[ ]   [ ]   [ ]                        [ ]      [ ]   [ ]
Bob Dylan — A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall
Album: The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan
Avg rating:
7.5

Your rating:
Total ratings: 666









Released: 1963
Length: 6:47
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Oh, where have you been, my blue-eyed son?
Oh, where have you been, my darling young one?
I've stumbled on the side of twelve misty mountains
I've walked and I've crawled on six crooked highways
I've stepped in the middle of seven sad forests
I've been out in front of a dozen dead oceans
I've been ten thousand miles in the mouth of a graveyard
And it's a hard, and it's a hard, it's a hard, and it's a hard
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall
Oh, what did you see, my blue-eyed son?
Oh, what did you see, my darling young one?
I saw a newborn baby with wild wolves all around it
I saw a highway of diamonds with nobody on it
I saw a black branch with blood that kept drippin'
I saw a room full of men with their hammers a-bleedin'
I saw a white ladder all covered with water
I saw ten thousand talkers whose tongues were all broken
I saw guns and sharp swords in the hands of young children
And it's a hard, and it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall
And what did you hear, my blue-eyed son?
And what did you hear, my darling young one?
I heard the sound of a thunder, it roared out a warnin'
Heard the roar of a wave that could drown the whole world
Heard one person starve, I heard many people laughin'
Heard the song of a poet who died in the gutter
Heard the sound of a clown who cried in the alley
And it's a hard, and it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall
Oh, who did you meet, my blue-eyed son?
Who did you meet, my darling young one?
I met a young child beside a dead pony
I met a white man who walked a black dog
I met a young woman whose body was burning
I met a young girl, she gave me a rainbow
I met one man who was wounded in love
I met another man who was wounded with hatred
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard
It's a hard rain's a-gonna fall
Oh, what'll you do now, my blue-eyed son?
Oh, what'll you do now, my darling young one?
I'm a-goin' back out 'fore the rain starts a-fallin'
I'll walk to the depths of the deepest black forest
Where the people are many and their hands are all empty
Where the pellets of poison are flooding their waters
Where the home in the valley meets the damp dirty prison
Where the executioner's face is always well-hidden
Where hunger is ugly, where souls are forgotten
Where black is the color, where none is the number
And I'll tell it and think it and speak it and breathe it
And reflect it from the mountain so all souls can see it
Then I'll stand on the ocean until I start sinkin'
But I'll know my song well before I start singin'
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard
It's a hard rain's a-gonna fall
Comments (60)add comment
Is there a more classic American song? More prophetic? And timeless? 
Oh, where have you been, my blue-eyed son?
Oh, where have you been, my darling young one?
I've stumbled on the side of twelve misty mountains
I've walked and I've crawled on six crooked highways
I've stepped in the middle of seven sad forests
I've been out in front of a dozen dead oceans
I've been ten thousand miles in the mouth of a graveyard
And it's a hard, and it's a hard, it's a hard, and it's a hard
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall
Oh, what did you see, my blue-eyed son?
Oh, what did you see, my darling young one?
I saw a newborn baby with wild wolves all around it
I saw a highway of diamonds with nobody on it
I saw a black branch with blood that kept drippin'
I saw a room full of men with their hammers a-bleedin'
I saw a white ladder all covered with water
I saw ten thousand talkers whose tongues were all broken
I saw guns and sharp swords in the hands of young children
And it's a hard, and it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall
And what did you hear, my blue-eyed son?
And what did you hear, my darling young one?
I heard the sound of a thunder, it roared out a warnin'
Heard the roar of a wave that could drown the whole world
Heard one person starve, I heard many people laughin'
Heard the song of a poet who died in the gutter
Heard the sound of a clown who cried in the alley
And it's a hard, and it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall
Oh, who did you meet, my blue-eyed son?
Who did you meet, my darling young one?
I met a young child beside a dead pony
I met a white man who walked a black dog
I met a young woman whose body was burning
I met a young girl, she gave me a rainbow
I met one man who was wounded in love
I met another man who was wounded with hatred
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard
It's a hard rain's a-gonna fall
Oh, what'll you do now, my blue-eyed son?
Oh, what'll you do now, my darling young one?
I'm a-goin' back out 'fore the rain starts a-fallin'
I'll walk to the depths of the deepest black forest
Where the people are many and their hands are all empty
Where the pellets of poison are flooding their waters
Where the home in the valley meets the damp dirty prison
Where the executioner's face is always well-hidden
Where hunger is ugly, where souls are forgotten
Where black is the color, where none is the number
And I'll tell it and think it and speak it and breathe it
And reflect it from the mountain so all souls can see it
Then I'll stand on the ocean until I start sinkin'
But I'll know my song well before I start singin'
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard
It's a hard rain's a-gonna fall
 
Songwriters: Bob Dylan
 idiot_wind wrote:
Ya mean RnR performers actually use to write song lyrics that make you drop your jaw and your mind go !@*%$#* and maybe changed the way you see the world? 

