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Pink Floyd — Another Brick In The Wall [Parts 1 & 2]
Album: The Wall
Avg rating:
8.7

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2549









Released: 1979
Length: 9:00
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Daddy's gone across the ocean
Leaving just a memory
A snapshot in the family album
Daddy, what else did you leave for me?

Daddy, whatcha leave behind for me?
All in all it was just a brick in the wall
All in all it was all just bricks in the wall

When we grew up and went to school
There were certain teachers who would
Hurt the children any way they could

By pouring their derision upon anything we did
And exposing every weakness
However carefully hidden by the kids

But in the town it was well known
When they got home at night, their fat and
Psychopathic wives would thrash them
Within inches of their lives

We don't need no education
We don't need no thought control
No dark sarcasm in the classroom
Teacher, leave them kids alone

Hey, teacher, leave the kids alone

All in all it's just another brick in the wall
All in all you're just another brick in the wall

We don't need no education
We don't need no thought control
No dark sarcasm in the classroom
Teachers, leave them kids alone

Hey, teacher, leave us kids alone

All in all you're just another brick in the wall
All in all you're just another brick in the wall
Comments (194)add comment
 cavemanleong wrote:
Wow! What a freaking masterpiece!
 I was just thinking - so this is the "sell out" album that I refused to buy due to the lyrical content. - There simply aren't enough guitar licks to make up for that.
After the Berlin wall, the most famous one. Much harder to bring down.
What's with this playback? Pitch is higher and tempo about 20% faster than normal. Just ain't the same "Another Brick in the Wall" at this rate.
 lizardking wrote:
Of the many memories my brain's created with this song (Part 2 in particular), including the class of 91 (my freshman year) walking to get diplomas to this song (ha!) - my favorite is:

In the late 90s, picking up my dad as he was released from prison, he graciously offered (on my behalf) to give a ride to 4 also-being-released-thugs (and I mean THUGS with affection) to Tacoma, about a 30 minute drive, in my little car with the badass car stereo, and as we pulled out of the DOC lot we absolutely BLASTED this track for all to hear.  It was classic, what with 4 active PIRU members, all making my 6ft 200lb self look small, bumping to Pink Floyd.  Of course we switched to Rap (NWA's Fuck the Police of course!) before long, and that was one of the best rides I've ever given to 1-too-many in my compact car (outside of the time when it wasn't all dudes.)  

Long Live RP and kilowatt powered subwoofers!!
 
Wow bro that's crazy! Sending peace to all of you
That guitar solo will go through any wall !
For years I have thought they were singing "no dogs are handsome in the classroom" iso no dark sarcasm ...

After googling it I found out I was not the only one.

http://www.kissthisguy.com/no-dogs-are-handsome-in-the-classroom-pi-misheard-52106.htm

That's what I like about Google. No matter how stupid your ideas, beliefs or assumptions, Google will assure you you're not alone out there.
Of the many memories my brain's created with this song (Part 2 in particular), including the class of 91 (my freshman year) walking to get diplomas to this song (ha!) - my favorite is:

In the late 90s, picking up my dad as he was released from prison, he graciously offered (on my behalf) to give a ride to 4 also-being-released-thugs (and I mean THUGS with affection) to Tacoma, about a 30 minute drive, in my little car with the badass car stereo, and as we pulled out of the DOC lot we absolutely BLASTED this track for all to hear.  It was classic, what with 4 active PIRU members, all making my 6ft 200lb self look small, bumping to Pink Floyd.  Of course we switched to Rap (NWA's Fuck the Police of course!) before long, and that was one of the best rides I've ever given to 1-too-many in my compact car (outside of the time when it wasn't all dudes.)  

Long Live RP and kilowatt powered subwoofers!!
Sounded great to my ten year-old ears back in '79, still sounds great forty years later.

Wow.
 ziggytrix wrote:
.....

He isn't railing against education, he's railing against abuse.
 
