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The Byrds — My Back Pages
Album: Younger Than Yesterday
Avg rating:
7.8

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2093









Released: 1967
Length: 3:01
Plays (last 30 days): 3
Crimson flames tied through my years
Flowing high and mighty trapped
Countless fire and flaming roads
Using ideas as my maps
We'll meet on edges soon, said I
Proud 'neath heated brow
Ah, but I was so much older then
I'm younger than that now

Half-wracked prejudice leaped forth
Rip down all hate, I screamed
Lies that life is black and white
Spoke from my skull, I dreamed
Romantic flanks of musketeers
Foundationed deep, somehow
Ah, but I was so much older then
I'm younger than that now

In a soldier's stance I aimed my hand
At the mongrel dogs who teach
Fearing not I'd become my enemy
In the instant that I preach
Sisters fled by confusion boats
Mutiny from stern to bow
Ah, but I was so much older then
I'm younger than that now

Ah, but I was so much older then
I'm younger than that now

My guard stood hard when abstract threats
Too noble to neglect
Deceived me into thinking
I had something to protect
Good and bad, I define these terms
Quite clear, no doubt, somehow
Ah, but I was so much older then
I'm younger than that now
Comments (302)add comment
 LPCity wrote:

Well said sir, well said.

There is a ton of good Rock and Roll music out there to be enjoyed, you're just not likely to discover it listening to FM Radio as we all did decades ago.

That being said, I'm not sure I agree that this generation will look back fondly at the music they liked when they were young.  My 22 year old daughter has already disowned the fact that she once liked Britney Spears...


 
The younger generations will still look back fondly on 'their' music but, they will also have selective memory loss about having liked some artists, just like 'we' do.  Who, for example, acknowledges that they rocked out to Grand Funk Railroad?  GFR was huge  for a long while way back when though, so clearly ALOT of people liked their music, even if  nobody admits it now.  
 acamon wrote:

I imagine they'll look back fondly on all the music they liked when they were young, just like every generation since WW2 onwards. I think that perhaps the reason that boomers decry the state of music today (aside from the ubiquitous generational preference for one's own music) is that they assume that music is consumed and appreciated as it was in their day. There is never going to be another person like Bob Dylan who's lyrics performed an essential expression and communication of generation's ideals, because they have internet forum, blogs, etc. to share and create their identities.

Similarly there'll never be another band as big as the Beatles, simply because there are so many other great bands. That is why you only see meteoric success in image based bands/artists like 1Direction or Bieber, where their very hugeness (in media presence and merchandising) is a large part of what attracts younger fans. 

I think if you look at the charts or MTV these days and think that music is lacking, it's because you are looking in the wrong place. When I speak with young people who are interested in music their favourite bands are likely to come from a variety of continents, many won't be 'signed to a label' and almost all will have been discovered and listened to via the internet. With this level of diversity in musical taste only lowest common denominator groups will ever be superstars, but so what? Celebrities are mostly there to be fill space in the media and give middle-aged people something to tut about.
 
Perhaps I'm a particular species snob but I'm sure that the formation of my cultural psyche was very much a product of the many pressing issues of my baby boomerdom -- civil rights, inner city riots, nuclear and cold war, Vietnam and Tet and way more body bags than humane sense,  proxy wars (Congo, Indonesia, Chile, Israel), a series of traumatic domestic and international assassinations, and much more. It was the final fade out of the age of what could be called post-world war innocence.  The early Beatles were not just The Beatles. They were bellwethers of the zeitgeist -- the scandals in their own UK, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the murder of JFK, Martin Luther King and Selma and voting rights, the end of century old Jim Crow laws, global branding and newly emerging international media, and far more.  Jesus, to lay all that on one quartet of barely 20 somethings, and all of their Stones and Dead peers and  everyone else that grabbed such a gigantic comet tail of counter or alternative or future culture. 
 
