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The Beatles — While My Guitar Gently Weeps
Album: White Album
Avg rating:
9

Your rating:
Total ratings: 3492









Released: 1968
Length: 4:33
Plays (last 30 days): 1
I look at you all
See the love there that's sleeping
While my guitar gently weeps
I look at the floor
And I see it needs sweeping
Still my guitar gently weeps

I don't know why nobody told you
How to unfold your love
I don't know how someone controlled you
They bought and so-old you

I look at the world
And I notice it's turning
While my guitar gently weeps
(With) every mistake
We must surely be learning
Still my guitar gently weeps
Yeah

I don't know how you were diverted
You were perverted too
I don't know how you were inverted
No-one alerted you

I look at you all
See the love there that's sleeping
While my guitar gently weeps
Look at you all
Still my guitar gently wee-ee-eeps

Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh
Oh

Oh, oh, oh, oh (eee...)
Oh, oh, oh (... eee)

Oh, oh (eee...)
Oh, oh (... eee...)
Oh, oh (... eee)

Yeah, yeah, yeah (eee...)
Yeah, yeah, yeah (... eee...)
Yeah, yeah, yeah (... eee...)
Go! (... eee)

Oh (eee)
Comments (599)add comment
 Rtschnell wrote:
Regarding the Prince solo at the end of "While My Guitar..." at the posthumous induction of George Harrison at the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame, in a New York Times article from April 28, 2016, Craig Inciardi (Curator at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Museum) says "I’ve seen every induction performance from ’92 to the present, so that’s like 24 shows. On a purely musical level, a technical level as far as musicianship, that performance seems like the most impressive one."

During the rehearsals the night before, Jeff Lynne's guitar player, who was also playing the song, essentially takes the lead ahead of Prince at every opportunity, but places it straight, note for note, as George had done it.  Prince says nothing and just plays rhythm, so no one really gets to hear what's he's going to do.  He later comments to the producer not to worry, during the actual performance, he just says nonchalantly, I'll step in at the end.  So basically no rehearsal.

Tom Ferrone, drummer for Tom Petty, says just before the actual performance: "Tom sort of went over to him (Prince) and said, “Just cut loose and don’t feel sort of inhibited to copy anything that we have, just play your thing, just have a good time.” It was a hell of a guitar solo, and a hell of a show he actually put on for the band. When he fell back into the audience, everybody in the band freaked out, like, “Oh my God, he’s falling off the stage!” And then that whole thing with the guitar going up in the air. I didn’t even see who caught it. I just saw it go up, and I was astonished that it didn’t come back down again. Everybody wonders where that guitar went, and I gotta tell you, I was on the stage, and I wonder where it went, too."
 

I have mixed feelings about this performance.
Yes, Prince plays a fantastic solo, but I feel that Lynne and Petty are paying respect, leaving room for his purpleness to be just showing off, when it may not be appropriate.
Also, Prince is a truly great artist, but I still think Jimi Hendrix would have whooped his little arse here.
 On_The_Beach wrote:
Bumping the link below.
Prince comes in at 3:27 (through the end).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SFNW5F8K9Y
 
WOW....and even before Prince starts playing, Tom and Jeff were sounding great....then Prince with one of the best damn performances I've seen.  RIP George, Tom, and Prince!!
 Vref+10 wrote:
Great song!! Give the Jeff Healey version if you get a chance.
 
+1 - definately
This might be the only song of the fab 4 that I have rated a 10.  Might be the Clapton/Harrison combo, might be the 'sign of the end of the band coming' too.  Long Live RP!!  RIP George (and John)
Great song!! Give the Jeff Healey version if you get a chance.
Stay hard George! Beautiful
 downbylaw wrote:
probably my favorite beatles song. maybe their best song, period.
 
Period.
the secondslong piano intro alone is worth the whole brilliant song....
Waaaaayyy back in 1969 our Catholic grade school hired a renegade for an eighth grade teacher - Ed M.- and he would use this album to teach us poetry lyrics. Especially this song.  The other teachers hated him. We kids - we thought he walked on water. Especially when he brought in a motorcycle engine to teach us combustion in science.

He went on to a career in the National Park Service and is now retire. Thank you Mr. Ed.
I don't know why... there is no 11, or 12, or 20 for something like this...
 markybx wrote:

I often wonder the same Dave, but as an engineer I can explain it in terms of signal and noise. The peak, in this case around 10, is the signal. You may notice that even the greatest songs get around 1% 1s, 2s and 3s, this is the noise, i.e. random effects like static, cosmic background radiation, people being born with a genetic mutation that causes them to hate great music, etc. It's only possible to add votes, not take them away, so the noise is always additive, hence it creates a baseline just above zero.

The message here is, "don't worry about it" you can just ignore it.
Hope that helps {#Cheesygrin}
 

This comment is FANTASTIC! I had just bumped up one, now I think I'll go two!
 DeemerDave wrote:
How is it that 124 people rated this priceless gem below a 7, and 33 people rated it a 1? Why are those people even listening to RP?{#Stupid}

 
I often wonder the same Dave, but as an engineer I can explain it in terms of signal and noise. The peak, in this case around 10, is the signal. You may notice that even the greatest songs get around 1% 1s, 2s and 3s, this is the noise, i.e. random effects like static, cosmic background radiation, people being born with a genetic mutation that causes them to hate great music, etc. It's only possible to add votes, not take them away, so the noise is always additive, hence it creates a baseline just above zero.

