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Steeleye Span — Cam Ye O'er Frae France
Album: Parcel of Rogues
Avg rating:
6.2

Your rating:
Total ratings: 734









Released: 1973
Length: 2:40
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Cam ye o'er frae France? Cam ye down by Lunnon?
Saw ye Geordie Whelps and his bonny woman?
Were ye at the place ca'd the Kittle Housie?
Saw ye Geordie's grace riding on a goosie?

Geordie he's a man there is little doubt o't;
He's done a' he can, wha can do without it?
Down there came a blade linkin' like my lordie;
He wad drive a trade at the loom o' Geordie.

Though the claith were bad, blythly may we niffer;
Gin we get a wab, it makes little differ.
We hae tint our plaid, bannet, belt and swordie,
Ha's and mailins braid -- but we hae a Geordie!

Jocky's gane to France and Montgomery's lady;
There they'll learn to dance: Madam, are ye ready?
They'll be back belyve belted, brisk and lordly;
Brawly may they thrive to dance a jig wi' Geordie!

Hey for Sandy Don! Hey for Cockolorum!
Hey for Bobbing John and his Highland Quorum!
Mony a sword and lance swings at Highland hurdie;
How they'll skip and dance o'er the bum o' Geordie!
Comments (167)add comment
Long Live                                                                                                               Radio Paradise
To me Steeleye Span  Cam Ye O'er Frae France   is a SOLID      8 - Most Excellent
Much too olde for my taste.  I just don't have the britches for it.
Liked it overall, but have to agree with the somewhat jarring seemingly random guitar.

A 6.
Nice to hear some trad folk, albeit rocked out.
Nice surprise to hear these guys. Really takes me back. Good pick, Bill.
OMG can Maddy Prior sing.
Spooky!
Just reading about Guedelon Castle in France

Obligatory Span reference - saw them at Harlow Playhouse performing Wintersmith. Terry Pratchett died the next day :-(

It has its value...somewhere...in some obscure black market...where electric medieval folk trades at a premium
I would rather hear 2 cats fighting outside my bedroom window than this p.o.s.
 

Tomasni wrote:

Bill :

Just to inform You: Again PSD delivers only silence   :-(  



 
Same for me.
Bill!

From The Smashing Pumkins
To John Mellenkamp
and now this ...
Some may like it but, not me &
PSD fails me today!

{#Frustrated} 
Arany Zoltan does a fine cover of this.
 Antigone wrote:
Interesting Wiki article about this song.

 
Thanks for pointing it out. Makes the music even better.
Thank you RP for playing such diverse music.
Interesting Wiki article about this song.
I don't think I have heard this song in a couple of decades.  But it made me exclaim OMG when it came on.  They are a great band I had nearly forgotten about.  Now I have to dig through a ton of vinyl to find my copy of this album, if the spiders have not consumed it yet.
Awesome to hear this on RP.

Please, sir, can we have more? (Steeleye Span, that is)

Graham
Somewhere in Kuwait....
 RobN wrote:
She's got a great voice, but you'd need to be a dyed in the hemp folkie with historical sensibilities to fully appreciate this one.

 
So that's what I am!  I had no idea.
 DrJaaaaay wrote:
Saw them open for Jethro Tull in the early 70's.  They were surreal, starting out covered in sheets like ghosts and singing acapella.  Then one by one they threw off their sheets and started rocking, with Maddy dancing up a storm.  It was just after they added a drummer to their lineup.  Have loved them ever since. (Tull was pretty good too.)

  (bump)


Image result for Steeleye Span
Wow, I think this seriously underrated {#Frown}
 fredriley wrote:
Bumping Strawdog's excellent and informative post from a few years back, for info and enlightenment:

Listen up lads and lassies !

Cam ye o'er frae France is a fine Scottish Traditional folk song !

In 1714, a portly little fellow arrived in London from Hanover, in what is now Germany, and set up shop as the legally ordained ruler of Great Britain, though he spoke not a word of English. He was George I, the first of the Germans to have ruled there ever since. Anything for a Protestant king, the reasoning went; and so it was that when Queen Anne died without leaving an heir, the House of Hanover came to power.