Yes.  He is also a railing against a system that permits that kind of abuse.
After avoiding this album for decades (thank you rock stations, NOT) RP reminded me why I loved it in the first place. Thanks!!
Try this with Steppenwolf - The Pusher, at the same time. So much fuss for what?
 DaidyBoy wrote:

I was born in 1960 and have been blessed with a son later in life - he's now 13 and right in the middle of it all.  What creeps me out is that this song still stands up today.  When will the education authorities in the UK weed out the sadists?  Or do they think they are still needed?
 

This is my era too. I went to public school.  The cane was phased out, there were no psychopathic wive that I met.  This is from the highly productive, imaginative mind of Roger Waters shaped by his own experiences.  We greeted this song with a wry smile seeing playful half truths.   
8 down to 7   
Down to three and then Skip
 Bystander wrote:
I was born in the 60s in the UK and was about 12 when this was released. The amount of hand-wringing it caused amongst teachers in schools across the country was phenomenal.
Entire school assemblies devoted to explaining to us how we shouldn't be influenced by the evil lyrics, music teachers doing hour long sympathetic break downs of the song.
The thing is, it was basically just the truth and everyone knew it.
 
I was born in 1960 and have been blessed with a son later in life - he's now 13 and right in the middle of it all.  What creeps me out is that this song still stands up today.  When will the education authorities in the UK weed out the sadists?  Or do they think they are still needed?
An absolute outstanding tune. It cannot be more of a 10 for me.

The lyrical highlight will always be:
But in the town it was well known
When they got home at night, their fat and
Psychopathic wives would thrash them
Within inches of their lives


The sense morale of the song remains true today as back then in many areas unfortunately.
People misunderstand this song because they don't pay attention to the words at the very beginning (or because the radio doesn't play Happiest Days of Our Lives and launches right into Brick Part 2, but what kind of asshole would do that?!):

"When we grew up and went to school
There were certain teachers who would
Hurt the children any way they could"

He isn't railing against education, he's railing against abuse.
Is there a way to rate a song a "10 but never play again"?
I was born in the 60s in the UK and was about 12 when this was released. The amount of hand-wringing it caused amongst teachers in schools across the country was phenomenal.
Entire school assemblies devoted to explaining to us how we shouldn't be influenced by the evil lyrics, music teachers doing hour long sympathetic break downs of the song.
The thing is, it was basically just the truth and everyone knew it.
 LudicrousMaximus wrote:
 cavemanleong wrote:

Wow! What a freaking masterpiece!


 The Wall in its entirety certainly - as was the original live  show/performance that went with it!



 
Couldn't agree more.  I saw Roger Waters doing the Wall tour about two years ago, and it was an amazing experience.  We were in the 5th row, and all I could think was "Wow, that is the guy who wrote The Wall standing right there."
 cavemanleong wrote:
Wow! What a freaking masterpiece!

 The Wall in its entirety certainly - as was the original live  show/performance that went with it!


Wow! What a freaking masterpiece!
 babuin wrote:
К сожалению, сейчас так уже не пишут музыку. Поправьте меня, если я неправ.
 
Eye A Greee
К сожалению, сейчас так уже не пишут музыку. Поправьте меня, если я неправ.
Sad to hear about the guy who took his life to this album, however I there's probably as many experiences with The Wall as there pairs of ears that have listened to it. On that note I thought I'd share this little gem:
 
Years ago I rode to work with a colleague as he was dropping his 10 year old off at her school. You can almost guess what happened - and that's exactly what did: The Wall Pt 2 came on the radio - and soon the three of us, with windows down and volume cranked up were bellowing along on "..WE DON'T NEED NO EDUCATION!!" as we pulled to the curb, earning us some stern frowns from the PC purity ponies among the other parents and school types. I still get a mischievous grin on my face to this day when I think about the episode. And nope, we didn't manage to completely mess up the kid - she graduated last year :)
Sure like Part 1 better than 2.
 ColdMiser wrote:
You know Bill, it would be kind of cool to play the ENTIRE Wall album start to finish some day. Just saying.

 
BillG would for sure do that IF big brother (aka the FCC) didn't have their say (no more than 3 album tracks in a row in an hour...did I get that right BillG?) Long Live RP!!
I used to play this song in my boarding school in the UK in the 80s. Now I hum it every time our president speaks.
reindeer wrote:
My brother committed suicide with this album on his turntable.  Every time it comes on I have to rip my headphones off.  This music so depressed my brother that he went through with his plan to take his life.  I know that it's popular, but I fucking hate it, all of it, and it reminds me of the moment when my life was forever altered and not for the better. 

