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Album: Break In The Clouds
Avg rating:
6.8

Your rating:
Total ratings: 937









Released: 2010
Length: 4:23
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Once I was a big drop of water.
I was in the desert.
I was in high,
Was in high demand.
Saw you turn, saw you turn, turn away.
Water came down, hit the dry ground.
Lost all the facts, slipped through the cracks.
Spread around,
Under and down.
Down through the ground
Carry on, now beyond
Past where all the dancing rained like thunder
After laughter and music, different sounds
To where the thunder became something
Like the pulsing of the flowers
Which is something like the nothing,
Like the pulsing like the hours.
But the hour was on time because I slipped into a flower
Recalled the time to climb the line,
A honeysuckle tower.
I was water brought to lifted leaves
Of daffodils and daily leaves.
Drank into the grace of trees
The aspens like the willows weep.

It hung so low
It touched below
The surface of
A still puddle.
Did I behold
Reflection told
Looking back at me
The eyes of my body.
So I jumped in
Back into my skin
And sang this song
Of where I'd been.

Once I was a big drop of water.
I spread around and became part of many living in the land.
Saw you turn when I turned, turned away.
In the still, in the still water.
And we're still water.
Comments (53)add comment
Elephant Revival? I guess all the good band names have been taken.
Drop.
As in raindrop.
Water.
Not about an elephant,
OR pink floyd.


{#Crown}
Pink Floyd's Animals?!?!?
 iTuner wrote:

Pretty sure that in America no one is shooting sharks or elephants, but be proud because you got a pointless gun hating statement in. 
 
Actually the USA remains the world's second largest importer (after China) of elephant ivory, ALL of which is illegally/illicitly obtained.  And we occupy a similar status with regard to the shark fin trade, which are a prime reason shark populations have been decimated globally.

So, yeah, we Yanks got skin in this most shameful game.
 Proclivities wrote:

He was doing well for a while after he was revived, then he went rogue one day and trampled a quiet, little village of tribal mimes.  It was tragic since no one outside the village could see their pantomime cries for help  Also, he was not at all fooled by their "invisible wall" or "invisible rope" tricks.  The elephant was last seen wearing a striped shirt and beret.

 
{#Roflol}
 fredriley wrote:

If hunters had to use weapons other than guns - say, arrows, spears, bare hands even - they'd be many magnitudes fewer creatures, and the creatures would have a sporting chance. I don't know about the States, other than that youse hunt bears and deer, but in the UK every August, the "Glorious Twelfth", the grouse shooting season starts, with hundreds of posh bastards descending upon the hills and moors with double-barrelled shotguns to blast the shit out of grouse, ground-dwelling birds that have to be scared into the air and then fly like bricks. Hitting a grouse with a shotgun is easier than hitting a cow's arse with a banjo, but these Hooray Henrys consider this to be 'sport' and kill untold thousands of grouse each season. Perhaps if they had to use, say, .22 single-shot rifles, or, better, arrows, it would be 'sport'. Oh, and they'd be forced to eat the bird afterwards. As Freewheelin' Franklin said: "you kill it, you eat it"

Now that I think of it, in the States hunters almost eradicated the bison, which once roamed the prairies in millions, and are now reduced to a few small groups. They couldn't have done that without guns. Is that a "pointless gun hating statement", or just a statement of fact?

 
That'd be cruel and unusual punishment, because 7.5 shot can break the teeth of a yeoman, let alone a buck-toothed Sloane Ranger.
OK I'm in, force 'em to eat the whole damn thing. 
PS Looking on the bright side, the Telegraph recently said that S.L's are being reduced to butler status in service of the foreign oligarchs. How sweet.
Hot Doc.
 CaffeineSam wrote:
I'm confused, is the elephant doing okay now ?

 
He was doing well for a while after he was revived, then he went rogue one day and trampled a quiet, little village of tribal mimes.  It was tragic since no one outside the village could see their pantomime cries for help  Also, he was not at all fooled by their "invisible wall" or "invisible rope" tricks.  The elephant was last seen wearing a striped shirt and beret.
I'm confused, is the elephant doing okay now ?
Forgetting all the pointless rambling on things that have little to do with the music or the group, I think Elephant Revival makes some of the most interesting and wonderful music made today. "Drop" is only one example of heartfelt emotions and great delivery. They were amazing at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival and should be seen in concert if possible. 