The message here is, "don't worry about it" you can just ignore it.
Hope that helps {#Cheesygrin}
 DeemerDave wrote:
How is it that 124 people rated this priceless gem below a 7, and 33 people rated it a 1? Why are those people even listening to RP?{#Stupid}
 
Everybody in my hotel room agrees with you, DeemerDave...  hope you are having a blast this nude year...  this song is soooo good for the ears... everybody in my hotel room loves this song...  we be dancing like happy hippies...  love Radio Paradise...
Never have been a fan of the Beatles per se but love some of their music.  This one especially.  Thanks RP - brightened my day!
Makes me chuckle to see that there are actually 43 people who desire to play the contrarian enough to rate this song a '1'. You don't have to 'love the Beatles' but come on, a 1? What kind of a foul mood do you have to be in to rate this song a 1? :-)
Great song! Love Todd Rundgren's cover: https://youtu.be/935UEiqO95A
Still beautiful!
Perfect song
 On_The_Beach wrote:
Bumping the link below.
Prince comes in at 3:27 (through the end).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SFNW5F8K9Y

 
WOW! Spine tingling solo. {#Notworthy} RIP man.
Regarding the Prince solo at the end of "While My Guitar..." at the posthumous induction of George Harrison at the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame, in a New York Times article from April 28, 2016, Craig Inciardi (Curator at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Museum) says "I’ve seen every induction performance from ’92 to the present, so that’s like 24 shows. On a purely musical level, a technical level as far as musicianship, that performance seems like the most impressive one."

During the rehearsals the night before, Jeff Lynne's guitar player, who was also playing the song, essentially takes the lead ahead of Prince at every opportunity, but places it straight, note for note, as George had done it.  Prince says nothing and just plays rhythm, so no one really gets to hear what's he's going to do.  He later comments to the producer not to worry, during the actual performance, he just says nonchalantly, I'll step in at the end.  So basically no rehearsal.

Tom Ferrone, drummer for Tom Petty, says just before the actual performance: "Tom sort of went over to him (Prince) and said, “Just cut loose and don’t feel sort of inhibited to copy anything that we have, just play your thing, just have a good time.” It was a hell of a guitar solo, and a hell of a show he actually put on for the band. When he fell back into the audience, everybody in the band freaked out, like, “Oh my God, he’s falling off the stage!” And then that whole thing with the guitar going up in the air. I didn’t even see who caught it. I just saw it go up, and I was astonished that it didn’t come back down again. Everybody wonders where that guitar went, and I gotta tell you, I was on the stage, and I wonder where it went, too."
 On_The_Beach wrote:
Bumping the link below.
Prince comes in at 3:27 (through the end).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SFNW5F8K9Y

 
And is fully on!  Just the theatrics that go with it,  Backwards off stage in the middle of it all!
Bumping the link below.
Prince comes in at 3:27 (through the end).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SFNW5F8K9Y
 TianGongZhong wrote:

Is this a question or a statement ?
In case of  question; why don´t you google the playlist of the album ?
In case of a statement, what do you want to tell us ?

 

 

 

 

Lighten up Francis 


 Skydog wrote:
this song preceded "Happiness Is A Warm Gun" on this album, right?

 
Is this a question or a statement ?
In case of  question; why don´t you google the playlist of the album ?
In case of a statement, what do you want to tell us ?

 
Pffffffffffff to long this song {#Drunk}
this song preceded "Happiness Is A Warm Gun" on this album, right?
 SquiddlyDiddly wrote:

Deserves a bump because the Purple One HAS TO BE WATCHED on this video with what is (in my book) one of the best solos ever played.

 
No shit!
 Proclivities wrote:
 skooba wrote:
80% of all people know that. 

 
islander wrote:
90% of song ratings are crap.
 
65% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

 
If you counted three quarters of the population of the United States there would be about 25% who were not counted.
 
5/3 of people are bad at fractions.
 Jannne wrote:

               80% of communication is body language so I don't know what you're all  talking about

 
It's time for Wynona's Big Brown Beaver
 gjr wrote:
i miss beatle george

 
My favorite song by my favorite Beatle...
 Poacher wrote:

Deserves a bump because the Purple One HAS TO BE WATCHED on this video with what is (in my book) one of the best solos ever played.

 
Wow!!
 zepher wrote:
Beatles Best - Thanks George!  Here's an amazing tribute ——>



 
Deserves a bump because the Purple One HAS TO BE WATCHED on this video with what is (in my book) one of the best solos ever played.
 oldsaxon wrote:

The owls are not what they seem.

 
               80% of communication is body language so I don't know what you're all  talking about
 rharvey658 wrote:

skooba wrote:
80% of all people know that. 

 
islander wrote:
90% of song ratings are crap.
 
65% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

 
Yes, but did you know that some owls aren't that smart?

 
The owls are not what they seem.
 gjr wrote:
i miss beatle george

 
I opened the comments section just to add the very same comment. George Harrison is sorely missed.

And this is is one of the few truly good Beatles songs. John Lennon and George Harrison was easily the two best song writers in the group, in my humble opinion. Mind you, I see Beatles as being overrated in general... But not George Harrison. He's often underrated. But a great musician!
 Padutarb wrote:
A stunning example of the Beatles and special guest playing at their best.
 
I had no idea!  Thanks for posting...
 skooba wrote:
80% of all people know that. 

 
islander wrote:
90% of song ratings are crap.
 
65% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

 
If you counted three quarters of the population of the United States there would still be about 25% who were not counted.
i miss beatle george
A stunning example of the Beatles and special guest playing at their best.
 treatment_bound wrote:
I thought I'd post this on a song which gets played a lot, and this one seems to fit the bill—
Does anybody know what were the very first songs played here at RP?  I'd love to go back and read some embryonic comments of 13+ years ago.  I only found this station after reading this TIME magazine article from April 2004:
 
>>Bill and Rebecca Goldsmith are making a living from an idea that would probably get you laughed out of business school: running an Internet radio station commercial free. From their home in Paradise, Calif., in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, they operate Radioparadise.coma format-busting station that spins a tasteful mix of music ranging from the Beatles to Norah Jones to the Strokes. Fewer than 5,000 listeners tune in during peak times, but fans like it so much, they sent the couple $120,000 in contributions last year, covering the cost of bandwidth, song royalties and other expenses and leaving enough to support a "comfortable lifestyle," says Bill Goldsmith, who quit a 30-year career in FM radio to run and DJ his homegrown version.

If you can't bear another spin of Britney Spears, you're one of the reasons that stations like Radioparadise are beginning to prosper and investors are again flocking to another alternative to the AM/FM dial: satellite radio. After years of unmet promise, online stations, along with satellite offerings like Sirius and XM Satellite Radio, are building audiences even as regular radio struggles through a decade-long slump (time spent listening is down 14% since 1994, according to the ratings firm Arbitron). Critics say industry consolidation has turned AM/FM stations into McRadio: nationally uniform, repetitive and clogged more than ever with ads and promos. But scores of high-quality alternatives are now competing for your ears (and dollars).

Just a few years ago, online radio heads were mainly tech geeks willing to put up with patchy, low-quality sound. These days about 19 million people listen to online radio at least once a week, up from 7 million in 2000, according to Arbitron. Online listenership is growing at an average 43% a year as more people get broadband connections at home and tune in for content that's unavailable or in short supply on commercial stations, from blues to folk to Al Franken's new liberal Air America network, which is broadcast in just a few markets on the AM/FM dial but was streamed 2 million times in its first week, according to its exclusive webcaster, RealNetworks. "People are fed up with terrestrial radio," says Dave Goldberg, who oversees Yahoo's music site and radio network, Launchcast, which draws 1 million listeners a week.

For now, it's the satellite guys, together claiming around 2 million subscribers, who are drawing Wall Street's attention. Though their stock prices had plummeted over concerns that they might run out of cash, their shares have soared in the past year. XM is up 379%; Sirius, 491%. Analyst April Horace of Janco Partners in Denver predicts that within five years 16 million Americans will be listening to satellite radio. She says the market would explode if a popular shock jock like Howard Stern were to defect with his 15 million listeners, a prospect that looked more likely last week after six traditional stations dropped his show following an FCC proposal to fine their corporate parent, Clear Channel Communications, $495,000 for airing his "indecent" content.

Satellite broadcasters use a pay-radio model, beaming dozens of channels coast to coast commercial free, with original programming such as comedy and kids' shows. Financially backed in part by automakers, the satellite firms charge between $10 and $13 a month, mainly targeting car-radio users. Increasingly, though, listeners are buying portable tuners for their homes. To neutralize a key AM/FM advantage, both satellite broadcasters have started to provide traffic and weather updates in select markets.

So far, digital radio's growth isn't hurting big radio empires such as Clear Channel. With 1,213 stations and roughly a 30% ratings share in markets such as Phoenix, Ariz., and Milwaukee, Wis., Clear Channel had a record 2003: revenues of $8.9 billion and a net income of $1.1 billion. But listeners are clearly spending less time with terrestrial radio. One cause may simply be more media competition, from DVDs to video games to an expanding universe of digital TV. But critics of the radio industry say consolidation is partly to blame too. They claim Clear Channel and other big groups have ruined the airwaves by homogenizing song lists, politicizing the dial with conservative talk and sucking out local flavor with voice-tracking technology, which enables DJs to sound like local talent even if they're a thousand miles away. Clear Channel contends that its cost-cutting measures have saved hundreds of stations from bankruptcy and that it's the programming's popularity, reflected in ratings, that ultimately drives the business.

Nonetheless, teenagers and young adults are increasingly going online to find new music (not just file-sharing networks), particularly alternative content that rarely gets airplay on the commercial FM dial. About 13% of Americans ages 12 to 24 now listen to online radio on a weekly basis, up from 6% of that age group in 2001, according to Edison Media Research/Arbitron. With 185 stations, AOL's radio network, which, like TIME, is part of Time Warner, draws a weekly listenership of 1.5 million (by that measure, Arbitron notes, it's the nation's largest online network). Advertising remains tiny, but that may change. Ronning Lipset, an upstart Internet-radio ad firm in New York City, recently started packaging AOL, Live365.com MSN and Yahoo into a kind of national network, which has a combined audience of at least 250,000 listeners in a quarter hour, the minimum needed to appeal to national-media planners. The firm says the networks will start running audio spots from national advertisers in May.

For now the AM/FM industry doesn't seem too concerned. Arbitron estimates that 228 million Americans ages 12 and up still listen to broadcast radio weekly, and radio remains the top broadcast medium after TV for advertisers who want to reach a mass market. Radio ad sales in Arbitron markets are forecast to rise 5.5% this year, to $14 billion, according to BIA Financial Network, a media consultancy in Chantilly, Va. Yet as more consumers tune to stations like Radioparadise, those numbers could slip. Goldsmith's thoughtful playlists are organized by musical theme, moving from, say, a bluesy Tracy Chapman tune to a Latin-blues Carlos Santana track to a rock-blues number by the Hellecasters. He heeds listener feedback and says the only thing he really cares about is "playing good music," regardless of whether it's a hot single being pitched by a promoter or a classic. That's why his fans are pulling out their wallets to support him.



