of the bike shop just closed his doors in December. So now we're looking for tenants. Some folks recently moved here from Ohio and think our town needs a bakery. They've never run a business before; he's an avid home baker and she's worked in institutional kitchens (hospitals, schools) so anyway I spent the afternoon-to-midnight reviewing their business plan and making notes. It's partly "you need to get us this information before we'll rent to you/allow you begin remodeling" and partly "oh, honey, this is not realistic market research." 

I'd love for them to make a go of it, but I don't think I want anyone to be plastering "bankrupt" notices on the door in a year, either. And leave me to restore the building after it's been outfitted to have fryers and hoods in it. Oy. But I'm trying to nudge them into making good decisions without saying "you can't do that here."
 
My initial question....can they afford for it to fail?

If this is something "we always wanted to do" and they have the financial ability to get it off the ground, then get a deposit that will cover any repairs and move ahead.   If nobody else wants the space, NOT letting them take the risk could be expensive (for you).

If they need this to pay their bills, I'd be a lot more interested in the length of their runway and the quality of their products.  If I were them...I'd make you something to eat right now and drop it off...but that's me.

If they know what they're doing (ie food is good...), people will be looking for places to go very soon.  Good luck.
 

Absolutely, if this were some sort of wealthy person's retirement lark I wouldn't be losing any sleep. Just have the lawyer draw up a real good contract and sit back. But the success of the plan assumes the wife is going to put in 6 12 hour days and the dad 6 6 hour days in addition to his day job as a school bus driver. 

One part of their business plan includes a bulk foods store with pre-packaged "kits" of grains and ingredients for home bakers that he assembles himself. I conveyed to them that the potential for local/regional/national sales is limitless, and the risk is vastly less than a bakery. Couple that with cooking demonstrations and sales of specialty kitchen items, I think that's a lower-risk, higher margin business that they can train someone to operate in their absence and actually semi-retire from. Less waste and spoilage, less competition, less downside. We'll see what they think.
 
Youtube and the internet....lessons and sales for almost nothing.

Your comment made me think of this as proof anything (good) can take off on the internet.... Rancho Gordo

ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 10:16am



 rgio wrote:


 ScottFromWyoming wrote:
My sister and I own the building that our parents bought and operated a bicycle shop out of for many years, and then the new owner of the bike shop just closed his doors in December. So now we're looking for tenants. Some folks recently moved here from Ohio and think our town needs a bakery. They've never run a business before; he's an avid home baker and she's worked in institutional kitchens (hospitals, schools) so anyway I spent the afternoon-to-midnight reviewing their business plan and making notes. It's partly "you need to get us this information before we'll rent to you/allow you begin remodeling" and partly "oh, honey, this is not realistic market research." 

I'd love for them to make a go of it, but I don't think I want anyone to be plastering "bankrupt" notices on the door in a year, either. And leave me to restore the building after it's been outfitted to have fryers and hoods in it. Oy. But I'm trying to nudge them into making good decisions without saying "you can't do that here."
 
My initial question....can they afford for it to fail?

If this is something "we always wanted to do" and they have the financial ability to get it off the ground, then get a deposit that will cover any repairs and move ahead.   If nobody else wants the space, NOT letting them take the risk could be expensive (for you).

If they need this to pay their bills, I'd be a lot more interested in the length of their runway and the quality of their products.  If I were them...I'd make you something to eat right now and drop it off...but that's me.

If they know what they're doing (ie food is good...), people will be looking for places to go very soon.  Good luck.
 

Absolutely, if this were some sort of wealthy person's retirement lark I wouldn't be losing any sleep. Just have the lawyer draw up a real good contract and sit back. But the success of the plan assumes the wife is going to put in 6 12 hour days and the dad 6 6 hour days in addition to his day job as a school bus driver. 

One part of their business plan includes a bulk foods store with pre-packaged "kits" of grains and ingredients for home bakers that he assembles himself. I conveyed to them that the potential for local/regional/national sales is limitless, and the risk is vastly less than a bakery. Couple that with cooking demonstrations and sales of specialty kitchen items, I think that's a lower-risk, higher margin business that they can train someone to operate in their absence and actually semi-retire from. Less waste and spoilage, less competition, less downside. We'll see what they think.
westslope

westslope Avatar

Location: BC sage brush steppe


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 10:09am

Interesting situation Scott.  Sounds like you are on top of it.

The Pros and Cons of Lifestyle-driven business dreams.  Dreams is more accurate than 'plans' or 'strategies'.

Pros


Folks will work hard, earning possibly for many years, a rate of return that is well below 'market rates'.

Potential for new technology, better products, improved service, especially if the lifestylers come from 'away', and (heaven forbid) actually bring some solid skills with them.


