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Love this song, if I would walk 500 miles....la da da....
Love Hooters!
Holy crap. Sucko.
Now I don't know WHAT to think. I saw them opening for Squeeze at the Nassau Mausoleu...er...Colisseum, back in '85; all I can remember is "All You Zombies" and I thought they were pretty lame. Now I read here that (1) Peter, Paul & Mary actually did backup on this, and (2) they produced Joan Osborne's "Relish"? But I LOVE that album! So who is from the Hooters -- Eric Bazilian? Rick Chertoff? I've got to check this out... Well I'll be darned...
Biography by Jason Ankeny Best remembered for a string of mid-'80s hits including the MTV staple "And We Danced," Philadelphia rockers the Hooters were led by singer/keyboardist Rob Hyman and singer/guitarist Eric Bazilian, whose longtime creative partnership also yielded hits for artists including Cyndi Lauper and Joan Osborne. Hyman and Bazilian first teamed in the group Baby Grand, which also included future producer Rick Chertoff; after a pair of LPs for Arista, the band dissolved in 1978, with the Hooters forming soon after. Also including guitarist John Lilley, bassist Rob Miller, and drummer David Uosikkinen, the group honed an eclectic blend of rock, folk, and ska, taking their name from the melodica, or "hooter," which lent their sound its distinctive edge; while the Hooters earned a devoted cult following at home in Philadelphia, Hyman and Bazilian also enjoyed busy careers as composers and session players, most notably contributing extensively to Cyndi Lauper's 1983 blockbuster She's So Unusual. The album was produced by Chertoff, who co-wrote the oft-covered ballad "Time After Time" with Hyman. The Hooters' debut LP, Amore, appeared on the tiny local imprint Antenna in 1983 as well, and the group issued its major label debut, Nervous Night, in 1985 upon signing to Columbia. The record fell just shy of the Top Ten on the strength of a series of chart hits including "All You Zombies," "And We Danced," "Day by Day," and "Where Do the Children Go"; the follow-up, 1987's One Way Home, also went gold, although no more hits were forthcoming (at least at home -- overseas, the single "Satellite" was a smash). Despite their initial success, the Hooters' fortunes continued to dim. After 1989's Zig Zag failed to reach the Hot 100, Columbia dropped the group, and only in 1993 did they resurface on MCA with the little-noticed Out of Body. The following year's The Hooters Live remains their final effort to date, although Hyman and Bazilian continued their busy writing and arranging careers, appearing on albums from artists ranging from Sophie B. Hawkins to Jon Bon Jovi. In 1995 the duo composed much of Joan Osborne's breakthrough, Relish, including the Grammy-nominated "One of Us."
These guys could've, should've gone farther. Whatever happened?
With a name like Hooters it has to be good... (pimp)
Sweet song! A Swiss guy I ended up backpacking with for a bit in Greece turned me on to this. He was a huge Hooters fan and played some tape that I found absolutely terrible. But somehow this song stuck with me, particularly because the lyrics seemed aprpopos for my first solo backpacking trip. I DLed it when I got home, and like to pull it out from time to time.
Gregorama wrote:
Boy, they didn't last long...I had their first album, but it seems that they quickly fell off the edge of the Earth after that....
They've become fairly deft producers, composers, and session players since, Cindy Lauper's "She's So Unusual" and Joan Osborne's "Relish" two of the better.
C'mon you Zombies!
Boy, they didn't last long...I had their first album, but it seems that they quickly fell off the edge of the Earth after that....
rolokan wrote:
I almost forgot about these guys. Thanks for the reminder. Very Knopfleresque guitar.
Boy, I'll say! Is it mr. knopfler?
Philly Bands Rock!! :D/ :guitarist: :drummer: :guitarist: :jump: :wave:
Play some stuff from Amore. That was teir best I think. I grew up in Philly, and when I was in my tweens, I went to all their local shows before they became big. Used to play hackeysack with them in the parking lot before the show. And my sister babysat for one of their kids. Ahhh, the memories...
I saw the Hooters when they opened for Heart, in Ramstein, Germany, in the early 90s. I was shocked to discover the Hooters' show was better by far.
Queue wrote:
uh... I like the Hooters, and the REAL Hooters are far from this and the over-produced stuff that everyone knows them for... Q
REAL Hooters? Hmmm... :-k
this is immeasurably better than that other "500 Miles" song that gets played from time to time (proclaimers?).
HEY!!! I haven't heard this in FOREVER. Had this on tape. What a blast from the past.
:D Hey i like this, it isn't so bad at all! :heartkiss:
One two three - four, five - six seven eight nine ten - eleven twelve!
i think there is little worse than this band.
Well, it's better than All you Zombies.
I almost forgot about these guys. Thanks for the reminder. Very Knopfleresque guitar.
What an under recognized band! I see from other comments that this tune is not as representative of what makes them great, but it is not bad at all! There are worse curses than good production! : >
What a timely tune. Thanks for airing this one.
Originally Posted by Queue: uh... I like the Hooters, and the REAL Hooters are far from this and the over-produced stuff that everyone knows them for... Q
I saw them in Avalon the summer of 1982, and they were amazing. In the late 80's, I got tired of explaining why I owned Amore to people who were introduced to them on MTV. Now if you could upload something from the A's.
Originally Posted by Queue: I'm a little partial to the originally released tracks from their indy release "Amore".
Look what I found! on CD! Will certainly be uploading a few of these when I get the CD. Hooters - Amore on CD + 2 bonus tracks! Q
Not exactly representative of what The Hooters were/are capable of... I had the pleasure of seeing them live at the Jersey Shore just before they signed their record deal... Loads of talent in that band. Seeing them live, you could sense that they were going to make it big. Like \"Stinky\" below, I\'m a little partial to the originally released tracks from their indy release \"Amore\". Where the hell am I going with this.... uh... I like the Hooters, and the REAL Hooters are far from this and the over-produced stuff that everyone knows them for... Q
white boy reggae crapola
Pseudo reggae to an old sweet folk song. Pllleeese! :frustrated:
Originally Posted by RParadise: Liked the reference to the lone man stopping the tank in Beijing after the slaughter in Tienanmen Square. Interesting use of an old spiritual to make it current.
I agree! :)
I haven\'t heard the \"Hooters\" played by ANYONE for years. Thanks, Bill. How about \"Hangin on a Heartbeat\" or something else from AMORE? :D
My fave Hooters track. Actually, one of the few that has stood the test of time...
If you listen carefully, you\'ll hear Peter, Paul, and Mary singing backup. Nice bridge between then and now. Well, then and then - this song was released in the 80s as I remember. :)
Originally Posted by RParadise: Liked the reference to the lone man stopping the tank in Beijing after the slaughter in Tienanmen Square. Interesting use of an old spiritual to make it current.
I stepped in on the end. "All you Zombies" sound Eh? I don't remember so clear…. Though, I remember him there. He is clear. Standing there. I was in San Anselmo drinking Tusker Beer. He was in Tienanmen Square. Were we all in 89" then? It is not so clear. I saw him there. Standing full of fear, but still standing there. I still stand there with him and wonder where they took him. Did they take him to Hell? Or did they let him go? They took him to Hell. They never let anyone go. Though we all watched him go. He was alone. Standing there for 5.5 Billion of us. And I just let him go. No more just letting them go…I still stand there.
Liked the reference to the lone man stopping the tank in Beijing after the slaughter in Tienanmen Square. Interesting use of an old spiritual to make it current.