 

Posted: Mar 08, 2002 - 12:17

 

An interesting worldbeat track. The AMG Artist Info link is kinda funny, though. For Similar/Related albums they list Dave Brubeck, Jackson Browne, Bananarama, and Perry Como, among others. (Maybe they just use a random album generator if they're not sure?) :p

Earlier than Pangea — Kiranga Beat, anyway.



skooba wrote:
80% of all people know that. 

 
islander wrote:
90% of song ratings are crap.
 
65% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

 
Yes, but did you know that some owls aren't that smart?
80% of all people know that. 

 
islander wrote:
90% of song ratings are crap.
 
65% of all statistics are made up on the spot.
Thanks for this one this morning👍🎶😁
Never before have I seen a linkage between New Years' Day by U2 and this song. It is a real skill to be able to see the relationships among pieces from different eras and to blend them so effectively. A toast to the proprietor!
 DaidyBoy wrote:
The problem for me is that, although I think it is vain in the extreme to even attempt to make a meaningful comment about this song, I struggle with it a bit.  I love George's music and that is why I feel guilty even saying this, but this song always sounds "awkward" to my ears, if that makes sense.  The drumming sounds tired, like maybe he was feeling a bit bored that day.  Perhaps they were all a little the worse for wear, but I have a job getting over its plodding feel.  Over to you.

 
George even said it himself about this song, that when he first presented it to the band, that they weren't into it.  So he brought in Eric Clapton (which was unheard of back in the day) to spruce it up a bit.
Instant PSD for me :P
 DaidyBoy wrote:
The problem for me is that, although I think it is vain in the extreme to even attempt to make a meaningful comment about this song, I struggle with it a bit.  I love George's music and that is why I feel guilty even saying this, but this song always sounds "awkward" to my ears, if that makes sense.  The drumming sounds tired, like maybe he was feeling a bit bored that day.  Perhaps they were all a little the worse for wear, but I have a job getting over its plodding feel.  Over to you.
 
I think I know what you mean. I always assumed it was something to do with the engineering/production. Like maybe the tape speed was just slightly off, or fluctuating, resulting in that "not quite right" sound. If there are any recording engineers in the audience I'd be interested to hear their opinion. No denying it's a classic song, of course.
 DaidyBoy wrote:
... this song always sounds "awkward" to my ears, if that makes sense.  The drumming sounds tired, like maybe he was feeling a bit bored that day.  Perhaps they were all a little the worse for wear, but I have a job getting over its plodding feel.
 
This piece does "plod," and that's a result of the slowed-down tempo. I have to believe the tempo is 100% purposeful. It's slower than your heart rate with a timing that makes it feel a bit off balance. This tempo gives the whole number a certain lamenting effect. Another reason why I find the tune so amazing.
The problem for me is that, although I think it is vain in the extreme to even attempt to make a meaningful comment about this song, I struggle with it a bit.  I love George's music and that is why I feel guilty even saying this, but this song always sounds "awkward" to my ears, if that makes sense.  The drumming sounds tired, like maybe he was feeling a bit bored that day.  Perhaps they were all a little the worse for wear, but I have a job getting over its plodding feel.  Over to you.
 islander wrote:
90% of song ratings are crap.
 
65% of all statistics are made up on the spot. 
 islander wrote:

90% of song ratings are crap.

 

True, but only 10% of the time.
Just another phenomenal Beatles track.
{#Heartkiss} GODLIKE + + +
Bliss
 spiggy wrote:
Because we are not all robots or same tastes or age :)

 
personally it's a 9 :) Just be happy it averages North of 9, indicating the vast majority rate highly. 
DeemerDave wrote:
How is it that 124 people rated this priceless gem below a 7, and 33 people rated it a 1? Why are those people even listening to RP?{#Stupid}

 


 
90% of song ratings are crap.
Certain long stretches of this song -- or at least this recording of this song -- feature a high-pitched quavering beeping in the background, unpleasantly, which I've never noticed before.  Like a cell phone going off in the other room.  But I've turned everything else off, and this is the source.  Weird.
Beatles Best - Thanks George!  Here's an amazing tribute ---->


Because we are not all robots or same tastes or age :)

 
personally it's a 9 :) Just be happy it averages North of 9, indicating the vast majority rate highly. 
DeemerDave wrote:
How is it that 124 people rated this priceless gem below a 7, and 33 people rated it a 1? Why are those people even listening to RP?{#Stupid}

 

 gjr wrote:



haters gonna hate

 
Good question, Its a perfect 10 for me.
 DeemerDave wrote:
How is it that 124 people rated this priceless gem below a 7, and 33 people rated it a 1? Why are those people even listening to RP?{#Stupid}

 


haters gonna hate
 Poacher wrote:

Just message Bill. . . I am sure he will remember the first songs he played. A clue will be the first songs he loaded onto the system, which can be found by changing the end number in the address bar on your browser

I found this station very soon after it appeared in 2010 because it was one of the first songs listed on the first iTunes radio listings and I was listening before there were such things as logins or members. . . it was just streaming music that Bill put out to start the whole thing. At that time there were no comments section on each track but early on there was a comments forum that is now in the main community forum on RP. This only goes back to 2004 but I bet Bill has copies of all the comments before that somewhere. 

Hope this helps. 




 
"appeared in 2010"—you must have typed that in wrong. It was 2001. I remember vividly that's when I found it.
How is it that 124 people rated this priceless gem below a 7, and 33 people rated it a 1? Why are those people even listening to RP?{#Stupid}
here's a song i never gave much thought when i was much, much younger but now i love it.  it has grown on me so much in recent years even more so after george died i think.

it's weird and wonderful to mark your life by how things that haven't changed (beatles songs, for instance) have changed in perspective in one's own life..... 

just sayin'


love these guys more and more the older i get 
big stud Romeo Tuma wrote:

George Harrison Documentary Will Premiere on HBO


A new documentary about the life of George Harrison featuring home movies, interviews and unseen footage of the late Beatle will premiere on HBO in October. George Harrison: Living in the Material World, a film produced by Martin Scorcese along with Harrison's widow Olivia, is set to air in two parts on October 5th and 6th.