Cons


Excess entry.   Everybody wants to live the 'dream'.    Mom and Pop style service outlets such as restaurants, cafes, bakeries, etc., are popular with recent immigrants.  The American border is an open sieve; Canada has the highest rates of net migration in the rich west and most are family reunification candidates, i.e., little or no economic criteria.

Limited knowledge of the local market based on naive assumptions such as "we are all the same".  

High rates of failure.

Lots of cheating in an attempt to make the 'dream' come true.

Dark Ages-style  righteous attitudes that can bite landlords and suppliers.  


If I were in your position, I would want to see a detailed pandemic-management plan.   I would also be concerned with physical health as bakery shifts can start as early a 1:00 AM. 

I know; I worked in a bakery in early 1983 when BC was experiencing 12% unemployment.  I did not mind the work even if I drove into work after finishing my typing course up the valley at 10 PM.  The abusive behaviour was a little much.  I still feel sorry for the poor young Brit ex-pat women working the cash.

Good luck!  

ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 10:08am



 black321 wrote:


 ScottFromWyoming wrote:


 haresfur wrote:


 ScottFromWyoming wrote:
My sister and I own the building that our parents bought and operated a bicycle shop out of for many years, and then the new owner of the bike shop just closed his doors in December. So now we're looking for tenants. Some folks recently moved here from Ohio and think our town needs a bakery. They've never run a business before; he's an avid home baker and she's worked in institutional kitchens (hospitals, schools) so anyway I spent the afternoon-to-midnight reviewing their business plan and making notes. It's partly "you need to get us this information before we'll rent to you/allow you begin remodeling" and partly "oh, honey, this is not realistic market research." 

I'd love for them to make a go of it, but I don't think I want anyone to be plastering "bankrupt" notices on the door in a year, either. And leave me to restore the building after it's been outfitted to have fryers and hoods in it. Oy. But I'm trying to nudge them into making good decisions without saying "you can't do that here."
 
Sounds like a bit of a risk, but good quality baked goods seem to be popular now. The question is whether they can make them commercially (think consistency) and whether people in the town are willing to pay for quality. A bakery/cafe just opened here and sells croissants for something like $12. Seems really steep to me but they are busy. How much of the equipment will go to you if they fail? 

 

We'd put it in the contract that they can/must take most of it. There would be some exhaust fans installed in an exterior wall; those would have to stay. One part of their business plan is really intriguing to me and wouldn't expose them or us to so much risk, but they want to take on baking. The business plan doesn't state what they think their costs will be or what they think the prices will be, but they do hope to "start" with an average 100 customers at an average of $10 each. I want to rent the place, I want a good bakery in town, I want them to succeed. I just don't think this is gonna fly and I don't want to be the landlord that was the problem... "we could have made it but the rents were so high..." etc.
 


Did you taste?
Retail is all about the quality....how you position above the mass/online competitor.
If it tastes no better than a safeway donut, why bother?

Surprised the bike shop closed...bike sales have been through the roof during the pandemic.

 

I have not tasted these but he's doing a yeast recipe donut which already sets it apart from the grocery store.

The bike shop was heading toward retirement already, and he preordered a smaller number of bikes during January... those are scheduled several months out. By March, the pandemic hit, so they said they'd be late getting orders shipped and allowed dealers to opt out or modify their pre-orders. Which he did. Then when he sold out immediately, they declined to sell him any more bikes unless he got a full container (many more bikes than he could possibly take in in one shipment) so he declined. Hindsight knows he could have had the best year in history, since there were no bikes available within 1000 miles of us this summer (Specialized brand, anyway). My son's bike was stolen in June (also a big spike in that activity) and we waited patiently for more to arrive but none ever did. By mid-summer it was clear that he was just going to spool it up. He was very busy repairing bikes that were last ridden during the Reagan years anyway, so new sales weren't critical.

In October, a bike that he'd special ordered in February arrived. He almost refused the shipment because the buyer had found something somewhere else, but decided to put it on the floor anyway. My wife happened to stop in to see if they had any tire pumps remaining since ours was shot, and happened to ask if any bikes came in. Well it just so happens...

After almost 50 years, and completely by random happenstance, the last bicycle sold by Larsen's Bicycles was to the grandson of the people who started the shop.
rgio

rgio Avatar

Location: West Jersey
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 9:32am



 ScottFromWyoming wrote:
My sister and I own the building that our parents bought and operated a bicycle shop out of for many years, and then the new owner of the bike shop just closed his doors in December. So now we're looking for tenants. Some folks recently moved here from Ohio and think our town needs a bakery. They've never run a business before; he's an avid home baker and she's worked in institutional kitchens (hospitals, schools) so anyway I spent the afternoon-to-midnight reviewing their business plan and making notes. It's partly "you need to get us this information before we'll rent to you/allow you begin remodeling" and partly "oh, honey, this is not realistic market research." 

