[ ]   [ ]   [ ]                        [ ]      [ ]   [ ]
Bombino — Ahoulaguine Akaline
Album: Agadez
Avg rating:
6.3

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1579









Released: 2011
Length: 4:00
Plays (last 30 days): 1
(no lyrics available)
Comments (69)add comment
The more I hear this, the more I like it!!  Thanx RP!
Can you imagine, from a Nomadic Background in Niger, comes a true world artist!! Check out the work Bombino has done with The Black Keys!! What are the odds? Music is what makes the world go around!!.......no matter how F____D that world is!
 mattenuttall wrote:

To quote my fellow Canadian, Robbie Robertson "I like it, I like it, it's good."



somewhere down that crazy river.
 a_geek wrote:

I like Bombino, but there's nothing wrong with yodeling, alp horns, or Hocus Pocus, for that matter. Now, this song by Bombino should imho be followed by Rachid Taha's "Barra Barra".
 
and. .... this tune needs a few 'cowbells'.... would help put it into a new orbit.
 Stingray wrote:
BOMBINO are (is?) an exception - they are of Tuareg descent - "natural born kidnappers" (a long and very interesting story about why and how).

All other Mailian singer/songwriters have a Griot  background and usually tell about the glorious and (literally) "GOLDEN PAST" of the country!

Today's Mali - back then the black "Kingdom of Ghana"  - was the main source of gold for Western Kingdoms (gold-coins) during the Middle Ages from ca. 600 AD to 1900 (and even today). While Western luxury goods (fine textiles, glass beads from Venice, precious stones from India, swords and blades from Solingen, Germany, ammunition, perfume and fine paper from China, together with many other items) were transported southbound to Ghana (or Gana) - "the land of the blacks", not to be confused with the actual country of Ghana - while the same caravans would return with gold-dust and "black gold" (slaves) for the most part, though other items were part of this extensive trade as well: Gum Arabic, ostrich feathers, oryx leather, oils, ivory and wild animals, for example!

The modern Griots of Mali - especially Mali, but not only Mali (keepers of this tradition) - represent most of the fine music Bill is playing for us here - thankfully! All lyrics tell of those glorious days long past - Griots are, and always have been "historians-with-guitar" of Mali and other Sahelian countries (the "Sahel" is the grassland south of the Sahara, and north of black Africa!) - a racial mixture of Maghrebinian Berbers, Arabs and only some black African genes. A beautiful race (for the lack of a politically more correct term, I guess) with the world's most beautiful woman, if you ask me!

The dramatic history of this trans-Saharan trade equals ten of the best modern crime novels. I am stunned this part of our history hasn't been material for a Hollywood blockbuster.

Though I write this from a European perspective, it is all of HIGHEST INTEREST for America and Americans. It was the VERY SAME TRADE that delivered ca. 20 million black slaves for the plantations if the American South (after ca. 1550+ by ship, though).

Get yourself educated on the matter - I promise you sleepless nights, if you buy the right books!

 
 
Fascinating.  
 justin4kick wrote:

Entirely different from yodeling and alp horns.
 
I like Bombino, but there's nothing wrong with yodeling, alp horns, or Hocus Pocus, for that matter. Now, this song by Bombino should imho be followed by Rachid Taha's "Barra Barra".
 tadeuluciano39 wrote:
Omara "Bombino" Moctar é um internacionalmente aclamado guitarrista e compositor tuaregue da região de Agadez, no Níger. A temática de suas canções remete frequentemente às questões geopolíticas do seu país e de seu povo, e são cantadas no dialeto tuaregue de Tamasheq . Bombino é protagonista do documentário Agadez, the Music and the Rebellion.
 
Trans: "Omara "Bombino" Moctar is an internationally acclaimed Tuareg guitarist and composer from the Agadez region of Niger. The theme of his songs often refers to the geopolitical issues of his country and his people, and are sung in the Tamasheq Tuareg dialect. Bombino is the protagonist of the documentary Agadez, the Music and the Rebellion."