 
I'm so sorry
My brother committed suicide with this album on his turntable.  Every time it comes on I have to rip my headphones off.  This music so depressed my brother that he went through with his plan to take his life.  I know that it's popular, but I fucking hate it, all of it, and it reminds me of the moment when my life was forever altered and not for the better. 
This is 8 - Most Excellent  to me BUT I am increasing to 9 -OUTSTANDING
You know Bill, it would be kind of cool to play the ENTIRE Wall album start to finish some day. Just saying.
{#Bananajam}
 maxvonevil wrote:

Halt ! Hammerzeit !

 
When I went to Philly and saw the metal sculpture below, all I could think of was the animation above:

South Street, Philadelphia near Penn Landing
Skydog wrote:
it's hard getting through these PF sing-alongs.
2 

 
You are in the 3 percentile on this one.

Halt ! Hammerzeit !
LOVE it!!
Another Pink Floyd track so thank goodness for the PSD button and hope for something not endlessly repeated. They are all brilliant but if you stare at the sun often enough you will go blind.
GO ON! DOIT AGAIN!
Gone through the gamut of feelings about this one: one it (Genius!), hated it (Not Again!?!?), and now, pleasant to hear, as a tune so familiar I can sing the guitar parts.
it's hard getting through these PF sing-alongs
.
2 
I LIKE the double-tap of 70's hits, ST School followed by a combo Another Brick in the Wall I & II 

Brilliant transition as always, BillG, if not an obvious one.

And for me two 10 ratings in a row!

Nice  
RP needs a "like" button.......so in the meantime I liked this story...wonderful
looking for a key ?
 ravnur wrote:

Reminds me of taking my 14-year-old daughter to the Australian Pink Floyd show last time they were in town. She thoroughly enjoyed the show, although she thought the crowd looked like a checkout line at Costco. She was definitely one of the youngest there. Before the show began she remarked to me, “Looks like you’re the only parent that brought their kid”. The 30-year-old next to us must have overheard her and laughed, and then pointed at the guy with the grey pony tail next to him “That’s my dad!”.



 


Complicated feelings about this one. It deserves a 10 but I don't want to hear it on RP. What to do...

Reminds me of taking my 14-year-old daughter to the Australian Pink Floyd show last time they were in town. She thoroughly enjoyed the show, although she thought the crowd looked like a checkout line at Costco. She was definitely one of the youngest there. Before the show began she remarked to me, “Looks like you’re the only parent that brought their kid”. The 30-year-old next to us must have overheard her and laughed, and then pointed at the guy with the grey pony tail next to him “That’s my dad!”.


 ScottishWillie wrote:

A rating of 8.7 confirms that I’m one of the few people who doesn’t care for this album. It may have been partly due to the line “we don't need no education”. Like many others my route out of poverty was education and, to me, saying kids don't need it is thought disordered.

However each to their own, I’m glad so many people get pleasure from this song, but its ‘not my cup of tea’.

 
I'm shocked that you're only a few years younger than me, in Scotland, and you don't get it. They were critiquing how education was delivered to the working class. I was born in Glasgow 1955 and by the time I was 11 had been streamed by my social class to a lesser education. No exceptions allowed. The delivery of education not the quality was complete crap. Most teachers and headmasters were borderline sadists and excessive physical and emotional punishment was the norm. Fortunately for me we escaped to Canada in 1966. While not perfect, I was actually tested and given the opportunity to try. I was allowed to choose an advanced high school course which in turn led to post secondary education. The first in my family to do so.

I firmly believe that had I stayed in Scotland, I'd be dead or in jail. If not I would have continued the generational dance of under employment and unemployment as the system was designed to do. I'm not suggesting people can't beat the system but the deck was stacked and I had no role model. Maybe you were lucky or just very good.

You completely miss the point of these songs and the theme of the album IMO.