Sorry, no matter what -- though we still obviously struggle with race, war, nuclear weapons and scandal -- we are no longer nearly so naive, innocent or quite so ignorant or confused about up or down in a brave new world.   Justin Bieber, Gaga or Mumford & Sons and just about anyone else have almost zero resonance on that relative '60s scale. They are just commodities when the world once had something like commandments.  
Talk about Song Du Jour. Nailed it, Mr. Bill & Ms. Rebecca. Thanks! Y'all da king/queen. {#Crown}
 westslope wrote:
Irony?

Young protesters are often as about as intellectually sharp and self-aware as Donald Trump supporters.   

 
You must have been a hoot when you were young. Thank God I missed that.
Good and bad, I define these terms, 

Quite clear, no doubt, some how. 


Now who could write such lyrics? Ha!
I've just realized,that I've been hearing this song for over fifty years, and know a good amount of the lyrics, but have never until this moment known the song's title.
This song made me feel younger 40 years ago and today, it makes me feel younger, more so if that is even possible, my self lives in an eternal now that this song makes apparent.
 hayduke2 wrote:

 
That is quite a bit more prescient than I'd like to ponder. Need to change your username to Nostradukemas or some variation thereof.
 
(I posted this 2 1/2 years ago as a joke but now... )

Posted: Aug 22, 2015 14:57
 

 owchita wrote:
We were lucky to have the 60s and the music of that time. I can remember it, so I probably wasn't really there.
I feel sorry for the current generation - in 45 years time, what can they possibly have to look back on ?

  
hayduke2 wrote:

Emperor Trumps's portioning of Central America/Mexico into Giant Costco-stan, his creating the great western water park that used to be California before the 9.9 earthquake of 2016, and all the cultural splendor from the United States of Russiakorea, Nostrovia!!!


Back in Black - Trump 201203/22/2011 - (5:54)

 

 lemmoth wrote:
Love the BobFest version
Roger
Petty - playing in heaven 
Eric
Neil
Bob
George 

 
Me too.  That one and this original always makes me stop and listen.  The Byrds guitar is iconic.  
 westslope wrote:
Irony?

Young protesters are often as about as intellectually sharp and self-aware as Donald Trump supporters.   

 



       "Intellectually sharp" ?

       The first 'as' here in your attempt at a scathing profundity, is grammatically incorrect, Sparky. {#Roflol}
       MAGA ~ 





Irony?

Young protesters are often as about as intellectually sharp and self-aware as Donald Trump supporters.   
I think you have to have been a 'movement person' in order to fully grasp this song.


 owchita wrote:
We were lucky to have the 60s and the music of that time. I can remember it, so I probably wasn't really there.
I feel sorry for the current generation - in 45 years time, what can they possibly have to look back on ?

 
It's hard to say now what they may have to "look back on", but perhaps they can now look forward to being able to disparage the cultures of younger generations solely because they are from an older generation; kind of like some of our parents or grandparents did 45 years ago.  Indulging in ageism seems to be a popular past-time on these boards.
 WonderLizard wrote:
Younger Than Yesterday

 
I still have this too! Nice.
Afbeeldingsresultaat voor guitar tuna
I like this song, but 2 times a day is a bit much!{#Umbrella}
Ya know, this could be the best cover version of a pop song ever.
 WonderLizard wrote:
Younger Than Yesterday

Crosby always had the cool look in the 60's.  After that, I think Jon Lovitz  had his look down better than Cros did:



 


We should all have back pages.

Quite clear, no doubt, some how.
Love the BobFest version
Roger
Petty
Eric
Neil
Bob
George 
Sounds great!  This cover turns 50 next Feb.
10.  Of course.  Jeez.......Classic stuff.  Music of a generation - mine.   {#Cheers}{#Daisy}
How 'bout that Bob...
Made me cry... thanks...
 deepgaze wrote:

I used to think that when Eminem was at his peak- hard to imagine that it would be nostalgic music for some kids later on in life.  On the other hand, my 17 year old recently came back from the record store with vinyls of Frank Sinatra, Miles Davis and Junip.  And he says his tastes aren't as wide as his friends.  