(And by the way, Bill, great set, putting them between Daniel Lanois and Damien RIce) 
 fredriley wrote:

If hunters had to use weapons other than guns - say, arrows, spears, bare hands even - they'd be many magnitudes fewer creatures, and the creatures would have a sporting chance. I don't know about the States, other than that youse hunt bears and deer, but in the UK every August, the "Glorious Twelfth", the grouse shooting season starts, with hundreds of posh bastards descending upon the hills and moors with double-barrelled shotguns to blast the shit out of grouse, ground-dwelling birds that have to be scared into the air and then fly like bricks. Hitting a grouse with a shotgun is easier than hitting a cow's arse with a banjo, but these Hooray Henrys consider this to be 'sport' and kill untold thousands of grouse each season. Perhaps if they had to use, say, .22 single-shot rifles, or, better, arrows, it would be 'sport'. Oh, and they'd be forced to eat the bird afterwards. As Freewheelin' Franklin said: "you kill it, you eat it"

Now that I think of it, in the States hunters almost eradicated the bison, which once roamed the prairies in millions, and are now reduced to a few small groups. They couldn't have done that without guns. Is that a "pointless gun hating statement", or just a statement of fact?

 
Statement of fact.  But not so much about the gun, per se, and certainly is not something specific to the American demeanor.   Fact is, and history shows, we're a rapacious species oblivious of all but ourselves, and it ain't the gun that makes us that way.  Be it for greed or hunger or sport we're careless of all others that roam the planet, be they fish or fowl, mammal insect or reptile, and someday it'll be the death of us me thinks.  As Kurt Vonnegut would say.....So it (will) go....

Highlow
American Net'Zen
 iTuner wrote:

Pretty sure that in America no one is shooting sharks or elephants, but be proud because you got a pointless gun hating statement in. 
 
If hunters had to use weapons other than guns - say, arrows, spears, bare hands even - they'd be many magnitudes fewer creatures, and the creatures would have a sporting chance. I don't know about the States, other than that youse hunt bears and deer, but in the UK every August, the "Glorious Twelfth", the grouse shooting season starts, with hundreds of posh bastards descending upon the hills and moors with double-barrelled shotguns to blast the shit out of grouse, ground-dwelling birds that have to be scared into the air and then fly like bricks. Hitting a grouse with a shotgun is easier than hitting a cow's arse with a banjo, but these Hooray Henrys consider this to be 'sport' and kill untold thousands of grouse each season. Perhaps if they had to use, say, .22 single-shot rifles, or, better, arrows, it would be 'sport'. Oh, and they'd be forced to eat the bird afterwards. As Freewheelin' Franklin said: "you kill it, you eat it"

Now that I think of it, in the States hunters almost eradicated the bison, which once roamed the prairies in millions, and are now reduced to a few small groups. They couldn't have done that without guns. Is that a "pointless gun hating statement", or just a statement of fact?
Awful. Went on forever. 
 dew34 wrote:


As it should, maybe apex predator species, ie wolves, bears, big cats all face elimination for one reason or another. Mostly it is the greed of man and his rapacious nature. Humans, espiecally in America, have a gun problem, that is triple fold inflicted upon the animal kingdom. We do it because we can and some instinct inbred since the days of cave dwelling demands we be the only force of great power in this world. That kind of insecurity is both maddening and nealy incomprehensible.

 
Pretty sure that in America no one is shooting sharks or elephants, but be proud because you got a pointless gun hating statement in. 
Depth, good production....well done
 ch83575 wrote:

Thats terrible, I had no idea.  Its awful that we are moving backwards on several conservation issues, sharks come to mind.  The thought that shark-fin soup has led to the wanton mutilation and death of so many animals makes me terribly sad.

 

As it should, maybe apex predator species, ie wolves, bears, big cats all face elimination for one reason or another. Mostly it is the greed of man and his rapacious nature. Humans, espiecally in America, have a gun problem, that is triple fold inflicted upon the animal kingdom. We do it because we can and some instinct inbred since the days of cave dwelling demands we be the only force of great power in this world. That kind of insecurity is both maddening and nealy incomprehensible.
 xkolibuul wrote:

Elephant conservation methods were very successful over large areas of Africa—until 2008 when China jump-started the global ivory trade by convincing the organization that monitors international wildlife trade (CITES) to grant a one-time legal sale of ivory from those countries that had conserved elephants well.  But that legal sale provided cover for many unsavory characters to start poaching elephants again and trading illegally gained ivory, mostly to China and SE Asia.  Since 2008, elephants have been slaughtered steadily across most of Africa, and 2012 was the worst year yet.  