I was a dopey stoner who did quite well overall. Maybe my evaluation of quite well could be challenged but I don't give a shit.{#Wink}

Edit; BTW this dopey stoner got an education while having a lot of fun. Some severely uptight folks here.
I swear, Dave Gilmour plays the tastiest guitar solos ever.
 thewiseking wrote:

I would never judge any genre by the fan base. To do so would preclude my enjoyment of outlaw country, metal and Mozart. However, Pink Floyd themselves throughout their career have denigrated a certain subset who just happen to be their fan base!. They float a giant Pig yet they are a huge commercial enterprise. They excoriate the mindless hedonist yet their fans are the ones screaming "Fuclin Aye!" and swigging brewskis at their shows. Their catalogue is indeed artless, bombastic and yet extremely pretentious. The endless overplay of their stuff was a real annoyance and it continued way beyond the period when they might have once been relevant. It continues today.

 
All fair points and I won't argue them with you (though I don't agree with them all). But I was addressing the statement that The Wall is an album for dopey stoners. It's not. It may be an album for self-righteous armchair psychiatrists, I won't get into it with you on that one either though I think you could make a better argument for that if you wanted to. 

I just wanted to point out that there was a lot going on in The Wall, a lot that the dopey stoners missed (and that some of us have been pondering for decades). You don't have to like it, I am not so arrogant as all that, I'm just sayin', if you hate it, hate it for the right reasons. 
 Ag3nt0rang3 wrote:

The dopey stoners are always with us, and their tastes are whatever they are. Why should we judge The Wall by the quality of their fans? Do we judge Jimi Hendrix that way? Late Beatles? Cypress Hill? (okay maybe Cypress Hill) Did the stoners listen to Another Brick In The Wall Part 3? (which you really should do, by the way, if you haven't, it puts the whole thing in context). Any album (and its component songs) stands alone and means what it means (mostly what the artist intended, but great art is often smarter than the artist).

Edit: I chased down the lyrics to Part 3 (which is basically one verse and the chorus of the song as a whole)

"I don't need no arms around me
And I don't need no drugs to calm me
I have seen the writing on the wall
Don't think I'll need anything at all
No, don't think I'll need anything at all..."

 

 
I would never judge any genre by the fan base. To do so would preclude my enjoyment of outlaw country, metal and Mozart. However, Pink Floyd themselves throughout their career have denigrated a certain subset who just happen to be their fan base!. They float a giant Pig yet they are a huge commercial enterprise. They excoriate the mindless hedonist yet their fans are the ones screaming "Fuclin Aye!" and swigging brewskis at their shows. Their catalogue is indeed artless, bombastic and yet extremely pretentious. The endless overplay of their stuff was a real annoyance and it continued way beyond the period when they might have once been relevant. It continues today.
 thewiseking wrote:

Interesting insight. Did you live through these times? Where I grew up, Suburban New York City, this stuff really struck a chord with the dopey stoners who hung out in the 7 Eleven parking lot and never amounted to much. 

 
The dopey stoners are always with us, and their tastes are whatever they are. Why should we judge The Wall by the quality of their fans? Do we judge Jimi Hendrix that way? Late Beatles? Cypress Hill? (okay maybe Cypress Hill) Did the stoners listen to Another Brick In The Wall Part 3? (which you really should do, by the way, if you haven't, it puts the whole thing in context). Any album (and its component songs) stands alone and means what it means (mostly what the artist intended, but great art is often smarter than the artist).

Edit: I chased down the lyrics to Part 3 (which is basically one verse and the chorus of the song as a whole)

"I don't need no arms around me
And I don't need no drugs to calm me
I have seen the writing on the wall
Don't think I'll need anything at all
No, don't think I'll need anything at all..."

 

and a great big American F YOU to trump the dump

just say NO to orange facists

{#Cowboy}  {#Frustrated}{#Frustrated}{#Frustrated}{#Frustrated}{#Frustrated}{#Frustrated}{#Frustrated}{#Frustrated}{#Frustrated}{#Frustrated}


 ScottishWillie wrote:

A rating of 8.7 confirms that I’m one of the few people who doesn’t care for this album. It may have been partly due to the line “we don't need no education”. Like many others my route out of poverty was education and, to me, saying kids don't need it is thought disordered.