 
There are kids out there that deserve a bit more credit than we give them.  I oftentimes think it's not so much about what the kids are listening to but what the record executives think the kids are listening to and how they think they're getting the music they listen to.  
Yes, this is "oldest brother and sister music" for me/my friends. As to what will be remembered from being very young then, is actually The Monkees tunes, who appear to have many enduring tunes - who knew ?
wooah is something really wrong with this file?  
owchita wrote:
We were lucky to have the 60s and the music of that time. I can remember it, so I probably wasn't really there.
I feel sorry for the current generation - in 45 years time, what can they possibly have to look back on ?

 

Motown.  
 owchita wrote:
We were lucky to have the 60s and the music of that time. I can remember it, so I probably wasn't really there.
I feel sorry for the current generation - in 45 years time, what can they possibly have to look back on ?

 
Emperor Trumps's portioning of Central America/Mexico into Giant Costco-stan, his creating the great western water park that used to be California before the 9.9 earthquake of 2016, and all the cultural splendor from the United States of Russiakorea, Nostrovia!!!


Back in Black - Trump 201203/22/2011 - (5:54)


10++ !
Bobfest version please:-)
 LPCity wrote:

That being said, I'm not sure I agree that this generation will look back fondly at the music they liked when they were young.  My 22 year old daughter has already disowned the fact that she once liked Britney Spears...



 
I used to think that when Eminem was at his peak- hard to imagine that it would be nostalgic music for some kids later on in life.  On the other hand, my 17 year old recently came back from the record store with vinyls of Frank Sinatra, Miles Davis and Junip.  And he says his tastes aren't as wide as his friends.  
The older I get the more those lyrics resonate
 lemmoth wrote:
Would love to hear the version from the Dylan at 30 years celebration with a couple of talented folks named McGuinn, Petty, Clapton, Young, Harrison and oh yeah Dylan.

 
That is a great version. A guy named something Young sings on that too :)
Would love to hear the version from the Dylan at 30 years celebration with a couple of talented folks named McGuinn, Petty, Clapton, Young, Harrison and oh yeah Dylan.
 acamon wrote:

I imagine they'll look back fondly on all the music they liked when they were young, just like every generation since WW2 onwards. I think that perhaps the reason that boomers decry the state of music today (aside from the ubiquitous generational preference for one's own music) is that they assume that music is consumed and appreciated as it was in their day. There is never going to be another person like Bob Dylan who's lyrics performed an essential expression and communication of generation's ideals, because they have internet forum, blogs, etc. to share and create their identities.

Similarly there'll never be another band as big as the Beatles, simply because there are so many other great bands. That is why you only see meteoric success in image based bands/artists like 1Direction or Bieber, where their very hugeness (in media presence and merchandising) is a large part of what attracts younger fans. 

I think if you look at the charts or MTV these days and think that music is lacking, it's because you are looking in the wrong place. When I speak with young people who are interested in music their favourite bands are likely to come from a variety of continents, many won't be 'signed to a label' and almost all will have been discovered and listened to via the internet. With this level of diversity in musical taste only lowest common denominator groups will ever be superstars, but so what? Celebrities are mostly there to be fill space in the media and give middle-aged people something to tut about.

 
Well said, especially the "generational preference" bit.  
Younger Than Yesterday
interesting (and telling) what kind of comments this song evokes.
 acamon wrote:

I imagine they'll look back fondly on all the music they liked when they were young, just like every generation since WW2 onwards. I think that perhaps the reason that boomers decry the state of music today (aside from the ubiquitous generational preference for one's own music) is that they assume that music is consumed and appreciated as it was in their day. There is never going to be another person like Bob Dylan who's lyrics performed an essential expression and communication of generation's ideals, because they have internet forum, blogs, etc. to share and create their identities.

Similarly there'll never be another band as big as the Beatles, simply because there are so many other great bands. That is why you only see meteoric success in image based bands/artists like 1Direction or Bieber, where their very hugeness (in media presence and merchandising) is a large part of what attracts younger fans. 

I think if you look at the charts or MTV these days and think that music is lacking, it's because you are looking in the wrong place. When I speak with young people who are interested in music their favourite bands are likely to come from a variety of continents, many won't be 'signed to a label' and almost all will have been discovered and listened to via the internet. With this level of diversity in musical taste only lowest common denominator groups will ever be superstars, but so what? Celebrities are mostly there to be fill space in the media and give middle-aged people something to tut about.