At this point, South Africa is exceedingly atypical in having elephants that are at capacity in their limited habitats, and relatively well protected in parks—thus the contraceptives that catch peoples' attention.  But even there, experts are worried that poaching will arrive:

https://mg.co.za/article/2012-12-05-experts-alarmed-by-dramatic-increase-in-elephant-killings

Across all of West and Central Africa, elephants could disappear entirely if current poaching rates continue.  And East Africa has seen a huge upswing in elephant killing as well.  It is like the dark days of the 1980s when elephants were slaughtered in droves—only with vastly greater ivory demand now from China.  I would love to proclaim an Elephant Revival, but sadly we have a long, long ways to go to reach that.  

 
Thats terrible, I had no idea.  Its awful that we are moving backwards on several conservation issues, sharks come to mind.  The thought that shark-fin soup has led to the wanton mutilation and death of so many animals makes me terribly sad.
 ch83575 wrote:

I am not an expert in the matter, but I was under the impression that elephant conservation methods have been very successful over large areas of Africa.  Successful to the point where humane methods of population control, including birth control vaccines, are being considered in South Africa (https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/15/elephant-birth-control_n_1778127.html). Now, I am not saying that poaching is not a serious problem, and I believe that conserving our natural resources is an obligation that we must take much more seriously globally, but I think that obviously there is somebody doing something right with the elephants.  Like I said, im not an expert on elephant conservation or anything like that, but it seems to me that if some areas of Africa are instituting elephant birth control that it is probably unreasonable to think that our kids will grow in a world without wild elephants.  Maybe we could even call it an Elephant Revival!
 
Elephant conservation methods were very successful over large areas of Africa—until 2008 when China jump-started the global ivory trade by convincing the organization that monitors international wildlife trade (CITES) to grant a one-time legal sale of ivory from those countries that had conserved elephants well.  But that legal sale provided cover for many unsavory characters to start poaching elephants again and trading illegally gained ivory, mostly to China and SE Asia.  Since 2008, elephants have been slaughtered steadily across most of Africa, and 2012 was the worst year yet.  

At this point, South Africa is exceedingly atypical in having elephants that are at capacity in their limited habitats, and relatively well protected in parks—thus the contraceptives that catch peoples' attention.  But even there, experts are worried that poaching will arrive:

https://mg.co.za/article/2012-12-05-experts-alarmed-by-dramatic-increase-in-elephant-killings

Across all of West and Central Africa, elephants could disappear entirely if current poaching rates continue.  And East Africa has seen a huge upswing in elephant killing as well.  It is like the dark days of the 1980s when elephants were slaughtered in droves—only with vastly greater ivory demand now from China.  I would love to proclaim an Elephant Revival, but sadly we have a long, long ways to go to reach that.  
Great group.  Saw them live at the HBT in blairstown. 5 talented players.
Mrs. Iron & Wine?
 xkolibuul wrote:

I never thought I would say this, but Stingray has a point.  

Elephants are being hunted down and slaughtered all across Africa and Asia for their ivory, most of which is shipped by criminal gangs to East and Southeast Asia, especially China, to be carved into mere trinkets.

There is no revival underway.  The tragic destruction of elephant populations is one of the saddest indictments of humankind's greed and lack of vision.  If current trends continue, it is possible that my kids will grow up in a world without wild elephants.  

Please help by supporting global sanctions against China, the Philippines, and other illegal ivory consumers until they get serious about following and enforcing international wildlife laws. 

   
 
I am not an expert in the matter, but I was under the impression that elephant conservation methods have been very successful over large areas of Africa.  Successful to the point where humane methods of population control, including birth control vaccines, are being considered in South Africa (https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/15/elephant-birth-control_n_1778127.html). Now, I am not saying that poaching is not a serious problem, and I believe that conserving our natural resources is an obligation that we must take much more seriously globally, but I think that obviously there is somebody doing something right with the elephants.  Like I said, im not an expert on elephant conservation or anything like that, but it seems to me that if some areas of Africa are instituting elephant birth control that it is probably unreasonable to think that our kids will grow in a world without wild elephants.  Maybe we could even call it an Elephant Revival!
 xkolibuul wrote:


I never thought I would say this, but Stingray has a point.  

Elephants are being hunted down and slaughtered all across Africa and Asia for their ivory, most of which is shipped by criminal gangs to East and Southeast Asia, especially China, to be carved into mere trinkets.

There is no revival underway.  The tragic destruction of elephant populations is one of the saddest indictments of humankind's greed and lack of vision.  If current trends continue, it is possible that my kids will grow up in a world without wild elephants.  

Please help by supporting global sanctions against China, the Philippines, and other illegal ivory consumers until they get serious about following and enforcing international wildlife laws. 