 

This seems like a few months ago...  time flies when we're having fun...  love this song...
 
Radio Paradise is the best!
 treatment_bound wrote:
I thought I'd post this on a song which gets played a lot, and this one seems to fit the bill--


Does anybody know what were the very first songs played here at RP?  I'd love to go back and read some embryonic comments of 13+ years ago.  I only found this station after reading this TIME magazine article from April 2004:
 
Just message Bill. . . I am sure he will remember the first songs he played. A clue will be the first songs he loaded onto the system, which can be found by changing the end number in the address bar on your browser

I found this station very soon after it appeared in 2010 because it was one of the first songs listed on the first iTunes radio listings and I was listening before there were such things as logins or members. . . it was just streaming music that Bill put out to start the whole thing. At that time there were no comments section on each track but early on there was a comments forum that is now in the main community forum on RP. This only goes back to 2004 but I bet Bill has copies of all the comments before that somewhere. 

Hope this helps. 



Great classic song

a magnificent song from a truly great album...  love it...
 
this is the current list 
Air — Talisman
Younger Brother — Train
Pink Floyd — Time
Beethoven — Symphony No.5
While my guitar gently weeps

this is why I listen to RP
Great point- is it possible to post old playlists through time. High historical interest and a great source of musical inspiration... B&R recommendations would probably result in a lot of music purchases online...
I thought I'd post this on a song which gets played a lot, and this one seems to fit the bill--


Does anybody know what were the very first songs played here at RP?  I'd love to go back and read some embryonic comments of 13+ years ago.  I only found this station after reading this TIME magazine article from April 2004:
 
>>Bill and Rebecca Goldsmith are making a living from an idea that would probably get you laughed out of business school: running an Internet radio station commercial free. From their home in Paradise, Calif., in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, they operate Radioparadise.coma format-busting station that spins a tasteful mix of music ranging from the Beatles to Norah Jones to the Strokes. Fewer than 5,000 listeners tune in during peak times, but fans like it so much, they sent the couple $120,000 in contributions last year, covering the cost of bandwidth, song royalties and other expenses and leaving enough to support a "comfortable lifestyle," says Bill Goldsmith, who quit a 30-year career in FM radio to run and DJ his homegrown version.

If you can't bear another spin of Britney Spears, you're one of the reasons that stations like Radioparadise are beginning to prosper and investors are again flocking to another alternative to the AM/FM dial: satellite radio. After years of unmet promise, online stations, along with satellite offerings like Sirius and XM Satellite Radio, are building audiences even as regular radio struggles through a decade-long slump (time spent listening is down 14% since 1994, according to the ratings firm Arbitron). Critics say industry consolidation has turned AM/FM stations into McRadio: nationally uniform, repetitive and clogged more than ever with ads and promos. But scores of high-quality alternatives are now competing for your ears (and dollars).

Just a few years ago, online radio heads were mainly tech geeks willing to put up with patchy, low-quality sound. These days about 19 million people listen to online radio at least once a week, up from 7 million in 2000, according to Arbitron. Online listenership is growing at an average 43% a year as more people get broadband connections at home and tune in for content that's unavailable or in short supply on commercial stations, from blues to folk to Al Franken's new liberal Air America network, which is broadcast in just a few markets on the AM/FM dial but was streamed 2 million times in its first week, according to its exclusive webcaster, RealNetworks. "People are fed up with terrestrial radio," says Dave Goldberg, who oversees Yahoo's music site and radio network, Launchcast, which draws 1 million listeners a week.

For now, it's the satellite guys, together claiming around 2 million subscribers, who are drawing Wall Street's attention. Though their stock prices had plummeted over concerns that they might run out of cash, their shares have soared in the past year. XM is up 379%; Sirius, 491%. Analyst April Horace of Janco Partners in Denver predicts that within five years 16 million Americans will be listening to satellite radio. She says the market would explode if a popular shock jock like Howard Stern were to defect with his 15 million listeners, a prospect that looked more likely last week after six traditional stations dropped his show following an FCC proposal to fine their corporate parent, Clear Channel Communications, $495,000 for airing his "indecent" content.

Satellite broadcasters use a pay-radio model, beaming dozens of channels coast to coast commercial free, with original programming such as comedy and kids' shows. Financially backed in part by automakers, the satellite firms charge between $10 and $13 a month, mainly targeting car-radio users. Increasingly, though, listeners are buying portable tuners for their homes. To neutralize a key AM/FM advantage, both satellite broadcasters have started to provide traffic and weather updates in select markets.

So far, digital radio's growth isn't hurting big radio empires such as Clear Channel. With 1,213 stations and roughly a 30% ratings share in markets such as Phoenix, Ariz., and Milwaukee, Wis., Clear Channel had a record 2003: revenues of $8.9 billion and a net income of $1.1 billion. But listeners are clearly spending less time with terrestrial radio. One cause may simply be more media competition, from DVDs to video games to an expanding universe of digital TV. But critics of the radio industry say consolidation is partly to blame too. They claim Clear Channel and other big groups have ruined the airwaves by homogenizing song lists, politicizing the dial with conservative talk and sucking out local flavor with voice-tracking technology, which enables DJs to sound like local talent even if they're a thousand miles away. Clear Channel contends that its cost-cutting measures have saved hundreds of stations from bankruptcy and that it's the programming's popularity, reflected in ratings, that ultimately drives the business.

