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Erik Satie — Gnossienne No1
Album: Satie: Piano Music (Frank Glazer, Piano)
Avg rating:
8.6

Your rating:
Total ratings: 4467









Released: 1889
Length: 3:43
Plays (last 30 days): 2
(Instrumental)
Comments (525)add comment
What a nice break from the chitter chatter in my mind
If Satie is not a reason to learn how to play the piano, I don't know of one. This must be my first 10 on Radio Paradise.

 Karima wrote:
Also listen to France Clidat playing Satie. And Reinbert de Leeuw!

This was just what I was going to write. Although I'd name de Leeuw first – I still cannot believe how beautiful Satie's music gets by playing it so slowly that it almost stops. It must have taken such a lot of courage to play it that way!
This reminds me of the piano soundtrack in the movie Being There. Not sure if it's the same person, but a similar hauntingly beautiful melody.
 Proclivities wrote:

Enter "Erik Satie" as the search criteria on IMDB and you should retrieve a list of films which feature his music.
 
and I heard he never once objected to using his music in films.
I wonder if he released it online..........

 
AhhtheMusic wrote:

Some things are just too amazing to explain...
 

 rharvey658 wrote:
 cosmiclint wrote:
Album: Satie: Piano Music (Frank Glazer, Piano)
Released: 1889
Last play: Apr 8, 2018
Plays in last 30 days: 3
There is no way this album was released in 1889. Just saying ...
 
Marty McFly had it in the DeLorean when he went back in time to 1885. It must have been taken out of the car before he returned to 1985, and someone found it 4 years later.

 

Éric Alfred Leslie Satie (French: [eʁik sati]; 17 May 1866 – 1 July 1925), who signed his name Erik Satie after 1884, was a French composer and pianist. Satie was an influential artist in the late 19th- and early 20th-century Parisian avant-garde. His work was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music, and the Theatre of the Absurd.

Well then!  Having your name used as a precursor to both repetitive music AND the Theatre of the Absurd....how cool is that!  It's still a 9, though Satie is an interesting character from back in the late 1800s....Long Live RP!!
 cosmiclint wrote:
Album: Satie: Piano Music (Frank Glazer, Piano)
Released: 1889
Last play: Apr 8, 2018
Plays in last 30 days: 3
There is no way this album was released in 1889. Just saying ...
 
Marty McFly had it in the DeLorean when he went back in time to 1885. It must have been taken out of the car before he returned to 1985, and someone found it 4 years later.

NINE
 cosmiclint wrote:
Album: Satie: Piano Music (Frank Glazer, Piano)
Released: 1889
Last play: Apr 8, 2018
Plays in last 30 days: 3


There is no way this album was released in 1889. Just saying ...
 

You never know; it's been said that Erik Satie had magic powers and could manipulate time and space.
Tout à fait
More classical please!
Hemelse muziek; elke keer weer magisch om te horen
 cosmiclint wrote:
Album: Satie: Piano Music (Frank Glazer, Piano)
Released: 1889
Last play: Apr 8, 2018
Plays in last 30 days: 3
There is no way this album was released in 1889. Just saying ...
 
Some things are just too amazing to explain...
Relevant: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PsUkQGY8vR0

 jenakle wrote:
patreezia wrote:
This gorgeous delicate piece features in 100's of films, check Internet Movie Database!
I know the site, but how do you search the soundtracks?
 
Enter "Erik Satie" as the search criteria on IMDB and you should retrieve a list of films which feature his music.
 kevrey wrote:
Continuing the mood from Vienna Teng Passage, a solemn bit of music.
 
Yeah, this is an inspired bit of work from RP. Kudos!

(But, could you follow it up with something that doesn't make me want to reach for the razor blades, please? Kthxbai.) 
Slightly prefer the original by Chicha Libre
https://youtu.be/bHY2ldYdaKA


Minimal-music at its best. 
 On_The_Beach wrote:
I mean, come on, this is it.
 