   
 
Wholeheartedly agreed. Elephant slaughter may be the most visible, or the most egregious, but it's far from the only significant crime against animals and nature. Human scumbags are also murdering rhinos by the hundreds for the same reason as elephants. In addition, wolves in the U.S., whales, particularly in the southern oceans, and tigers and orangutans in Indonesia — and that's the short list — are being hunted to endangered status, next stop extinction, and/or their habitat is being annihilated. The offending countries — China, Yemen, Indonesia, Sudan, and others — and/or the mercenaries who kill these animals don't give a shit about sanctions, the moral dilemmas, or any damage to the chain of life. Japan and Iceland may someday heed pressures to suspend their whale hunting. (Want to save a whale? Stop buying Japanese goods, and tell them why.) Otherwise, thugs and gangsters are in it for money or status. Animals hold a very weak hand. Their best chance may be local summary execution of those caught shooting the wildlife or trafficking their parts. Raise the stakes to raise the consciousness of some bad actors.  
If we were to dub a musical act in dedication to the revival of eradicated species, at this rate it would be a long list of bands. 
 Stingray wrote:

To shoot a beautiful adult elephant cost 100.000 Euro in Namibia!

What revival is meant here...?

Stupid name of another (mindless?) folk-band (with beard, I assume)!

 
I never thought I would say this, but Stingray has a point.  

Elephants are being hunted down and slaughtered all across Africa and Asia for their ivory, most of which is shipped by criminal gangs to East and Southeast Asia, especially China, to be carved into mere trinkets.

There is no revival underway.  The tragic destruction of elephant populations is one of the saddest indictments of humankind's greed and lack of vision.  If current trends continue, it is possible that my kids will grow up in a world without wild elephants.  

Please help by supporting global sanctions against China, the Philippines, and other illegal ivory consumers until they get serious about following and enforcing international wildlife laws. 

   
 joelbb wrote:
These lyrics came from a Dr. Seuss book.  Gimme a break.
 
no they didn't 
i jumped back into my skin
i do that all the time
 
 drewd wrote:

Do we get a discount for shooting an ugly one ?
 
I know, it's a serious matter, I mean, shooting an elephant. For 100 000USD.
But your comment truly makes my wrinkles wrinkle more    {#Roflol}{#Mrgreen}

aren't we all elephants after all ?
 Stingray wrote:

To shoot a beautiful adult elephant cost 100.000 Euro in Namibia!

 

 
Do we get a discount for shooting an ugly one ?
What bizarre timing! I saw the singer playing (a saw) and singing about nine hours ago in a folk club near Liverpool. She was playing with Gregory Isakov. Amazing voice!
up an' runnin' again, good one rp, rough trot there without the website, but the music continued nonetheless, 'on ya! ;)*
These lyrics came from a Dr. Seuss book.  Gimme a break.

To shoot a beautiful adult elephant cost 100.000 Euro in Namibia!

What revival is meant here...?

Stupid name of another (mindless?) folk-band (with beard, I assume)!


Great band and very cool folks on top of their talent.
Quite the easy listening Friday afternoon...time for a nap.
i rated a 1. now i rate a 6. it's all so emotional and timely.
So much of life depends on drops
Elephant droppings. . . 
This plods along...glad the band name isn't 'Elephant Drop' with a song called "Revival".

Sounds like Cat Power. Why not just play her?
The weakest link of the Be Good Tanyas was revived by an elephant. Instrumentals, yes. Vocals, try another form of expression.
Nope don't like the vocals...at all !
Well, I saw once a five-legged elephant and the love interest was a recumbent log. Why bother reviving him?
 drewd wrote:
Reviving elephants is never easy. Giving mouth to trunk is challenging.{#Roflol}
 
Quite. And you'd need a piledriver for the chest compressions :o)

 jen3005545 wrote:

This sounds a lot like Fiest.


 

That's who I thought it was too.

This sounds a lot like Fiest.


 drewd wrote:
Reviving elephants is never easy. Giving mouth to trunk is challenging.{#Roflol}
 
A valid point, but it's probably easier than an elephant attempting to revive a human being. {#Propeller}

I like it. It's different. Interesting.
Gave it a 7 only because of my misguided sense of what deserves an '8' - and my use of the '8' rating in the past. Probably deserves one from me, even then. Fence-sitter? Evidently.
Very nice. Never heard of them, but want to hear more.
Love this album...

I like it. . . 
Reviving elephants is never easy. Giving mouth to trunk is challenging.{#Roflol}
Good to see more of the Elephant Revival! They got some really awesome songs.