One can feel it from the music.
 tadeuluciano39 wrote:
Omara "Bombino" Moctar é um internacionalmente aclamado guitarrista e compositor tuaregue da região de Agadez, no Níger. A temática de suas canções remete frequentemente às questões geopolíticas do seu país e de seu povo, e são cantadas no dialeto tuaregue de Tamasheq . Bombino é protagonista do documentário Agadez, the Music and the Rebellion.
 
Gracias. I know enough Spanish to understand this information and appreciate it, maybe because Portuguese has always seemed (unnecessarily) different. This I understand.
This is just gorgeous, especially knowing the back story to the song.  Bombino is mesmerizing, ethereal, some of the best music I have discovered via RP in the past decade.  
Omara "Bombino" Moctar é um internacionalmente aclamado guitarrista e compositor tuaregue da região de Agadez, no Níger. A temática de suas canções remete frequentemente às questões geopolíticas do seu país e de seu povo, e são cantadas no dialeto tuaregue de Tamasheq . Bombino é protagonista do documentário Agadez, the Music and the Rebellion.
 jp33442 wrote:


YES
 
O hell yes!
 ChrisVIII wrote:
What was happening with me when I rated the song last time ? I gave it an 8, today, I can barely give it a 4, it's repetitive and whiny.
 
Succinct description of the current trend in popular music (he says stroking his greying beard)!
Carp, please dont play it so often as u do. It dont get any better by doing so'
 sfyi2001 wrote:
No.
 

YES
No.

bandcamp info

The elder Tuareg guitar player Intayaden originally performed this song. He was exiled to Libya during the drought of 1973. This song is in homage to his homeland, and reflects the pain he endured when he had to leave his family and friends behind. Bombino rearranged this traditional song during the second Tuareg rebellion when he was exiled in Burkina Faso. This song focuses on his homeland, and reaches out to other Tuaregs reminding them to think of their country as well. The trance-like chant about Niger and Mali transports the listener.


I greet my country where I left my parents
I greet my country
I greet my country where I left my love
I greet my country
I greet my country where I left my community
I greet my country
You know that I am suffering from it
I greet my country
I do like this.
Meditative

Sounds like an exotic Grateful Dead to me.  rating=1
To quote my fellow Canadian, Robbie Robertson "I like it, I like it, it's good."
 Azrica wrote:

'The elder Tuareg guitar player Intayaden originally performed this song. He was exiled to Libya during the drought of 1973. This song is in homage to his homeland, and reflects the pain he endured when he had to leave his family and friends behind. Bombino rearranged this traditional song during the second Tuareg rebellion when he was exiled in Burkina Faso. This song focuses on his homeland, and reaches out to other Tuaregs reminding them to think of their country as well. The trance-like chant about Niger and Mali transports the listener.'
lyrics translated 
I greet my country where I left my parents 
I greet my country 
I greet my country where I left my love 
I greet my country 
I greet my country where I left my community 
I greet my country 
You know that I am suffering from it 
I greet my country

 

!!!!!!plzno

'The elder Tuareg guitar player Intayaden originally performed this song. He was exiled to Libya during the drought of 1973. This song is in homage to his homeland, and reflects the pain he endured when he had to leave his family and friends behind. Bombino rearranged this traditional song during the second Tuareg rebellion when he was exiled in Burkina Faso. This song focuses on his homeland, and reaches out to other Tuaregs reminding them to think of their country as well. The trance-like chant about Niger and Mali transports the listener.'
lyrics translated 
I greet my country where I left my parents 
I greet my country 
I greet my country where I left my love 
I greet my country 
I greet my country where I left my community 
I greet my country 
You know that I am suffering from it 
I greet my country

 joempie wrote:
WTF PSD. The only positive thing I can say is that it's definitely different...

 
Entirely different from yodeling and alp horns.
Like.
Disagree.

Open your mind to other forms of music and ye shall be rewarded.
 