I would not say it is "it", but pretty good!
Continuing the mood from Vienna Teng Passage, a solemn bit of music.
OBO

Outstanding, but overplayed....

<donning fire suit>
I mean, come on, this is it.
First heard this on a Delta playlist of all things - now every time I hear it, I sigh.

When I hear this, I think of Isabelle Huppert walking barefoot on a parquet floor.
Play this to your Cannabis plants {#Daisy}
Fantastic.
Album: Satie: Piano Music (Frank Glazer, Piano)
Released: 1889
Last play: Apr 8, 2018
Plays in last 30 days: 3


There is no way this album was released in 1889. Just saying ...
 Tomasni wrote:
To me this is strong 8- Most Excellent

 
DuranAir agrees!  Mui Bueno!
quelle ambiance !!
To me this is strong 8- Most Excellent
 stoatva wrote:
Check out Tony McManus’ guitar version of this one.  
 
https://youtu.be/MmiWlMJiq1s

(my cousin Mike made that guitar, he noted proudly)
Check out Tony McManus’ guitar version of this one.  
Not enough notes! Too short, too short!
As the first few notes sounded, I said out loud "Oohh, nice!" The whole piece makes a nice change from whatever preceeded.
Da iawn, bendegedig!
To me this is strong 8- Most Excellent
What a nice break from U2 and Zeppelin. 
Nice music.
Very black lyrics....
 nicolaluna wrote:
Does this feature in any soundtracks besides Man on Wire and Gloomy Sunday?  I know I've heard it somewhere before here, today, in association with some film....

~anyone?

  
Proclivities wrote:

I believe it's also in the film Chocolat.

 
Erik Satie's Gymnopédie No. 1 is in a fabulous film: Louis Malle's "My Dinner with Andre"  
My Dinner with Andre 1981 film theatrical release poster.jpg
 LAwolf8 wrote:
This is Paris cafe' music from that great Impressionist era turn of the century, can't you smell the absinth  ?

 
Un Ricard svp.....{#Cheers}
This is Paris cafe' music from that great Impressionist era turn of the century, can't you smell the absinth  ?
https://jtinamac.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/mid-clouds-2-altocumulus-lenticular_13960_600x450.jpg
wonderful. love to hear songs interspersed with instrumentals like this. Lovely and moody.
Exquisite music

(hey Kicks have you read Roger Shattucks "The Banquet Years: The Origins of the Avant-Garde in France, 1885 to World War I (1955)"
it's super  : )


I realy love this music...!
It is strong, soft, sad and joyful!
I want this music at my funeral... ( It is still a very long time, untill I'll die... ;-) ) 
Nice segue from the Carolina Chocolate Drops 'Snowden's Jig' piece!
perfect rainy day music
I love music in so many forms....more often raucous or with good lyrics.  But something about this Satie piece and Albinoni's Adagio in G Minor knock my emotional socks off.
Another of my "Chill Set" inhabitants.
The phrasing is exquisite; the secret of great jazz... Bill Evans, MM&W, Coltrane, Miles Davis, BB King, Gilmour, and yes Frank Zappa 
Found this interesting:

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/a-dangerous-and-evil-piano-piece 
Always been a fan of ES.
This after Feist !    Bill, you still got it !   Awesome.
 oldviolin wrote:

Ah, I see it. Crippled and lonely; he wanders the crumbling alleys paved with ancient cobbles polished by circular regeneration; the streets littered with the refuse of intolerant time, and cruel space...how is it that music can so express suffering at the whim of the eternal muse...
to lame indeed. And yet, to healing comes the listening ear and hearing heart...

 
Fu** yeah, man!
Yet another perfect segue: Carolina Chocolate Drops - Snowden's Jig to this. I wouldn't have called it but Bill nailed it. You are the master, sir!!
This is my favorite song on RP, by a long ways.

Second is Ruby Falls by Guster.

Third is anything by LZ.