Nonetheless, teenagers and young adults are increasingly going online to find new music (not just file-sharing networks), particularly alternative content that rarely gets airplay on the commercial FM dial. About 13% of Americans ages 12 to 24 now listen to online radio on a weekly basis, up from 6% of that age group in 2001, according to Edison Media Research/Arbitron. With 185 stations, AOL's radio network, which, like TIME, is part of Time Warner, draws a weekly listenership of 1.5 million (by that measure, Arbitron notes, it's the nation's largest online network). Advertising remains tiny, but that may change. Ronning Lipset, an upstart Internet-radio ad firm in New York City, recently started packaging AOL, Live365.com MSN and Yahoo into a kind of national network, which has a combined audience of at least 250,000 listeners in a quarter hour, the minimum needed to appeal to national-media planners. The firm says the networks will start running audio spots from national advertisers in May.

For now the AM/FM industry doesn't seem too concerned. Arbitron estimates that 228 million Americans ages 12 and up still listen to broadcast radio weekly, and radio remains the top broadcast medium after TV for advertisers who want to reach a mass market. Radio ad sales in Arbitron markets are forecast to rise 5.5% this year, to $14 billion, according to BIA Financial Network, a media consultancy in Chantilly, Va. Yet as more consumers tune to stations like Radioparadise, those numbers could slip. Goldsmith's thoughtful playlists are organized by musical theme, moving from, say, a bluesy Tracy Chapman tune to a Latin-blues Carlos Santana track to a rock-blues number by the Hellecasters. He heeds listener feedback and says the only thing he really cares about is "playing good music," regardless of whether it's a hot single being pitched by a promoter or a classic. That's why his fans are pulling out their wallets to support him.


oh my ... your killing me,how do you guys come up with this wave? I dont care im riddin it thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Ho man, what a fantastic, timeless piece. Beefy be the bass. And Paul always looked so childlike, how can that face make that thump?

Of course, George's part is nothing less than the very top of musicianship here. He has a way of reaching in and grabbing my heart, and giving it a good squeeze....

Extremely engaging quality from the very beginning chords. Timely too, in brilliant sunlight just "noticed the floor still needs sweeping". Has to wait 'til guitar finishes weeping, Thank you Radio Paradise. :)




marvelous...  love this song...  love this whole album...
 
Beethoven and then the Beatles. Two 10's, one after the other. I love RP.

Everybody in my church loves this song...  and this entire album...
 

White Album – the best rock/pop album ever.


 Hannio wrote:


Your grammar.
 
Seriously?
 
 ckcotton wrote:

Really?

Your CRAZY! 
 

Your grammar.
 MojoJojo wrote:
While my ears gently bleed.
 
Really?

Your CRAZY! 
Three 9+ songs in a row....Bill is not messing around this morning!
{#Bananajam}
 lemmoth wrote:


Me thinks a certain former member, may be a member again..................C'mon Lazarus
 

I be me...  hope you are having a marvelous time right this moment...

love this song...
 
 Lazarus wrote:

Well said...  miss you...

 
 

Me thinks a certain former member, may be a member again..................C'mon Lazarus
 I wish this was like reddit so I could upvote your comment.  

ambrebalte wrote:
The first Beatles I listened too.
I was 13. Just moved to a place I didn't like, a village, where people were looking at us "from the suburbs", as perfect strangers. I just lost all my friends, never felt that alone before, outcast. And there was this music teacher who seemed so softly sad, who decided that instead of the usual "flatitudes" we would be better off discovering sounds we could relate to, giving us a good reason to study English simultaneously.
I don't remember if it was just after noon or later, if it was in the winter or in the summer. But I clearly see and feel the sudden suspension of breathes. Never were we so calm, even long after the music finished. Moments of grace last. 
I don't remember any other moments in my teen age when we were so moved that we didn't even think about hiding it. It was beyond music, a whole state of mind, like to touch a legend, to be a part of the myth. In this small French village in the deep countryside, beginning of the 70s'.
 
I wish this was like reddit so I could upvote your comment.
The first Beatles I listened too.
I was 13. Just moved to a place I didn't like, a village, where people were looking at us "from the suburbs", as perfect strangers. I just lost all my friends, never felt that alone before, outcast. And there was this music teacher who seemed so softly sad, who decided that instead of the usual "flatitudes" we would be better off discovering sounds we could relate to, giving us a good reason to study English simultaneously.
I don't remember if it was just after noon or later, if it was in the winter or in the summer. But I clearly see and feel the sudden suspension of breathes. Never were we so calm, even long after the music finished. Moments of grace last. 
I don't remember any other moments in my teen age when we were so moved that we didn't even think about hiding it. It was beyond music, a whole state of mind, like to touch a legend, to be a part of the myth. In this small French village in the deep countryside, beginning of the 70s'.
 Bat wrote:
I finally rented it from Netflix (no HBO) and I would say the opposite.  There were a few interesting bits, but really nothing we've not heard before and 4 hours is WAY too long to watch people tell us things we already knew.  I'm not saying don't bother, but in my opinion it could have used some serious editing.
 
Personally I wouldn't edit anything, and I definitely wasn't bored, despite the running time. Perhaps they could keep the existing film as a "Director's Cut" and release a shorter version as an option.
While my ears gently bleed.
Wow
still
timeless 
 Cynaera wrote:

I love - and will always love - Harrison's music. But I read Clapton's biography, and he has a big, empty place in him that refuses to acknowledge his mistakes, other peoples' successes, and any hint of happiness. He's like a traveler, walking through life, observing events, sometimes even being part of those events, but not giving praise or blame, or anything. Neutral.