However each to their own, I’m glad so many people get pleasure from this song, but its ‘not my cup of tea’.



 
Here in the States the imbecile stoner drop outs loved this shite although I doubt they derived any pleasure from it.

A rating of 8.7 confirms that I’m one of the few people who doesn’t care for this album. It may have been partly due to the line “we don't need no education”. Like many others my route out of poverty was education and, to me, saying kids don't need it is thought disordered.

However each to their own, I’m glad so many people get pleasure from this song, but its ‘not my cup of tea’.


 Ag3nt0rang3 wrote:


Really? I hear a musical case history of one man's Narcissistic Personality Disorder and Chronic Depression, a case history given by the sufferer himself. You can decide for yourself if that's your cup of tea, but like it or not it's not exactly "geared towards the ignorami" now, is it?

 
Interesting insight. Did you live through these times? Where I grew up, Suburban New York City, this stuff really struck a chord with the dopey stoners who hung out in the 7 Eleven parking lot and never amounted to much. 
 thewiseking wrote:
A Dopey Stoner Anthem. A plodding, artless downer.  It is geared towards the ignorami, an audience the bandmembers made many millions off yet hold in absolute contempt.

 

Really? I hear a musical case history of one man's Narcissistic Personality Disorder and Chronic Depression, a case history given by the sufferer himself. You can decide for yourself if that's your cup of tea, but like it or not it's not exactly "geared towards the ignorami" now, is it?
Had the cassette, driving across Michigan's Upper Peninsula in snowstorms, first year of marriage, pretty good memories.{#Kiss}

And then there's Gilmour.
Ah, high school…
A Dopey Stoner Anthem. A plodding, artless downer.  It is geared towards the ignorami, an audience the bandmembers made many millions off yet hold in absolute contempt.
 mardisoninnc wrote:
How can you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat?  Classic.

 
Had some Jack Link's jerky recently.  It had a big blank sticker on the back of the bag.  Looking through from the inside of the bag, it was apparent that the blank sticker was covering up writing that had originally been printed on the bag.  "If you don't eat yer meat, you can't have any pudding.  How can you have any pudding if you don't eat yer meat?"  Don't know why they printed that on the bags and then decided to cover it up.  Did they not have permission from Pink Floyd? 
Love Floyd! {#Frustrated} Another Brick in the Wall!{#Frustrated}
Kuddos for playing both parts consecutively!  Still thinking I shouldn't be in this theater in the middle of the afternoon!!!! F*** I have an exam!
And Now just an hour later - Bill presents From the SECOND BEST album since AD
My "rating-o-meter" is permanently stuck on 10😀 Thanks Bill for playing this anthem sometimes!
 Stefen wrote:
I always hear that double negative and think that they do need an education.

 
Ah, but does the double negative truly not exist in English, or is it just cleverly hidden? {#Ask} The use of "any" in a declarative statement does indeed form a type of double negative because it cannot be used in the affirmative.

Example: "We don't need any education."  Correct. "We need any education." Incorrect. "Any" plays the same grammatical role as "no" in the double negative. Nearly all other quantifiers (e.g., some, much/many, little/few, etc.) can be used in both the affirmative and negative.

All of that said, my answer may be the very type of thing Roger and the guys were complaining about in this song since I'm a teacher {#Cheesygrin}
 reindeer wrote:
I really cannot stand this entire album.
Please, play something different.
Thank you.