When George I imported his seraglio of impoverished gentlewomen  from Germany, he provided the Jacobite songwriters with material for some of their most ribald verses. Madame Kilmansegge, Countess of Platen, is referred to exclusively as "The Sow" in the songs, while the King's favorite mistress, the lean and haggard Madame Schulemburg (afterwards Named Duchess of Kendall) was given the name of "The Goose". She is the "goosie" referred to in this song. The "blade" is the Count Koningsmark. "Bobbing John refers to John, Earl of Mar, who was at the time recruiting Highlanders for the Hanoverian cause. "Geordie Whelps" is, of course, George I himself.

 

For the academically inclined , see also:

https://cfmb.icaap.org/content/23.1/BV23-1art3.pdf

Many Jacobite songs are riddling - in part to steer clear of the laws against treason, and in part from a love of satirical wit that was widespread at the time throughout Great Britian. "Came Ye O'er Frae France?" is one of the most witty of the songs, and is packed with
cryptic metaphoricala nd allegorical referencesI. It is also a well-constructed piece of poetry, with each stanza carefully linked to the next. The song does not seem to haver received as much attention as it deserves,a defect that I hope to remedy with this article.

 

Try to get it right and if it did not do it for you.....it did for me.....but then mebbe it has to be part of your ancestral memory.

Strawdog( not watching royal weddings , y'follow ? )

Aberdeen

******

There's nothing like a proper frame of reference to fully appreciate the merits of the song.  Especially the "riding on the Goosie." 

As a "Yank" I say thankie kindly!  {#Wink}

Highlow
American Net'Zen

 


Outstanding! ... Just shows how broadminded RP is!  You put the E into eclectic (TWICE)

Now, how about some RunRig {#Smile} ?

    Siol Ghoraidh     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFN7akfH3tA
    In Scandinavia    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_2sCpK1e9E
    From The North  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-RdkyTf1fO0
    Life is Hard        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AV7PTWkIap8

10

https://goo.gl/GZEG45
 
 

Taking the rough with the smooth.


 sandythewomble wrote:
Never thought I'd hear SP on the radio.

Not one of my fave bands, or even music genres, but just reinforces what a brilliant eclectic radio station this is.

 
Well said
Never thought I'd hear SP on the radio.

Not one of my fave bands, or even music genres, but just reinforces what a brilliant eclectic radio station this is.
 fredriley wrote:
Bumping Strawdog's excellent and informative post from a few years back, for info and enlightenment:

Listen up lads and lassies !

Cam ye o'er frae France is a fine Scottish Traditional folk song !

In 1714, a portly little fellow arrived in London from Hanover, in what is now Germany, and set up shop as the legally ordained ruler of Great Britain, though he spoke not a word of English. He was George I, the first of the Germans to have ruled there ever since. Anything for a Protestant king, the reasoning went; and so it was that when Queen Anne died without leaving an heir, the House of Hanover came to power.

When George I imported his seraglio of impoverished gentlewomen  from Germany, he provided the Jacobite songwriters with material for some of their most ribald verses. Madame Kilmansegge, Countess of Platen, is referred to exclusively as "The Sow" in the songs, while the King's favorite mistress, the lean and haggard Madame Schulemburg (afterwards Named Duchess of Kendall) was given the name of "The Goose". She is the "goosie" referred to in this song. The "blade" is the Count Koningsmark. "Bobbing John refers to John, Earl of Mar, who was at the time recruiting Highlanders for the Hanoverian cause. "Geordie Whelps" is, of course, George I himself.

 

For the academically inclined , see also:

https://cfmb.icaap.org/content/23.1/BV23-1art3.pdf

Many Jacobite songs are riddling - in part to steer clear of the laws against treason, and in part from a love of satirical wit that was widespread at the time throughout Great Britian. "Came Ye O'er Frae France?" is one of the most witty of the songs, and is packed with
cryptic metaphoricala nd allegorical referencesI. It is also a well-constructed piece of poetry, with each stanza carefully linked to the next. The song does not seem to haver received as much attention as it deserves,a defect that I hope to remedy with this article.