 
Good points...But one would think that with increased access to music now,it would be easier to find the next great bands
 acamon wrote:

I imagine they'll look back fondly on all the music they liked when they were young, just like every generation since WW2 onwards. I think that perhaps the reason that boomers decry the state of music today (aside from the ubiquitous generational preference for one's own music) is that they assume that music is consumed and appreciated as it was in their day. There is never going to be another person like Bob Dylan who's lyrics performed an essential expression and communication of generation's ideals, because they have internet forum, blogs, etc. to share and create their identities.

Similarly there'll never be another band as big as the Beatles, simply because there are so many other great bands. That is why you only see meteoric success in image based bands/artists like 1Direction or Bieber, where their very hugeness (in media presence and merchandising) is a large part of what attracts younger fans. 

I think if you look at the charts or MTV these days and think that music is lacking, it's because you are looking in the wrong place. When I speak with young people who are interested in music their favourite bands are likely to come from a variety of continents, many won't be 'signed to a label' and almost all will have been discovered and listened to via the internet. With this level of diversity in musical taste only lowest common denominator groups will ever be superstars, but so what? Celebrities are mostly there to be fill space in the media and give middle-aged people something to tut about.

 
Well said sir, well said.

There is a ton of good Rock and Roll music out there to be enjoyed, you're just not likely to discover it listening to FM Radio as we all did decades ago.

That being said, I'm not sure I agree that this generation will look back fondly at the music they liked when they were young.  My 22 year old daughter has already disowned the fact that she once liked Britney Spears...


 owchita wrote:
We were lucky to have the 60s and the music of that time. I can remember it, so I probably wasn't really there.
I feel sorry for the current generation - in 45 years time, what can they possibly have to look back on ?

 
I imagine they'll look back fondly on all the music they liked when they were young, just like every generation since WW2 onwards. I think that perhaps the reason that boomers decry the state of music today (aside from the ubiquitous generational preference for one's own music) is that they assume that music is consumed and appreciated as it was in their day. There is never going to be another person like Bob Dylan who's lyrics performed an essential expression and communication of generation's ideals, because they have internet forum, blogs, etc. to share and create their identities.

Similarly there'll never be another band as big as the Beatles, simply because there are so many other great bands. That is why you only see meteoric success in image based bands/artists like 1Direction or Bieber, where their very hugeness (in media presence and merchandising) is a large part of what attracts younger fans. 

I think if you look at the charts or MTV these days and think that music is lacking, it's because you are looking in the wrong place. When I speak with young people who are interested in music their favourite bands are likely to come from a variety of continents, many won't be 'signed to a label' and almost all will have been discovered and listened to via the internet. With this level of diversity in musical taste only lowest common denominator groups will ever be superstars, but so what? Celebrities are mostly there to be fill space in the media and give middle-aged people something to tut about.
Oh good grief - here it comes again; that bloody annoying chorus. *Sigh*
{#Bananapiano}
This where so much of today's pop music has it's roots. david crosby, roger mcguinn, chris hillman, gene clark. 
 haljordan wrote:
Why does this man hate ice cream? Who hates ice cream? Oh, the humanity...

 

It could only happen under a Vanilla Sky ..
Why does this man hate ice cream? Who hates ice cream? Oh, the humanity...
A timeless timepiece! Beautiful.
Unfortunately when I hear it I can't help but think "I was so much younger then; I'm older than that now".  ; )
We were lucky to have the 60s and the music of that time. I can remember it, so I probably wasn't really there.
I feel sorry for the current generation - in 45 years time, what can they possibly have to look back on ?
 bb_matt wrote:
The 60's greatest cover band.
 

True enough, but their two best songs (I'll Feel A Whole Lot Better and Eight Miles High) were their own.
 jbunniii wrote:
Why aren't there any bands today that make their careers by putting out superior cover versions of some other guy's recent material?

 
because unfortunately rock bands are dead lately.

although some "DJ" will sample a hit to make it his own 
Roger McGuinn's voice was made to cover Dylan tunes (along with anything else he felt like singing)
 westslope wrote:

President Obama just scored a major diplomatic coup by restoring relations between Israel and Turkey.  