I'd love for them to make a go of it, but I don't think I want anyone to be plastering "bankrupt" notices on the door in a year, either. And leave me to restore the building after it's been outfitted to have fryers and hoods in it. Oy. But I'm trying to nudge them into making good decisions without saying "you can't do that here."
 
My initial question....can they afford for it to fail?

If this is something "we always wanted to do" and they have the financial ability to get it off the ground, then get a deposit that will cover any repairs and move ahead.   If nobody else wants the space, NOT letting them take the risk could be expensive (for you).

If they need this to pay their bills, I'd be a lot more interested in the length of their runway and the quality of their products.  If I were them...I'd make you something to eat right now and drop it off...but that's me.

If they know what they're doing (ie food is good...), people will be looking for places to go very soon.  Good luck.
black321

black321 Avatar

Location: An earth without maps
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 9:15am



 ScottFromWyoming wrote:


 haresfur wrote:


 ScottFromWyoming wrote:
My sister and I own the building that our parents bought and operated a bicycle shop out of for many years, and then the new owner of the bike shop just closed his doors in December. So now we're looking for tenants. Some folks recently moved here from Ohio and think our town needs a bakery. They've never run a business before; he's an avid home baker and she's worked in institutional kitchens (hospitals, schools) so anyway I spent the afternoon-to-midnight reviewing their business plan and making notes. It's partly "you need to get us this information before we'll rent to you/allow you begin remodeling" and partly "oh, honey, this is not realistic market research." 

I'd love for them to make a go of it, but I don't think I want anyone to be plastering "bankrupt" notices on the door in a year, either. And leave me to restore the building after it's been outfitted to have fryers and hoods in it. Oy. But I'm trying to nudge them into making good decisions without saying "you can't do that here."
 
Sounds like a bit of a risk, but good quality baked goods seem to be popular now. The question is whether they can make them commercially (think consistency) and whether people in the town are willing to pay for quality. A bakery/cafe just opened here and sells croissants for something like $12. Seems really steep to me but they are busy. How much of the equipment will go to you if they fail? 

 

We'd put it in the contract that they can/must take most of it. There would be some exhaust fans installed in an exterior wall; those would have to stay. One part of their business plan is really intriguing to me and wouldn't expose them or us to so much risk, but they want to take on baking. The business plan doesn't state what they think their costs will be or what they think the prices will be, but they do hope to "start" with an average 100 customers at an average of $10 each. I want to rent the place, I want a good bakery in town, I want them to succeed. I just don't think this is gonna fly and I don't want to be the landlord that was the problem... "we could have made it but the rents were so high..." etc.
 


Did you taste?
Retail is all about the quality....how you position above the mass/online competitor.
If it tastes no better than a safeway donut, why bother?

Surprised the bike shop closed...bike sales have been through the roof during the pandemic.

ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 8:35am



 haresfur wrote:


 ScottFromWyoming wrote:
My sister and I own the building that our parents bought and operated a bicycle shop out of for many years, and then the new owner of the bike shop just closed his doors in December. So now we're looking for tenants. Some folks recently moved here from Ohio and think our town needs a bakery. They've never run a business before; he's an avid home baker and she's worked in institutional kitchens (hospitals, schools) so anyway I spent the afternoon-to-midnight reviewing their business plan and making notes. It's partly "you need to get us this information before we'll rent to you/allow you begin remodeling" and partly "oh, honey, this is not realistic market research." 

I'd love for them to make a go of it, but I don't think I want anyone to be plastering "bankrupt" notices on the door in a year, either. And leave me to restore the building after it's been outfitted to have fryers and hoods in it. Oy. But I'm trying to nudge them into making good decisions without saying "you can't do that here."
 
Sounds like a bit of a risk, but good quality baked goods seem to be popular now. The question is whether they can make them commercially (think consistency) and whether people in the town are willing to pay for quality. A bakery/cafe just opened here and sells croissants for something like $12. Seems really steep to me but they are busy. How much of the equipment will go to you if they fail? 

 

We'd put it in the contract that they can/must take most of it. There would be some exhaust fans installed in an exterior wall; those would have to stay. One part of their business plan is really intriguing to me and wouldn't expose them or us to so much risk, but they want to take on baking. The business plan doesn't state what they think their costs will be or what they think the prices will be, but they do hope to "start" with an average 100 customers at an average of $10 each. I want to rent the place, I want a good bakery in town, I want them to succeed. I just don't think this is gonna fly and I don't want to be the landlord that was the problem... "we could have made it but the rents were so high..." etc.
NoEnzLefttoSplit

NoEnzLefttoSplit Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 12:05am

 haresfur wrote:


 ScottFromWyoming wrote:
My sister and I own the building that our parents bought and operated a bicycle shop out of for many years, and then the new owner of the bike shop just closed his doors in December. So now we're looking for tenants. Some folks recently moved here from Ohio and think our town needs a bakery. They've never run a business before; he's an avid home baker and she's worked in institutional kitchens (hospitals, schools) so anyway I spent the afternoon-to-midnight reviewing their business plan and making notes. It's partly "you need to get us this information before we'll rent to you/allow you begin remodeling" and partly "oh, honey, this is not realistic market research." 