 

Try to get it right and if it did not do it for you.....it did for me.....but then mebbe it has to be part of your ancestral memory.

Strawdog( not watching royal weddings , y'follow ? )

Aberdeen



 
Brilliant! Thank you fredriley
 ScottishWillie wrote:

This song comes under the category of ‘Never thought I’d hear this on radio!’

I do so love electric folk! Brilliant brilliant brilliant. 



 
Radio Paradise is the best internet radio station. {#Roflol}
The wife says the guitar is not right! I'm with her

This song comes under the category of ‘Never thought I’d hear this on radio!’

I do so love electric folk! Brilliant brilliant brilliant. 


What the ? This is terrible! PSD.
aaaaah, celtic sound.....

{#Yes} 
The fact that RP plays Steeleye Span only reinforces my feeling, that the music programing of RP is THE BEST bar none. Hats off to RP.
Oh please, more Steeleye Span!
Bumping Strawdog's excellent and informative post from a few years back, for info and enlightenment:

Listen up lads and lassies !

Cam ye o'er frae France is a fine Scottish Traditional folk song !

In 1714, a portly little fellow arrived in London from Hanover, in what is now Germany, and set up shop as the legally ordained ruler of Great Britain, though he spoke not a word of English. He was George I, the first of the Germans to have ruled there ever since. Anything for a Protestant king, the reasoning went; and so it was that when Queen Anne died without leaving an heir, the House of Hanover came to power.

When George I imported his seraglio of impoverished gentlewomen  from Germany, he provided the Jacobite songwriters with material for some of their most ribald verses. Madame Kilmansegge, Countess of Platen, is referred to exclusively as "The Sow" in the songs, while the King's favorite mistress, the lean and haggard Madame Schulemburg (afterwards Named Duchess of Kendall) was given the name of "The Goose". She is the "goosie" referred to in this song. The "blade" is the Count Koningsmark. "Bobbing John refers to John, Earl of Mar, who was at the time recruiting Highlanders for the Hanoverian cause. "Geordie Whelps" is, of course, George I himself.

 

For the academically inclined , see also:

https://cfmb.icaap.org/content/23.1/BV23-1art3.pdf

Many Jacobite songs are riddling - in part to steer clear of the laws against treason, and in part from a love of satirical wit that was widespread at the time throughout Great Britian. "Came Ye O'er Frae France?" is one of the most witty of the songs, and is packed with
cryptic metaphoricala nd allegorical referencesI. It is also a well-constructed piece of poetry, with each stanza carefully linked to the next. The song does not seem to haver received as much attention as it deserves,a defect that I hope to remedy with this article.

 

Try to get it right and if it did not do it for you.....it did for me.....but then mebbe it has to be part of your ancestral memory.

Strawdog( not watching royal weddings , y'follow ? )

Aberdeen


gotta give it a 7 at leas for the nostalgia......
Same guitar work from "Cover of the Rolling Stone" 
I immediately recognized Maddy Prior's voice - it's been decades since I heard them on the radio...but JEEZ...anything from "Below The Salt" would've been better.
Well, that was stressful.

I can understand people not liking history, poetry, reality of the time and fine ribaldry, but must they express their feelings in such a mundane way? See StrawDog's Post: Apr 29, 2011  for an education.

This was pushing the limits when it was released. Hah, both in the 1700's and 1970's.


Utterly terrible

droping from a "2"- "1" 
She's got a great voice, but you'd need to be a dyed in the hemp folkie with historical sensibilities to fully appreciate this one.
Kate Bush a la Life of Brian sort of thing...
My ugly god.
Wow.  Haven't heard this for years.  Love it. 
 shellbella wrote:
Horrible.  Really horrible.

 
I'll take a Celtic whirling, swirling jig anytime from SS please.         (it's in the DNA don't you reckon?)     {#Yes}
 Art_Carnage wrote:
Hey! Somebody shoot that jackass on the electric guitar!
  
michaelgmitchell wrote:

One of the best comments EVER.