Nah. Couldn't be true.  
 

 
And get all teary eyed when you try to sing along? Not possible.

I heard ten thousand whispering and nobody listening.
If you think of each of his albums as a book, and consider his entire library, then the Nobel Prize makes sense.

N'est-ce Pas? 

 
 westslope wrote:

Yup.  The likelihood of a regional nuclear war is greater today than perhaps it ever has been in the post-war period.

That and you get to pay for over half a century of Israeli occupation of the remaining bits of the former Palestinian mandate.   

According to my count, a little under 30,000 Americans have died for this 'cause' so  far and I fully expect more to die.  Presumably the proponents will be happy with the enormous kill ratios.

 
I re-re-watched Dr. Strangelove recently (my first 're-watching' was just after 9/11 while we were looking for WMD in Iraq) and I remember back in early 2002 how I hoped that movie didn't feel relevant again.  Well damnit if it is!  And now with a president about as loony as General Jack D Ripper, I can totally see something STUPID happening because of totally baseless fears (those dang Ruskies don't drink water, Mandrake!)  And with tax season coming soon, all I can think of is "how many lives do my tax dollars help kill?" UGGG double UGGG

If I take back all the snide Canadian remarks (lol, well, not that many, eh?) I've ever made, can I be allowed to live in BC?  It's aboot (sorry :)) the same as living in Washington state, and I already know the metric system from my university studies.  And I can learn hockey. 

 


 lizardking wrote:
.....

And goshdarnit if I don't feel those early 1960's feelings of angst and fear all again now in the early 21st century, like of all the things I MISSED by being born in '77 a new cold war IS NOT what I want. 

........

 
Yup.  The likelihood of a regional nuclear war is greater today than perhaps it ever has been in the post-war period.

That and you get to pay for over half a century of Israeli occupation of the remaining bits of the former Palestinian mandate.   

According to my count, a little under 30,000 Americans have died for this 'cause' so  far and I fully expect more to die.  Presumably the proponents will be happy with the enormous kill ratios.
Got some Led Zepplin Album one on PSD >>.    Life is good.

Nobel Prize? 

Yeah baby. 

Yeah Bobby. 

Why do his songs seem to last about 5 minutes too long?  Bleck.
 kingart wrote:
Umm, no lyrics are available? Blank verse, indeed. 
Oh, where have you been, my blue-eyed son?
And where have you been my darling young one?
I've stumbled on the side of twelve misty mountains
I've walked and I've crawled on six crooked highways
I've stepped in the middle of seven sad forests
I've been out in front of a dozen dead oceans
I've been ten thousand miles in the mouth of a graveyard
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, and it's a hard
It's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.

Oh, what did you see, my blue eyed son?
And what did you see, my darling young one?
I saw a newborn baby with wild wolves all around it
I saw a highway of diamonds with nobody on it
I saw a black branch with blood that kept drippin'
I saw a room full of men with their hammers a-bleedin'
I saw a white ladder all covered with water
I saw ten thousand talkers whose tongues were all broken
I saw guns and sharp swords in the hands of young children
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, and it's a hard
It's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.

And what did you hear, my blue-eyed son?
And what did you hear, my darling young one?
I heard the sound of a thunder that roared out a warnin'
I heard the roar of a wave that could drown the whole world
I heard one hundred drummers whose hands were a-blazin'
I heard ten thousand whisperin' and nobody listenin'
I heard one person starve, I heard many people laughin'
Heard the song of a poet who died in the gutter
Heard the sound of a clown who cried in the alley
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.

Oh, what did you meet my blue-eyed son?
Who did you meet, my darling young one?
I met a young child beside a dead pony
I met a white man who walked a black dog
I met a young woman whose body was burning
I met a young girl, she gave me a rainbow
I met one man who was wounded in love
I met another man who was wounded in hatred
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.