IMO, Harrison is the more "human" of the two. Clapton is genius on guitar, but Harrison was genius on life and love. Neither of which impacts the music, I guess, but I'd rather hear a bad song by Harrison than a good song by Clapton, based on what I know now.
 

 
Well said...  miss you...

 
great song, great album. In 1968 when it was released I think it stayed on my turntable for months.
 On_The_Beach wrote:
Just saw the 3.5 hour Scorsese documentary on George last night.
Really excellent and a must-see for even the most casual Harrison/Beatles fan.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xnx87LIDO9k
 
I finally rented it from Netflix (no HBO) and I would say the opposite.  There were a few interesting bits, but really nothing we've not heard before and 4 hours is WAY too long to watch people tell us things we already knew.  I'm not saying don't bother, but in my opinion it could have used some serious editing.
 rockpommel16 wrote:

 stevendejong wrote:
Younger Brother - Train (a new great song)
Pink Floyd - Time
Beethoven - Symphony No.5 - 1. Allegro
The Beatles - While My Guitar Gently Weeps

This must be the Radio Paradise All Stars set. What will be next... AWESOME. 
 
....same as today......incredible....is RP really a radio station?.....think,it´s A LOT more......
 
And today... 63 days cycle?
one of the best songs of all time anywhere
Love Macca's bass fluff just prior to the fade out.

I mean, that mistake reveals the level of boredom and disinterest that George's songs generally induced in the Fab Two.

And one wonders what Lennon's contribution to the recording was. I could look it up in my Beatles Sessions book but I suspect the answer will be "bonking Yoko".

 
 jhorton wrote:
Hard to pick a, " Most overplayed Beatles song," but this one would certainly be high on my list....
  bumpity bump-ditty bump .. indeed. Thanks horty


Still my favourite Beatles track after nearly 45 years..........
 
Very super nice!
20!
Beatles were great......GH's greatest contribution!!

He's a team player, letting the rest in on this gem!!!
 stevendejong wrote:
Younger Brother - Train (a new great song)
Pink Floyd - Time
Beethoven - Symphony No.5 - 1. Allegro
The Beatles - While My Guitar Gently Weeps

This must be the Radio Paradise All Stars set. What will be next... AWESOME. 
 
....same as today......incredible....is RP really a radio station?.....think,it´s A LOT more......

WE BE DANCING...  LOVE IT...


 


bingo by jingo...  love this song...

 
We can not have this!This song is the best clue ever to...... something. What it is we may never know but I wouldn't want it any other way.

https://myfuneral.com/images/wirkandasnichthaben.jpg 
To All Who have responded: 

Thank you for your thought provoking feedback. I agree with most everything that was said. Thank you for sharing your opinions and thoughts. They were well received and fun to read. I suppose I was a bit harsh in my first comment...however I do feel a discombobulation on this album as WonderLizard said very eloquently. 
 amoreena wrote:
More proof that the Beatles are dying in the wrong order........
 
Beatle death list , in order
Stu
Brian
John
Linda
George

(note: did Paul died in 68? ya know, the whole Paul is dead thing)
 amoreena wrote:
More proof that the Beatles are dying in the wrong order........
 
That's harsh... I know what you mean... but its still harsh....
Just saw the 3.5 hour Scorsese documentary on George last night.
Really excellent and a must-see for even the most casual Harrison/Beatles fan.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xnx87LIDO9k
 ziakut wrote:
Ok, I'm gonna catch flack for this one...This album is a huge disappointment from beginning to end. Why on earth would this album be released shortly after Hey Jude was released as a single and have it no where to be found? The version of Revolution on this album was a slurred, slow, prodding performance. There was so much filler here too? Ob-la-di? C'mon! Songs like 'Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except For Me and My Monkey'...?! I suppose an album with such filler...songs like this one and possibly 'Julia' sound like masterpieces. Granted...I find George's contributions to be some of the best on this album...it is by far a 'good' Beatles album. A real middle finger from the fab four...knowing they can sell albums no matter what the material is. A botching from beginning to end IMO.

Ok bring on the lashings...I can take it.
 
Parlophone never released Beatles' singles on albums. They were always separate releases. It was the U.S. market that expected singles on albums—hence Capitol's chopping up the British releases to fit the American conception of an album. Not coincidentally the practice enabled Capitol to squeeze out a couple of "extra" albums, those wily devils. Heh-heh.

Actually, I think you're spot on about the overall change in quality from Sgt. Pepper's and Revolver. However, what it displayed was four separate Beatles instead of The Beatles, if you get the distinction. I think a lot of their success as songwriters and recording musicians was attributable to how they interacted. John roughed up Paul's pabulum, and Paul smoothed out John's bombast. They both worked George's stuff over. Regardless of the dynamic, it worked stunningly well. The Beatles was the first glimpse we got into the band's inner tensions—that each member of the band was bursting to be considered as an individual. So, Paul's stuff was a little sweeter than usual ("Ob-la-di Ob-la-da"), and John's a little raunchier ("Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except For Me and My Monkey")—good gets, BTW. And maybe, like Tommy a couple of years later, half could have been jettisoned, and the rest assembled into a decent rock'n'roll album. We have instead what they gave us.

IMHO, I don't think what they gave us was an upthrust middle finger. Now, they may have been giving it to each other, but I can't believe—nor have I found quoted evidence—that would support the notion that they were so scornful of their audience, that they thought they could foist anything, no matter how badly conceived or shoddily performed, on their drooling minions. All in all, The Beatles methinks has withstood the test of time, unevenness and all. So, no flak—just food for thought.