 
That's what we have PSD for. It's right there next to Stop & Play
The meat grinder teacher in the illustrations looked just like a maths master at our place (later to become headmaster).  Always wondered if Scarfe had seen this guy before drawing...
I always hear that double negative and think that they do need an education.
How can you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat?  Classic.
I have been avoiding The Wall for years because classic rock stations play it to death. But this is the second song from that album in as many days and now I recall why it gets overplayed elsewhere: it is really an excellent album! I remember when it came out, I was on Spring Break in Daytona Beach and this album was everywhere.
Ah perfect! Came in right at the guitar solo.
Pure 10! {#Frustrated}
I've seen this live on stage - what a show! Helicopters and all...{#Clap}
It's still quite good but to me PF lost its magic after Wish You Were Here.
Incredible. Pink Floyd. The Wall. Again, and again, and again on RP. And with a world of music out there....millions of songs...Pink Floyd (and The Who) keep coming to the top of RP's playlist. Great songs in their day but, along with Stairway to Heaven and other smash hits from yesterday, just need to be retired.
{#Bananajam}
Que recuerdos. Uno de mis preferidos de todos los tiempos. Casi se me raya el disco de tanto ponerlo.
Steve Earl, Radiohead & The War On Drugs before this.
.
.

 

Bill just murdered a great set with Pi Flo


{#Frustrated}
Nice mix with school, after all these years never saw the link.
In mid-winter January of 1980 - a revelation.
 OHMish wrote:
It's very produced

 
And very well produced at that.
It's very produced
 fredriley wrote:

It's certainly relevant to me as I went to a school just like the one portrayed in the song, where teachers would do everything to make your life hell (although I don't know if their wives beat them to within an inch of their lives, though it's a nice thought to have) and were, frankly, sadists who'd beat you at a moment's notice, with a few notable and praiseworthy exceptions. My high school was a violent and brutal boys-only institution, which made Lord of the Flies look like the Teddy Bears Picnic.

So I identified with the song when it came out, and laughed when all the pompous pedants slagged off "we don't need no education" as ungrammatical which showed that they missed the point by a country mile. It was No.1 in the charts for yonks, seemingly forever, so after a while I got a bit fed up with it, but even these days hearing it takes me back to the penal institution that was my 'school', the laughable motto of which was "Cheerfulness and Industry". Hah!

 
What, the one with the "Hitler tree"?


 Hey!  Black Hawk Unthought Known
     Seen And Not Seen.

 izycrzy wrote:
Lots and lots of comments about this and that... I think the point he's trying to make, which is a really good one, is that sometimes, often, adults screw up children and cause them pain. It may be at the macro level, with something like a war or environmental degradation, or it may be at a personal level with their "psychopathic rage". Either way, when an adult hurts a child it is a really really awful thing. That, to me is why the song is relevant.  

 
It's certainly relevant to me as I went to a school just like the one portrayed in the song, where teachers would do everything to make your life hell (although I don't know if their wives beat them to within an inch of their lives, though it's a nice thought to have) and were, frankly, sadists who'd beat you at a moment's notice, with a few notable and praiseworthy exceptions. My high school was a violent and brutal boys-only institution, which made Lord of the Flies look like the Teddy Bears Picnic.

So I identified with the song when it came out, and laughed when all the pompous pedants slagged off "we don't need no education" as ungrammatical which showed that they missed the point by a country mile. It was No.1 in the charts for yonks, seemingly forever, so after a while I got a bit fed up with it, but even these days hearing it takes me back to the penal institution that was my 'school', the laughable motto of which was "Cheerfulness and Industry". Hah!
{#Notworthy} 11...never gets old for me
 reindeer wrote:
I really cannot stand this entire album.
Please, play something different.
Thank you.

 
Just be thankful he doesn't play Dave Mathews...much
I really cannot stand this entire album.
Please, play something different.
Thank you.
 crogers wrote:

Ponderous?  Hmmm.   As I understand it, ponderous means dull, clumsy or unwieldy.  This piece, IMO, is none of those things.  Have you even listened to the guitar work herein?  Try headphones of at least middling quality, a darkened room and some focus.  Just because you heard it ad nauseum on a crappy FM radio back in the day doesn't mean a fresh listen is unwarranted.  This thing has legs, but it fails as background — it was written to be listened to.

Just some thoughts... 

 

Well put!  
 clwguy wrote:
perfection. and yet they still complain. 

 
Like!
A good song but all in all there must not be so many bricks in that wall, they only mention four bricks in the whole song.
perfection. and yet they still complain. 
I fully agree. Maybe RP could just play the radio edits of Pink Floyd and also less often.
 

Dazzerb wrote:
way too much Pink Floyd on RP.  Some is ok but gets boring after a while.