And what'll you do now, my blue-eyed son?
And what'll you do now my darling young one?
I'm a-goin' back out 'fore the rain starts a-fallin'
I'll walk to the depths of the deepest black forest
Where the people are a many and their hands are all empty
Where the pellets of poison are flooding their waters
Where the home in the valley meets the damp dirty prison
And the executioner's face is always well hidden
Where hunger is ugly, where souls are forgotten
Where black is the color, where none is the number
And I'll tell and speak it and think it and breathe it
And reflect from the mountain so all souls can see it
And I'll stand on the ocean until I start sinkin'
But I'll know my song well before I start singing
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, and it's a hard
It's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.

  Thanks kingart, I was coming here to do the same!

And goshdarnit if I don't feel those early 1960's feelings of angst and fear all again now in the early 21st century, like of all the things I MISSED by being born in '77 a new cold war IS NOT what I want. 

22 y/o Bob doing his thing....when I was 22...well...I was not writing songs of such social importance that nearly EVERYONE knows the song in their soul.  Haunting for sure...glad we haven't gotten there again quite yet...hopefully a new version of Robert Zimmerman comes around soon to help remind us to be NORMAL human beings.  LONG LIVE PLANET EARTH and RP!


Umm, no lyrics are available? Blank verse, indeed. 


Oh, where have you been, my blue-eyed son?
And where have you been my darling young one?
I've stumbled on the side of twelve misty mountains
I've walked and I've crawled on six crooked highways
I've stepped in the middle of seven sad forests
I've been out in front of a dozen dead oceans
I've been ten thousand miles in the mouth of a graveyard
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, and it's a hard
It's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.

Oh, what did you see, my blue eyed son?
And what did you see, my darling young one?
I saw a newborn baby with wild wolves all around it
I saw a highway of diamonds with nobody on it
I saw a black branch with blood that kept drippin'
I saw a room full of men with their hammers a-bleedin'
I saw a white ladder all covered with water
I saw ten thousand talkers whose tongues were all broken
I saw guns and sharp swords in the hands of young children
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, and it's a hard
It's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.

And what did you hear, my blue-eyed son?
And what did you hear, my darling young one?
I heard the sound of a thunder that roared out a warnin'
I heard the roar of a wave that could drown the whole world
I heard one hundred drummers whose hands were a-blazin'
I heard ten thousand whisperin' and nobody listenin'
I heard one person starve, I heard many people laughin'
Heard the song of a poet who died in the gutter
Heard the sound of a clown who cried in the alley
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.

Oh, what did you meet my blue-eyed son?
Who did you meet, my darling young one?
I met a young child beside a dead pony
I met a white man who walked a black dog
I met a young woman whose body was burning
I met a young girl, she gave me a rainbow
I met one man who was wounded in love
I met another man who was wounded in hatred
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.

And what'll you do now, my blue-eyed son?
And what'll you do now my darling young one?
I'm a-goin' back out 'fore the rain starts a-fallin'
I'll walk to the depths of the deepest black forest
Where the people are a many and their hands are all empty
Where the pellets of poison are flooding their waters
Where the home in the valley meets the damp dirty prison
And the executioner's face is always well hidden
Where hunger is ugly, where souls are forgotten
Where black is the color, where none is the number
And I'll tell and speak it and think it and breathe it
And reflect from the mountain so all souls can see it
And I'll stand on the ocean until I start sinkin'
But I'll know my song well before I start singing
And it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard, and it's a hard
It's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.

{#Sleep}
Listen to these lyrics. Like him or not, this is part of the reason he won, and deserved, that Noble
Zimmy the Wise Man  -  stupendous words        {#Cheers}
Not to get all Apocalyptic on yez, but I gotta say these lyrics are resonating today.
 madaxeman wrote:
Shite! {#Grumpy}

 
you reckon?  I think this song is the closest modern equivalent we have to the Oracle of Delphi.
 slandering wrote:
recommend  the patti smith version Nobel prize nomination  urgently      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=941PHEJHCwU

 
you mean the line "and I'll know my song well before I start singing"?

not that I blame her.. I think she was just overwhelmed. 
recommend  the patti smith version Nobel prize nomination  urgently      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=941PHEJHCwU
Shite! {#Grumpy}
Gods words coming out of the mouth of  of mere mortals.Happens occasionally. Doesn't last long when it does. 
Twelve years later, the USA would finally withdraw from Vietnam with its tail between its legs. 
Bob has a new album and he's touring,.

The guy is just freakin amazing. We should all be so lucky and try to enjoy our days in the manner we choose.