Fourth is Casimir Pulaski Day. 
Above I've just read: Released in 1889. What? The note sheet?
This was in Being There
 OK, glad to hear it {#Ask}david927 wrote:
There is much beautiful, perfect music; this, though, is beautiful because it's not perfect.  It's injured and has nowhere to turn, like an orphan.  And, for that, it disarms me.

 


 thewiseking wrote:
didja know Frank Zappa was a big fan of Satie?

 
That is not surprising. And makes sense.
Nice segue....
didja know Frank Zappa was a big fan of Satie?
 buddy wrote:
I forgot how great this album is until hearing this tune again.  Had the fortune to see The Shins live in a smaller venue just when they were hitting it big in the mid-2000's.  Brilliant stuff.

 
hey buddy -      {#Arrowu}     your comment must be on the wrong song.
I forgot how great this album is until hearing this tune again.  Had the fortune to see The Shins live in a smaller venue just when they were hitting it big in the mid-2000's.  Brilliant stuff.
Agree with all comments.  He was a special kind of genius, and it awakens a seventh sense in me every time I hear Satie.  Thank you for playing it ...
I'm slightly surprised that this song has a higher rating than any Led Zeppelin song played on RP. Just shows the eclectic nature of the listeners!
Top of the melt in your mind and heart 
It makes me want to cry, it's so beautiful {#Notworthy}
Also listen to France Clidat playing Satie. And Reinbert de Leeuw!
Look out, Chopin... 
Album coverWith the help of Shazam and some further digging around, I found out that this particular performance is by Pascal Rogé, not Frank Glazer as the cover shown here suggests. It is originally from the 1984 release “Satie - 3 Gymnopédies & other piano works”, and is also featured on some compilations like “After the Rain / Après la Pluie”. The original album is available on iTunes, so Bill should update the database and shopping links. And while he's at it, he may try to find a better copy because this one obviously has glitches.

(Edit: Bill has replaced it with a glitch-free rip, so enjoy {#Smile})
Gorgeous music!  : )
first heard (read) of Satie in "The Banquet Years: The Origins of the Avant-Garde in France, 1885 to World War I (1955) Roger Shattuck -  who said: "Everything has been said. But nobody listens. Therefore it has to be said all over again—only better. In order to say it better, we have to know how it was said before."  
 
 TerryS wrote:
As the sole member of the Metropolitan Church of Art of Jesus  the Conductor he could call his pieces whatever he pleased......Flabby Preludes for a Dog, Sketches and Exasperations of a Big Boob made of Wood or Desiccated Embryos.
This is tamely named and simply beautiful. Not all his compositions are as easily grasped, but nearly all are worth the effort.
That's what comes from a man who thought so much of his umbrella that he preferred to keep it safe under his top coat when it rained.

 
{#Roflol}Really? The guy sounds more bananas than Fyffes, but perhaps that's the price of genius. His music is wonderful and transcendent.
 Kaw wrote:
With the headphone I hear the MP3 quality is below 128kbit/s. If I had to guess I would say its around 64 or 96.
Bill, if possible: replace with a better quality. 

 
Nice try but no cigar. 64kbps would be audible across the entire recording and would sound as if someone would have poured glass shards in the piano. I don't hear that when playing the 192kbps stream at high volume. There are only a few momentary glitches, either this was ripped from vinyl and what we hear are simply scratches, or it was ripped from CD and errors occurred while reading. Maybe I'll just buy this CD and make a new rip myself…
{#Hearteyes}
Goosebumps every time I hear it.
This sounds very much like the Aldo Ciccolini version, he understood the slight delays in timing that pull on the heart.
 mediamarv wrote:
Aldo Ciccolini's version is still my favorite. Sadly, he passed this February. I have 3 vinyls of his. KMPX in San Francisco, 1968 turned me on to Satie's music.

 
That's the version I've got, and I agree, it's perfect.

Along with Debussy and Ravel, Satie composed what I'd call Impressionist music - very much of a piece with the art of the period.