 
You don't get out much, do you?
 trailhub wrote:
This would be great without the random guitar interruptions.{#Stupid}

 
Agree completely with {#Arrowu}!
Horrible.  Really horrible.
There's no rating for IRRITATING
I second!
This would be great without the random guitar interruptions.{#Stupid}
 fredriley wrote:

That'll be Maddy Prior doing a Lowland Scots accent, and making a half-decent fist of it if I'm any judge. Not her native accent, of course.
 
She has the most beautiful voice - perfect pitch and timbre.  I could listen to her sing in any accent she chose.

By the way, Arany Zoltan does an excellent version of this, which you can find on youtube. 
 whtahtefcuk wrote:
OMG this is horrible!
 
Sassenach fiend!
Very cool!
 
 whtahtefcuk wrote:
OMG this is horrible!
 



don't yea be saying anything bad about me lass, ye slouch


OMG this is horrible!
I love the first Steeleye Span album very much—-just listening the other day. Old folk songs that rock ——great singing.
 DrJaaaaay wrote:
Saw them open for Jethro Tull in the early 70's.  They were surreal, starting out covered in sheets like ghosts and singing acapella.  Then one by one they threw off their sheets and started rocking, with Maddy dancing up a storm.  It was just after they added a drummer to their lineup.  Have loved them ever since. (Tull was pretty good too.)
 

Cool - from AMG: "They picked up some airplay on open-minded FM stations, but got their widest Stateside exposure as an opening act during a Jethro Tull tour. The onslaught of punk and new wave weakened any prospects for continued chart success at home."
Did the sound system for them at several Cambridge folk festivals in the 70's; how time go past so quickly. The music is still good after so long. Same as with Jethro.
 Art_Carnage wrote:
Hey! Somebody shoot that jackass on the electric guitar!
 
One of the best comments EVER.

 Byronape wrote:
I've never heard this before, but the singers accent is kinda hot.  
 
That'll be Maddy Prior doing a Lowland Scots accent, and making a half-decent fist of it if I'm any judge. Not her native accent, of course.
Sounds good, but just 6-7
Saw them open for Jethro Tull in the early 70's.  They were surreal, starting out covered in sheets like ghosts and singing acapella.  Then one by one they threw off their sheets and started rocking, with Maddy dancing up a storm.  It was just after they added a drummer to their lineup.  Have loved them ever since. (Tull was pretty good too.)
Hey! Somebody shoot that jackass on the electric guitar!
I've never heard this before, but the singers accent is kinda hot.  
I prefer their "Reelin' in the Years" period.
 Beckworth wrote:
WOW, I haven' heard this group on the air since the late 70's on a college radio station in New Orleans!  Loved them then, still do.  Hope you can be persuaded to play more of their tracks.   
 
yes break out some Heads Hands and Feet as well !
 

WOW, I haven' heard this group on the air since the late 70's on a college radio station in New Orleans!  Loved them then, still do.  Hope you can be persuaded to play more of their tracks.   
Ricolaaaaa!!!!{#Yell}
Really enjoyed hearing this here. Would love to hear more...like perhaps "All Around My Hat"...or something from Rocket Cottage. Perhaps an upload is in order. Glad any Steeleye Span is here.
Just love it even after all these years...
A song to switch off.
Great band. I love the folk rock from this era.
Nothing could be worse 
And don't forget his mother - Jeez Louise.

 
Cynaera wrote:

Cripes?  Would that be Jesus Cripes?  Son of.... Gosh?  I'm not making fun - I attend the church of Holy Moley, and I certainly don't wanna end up in Heck. {#Cool}
 


 redmachine wrote:
I would like to find a time machine. Go back to when they were about to record this and Rohypnol them all then lock them in a garage till they forgot how it went.
Utter gash.