Peace.  



 

Yay!  Peace for our time.

marvelous cover of a Dylan song...  love it...

 

Took me 4 decades to figure out the lyrics but what the heck, eh?

 

Sweet cover.  Lyrics beyond Dylan's years.


How anyone can hate ice cream I'll never know.
 bb_matt wrote:
The 60's greatest cover band.
 
I just gotta stop on this and say damn.  You're absolutely right.  In a good way.  I remember back in the day a lot us us would think and mention that because of all the Dylan tunes.  At the same time, they had some of their own stuff which was pretty powerful on its own merit.  But yep, heard that thought.  Its just been nearly 45 years in between.

Was only gonna post that many good old songs weather time differently.  This is one.  Loved it then and now.  It sounds better loud though after all these years.  Not as quiet background music.  Many old songs have this problem.

I'm also glad that at my ripenning age, I still like to hear music loud.  Its not that I can't hear. My hearing is still pretty damned good.  And I'm not sucking down Geritol and watching bubbles pop.   Even though I never figured out that Rubicks cube thingy life ain't too bad.
The 60's greatest cover band.

President Obama just scored a major diplomatic coup by restoring relations between Israel and Turkey.  

Peace.  


 kcar wrote:

Dude, where you gonna put your Byrds tattoo?

Some bands stand the test of time better than others, but it's largely down to the individual to get something out of an old band's music. Would love to know how many kids who grew up listening predominantly to hip-hop and rap like the Byrds and such.

I love this song, but I couldn't listen to it every week or month. It's a bit of a nostalgia trip but in a good way. The comments about the nasal singing are amusing—I think Bob started a trend. He probably wishes he could sing better. So do the rest of us. 
 
I think I've got enough room below to the Balinese Trimurti mask on my upper arm.  

I like this song too, but agree that I wouldn't want to hear it every day.  This was the radical's music at the time I suppose.  When music really caught my attention for the first time and I had started buying my own records it was Black Flag and Fear... a sign of the times I suppose.
 ick wrote:

Dude, I was one year old.
 
Dude, where you gonna put your Byrds tattoo?

Some bands stand the test of time better than others, but it's largely down to the individual to get something out of an old band's music. Would love to know how many kids who grew up listening predominantly to hip-hop and rap like the Byrds and such.

I love this song, but I couldn't listen to it every week or month. It's a bit of a nostalgia trip but in a good way. The comments about the nasal singing are amusing—I think Bob started a trend. He probably wishes he could sing better. So do the rest of us. 
 MirageRF wrote:
Dude, if you don't rock with the Byrds, what can I say?  You missed some great days, if not years.
 
Dude, I was one year old.
Dude, if you don't rock with the Byrds, what can I say?  You missed some great days, if not years.
 MiracleDrug wrote:
hey Roger could you do that last bit again... there's this Petty kid here and he missed the last chord before the chorus... {#Lol}
 
One thing more irksome than Roger McGuinn's (sometimes) nasal, whining vocals (as in this tune), was Tom Petty spending so much time mimicking them.  Whining vocals have their place though, and are within some very good songs.
Why aren't there any bands today that make their careers by putting out superior cover versions of some other guy's recent material?
 ziakut wrote:

Hey Romeotuma...

I'm almost afraid to ask. Did something happen to Cynaera? 
 
I found this link on a posting in the RP forum: https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/elkodaily/obituary.aspx?n=ann-lucas-stepp&pid=156470402#fbLoggedOut.

 romeotuma wrote:

Miss you so much, Ann...

rest in peace... 
 
Hey Romeotuma...

I'm almost afraid to ask. Did something happen to Cynaera? 
Makes me cry. Perfection. An absolutely wonderful time capsule, and as noble and timely as the day it was born. Gotta say, this improves on Dylan, even if he wouldn't agree. 