WTF PSD. The only positive thing I can say is that it's definitely different...
What was happening with me when I rated the song last time ? I gave it an 8, today, I can barely give it a 4, it's repetitive and whiny.
The musician and the interesting song is explained in the entries below dated Nov. 2 2014 and Oct 19 2014. Thanks kcar! Thanks Stingray!
 DaidyBoy wrote:

Some of us more ignorant types would appreciate the lyrics if anyone can oblige.  

 
Scroll down the page a bit - kcar posted them.  Or try this.
Second song by Bombino discovered this week thank to RP, very emotional content and even more appreciable after reading the translation of lyrics. Something of Youssou n'Dour in this guy's genes.
Looking forward to seeing this guy at the Edmonton Folk Fest this August
 gesue wrote:
horrible

  Stingray wrote:

Maybe - but only for the ignorant, unaware of the historic context!

This is the music of the West-African  "Griots" (google it), though "BOMBINO" do/es not perfectly match the original meaning. This music is historic story-telling  more than anything. Griots - in the old times, but even today - went from camp to camp educating people about their "golden past", nobody should forget!

Early Saharan Rappers - kinda!

 
Some of us more ignorant types would appreciate the lyrics if anyone can oblige.  
 kennewicksheri wrote:
thank you ... 
Bringing to me music I would never hear elsewhere..
enhancing my library, my views.....
Thank you for selecting this piece tonight.. another great reason I listen to Radio Paradise..... 

 
Yes.
thank you ... 
Bringing to me music I would never hear elsewhere..
enhancing my library, my views.....
Thank you for selecting this piece tonight.. another great reason I listen to Radio Paradise..... 
 Meolla_Reio wrote:
I know I can't really appreciate historical value of this, but my music sense is not tingling, it's quite opposite. I would even minus it again if I could. It's not horrible, it's just like a very specific fetish.
 
On the other hand, I gave it a 10. {#Cool} 
love it
I know I can't really appreciate historical value of this, but my music sense is not tingling, it's quite opposite. I would even minus it again if I could. It's not horrible, it's just like a very specific fetish.
horrible
 
 gesue wrote:
horrible

 
Maybe - but only for the ignorant, unaware of the historic context!

This is the music of the West-African  "Griots" (google it), though "BOMBINO" do/es not perfectly match the original meaning. This music is historic story-telling  more than anything. Griots - in the old times, but even today - went from camp to camp educating people about their "golden past", nobody should forget!

Early Saharan Rappers - kinda!
 kcar wrote:
Some background for the song and a translation of the lyrics, as found here

The elder Tuareg guitar player Intayaden originally performed this song. He was exiled to Libya during the drought of 1973. This song is in homage to his homeland, and reflects the pain he endured when he had to leave his family and friends behind. Bombino rearranged this traditional song during the second Tuareg rebellion when he was exiled in Burkina Faso. This song focuses on his homeland, and reaches out to other Tuaregs reminding them to think of their country as well. The trance-like chant about Niger and Mali transports the listener.


 
I did NOT read any of this, before posting my little excursion into (aanother) parts of rather cruel early-American history, though the slave master, dealers, buyer and seller have all been Muslims/Arabs. America was just the "innocent" buyer of what has been called "black gold"!

All "Blacks" one can sees nowadays in Morocco, Algeria, Tunesia, Mauritania,  Libya (MAGHREB) and Egypt are descandants of this Middle Age trade, that lasted far into the early 20th century!
BOMBINO are (is?) an exception - they are of Tuareg descent - "natural born kidnappers" (a long and very interesting story about why and how).

All other Mailian singer/songwriters have a Griot  background and usually tell about the glorious and (literally) "GOLDEN PAST" of the country!

Today's Mali - back then the black "Kingdom of Ghana"  - was the main source of gold for Western Kingdoms (gold-coins) during the Middle Ages from ca. 600 AD to 1900 (and even today). While Western luxury goods (fine textiles, glass beads from Venice, precious stones from India, swords and blades from Solingen, Germany, ammunition, perfume and fine paper from China, together with many other items) were transported southbound to Ghana (or Gana) - "the land of the blacks", not to be confused with the actual country of Ghana - while the same caravans would return with gold-dust and "black gold" (slaves) for the most part, though other items were part of this extensive trade as well: Gum Arabic, ostrich feathers, oryx leather, oils, ivory and wild animals, for example!