{#Clap} Great post. 
 fredriley wrote:

Ah, my mistake, though, after reading strawdog's excellent post - the language is Scots, not Geordie, though there are crossover points. A fine song an' a', canny :o)
It is Scots. I think they are singing Georgie as a derogatory term for the English/German Protestant King George. As against Geordie the nickname for a person from Newcastle. However both dialects are similarly unintelligible to non natives (and each other).

Unlike some of the poster I cant get enough of 70’s Folk Rock and love the fact that Radio Paradise are willing to play Steeleye and Fairport Convention.


I think my ears just declared mutiny...mute!!!
 redmachine wrote:
I would like to find a time machine. Go back to when they were about to record this and Rohypnol them all then lock them in a garage till they forgot how it went.
Utter gash.
 

{#Lol}
I would like to find a time machine. Go back to when they were about to record this and Rohypnol them all then lock them in a garage till they forgot how it went.
Utter gash.
 dwlangham wrote:
Cripes. it's one of those days. "suck-o barf-o" is a bit strong, but beam me the fuck up already scotty.
 
Cripes?  Would that be Jesus Cripes?  Son of.... Gosh?  I'm not making fun - I attend the church of Holy Moley, and I certainly don't wanna end up in Heck. {#Cool}
 unclehud wrote:

Knew about the term Geordie; now I understand why I thought they weren't speaking English.
 
Ah, my mistake, though, after reading strawdog's excellent post - the language is Scots, not Geordie, though there are crossover points. A fine song an' a', canny :o)

 strawdog wrote:

Listen up lads and lassies !

Cam ye o'er frae France is a fine Scottish Traditional folk song !

In 1714, a portly little fellow arrived in London from Hanover, in what is now Germany, and set up shop as the legally ordained ruler of Great Britain, though he spoke not a word of English. He was George I, the first of the Germans to have ruled there ever since. Anything for a Protestant king, the reasoning went; and so it was that when Queen Anne died without leaving an heir, the House of Hanover came to power.

When George I imported his seraglio of impoverished gentlewomen  from Germany, he provided the Jacobite songwriters with material for some of their most ribald verses. Madame Kilmansegge, Countess of Platen, is referred to exclusively as "The Sow" in the songs, while the King's favorite mistress, the lean and haggard Madame Schulemburg (afterwards Named Duchess of Kendall) was given the name of "The Goose". She is the "goosie" referred to in this song. The "blade" is the Count Koningsmark. "Bobbing John refers to John, Earl of Mar, who was at the time recruiting Highlanders for the Hanoverian cause. "Geordie Whelps" is, of course, George I himself.

 

For the academically inclined , see also:

https://cfmb.icaap.org/content/23.1/BV23-1art3.pdf

Many Jacobite songs are riddling - in part to steer clear of the laws against treason, and in part from a love of satirical wit that was widespread at the time throughout Great Britian. "Came Ye O'er Frae France?" is one of the most witty of the songs, and is packed with
cryptic metaphoricala nd allegorical referencesI. It is also a well-constructed piece of poetry, with each stanza carefully linked to the next. The song does not seem to haver received as much attention as it deserves,a defect that I hope to remedy with this article.

 

Try to get it right and if it did not do it for you.....it did for me.....but then mebbe it has to be part of your ancestral memory.

Strawdog( not watching royal weddings , y'follow ? )

Aberdeen

 
'Tis a useful backgrounder, Strawdog - thanks. Wee Georgie was one of the worst things to happen to Scotland, and his 'legacy' remains. IIRC Walter Scott, who singlehandedly created the 'tartan and kilts' myth of the noble Highlander (an awful irony, seeing as the Highlanders had been ethnically cleansed systematically by landowners and army), developed the myth primarily to entrance Wee Georgie into being monarch of all Scotland. This was in the excellent Scotland's History series on BBC by the rakish Neil Oliver.

For those wondering over the language, it's Scots.


Cripes. it's one of those days. "suck-o barf-o" is a bit strong, but beam me the fuck up already scotty.
More than I needed to know, but now that I read it, not more than I would have wanted to know!  Hope I don't find out that I need to do a 'Snopes" check on the facts....   ;-)

 strawdog wrote:

Listen up lads and lassies !