Sorry if that sound pretentious - not meant to be!
With the headphone I hear the MP3 quality is below 128kbit/s. If I had to guess I would say its around 64 or 96.
Bill, if possible: replace with a better quality. 
As the sole member of the Metropolitan Church of Art of Jesus  the Conductor he could call his pieces whatever he pleased......Flabby Preludes for a Dog, Sketches and Exasperations of a Big Boob made of Wood or Desiccated Embryos.
This is tamely named and simply beautiful. Not all his compositions are as easily grasped, but nearly all are worth the effort.
That's what comes from a man who thought so much of his umbrella that he preferred to keep it safe under his top coat when it rained.


deep simplicity and beauty {#Sunny}
This song was in the Painted Veil. Enchanting movie. 
lovely
As always you never cease to amaze me Radio Paradise....... Wonderful! Keep on truckin'!
Aldo Ciccolini's version is still my favorite. Sadly, he passed this February. I have 3 vinyls of his. KMPX in San Francisco, 1968 turned me on to Satie's music.
Don't forget to tip your waiter.  {#Music}

nznylcn wrote:

Thank you,my days gets better and better every hour:))

 thanks to Radio Paradise

 


The music has been wonderful this last hour!

Thank you,my days gets better and better every hour:))

 thanks to Radio Paradise


 TerryS wrote:

All you ever wanted to know about Erik:

https://wfmu.org/~kennyg/popular/articles/satie.html



 

All you ever wanted to know about Erik:

https://wfmu.org/~kennyg/popular/articles/satie.html


This is a very cool 2-CD set. I'm unfamiliar with Glazer, but IMHO he portrays Satie's romanticism with lyric feeling.
Haunting.
 helgigermany wrote:
To lame...

 
Ah, I see it. Crippled and lonely; he wanders the crumbling alleys paved with ancient cobbles polished by circular regeneration; the streets littered with the refuse of intolerant time, and cruel space...how is it that music can so express suffering at the whim of the eternal muse...
to lame indeed. And yet, to healing comes the listening ear and hearing heart...
{#Notworthy}
Gnomic
To lame...
Haunting. The tune stays with you. 
Very nice... it softens the moment{#Clap}
Mighty fine.
Didn't The Doors cover this?
Boy I get so sad when i hear this...Broody Moody
I prefer Ciccolini's version (studio one).
Play Elbow's "CHARGE" and understand a true 10!



Salve for the soul...
Thank you,,my morning gets better  and better every day thanks to Radio Paradise.{#Sunny}
I do appreciate classical music once in a while on RP. Thank you!!
would very much like to hear more of this composers work, he was very radical in his time. good stuff. I love this quiet interlude even in edited form.
Haunting ... 
There is much beautiful, perfect music; this, though, is beautiful because it's not perfect.  It's injured and has nowhere to turn, like an orphan.  And, for that, it disarms me.
This makes for a good segue into Gary Jules's "Mad World." I expect it, in fact, even though it doesn't always happen.
 bonjourtristesse wrote:

Le Feu Follet by Louis Malle

 

It was also from the movie The Painted Veil
 nicolaluna wrote:
Does this feature in any soundtracks besides Man on Wire and Gloomy Sunday?  I know I've heard it somewhere before here, today, in association with some film....

~anyone?

 
I believe it's also in the film Chocolat.
 thewiseking wrote:

There should not be any rating option over this. It is of a higher level.



 
I was thinking the same...
Very haunting… I see many people with tears in their eyes looking into the abyss!! {#Cry}
 oldfart48 wrote:
Zappa will live forever, also......

 
....... which is not a bad thing :)
Zappa will live forever, also......
Music - over 100 years old - still touching to the bones. 
Anybody see irony when comparing this music against the album cover's venue: Theatre du Vaudeville?
 thewiseking wrote:

There should not be any rating option over this. It is of a higher level.



 
11?
Expressive and weighty. More please.