I'd love for them to make a go of it, but I don't think I want anyone to be plastering "bankrupt" notices on the door in a year, either. And leave me to restore the building after it's been outfitted to have fryers and hoods in it. Oy. But I'm trying to nudge them into making good decisions without saying "you can't do that here."
 
Sounds like a bit of a risk, but good quality baked goods seem to be popular now. The question is whether they can make them commercially (think consistency) and whether people in the town are willing to pay for quality. A bakery/cafe just opened here and sells croissants for something like $12. Seems really steep to me but they are busy. How much of the equipment will go to you if they fail? 

 
{#Eek}  might be cheaper to fly to New Caledonia
haresfur

haresfur Avatar

Location: The Golden Triangle
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 1, 2021 - 12:00am



 ScottFromWyoming wrote:
My sister and I own the building that our parents bought and operated a bicycle shop out of for many years, and then the new owner of the bike shop just closed his doors in December. So now we're looking for tenants. Some folks recently moved here from Ohio and think our town needs a bakery. They've never run a business before; he's an avid home baker and she's worked in institutional kitchens (hospitals, schools) so anyway I spent the afternoon-to-midnight reviewing their business plan and making notes. It's partly "you need to get us this information before we'll rent to you/allow you begin remodeling" and partly "oh, honey, this is not realistic market research." 

I'd love for them to make a go of it, but I don't think I want anyone to be plastering "bankrupt" notices on the door in a year, either. And leave me to restore the building after it's been outfitted to have fryers and hoods in it. Oy. But I'm trying to nudge them into making good decisions without saying "you can't do that here."
 
Sounds like a bit of a risk, but good quality baked goods seem to be popular now. The question is whether they can make them commercially (think consistency) and whether people in the town are willing to pay for quality. A bakery/cafe just opened here and sells croissants for something like $12. Seems really steep to me but they are busy. How much of the equipment will go to you if they fail? 

ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 28, 2021 - 10:08pm

My sister and I own the building that our parents bought and operated a bicycle shop out of for many years, and then the new owner of the bike shop just closed his doors in December. So now we're looking for tenants. Some folks recently moved here from Ohio and think our town needs a bakery. They've never run a business before; he's an avid home baker and she's worked in institutional kitchens (hospitals, schools) so anyway I spent the afternoon-to-midnight reviewing their business plan and making notes. It's partly "you need to get us this information before we'll rent to you/allow you begin remodeling" and partly "oh, honey, this is not realistic market research." 

I'd love for them to make a go of it, but I don't think I want anyone to be plastering "bankrupt" notices on the door in a year, either. And leave me to restore the building after it's been outfitted to have fryers and hoods in it. Oy. But I'm trying to nudge them into making good decisions without saying "you can't do that here."
Antigone

Antigone Avatar

Location: A house, in a Virginian Valley
Gender: Female


Posted: Feb 12, 2021 - 12:34pm



 oldviolin wrote:


 Antigone wrote:
Crawled into, and out of, my crawl space and installed a pipe heater.


Oh, and after a friend lent me some electrical tape (for this project), I found Daddy's! Not sure it's viable, but it was here all along. 

 
An old roll of tape never dies. It just sticks to itself...


 

It's in a nifty case that has a cutter on the outside. But, yes, I think it's fused.
oldviolin

oldviolin Avatar

Location: esse quam videri
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 12, 2021 - 10:47am



 Antigone wrote:
Crawled into, and out of, my crawl space and installed a pipe heater.


Oh, and after a friend lent me some electrical tape (for this project), I found Daddy's! Not sure it's viable, but it was here all along. 

 
An old roll of tape never dies. It just sticks to itself...

Antigone

Antigone Avatar

Location: A house, in a Virginian Valley
Gender: Female


Posted: Feb 12, 2021 - 10:24am

Crawled into, and out of, my crawl space and installed a pipe heater.

Oh, and after a friend lent me some electrical tape (for this project), I found Daddy's! Not sure it's viable, but it was here all along. 
NoEnzLefttoSplit

NoEnzLefttoSplit Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 10, 2021 - 1:23pm



 islander wrote:


 ScottFromWyoming wrote:


 Coaxial wrote:
Saw my dermatologist...He did a little freezing and a little cutting...Yee haw!
 

That freezing business just feels like someone stubbed out a cigar on your face. 
 

I've had them do a couple on my noggin. When you see your reflection in the window you can see the steam rising from the spot. Now I'll just think of it as smoke from the stogie. 

   
why pay a doctor's bill?


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