Cam ye o'er frae France is a fine Scottish Traditional folk song !

In 1714, a portly little fellow arrived in London from Hanover, in what is now Germany, and set up shop as the legally ordained ruler of Great Britain, though he spoke not a word of English. He was George I, the first of the Germans to have ruled there ever since. Anything for a Protestant king, the reasoning went; and so it was that when Queen Anne died without leaving an heir, the House of Hanover came to power.

When George I imported his seraglio of impoverished gentlewomen  from Germany, he provided the Jacobite songwriters with material for some of their most ribald verses. Madame Kilmansegge, Countess of Platen, is referred to exclusively as "The Sow" in the songs, while the King's favorite mistress, the lean and haggard Madame Schulemburg (afterwards Named Duchess of Kendall) was given the name of "The Goose". She is the "goosie" referred to in this song. The "blade" is the Count Koningsmark. "Bobbing John refers to John, Earl of Mar, who was at the time recruiting Highlanders for the Hanoverian cause. "Geordie Whelps" is, of course, George I himself.

 

For the academically inclined , see also:

https://cfmb.icaap.org/content/23.1/BV23-1art3.pdf

Many Jacobite songs are riddling - in part to steer clear of the laws against treason, and in part from a love of satirical wit that was widespread at the time throughout Great Britian. "Came Ye O'er Frae France?" is one of the most witty of the songs, and is packed with
cryptic metaphoricala nd allegorical referencesI. It is also a well-constructed piece of poetry, with each stanza carefully linked to the next. The song does not seem to haver received as much attention as it deserves,a defect that I hope to remedy with this article.

 

Try to get it right and if it did not do it for you.....it did for me.....but then mebbe it has to be part of your ancestral memory.

Strawdog( not watching royal weddings , y'follow ? )

Aberdeen

 

 

 

 


Haggus for breakfast.  yum!  bony well
One of my favorite Steeleye Span songs...


Irritating. See ya'll on the other side.
Nice album cover  . . . I find the music . . . um, well . . . Oh, the mail just arrived!

Listen up lads and lassies !

Cam ye o'er frae France is a fine Scottish Traditional folk song !

In 1714, a portly little fellow arrived in London from Hanover, in what is now Germany, and set up shop as the legally ordained ruler of Great Britain, though he spoke not a word of English. He was George I, the first of the Germans to have ruled there ever since. Anything for a Protestant king, the reasoning went; and so it was that when Queen Anne died without leaving an heir, the House of Hanover came to power.

When George I imported his seraglio of impoverished gentlewomen  from Germany, he provided the Jacobite songwriters with material for some of their most ribald verses. Madame Kilmansegge, Countess of Platen, is referred to exclusively as "The Sow" in the songs, while the King's favorite mistress, the lean and haggard Madame Schulemburg (afterwards Named Duchess of Kendall) was given the name of "The Goose". She is the "goosie" referred to in this song. The "blade" is the Count Koningsmark. "Bobbing John refers to John, Earl of Mar, who was at the time recruiting Highlanders for the Hanoverian cause. "Geordie Whelps" is, of course, George I himself.

 

For the academically inclined , see also:

https://cfmb.icaap.org/content/23.1/BV23-1art3.pdf

Many Jacobite songs are riddling - in part to steer clear of the laws against treason, and in part from a love of satirical wit that was widespread at the time throughout Great Britian. "Came Ye O'er Frae France?" is one of the most witty of the songs, and is packed with
cryptic metaphoricala nd allegorical referencesI. It is also a well-constructed piece of poetry, with each stanza carefully linked to the next. The song does not seem to haver received as much attention as it deserves,a defect that I hope to remedy with this article.

 

Try to get it right and if it did not do it for you.....it did for me.....but then mebbe it has to be part of your ancestral memory.

Strawdog( not watching royal weddings , y'follow ? )

Aberdeen

 

 

 


Love Steeleye Span and have since the early 70's when I first heard of them.