Keep writing and singing brother Bob. There are still many moments to be experienced. May have to do with physics or religion. I always get them mixed up.     
Yes, 1963.
Ann Wilson's cover of this song is also amazing.
i may be going over board here but i can't help it
every single line of the lyrics conjure up vivid images and are thought provoking
.
.
also, lucky me, i PSD'd this from the Hooters 
 4merdj wrote:
Trivia question:
Who is the lady with Dylan on the front cover of the album?
Thank you for playing! {#Cheers} 

 
According to Wikipedia it is Suze Rotolo, Bob Dylan's girlfriend at the time.
Trivia question:
Who is the lady with Dylan on the front cover of the album?
Thank you for playing! {#Cheers} 
Ya mean RnR performers actually use to write song lyrics that make you drop your jaw and your mind go !@*%$#* and maybe changed the way you see the world? 

Nah. Couldn't be true.  
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdQnpezsxSc
{#Cheers}         {#Cheers}         {#Cheers}





{#Cheers}         {#Cheers}         {#Cheers}






{#Cheers}         {#Cheers}         {#Cheers}


10

 
Gets a 10 in the context of the time it was written. 
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz..............
 Bleyfusz wrote:

What I said: words. Not just vocables.

 

Sorry
I quoted you by mistake
My mistake.

Sure you´re right: words, not only vocables.
 hayduke2 wrote:
Powerful Dylan

there's a film by Phil Kaufman that has a strong and subtle image of Dylan singing in a small club, it sticks with me to this day:

The Wanderers is a 1979 drama film about gangs and the greaser subculture, based on the novel "The Wanderers" by Richard Price. It marks the sixth feature film directed by American Philip Kaufman.

The Wanderers
 gained popularity and cult status over the years because of its sensitive depiction of teenagers coming of age. The gangs named in the movie, though fictionalized, are based on real gangs encountered by Price in his childhood, growing up in a housing project in the Bronx. Real names of Bronx gangs (1950s-1960s) are used. "The Wanderers" was the name of an actual gang located in South Brooklyn that was part of the larger South Brooklyn Boys gang. The movie depicts the end of a more innocent time (1950s to early 1960s.), reflected by the violent death of Turkey (a former Wanderer), the recruitment of the Fordham Baldies into the Marines (a subtle foreshadowing of the Vietnam War), the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the imminent marriage and domestication of Wanderers leader Richie, the departure of Wanderers Joey and Perry (who drive off to California), and a scene depicting then-rising folk singer Bob Dylan in Greenwich Village performing his song "The Times They Are A-Changin'".

Kaufman later said, "When I was shooting Goldstein, we came out on the street one day and I saw people were staggering down the street crying. We were walking around with our cameras and saw a bunch of people standing around a store window, looking in and crying. That was how I found out that JFK had been killed. We duplicated that in The Wanderers with the people looking in the department store window at all the TVs, watching the news that JFK had been assassinated. I love that moment when Ritchie (the protagonist) sees this transition happen and he decides to go back to the old neighborhood and stay in the old world, instead of going to see Bob Dylan with the Karen Allen character and joining the new world."

 

 
Yes, I remember the Dylan scene very well, though I saw the movie decades ago. I wander, ooops: wonder why it had such a deep impact on me. Its historical value, maybe, the way Kaufman put it himself?
 thais wrote:
Lots of words, but no words, actually.
Only images, pictures, dreams, simbols, visions, metaphors.
Poetry, as a matter of fact.
 

 
Bleyfusz wrote:

Yes. Words, actually.

 

 
What I said: words. Not just vocables.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2IAJFCxAP_Y

 

some day a real rain will come


I finally get the whole Dylan thing
Lots of words, but no words, actually.
Only images, pictures, dreams, simbols, visions, metaphors.
Poetry, as a matter of fact.
 

 
Bleyfusz wrote:

Yes. Words, actually.

 


Powerful Dylan

there's a film by Phil Kaufman that has a strong and subtle image of Dylan singing in a small club, it sticks with me to this day:

The Wanderers is a 1979 drama film about gangs and the greaser subculture, based on the novel "The Wanderers" by Richard Price. It marks the sixth feature film directed by American Philip Kaufman.