The modern Griots of Mali - especially Mali, but not only Mali (keepers of this tradition) - represent most of the fine music Bill is playing for us here - thankfully! All lyrics tell of those glorious days long past - Griots are, and always have been "historians-with-guitar" of Mali and other Sahelian countries (the "Sahel" is the grassland south of the Sahara, and north of black Africa!) - a racial mixture of Maghrebinian Berbers, Arabs and only some black African genes. A beautiful race (for the lack of a politically more correct term, I guess) with the world's most beautiful woman, if you ask me!

The dramatic history of this trans-Saharan trade equals ten of the best modern crime novels. I am stunned this part of our history hasn't been material for a Hollywood blockbuster.

Though I write this from a European perspective, it is all of HIGHEST INTEREST for America and Americans. It was the VERY SAME TRADE that delivered ca. 20 million black slaves for the plantations if the American South (after ca. 1550+ by ship, though).

Get yourself educated on the matter - I promise you sleepless nights, if you buy the right books!

 
Some background for the song and a translation of the lyrics, as found here

The elder Tuareg guitar player Intayaden originally performed this song. He was exiled to Libya during the drought of 1973. This song is in homage to his homeland, and reflects the pain he endured when he had to leave his family and friends behind. Bombino rearranged this traditional song during the second Tuareg rebellion when he was exiled in Burkina Faso. This song focuses on his homeland, and reaches out to other Tuaregs reminding them to think of their country as well. The trance-like chant about Niger and Mali transports the listener.

lyrics:

I greet my country where I left my parents 
I greet my country 
I greet my country where I left my love 
I greet my country 
I greet my country where I left my community 
I greet my country 
You know that I am suffering from it 
I greet my country

Dig it.  Ringing guitar.
{#No} ...mulumba guitar-tinkling....
Pass the Hookah.
Great sound, great song, great Bombino!
This is awful. 
 oldfart48 wrote:
{#Cheers}{#Guitarist}never thought about a guitar sounding like bag pipes..... but there you are.......tasty

 
well, there you have it. I couldn't figure out this connection, and now I got it, loud and clear. I did get the drone part, but didn't make the bagpipe leap. Thank you oldfart48
horrible
ScottN wrote:
Tonight this song was a sublime segue from John Coltrane's Naima. Very, very nice.

 
{#Yes} 
LOVE LOVE LOVE see the video on his work--just phenomenal. A force for good!
grand/top stuff{#Bananajam}{#Whipit}
 stevieslo wrote:
I just got the Nomad CD after hearing a song or two off of it here...very good.
 
Me too. I am going to get this too. 

Its all gone a bit North African at Poacher Mansions - not a bad thing at al!
I just got the Nomad CD after hearing a song or two off of it here...very good.

this is the second song i have heard from this guy - both are really excellent.

the other song is called "Aman" and it ROCKS - totally different feel, but the same style of brilliant guitar playing.

might need to do a full download!
{#Dancingbanana}{#Dancingbanana}{#Dancingbanana}         {#Bananajam}{#Bananajam}{#Bananajam}
Nice...
This is brilliant! What a lovely sound on so many levels. Makes me feel good to be alive. Thank you for playing. :)
 
Remarkably pretty.
Tonight this song was a sublime segue from John Coltrane's Naima. Very, very nice.
Nice finger picking style.
his spirit shines through every song, hard to describe the spirit other than sweet, pure, raw, dignified ? Wilde? Hooray!
Very nice indeed
Very nice 
{#Cheers}{#Guitarist}never thought about a guitar sounding like bag pipes..... but there you are.......tasty
Very nice. Brings me back to the two weeks at The Golden Palms spa near Bangalore India. They had brilliant (Indian) music piped into the dining area.
LIKEITALOT
So good this artist is here.  The first thing I heard from him stopped me in my tracks.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-cB62Mvakk#aid=P-9NNKZHZoc 
I like this Tuareg...7.