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Jerry Douglas — Little Martha
Album: Lookout For Hope
Avg rating:
7.5

Your rating:
Total ratings: 855









Released: 2002
Length: 3:33
Plays (last 30 days): 1
(Instrumental)
Comments (60)add comment
 mread wrote:

Kottke actually covered this too.  Also a great version.
 
Got that one,  need to get this one.
 unclehud wrote:

... there's a "Little Martha" statue/tombstone in Macon's Rose Hill cemetery, where the Brothers used to hang out -- and quietly party.   Stoned is kinda like dreaming, innit?
 
It's an awesome place to visit!
Achingly beautiful.  And appropriately not too long after Jorma Kaukonen.
Was lucky enough to catch his solo show this past week - my God can he play. Blown away.
 thewiseking wrote:
this came to Duane in a dream, they say
 
... there's a "Little Martha" statue/tombstone in Macon's Rose Hill cemetery, where the Brothers used to hang out -- and quietly party.   Stoned is kinda like dreaming, innit?
Lovely
 glydev wrote:

I was listening to this as I was doing something else and it caught me, I thought "here's a Leo Kottke song I've never heard before"
then checked and it is Jerry Douglas, this got a 9 from me, it's beautiful..

 
Kottke actually covered this too.  Also a great version.
"Little Martha" minutes after "Embryonic Journey". This is why I listen to RP.
{#Heartkiss} Eine wunderschöne Musik-die direkt ins Herz geht
Haven’t heard this in so long. What a beautiful little song. Makes me happy.
It’s Friday night here in the UK. Ghosh! You are playing some fine music tonight. Thank you
A beautiful cover of a beautiful original. 
If this guy sticks with it, he could be really good...
Song is a masterpiece.  Well done cover. 
Love it. Duane is smiling.
I guess I prefer the AB original, but still, it's nice to hear another take on this sweet tune.
glydev wrote:
I was listening to this as I was doing something else and it caught me, I thought "here's a Leo Kottke song I've never heard before" then checked and it is Jerry Douglas, this got a 9 from me, it's beautiful..
  
Everybody in my hotel room loves this groovy cover...  we be dancing like bowlegged gypsy muleskinners...  big 10, glydev...  hope life is grand for you these days...  love Radio Paradise...
Love the Allman Brothers version too, but this one is tops!
this came to Duane in a dream, they say
Jerry is very talented but personally I prefer his dobro sound with a blue grass band not by itself.
Love his stuff with Allison Kraus and Union Station.
Nice. Would now like to hear the full bluegrass treatment on this
.....oh what an awesome song to drink my morning cuppa to on this spring Saturday morning.....thanks RP
This guy may just be THE master of the resonator.  For me though, when it comes to this instrument, less is more.  He is so accomplished that he can effectively play the instrument as a lead, but in my mind it lacks the pure magic of his work as an accompanist.  
 seangostage wrote:
Not familiar with this guy but great, great stuff
 
He may be the best slide player EVER. Cindy Cashdollar is right up there too, but I think even she would say Mr. Douglas is tops.
JD's the best.

Thank you Mr. Douglas

and thank you Mr. Bill

for just the right music

at just the right time...

Love ya, RP


{#Guitarist}
Not familiar with this guy but great, great stuff
I love anything JD does. But especially this awesome cover....

Volume went wayyyy up... this is a very very nice cover...  love it...

 TanteJensen wrote:

Oh, don't be so harsh. There are excellent musicians who aren't excellent composers. Covering is sometimes actually a compliment, not just a rip off.

 



Joe Bonamassa, are you listening?
Fabulous. Duane would love it, and I bet Greg does. 
I've heard several covers of Little Martha over the years. This is one of the best. RP made it easy to check out the rest of the album as I've never heard of Jerry Douglas before. Bought the download! Doncha love this modern world?   =)
My vote is Duane would approve.
 Alpine wrote:
I'm with you. Do something original you plageriser Jerry Douglas.
 
Oh, don't be so harsh. There are excellent musicians who aren't excellent composers. Covering is sometimes actually a compliment, not just a rip off.

 romeotuma wrote:


Love it...
 
I was listening to this as I was doing something else and it caught me, I thought "here's a Leo Kottke song I've never heard before"
then checked and it is Jerry Douglas, this got a 9 from me, it's beautiful..