 


 Dazzerb wrote:
way too much Pink Floyd on RP.  Some is ok but gets boring after a while.

 
ditto, some is to much though, but I did like "Meddle"
The reason I love RP so deeply is because they play music you wouldn't normally hear on any other radio station. How many times do you really need to hear this song. Classic song? Definitely. Overplayed everywhere?YES!  
 
way too much Pink Floyd on RP.  Some is ok but gets boring after a while.
Türlich 11 Punkte
I guess I am just a simpleton- this just seems like really great, emotional music
Good song but it has been played to death.
 
Lots and lots of comments about this and that... I think the point he's trying to make, which is a really good one, is that sometimes, often, adults screw up children and cause them pain. It may be at the macro level, with something like a war or environmental degradation, or it may be at a personal level with their "psychopathic rage". Either way, when an adult hurts a child it is a really really awful thing. That, to me is why the song is relevant.  
This song is The Anthem for the Young.  Of course you've heard it a lot, it's a classic anthem. The point is to know it by heart and hold the message in your heart. {#Sunny}
Nope. Not classic. Just 4 sides of the same three chords. Time to visit Pandora.
 Skid_Mark wrote:

Yep. I understand why many people consider this record a classic, but I have no need to hear it anymore. 

 
I don't feel this way about this song but I do understand.  I have the same feeling about Dave Mathews.
 Dav3thedog wrote:
It feels like The Wall is on RP every time I tune in!   Enough!

 
Yep. I understand why many people consider this record a classic, but I have no need to hear it anymore. 
"We don't need no education"...after 35 years I'm on the other side of the wall!
 usajpl wrote:

Either you're brilliant and know things that none of the rest of us do, or you just get a kick out of shitting on other people's fun. So, which is it?

 
Maybe he just doesn't like this song or album; there's no need to concoct a false dichotomy.  Plenty of people love this song, plenty of people never cared for it or are sick of hearing it, most people are probably somewhere in between.
I got serious grief for liking Floyd at school when this was number 1 for about 8 weeks running. Well, all these years later, and I was right. And they were wrong. All of 'em.
It feels like The Wall is on RP every time I tune in!   Enough!
A classic
A true classic



 
Please do make an educated guess why you are here.
You may need   some thought superintendence
No dark sarcasm in the classroom.
Please leave your message after the beep.


 wgsu_1978 wrote:
Ponderous. Sorry.
 
Ponderous?  Hmmm.   As I understand it, ponderous means dull, clumsy or unwieldy.  This piece, IMO, is none of those things.  Have you even listened to the guitar work herein?  Try headphones of at least middling quality, a darkened room and some focus.  Just because you heard it ad nauseum on a crappy FM radio back in the day doesn't mean a fresh listen is unwarranted.  This thing has legs, but it fails as background — it was written to be listened to.

Just some thoughts... 
 OHMish wrote:

In what way is it the same ground?

 
The theme of the educational system and parents/adults failing children is very similar. It runs through the early Zappa/Mothers albums (Freak Out, We're Only In It For the Money).

 
 wgsu_1978 wrote:
Not to stir up this hornets nest again, but I think I'd like this more if Frank Zappa hadn't covered the same ground 15 years before.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDE9MC3jnl0
 
I think Chuck Berry has your Frank Zappa beat by a few years: https://youtu.be/DHG5-GxI_Es
What is it with Zappa fans? 
 Mayasha wrote:
Bill, you don't like school very much, do you? School by Supertramp and now this? I can't wait to see what's next :)

 
Followed by Mad World.  Makes sense to me.  I didn't enjoy public school either.
I have always loved this, especially the way Gilmour gets total expression to flow from his Strat like Coltrane got out of his sax. Artistry!
Me likee! {#Bananajam}
 wgsu_1978 wrote:
Not to stir up this hornets nest again, but I think I'd like this more if Frank Zappa hadn't covered the same ground 15 years before.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDE9MC3jnl0
 
In what way is it the same ground?
Not to stir up this hornets nest again, but I think I'd like this more if Frank Zappa hadn't covered the same ground 15 years before.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDE9MC3jnl0