Apologies, but would someone please upload the amazing version of this from Bobfest - Bob's 30th Anniversary celebration, featruing McGuinn, Petty, Clapton, Neil Young, Bob and George Harrison.


ah, yes. what a wonderful song.
reminds me of times gone by...happy times.
 Cynaera wrote:
Survived a horrendous argument with my brother. Six out of twelve cats are sick, but they've gotten their antibiotics, the litterboxes are clean, and the sun is shining. This song is so good it makes my heart swell with joy and appreciation.  It wouldn't dare rain while the Byrds are singing... {#Sunny}
 
Miss you so much, Ann...

rest in peace... 
Absolutely marvelous!!!! Love this song...!!!!! 
 johnjconn wrote:
I'm pretty much alone on this thought, but I find the 60's music rather boring.
Beatles are ok, but I'm burnt out on them
Doors had an edge, which is good.
Stones, Cream, CSNY, Momma's & Pappa's, Byrds, Beach Boys, and the rest of them are pretty lame

Maybe after 40 years, I just sick of this sound.
just saying
 
Google to see the albums that were released in 1969. There was so much good music that year that there was no "sound". Such a wide variety and great contributions in any category. Lots of deep cuts to explore. Sure some have been overplayed and some have not stood the test of time but hard to consider it as boring. Sometimes life makes it hard to be inspired. Hope your day improves.

 johnjconn wrote:
My grandfather loves this song.

Enough said
 

Johnny boy.  Go and play in the sandbox now.

I love this song.  I also love a fairly equal amount great music from the 70s, 80s, 90s, '00s and '10s.

Someday - if you are the kind of person who appreciates RP - you will understand.
Play the Bobfest version Bill.

Where the singers lined up in legendariness (if that was a word)

McGuinn
Petty
Young
Clapton
Dylan
Harrison

If I got that right.  With the 2 distinct guitar solos of Neil and Eric
 kingart wrote:
Brilliant Byrds, by way of Bob. One of the touchstone songs of the 60s. 
 

Excuse me, but wouldn't that be "Brilliant Bob, by way of The Byrds"? - just sayin' ... {#Whisper}
I'm pretty much alone on this thought, but I find the 60's music rather boring.
Beatles are ok, but I'm burnt out on them
Doors had an edge, which is good.
Stones, Cream, CSNY, Momma's & Pappa's, Byrds, Beach Boys, and the rest of them are pretty lame

Maybe after 40 years, I just sick of this sound.
just saying


LOVE this
I'm so much older now... but was 12 years old then.
hey Roger could you do that last bit again... there's this Petty kid here and he missed the last chord before the chorus... {#Lol}
Fantastic!

Excellent.

{#Hearteyes}


Brilliant Byrds, by way of Bob. One of the touchstone songs of the 60s. 

This may be the most insightful comment on modern social movements in the last 50 years:

 

Half-wracked prejudice leaped forth
"Rip down all hate," I screamed
Lies that life is black and white
Spoke from my skull. I dreamed
Romantic facts of musketeers
Foundationed deep, somehow.
Ah, but I was so much older then,
I'm younger than that now.



he's got good taste

 
johnjconn wrote:
My grandfather loves this song.

Enough said
 


My grandfather loves this song.

Enough said
Just as or more adorable than ever.
This song really does sound old and dated, but it works for me, very lovely harmonies...

8
 lemmoth wrote:
Loved the version from Bob's 30 yrs celebration

McGuinn, Petty, Young, Clapton, Dylan and Harrison - incredible lineup for a great Bob tune
 
Holy jamoley.
 Cynaera wrote:
I am so happy... Life is hard, money is tight, the stress-factor threatens to do me in - and then this song comes on, and it all just goes away.  I want to live in a perpetual Byrds universe. {#Sunny}
 
me too!

I love the Byrds. Nothing beats their fabulous harmonies and jangly guitars

A few weeks ago I went for a Dylan concert here in Melbourne. It was one of those days that the coin landed wrong and Bad Bob turned up.   Haven't listened to any Dylan since then to help reset my head.

Well, thank you. Those golden Byrds harmonies, that gorgeous 12 string, the telescope of Time .... ah, now I remember why that songbook has travelled with me all my life....