Sweet cover...  Duane would like it...




Love it...


 sharkartist wrote:
What a lovely sounding instrument, those dobros.
 
You can say that again.
Always been a big fan of all resonator guitars. Needs a good player though, and Jerry Douglas certainly can do.

Infinitely preferable to the previous drivel.......
This cover is quite likeable...
Suppose it's a brave cover choice, but the original is such a masterpiece, this one just doesn't do it for me.
Jerry Douglas is a fine musician.
Please put Bill Frisell into the playlist.


This is one sweet cover... rest in peace, Duane...



What a lovely sounding instrument, those dobros.
lattalo wrote:
If this was the first time I had ever heard this it would be fine, but having heard it played on the Eat a Peach album, it just doen't cut it.
Too right. It pains me ears.
music_man wrote:
It's actually the dobro that he's playing. And he is quite good at it! You'll also find him in Allison Krauss' Union Station band.
He's also one of the three musicians on a great album that Bill plays a lot, "Skip, Hop and Wobble."
walkerpub wrote:
From wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Martha The story goes that Allman had a dream where Jimi Hendrix showed him the melody of the tune in a Holiday Inn motel bathroom, using the sink faucet as a guitar fretboard. Remembering the melody during the October 1971 sessions that produced most of the third side of what would become Eat A Peach, Allman laid down the track, joined only by Dickey Betts and bassist Berry Oakley, though Oakley's part would be mixed out of the final version, leaving the number as a duet for the two guitarists. (Oakley's part would be restored on the 1989 box set Dreams.) The song's namesake was Martha Ellis, a twelve-year-old girl whose grave the Allman Brothers Band had come across during their frequent trips to Rose Hill Cemetery in their homebase of Macon, Georgia. (Both Duane Allman himself and Berry Oakley would be buried there by the end of 1972). As with Dickey Betts' 1970 instrumental "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed", the song was named for one person but actually about somebody else. Allman envisioned it as an ode to his then-girlfriend, a groupie named Dixie Meadows, who later would sue to control Allman's estate after his death, going as far to assume the name "Dixie Allman". Her claim was rejected in favor of Allman's young daughter Galadrielle, whom he had with his former common law wife, Donna Roosman.
Great information & thanks for the insight into the history of this tune and a great band!
lattalo wrote:
If this was the first time I had ever heard this it would be fine, but having heard it played on the Eat a Peach album, it just doen't cut it.
I'm with you. Do something original you plageriser Jerry Douglas.
If this was the first time I had ever heard this it would be fine, but having heard it played on the Eat a Peach album, it just doen't cut it.
From wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Martha The story goes that Allman had a dream where Jimi Hendrix showed him the melody of the tune in a Holiday Inn motel bathroom, using the sink faucet as a guitar fretboard. Remembering the melody during the October 1971 sessions that produced most of the third side of what would become Eat A Peach, Allman laid down the track, joined only by Dickey Betts and bassist Berry Oakley, though Oakley's part would be mixed out of the final version, leaving the number as a duet for the two guitarists. (Oakley's part would be restored on the 1989 box set Dreams.) The song's namesake was Martha Ellis, a twelve-year-old girl whose grave the Allman Brothers Band had come across during their frequent trips to Rose Hill Cemetery in their homebase of Macon, Georgia. (Both Duane Allman himself and Berry Oakley would be buried there by the end of 1972). As with Dickey Betts' 1970 instrumental "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed", the song was named for one person but actually about somebody else. Allman envisioned it as an ode to his then-girlfriend, a groupie named Dixie Meadows, who later would sue to control Allman's estate after his death, going as far to assume the name "Dixie Allman". Her claim was rejected in favor of Allman's young daughter Galadrielle, whom he had with his former common law wife, Donna Roosman.
I like this version better than Kottke's but the original is tough to beat.
grimmel wrote:
Yes....great slide and great Little Feet song!
Little Feet?
Great dobro playing!
Actually it's an Allman Brothers tune...
Not quite the soul of a Sonny Landreth but mellow and enjoyable none-the-less.
Honeyman wrote:
Nice guitar work. Never heard of this guy before.
It's actually the dobro that he's playing. And he is quite good at it! You'll also find him in Allison Krauss' Union Station band.
Nice guitar work. Never heard of this guy before.