However in deference to many here, I still get grief from my wife every time I pull out an album to play... always have.

Never stops me from playing it tho- never has... {#Roflol}
This is what would happen if Joni Mitchell did a parody of Spinal Tap. Is this something the world needs now?
 unclehud wrote:

Knew about the term Geordie; now I understand why I thought they weren't speaking English.
 
Actually doesn't refer to that. It's a Jacobite tune. Check kopak's Jul 27, 2010 post for the link that is a rather detailed interpretation of the lyrics.

Oh man, this is a real treat.  I listened to this entire album over and over back when I was young.  I still love it.  Thanks Bill ! 


 fredriley wrote:
This is a blast from the past. Once upon a time Steeleye Span were hotter than hot, bringing zip and modernity to folk music. For those listeners outwith the UK, Geordies are inhabitants of Newcastle in the NE of England, with a very distinctive dialect and culture, and an often impenetrable accent. Whay-ay, canny, like :o)
 
Knew about the term Geordie; now I understand why I thought they weren't speaking English.
Wow... I remember this song from my teens ... Loved it back then and still love it
Wow, thanks for playing, Bill! You're the absolute best!
This is a blast from the past. Once upon a time Steeleye Span were hotter than hot, bringing zip and modernity to folk music. For those listeners outwith the UK, Geordies are inhabitants of Newcastle in the NE of England, with a very distinctive dialect and culture, and an often impenetrable accent. Whay-ay, canny, like :o)
Thanks so much for playing, Bill — a real classic and one of my all-time favourite songs.
How is it I never heard of these guys before, given that they are almost as old as Fairport Convention?  I don't understand all the vitriol, either...  I like it!

(image deleted 'cuz it was hosted on a site blacklisted by Google, so it kicks up scary warnings in Chrome)
What we really need is a romantic song like "Sir James the Rose" from Rocket Cottage - or perhaps Bill is saving that for Valentine's Day?
 iggam wrote:
A Mighty Wind.
 
Wrong. If you can't tell the difference, then you don't understand that movie and you also don't get this song.


Sheesh, why all the hostility?

This song is a classic!

It sends chills down my spine!

I love Maddy Prior's voice contrasted against the jarring, stabbing guitars.

Sorry to all you who hate it because it isn't sung in modern English.

A strong 10.
mute
Dang!  I only gave this a 2 before.  it's a solid 4!
A Mighty Wind.

Simon Emerson, Martin Carthy and Billy Bragg  by Bryan Ledgard
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ledgard/

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Martin Carthy MBE is an English folk singer and guitarist who has remained one of the most influential figures in British traditional music, inspiring contemporaries such as Bob Dylan and Paul Simon and later artists such as Richard Thompson since he emerged as a young musician in the early days of the folk revival.

He has also been involved with many musical collaborations. He has sung with The Watersons since 1972, was twice a member of the UK electric folk group Steeleye Span, was a member of the Albion Country Band 1973 line-up, with members from the Fairport Convention family and John Kirkpatrick, that recorded the 'Battle of the Field' album, and was part of the innovative Brass Monkey ensemble, which mixed a range of brass instruments with Carthy's guitar and mandolin and John Kirkpatrick's accordion, melodeon and concertina.(in Wikipedia)




No thanks.

Unriddling >>...here...<<                         


Still wonder why someone posted lyrics from Spinäl Tap {#Stupid}

Steeleye Span (1972-73):  

Personnel: Tim Hart, Maddy Prior, Peter Knight, Bob Johnson, Rick Kemp.


Decades, if not centuries before world music me old, Celtic if I'm nae mistaken'.............{#Sunny}

1, I cannot stand it and I generally love world music.

 zipper wrote:
what the fuckity fuck?
 
You made me laughity laugh!!!!
 ziakut wrote:
It's about time we got some Steeleye Span. Nothing short of excellent.
 

more please!
 DaveInVA wrote:
I can't believe so many are giving this great song a 1 especially with all the positive comments...

 
Yes, that confuses me as well...also, confusing is why anyone would give this excellent song a 1 in the first place.