 
Keith Jarrett performs this song on his first solo album. Obviously without lyrics, but the melody stands up well alone.
Survived a horrendous argument with my brother. Six out of twelve cats are sick, but they've gotten their antibiotics, the litterboxes are clean, and the sun is shining. This song is so good it makes my heart swell with joy and appreciation.  It wouldn't dare rain while the Byrds are singing... {#Sunny}
 Cynaera wrote:
I am so happy... Life is hard, money is tight, the stress-factor threatens to do me in - and then this song comes on, and it all just goes away.  I want to live in a perpetual Byrds universe. {#Sunny}
 
Sweet.

Taking a break from dishes to say, yay!
{#Laughing}

k_trout wrote:

I am old, but this too will change. You sir are stupid and that is immutable.
 

Loved the version from Bob's 30 yrs celebration

McGuinn, Petty, Young, Clapton, Dylan and Harrison - incredible lineup for a great Bob tune
Ive got a fever, and the only prescription, is more WOODBLOCK!!!
 Papernapkin wrote:
You're just old now.
 
I am old, but this too will change. You sir are stupid and that is immutable.


 romeotuma wrote:


Yup... Bobby Dylan at it again... he is a true poet...
 

Quite clear, no doubt, somehow..
"Ah, but I was so much older then, I'm younger than that now."

Well, I keep getting younger
My life's been funny that way
Before I ever learned to talk
I forgot what to say
"McGuinn and McGuire couldn't get no higher
But that's what they were aiming at. . ."

I read my last comment on this song, and I still feel the same way! Something about Roger McGuinn's vocals and writing... Has anyone ever checked out his "Back to Rio" CD?  Very good stuff, and worth a listen. Meanwhile, I have to go find my paisley Nehru jacket and my go-go boots. I'm feeling the need to turn on the old lava-lamp and just dance in the light.

And then I'll go back to my mundane, tragic life as an unemployed whatever, struggling to make payments on whatever and fight off whatever threatens my whatever.

Bod gless us veryone. (Geez - I guess I'm still running a fever...) {#Roflol}
Anthem for my teenage years

Still sounds great after all these years {#Music}
love it.

Love that 12-string Ricky 
I am so happy... Life is hard, money is tight, the stress-factor threatens to do me in - and then this song comes on, and it all just goes away.  I want to live in a perpetual Byrds universe. {#Sunny}
Long time since I'v added a new ten,missed this one ,apparently.
Having heard both this one and "Solsbury Hill" by Peter Gabriel on the same workday, tracks #1 and #2 in the soundtrack of my life being them, it's time to go home....

We didn't know when this came out that it was a Dylan song (what did we know?), but we were more amazed that a hippie-dippie (TIC) band could achieve The Byrds' vocal harmonies.


"Ah, but I was so much older then, I'm younger than that now."
Was it Mark Twain who once said: 
"When I was eighteen my parents were the dumbest people on Earth, when I was twenty I was amazed at how much they had learned in just two short years!"  {#Wink}

Definitely my favourite version.  A song for a generation.
You're just old now.
One of their finest efforts!{#Clap}
 bachbeet wrote:
Always liked both versions of this song, Dylan's and this one.  In fact, the lyrics always moved me and I still think it's one of Dylan's best.  He was only in his early to mid 20s when he wrote it but it offers both topical lines and self-reflective ones.  "Good and Bad I defined these terms.  Quite clear, no doubt, somehow.  Ah, but I was so much older then.  I'm younger than that now."  Great stuff!  And, he chose a perfect title too.
 
Did you hear, does anyone remember the version by The Nice on their album, Elegy. The musical presentation is way different from either Dylan or the Byrds. But the words carry through and resonate regardless of style and most importantly regardless of generation.

 sharkartist wrote:
What an amazing song and what an amazing sound, that Rikenbacher 12-string of McGuinn's.
 
I'm a sucker for that sound! Love It. {#Guitarist}

perfect !

>^_^<



Damn, that 12-string sounds good; chime on Jim/Roger, chime on...
 aarrgho wrote:
damn.....I'm old....
 
So was I but I'm younger now. {#Cheers}