The Wanderers
 gained popularity and cult status over the years because of its sensitive depiction of teenagers coming of age. The gangs named in the movie, though fictionalized, are based on real gangs encountered by Price in his childhood, growing up in a housing project in the Bronx. Real names of Bronx gangs (1950s-1960s) are used. "The Wanderers" was the name of an actual gang located in South Brooklyn that was part of the larger South Brooklyn Boys gang. The movie depicts the end of a more innocent time (1950s to early 1960s.), reflected by the violent death of Turkey (a former Wanderer), the recruitment of the Fordham Baldies into the Marines (a subtle foreshadowing of the Vietnam War), the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the imminent marriage and domestication of Wanderers leader Richie, the departure of Wanderers Joey and Perry (who drive off to California), and a scene depicting then-rising folk singer Bob Dylan in Greenwich Village performing his song "The Times They Are A-Changin'".

Kaufman later said, "When I was shooting Goldstein, we came out on the street one day and I saw people were staggering down the street crying. We were walking around with our cameras and saw a bunch of people standing around a store window, looking in and crying. That was how I found out that JFK had been killed. We duplicated that in The Wanderers with the people looking in the department store window at all the TVs, watching the news that JFK had been assassinated. I love that moment when Ritchie (the protagonist) sees this transition happen and he decides to go back to the old neighborhood and stay in the old world, instead of going to see Bob Dylan with the Karen Allen character and joining the new world."

 
 Giselle62 wrote:
um, boy, this song sure has a lot of words, doesn't it?

 
Yes. Words, actually.


 oldsaxon wrote:

He was so much older then. He's younger than that now.

 
{#Clap}
 
— I generally like Dylan songs better when someone other than Bob is singing them. So thanks to Jason Mraz for the version that turned me on to this song's greatness.


 
I like Bob just fine, but Edie Brickell also does an excellent version.
 ick wrote:
sounds like an old man

 
He was so much older then. He's younger than that now.
Sounds a bit like that guy from The War on Drugs. :-)
Such a cool and strange song with lyrics that blow your mind. 

But...I'm biased.  
 Lazarus wrote:
Everybody in my homeless camp loves this brilliant folk song...  we be dancing...

 
Hope you have strong muscles, gotta keep going for 20 mins.
sounds like an old man
...funny, i was just thinking about how much this song reminded me of woody...
Great song, great artist playing on a great station, thank you (Happy Woody Guthrie Birthday all!)!!!
Everybody in my homeless camp loves this brilliant folk song...  we be dancing...
I also love the Rolling Thunder version.
Genius.
 
That's some talent you have there calypsus

calypsus_1 wrote:

In the Middle of 7 Sad Forestsby *alsobroken
John Clementi   ©2008-2012 *alsobroken

I was listening to this Bob Dylan song and started sketching some images I got from the lyrics. When I had four or five images(It's a long song), I came up with a story connecting them and . . . well, four days later I had this.

I'd tell you what I think is going down in this scene, but I'd rather find out what you guys see ...

Here's some of the lines I was playing around with:

I saw a newborn baby with wild wolves all around it ...
I saw a black branch with blood that kept drippin' ...
I saw guns and sharp swords in the hands of young children ...
I met a young woman whose body was burning ...
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.

— I generally like Dylan songs better when someone other than Bob is singing them. So thanks to Jason Mraz for the version that turned me on to this song's greatness.




 



marvelous...  love this song...


 Giselle62 wrote:
um, boy, this song sure has a lot of words, doesn't it?
 


Yes, and they are all good...


Bob Dylan has a new album out called Tempest...  for more information about the new album, look here...



In the Middle of 7 Sad Forestsby *alsobroken
John Clementi   ©2008-2012 *alsobroken

I was listening to this Bob Dylan song and started sketching some images I got from the lyrics. When I had four or five images(It's a long song), I came up with a story connecting them and . . . well, four days later I had this.

I'd tell you what I think is going down in this scene, but I'd rather find out what you guys see ...

Here's some of the lines I was playing around with:

I saw a newborn baby with wild wolves all around it ...
I saw a black branch with blood that kept drippin' ...
I saw guns and sharp swords in the hands of young children ...
I met a young woman whose body was burning ...
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.

— I generally like Dylan songs better when someone other than Bob is singing them. So thanks to Jason Mraz for the version that turned me on to this song's greatness.




George Harrison A Hard Rain's Gonna Fall (feat.Bob Dylan)   

The concert for Bangladesh 1971.

I love this concert! Harrison you were one of a special kind & Dylan you just keep on keeping on. I imagine you would have done most anything for your friend, George. I always thought someone should give Dylan a prize for remembering all the lyrics to some of his greatest songs.     ohiodixiechick2




um, boy, this song sure has a lot of words, doesn't it?