More proof that the Beatles are dying in the wrong order........
Younger Brother - Train (a new great song)
Pink Floyd - Time
Beethoven - Symphony No.5 - 1. Allegro
The Beatles - While My Guitar Gently Weeps

This must be the Radio Paradise All Stars set. What will be next... AWESOME. 
Hey ope!
 ziakut wrote:
Ok, I'm gonna catch flack for this one...This album is a huge disappointment from beginning to end. Why on earth would this album be released shortly after Hey Jude was released as a single and have it no where to be found? The version of Revolution on this album was a slurred, slow, prodding performance. There was so much filler here too? Ob-la-di? C'mon! Songs like 'Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except For Me and My Monkey'...?! I suppose an album with such filler...songs like this one and possibly 'Julia' sound like masterpieces. Granted...I find George's contributions to be some of the best on this album...it is by far a 'good' Beatles album. A real middle finger from the fab four...knowing they can sell albums no matter what the material is. A botching from beginning to end IMO.

Ok bring on the lashings...I can take it.

 
 
Much as I love the Beatles, it's hard to disagree with you.

IMO, maybe this didn't need to be a double-album. Sounds like it could have used a little less LSD (no pun intended).
 ziakut wrote:
Ok, I'm gonna catch flack for this one...This album is a huge disappointment from beginning to end. Why on earth would this album be released shortly after Hey Jude was released as a single and have it no where to be found? The version of Revolution on this album was a slurred, slow, prodding performance. There was so much filler here too? Ob-la-di? C'mon! Songs like 'Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except For Me and My Monkey'...?! I suppose an album with such filler...songs like this one and possibly 'Julia' sound like masterpieces. Granted...I find George's contributions to be some of the best on this album...it is by far a 'good' Beatles album. A real middle finger from the fab four...knowing they can sell albums no matter what the material is. A botching from beginning to end IMO.

Ok bring on the lashings...I can take it.
 
Second only to Let It Be, it's admittedly my least favorite Beatles album (as released in the States). George Martin rightfully advised them to leave half of it on the cutting room floor, so to speak, but the Fabs (read: Paul) wouldn't have it. You also have to consider that they were floundering as a group—they had just recently lost Brian Epstein, immediately after which John was quoted as, "Great... what are we going to do now?" Never mind that Paul had already taken charge as the group's leader (at least in the studio) long before.

They had also just returned from that ill-advised trip to the Maharishi's compound in India, where most of them eventually saw through their new-found spiritual leader and correctly identified him as a fraud. After both events I know I'd be despondent and wouldn't be open to suggestions from George Martin or anyone at EMI. Given that they were also at loggerheads with one another at this point, I think recording this LP was nothing more than self-absorbed therapy. That it yielded any tunes worthy of inclusion in the Beatles canon is phenomenal and illustrates just how creative and musical they could be.

Oh, and did I fail to mention that Yoko had just recently come on the scene? I do not blame her for their breakup, as it had been brewing already. That said, the Lennons' insistence that she be ever-present in the studio during the recording of this double-LP could only serve to further alienate each individual member. (I lump Ringo and George together, however, as I both of them had issues with the "double-headed monster" at this point.)
 ziakut wrote:
Ok, I'm gonna catch flack for this one...This album is a huge disappointment from beginning to end. Why on earth would this album be released shortly after Hey Jude was released as a single and have it no where to be found? The version of Revolution on this album was a slurred, slow, prodding performance. There was so much filler here too? Ob-la-di? C'mon! Songs like 'Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except For Me and My Monkey'...?! I suppose an album with such filler...songs like this one and possibly 'Julia' sound like masterpieces. Granted...I find George's contributions to be some of the best on this album...it is by far a 'good' Beatles album. A real middle finger from the fab four...knowing they can sell albums no matter what the material is. A botching from beginning to end IMO.

Ok bring on the lashings...I can take it.

 
 
OK - You could have also asked in 1967, how could the Sgt. Pepper album possible be released without including either track on the just released single Strawberry Fields Forever b/w Penny Lane.

The answer is the pop/rock music industry was still transitioning from a heavy reliance on singles to albums - a trransition which of course has been reversed in recent years.

As for your overall take on the White Album — been hearing that there is a lot of filler ever since I picked up my first copy of Rolling Stone in the 70's but to say this far from a "good" Beatles album, or a "real middle finger" from the boys or a "botching from beginning to end are absolutely ludicrous statements.

By my reckoning there are 72:32 of terrific music and 21:03 of filler.  I'll let y'all guess what I consider filler.
@ ZIAKUT I dont know much about music but your question : "Why on earth would this album be released shortly after Hey Jude was released as a single and have it no where to be found? " havent much to do with music. Its more a marketing answer that you looking for. Creating the miss to create the need when it come at the moment they decide. To Beatles or not to Beatles :)
Ok, I'm gonna catch flack for this one...This album is a huge disappointment from beginning to end. Why on earth would this album be released shortly after Hey Jude was released as a single and have it no where to be found? The version of Revolution on this album was a slurred, slow, prodding performance. There was so much filler here too? Ob-la-di? C'mon! Songs like 'Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except For Me and My Monkey'...?! I suppose an album with such filler...songs like this one and possibly 'Julia' sound like masterpieces. Granted...I find George's contributions to be some of the best on this album...it is by far a 'good' Beatles album. A real middle finger from the fab four...knowing they can sell albums no matter what the material is. A botching from beginning to end IMO.

Ok bring on the lashings...I can take it.

 
Absolutely beautiful.


still incredible...