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Tiken Jah Fakoly — Les Martyrs
Album: Cours d'histoire
Avg rating:
6.4

Your rating:
Total ratings: 695









Released: 1999
Length: 5:02
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Ils ont oublié na na na na qu'ils ont torturé ils ont oublié oh non non qu'ils ont assasiné. ils ont oublié qu'ils ont oh non non qu'ils ont humilié
Ils ont oublié Ernest Boka....oubliéé
Ils ont oublié Biaka Boda....oublié
Ils ont oblié Gnabwé Krabwé..oublié
Ils ont spolié Djeny Godena...oublié
Mais le sorcier oublie toujours, les parents de la victime n'oublient jamais c'est pourquoi c'est pourquoi nous pouvons pardonner mais jamais nous allons pardonner mais jamais oublier

Ils ont oublié Thomas Sankara.....oublié
Ils ont oublié Tavio Amorin...oublié
Ils ont oublié Norbert Zongo...oublié
Ils ont oublié Sekou Sanogo...oublié
Ils ont oublié Vamé Touré....oublié
Ils ont oublié Diallo telli....oublié
Mais le sorcier oublie toujours les parents de la victime n'oublient jamais c'est pourquoi c'est pouquoi nous allons pardonner mais jamais oublié nous allons pardonner mais jamais oublié...
Mogo te monin kiere djin mogo te monin la kiere djin ou mossi kana monin kiere djin mogo te monin la kiere djin ikana monin ikana monin ikana monin ikana monin massa tele ntele dounougnan ba ikana monin loundjan djan sebari te ikan monin faaaaaakoly

Ils ont oublié la prison d'Assabou...oublié
Ils ont oublié le tribunal de la plantation....oublié
Ils ont oublié l'enfer du Guébié....oublié
Ils ont oublié Krabwé Gnabwé...oublié
Mais le sorcier oublie toujours les parents de le victime n'oublient jamais c'est pourquoi c'est pourquoi nous pouvons pardonner mais jamais oublier nous allons pardonner mais jamais oublier

Mogo te monin kiere djin mogo te monin la kiere djin ou mossi kana monin kiere djin ikana monin ikana
Monin ikana kiere djin massa tele ntele dounougnan ban ikana monin loundjandjan sebarri te ikana monin
Faaaakoly

Ils ont oublié na na na na na....
Comments (32)add comment
 johnmunsonjr wrote:



With all due respect, you apparently don't listen to much variety of reggae music! There is a lot of great reggae that comes from Africa! Look up Lucky Dube for starters! Enjoy!  And P.S. French reggae from Africa is not that uncommon if you live in one of the many French speaking former colonies in Africa!


Reggae is influenced by African music to start with (well, a LOT of music is influenced by the place, so no surprise there) so it's a circle of influence.
 Baby_M wrote:


French reggae- now, that's eclectic...


 
 

True, but I normally associate reggae with Jamaica rather than Africa.  Of course, there's French-speaking places in the Caribbean, but Jamaica isn't one of them.

It sure sounds cool, though.  Nothing like a little cross-cultural pollination to liven things up.





With all due respect, you apparently don't listen to much variety of reggae music! There is a lot of great reggae that comes from Africa! Look up Lucky Dube for starters! Enjoy!  And P.S. French reggae from Africa is not that uncommon if you live in one of the many French speaking former colonies in Africa!
 SquiddlyDiddly wrote:
Hurrah for this great track. All you haters can click PSD. . . I shall be steppin' through and enjoying every drop of this. 

Go, and just LISTEN to that bass. 
Yep!.... Don't understand a friggin thing he's saying but, guess what....track was SO good, couldn't change it if I wanted to!! (Didn't want to!!)  Was jamming just as intensely as I would to L.Zepp.!!!

Dig the song and really appreciate the comments from African listeners! 
Cantando os problemas sociais e políticos africanos, reclama abertamente das injustiças, gerando grande identicação com as camadas oprimidas dos vários povos africanos.
Com metais e backing vocals de qualidade completando uma banda de 10 musicos, Tiken Jah Fakoly canta uma mistura de dialetos locais com frances e ingles, e faz música "para despertar as consciências".
Doumbia Moussa Fakoly, mais conhecido pelo nome artístico Tiken Jah Fakoly, é um cantor de reggae contemporâneo da Costa do Marfim, atualmente residindo em Mali. Faz um reggae moderno
 Chumbawamba-1984 wrote:
Tiken Jah Fakoly is one of the most articulate African reggae singer. He uses French for lyrics as he has been raised in CÃŽte d'Ivoire, one of the former French colonies. IMHO he also uses French to reach the conscience and audience of other African fellows in the West and East Africa areas where France has a heavy colonial past, and also to reach the Africans of the diaspora worldwide to include but not limited to Belgium, France, UK, US, and the Caribbean Islands. If you were to understand the lyrics, you would find the reggae music to be the most universal vehicle for them.
 

From Google Translate:


They forgot na na na na they tortured they forgot oh no no they murdered. they forgot they have oh no no they humiliated
They forgot Ernest Boka .... forgot
They forgot Biaka Boda .... forgot
They obliterated Gnabwé Krabwé.. forgot
They robbed Djeny Godena ... forgotten
But the sorcerer always forgets, the parents of the victim never forget this is why this is why we can forgive but never we will forgive but never forget

They forgot Thomas Sankara ..... forgot
They forgot Tavio Amorin ... forgot
They forgot Norbert Zongo ... forgot
They forgot Sekou Sanogo ... forgot
They forgot Vamé Touré .... forgot
They forgot Diallo telli .... forgot
But the sorcerer always forgets the parents of the victim never forget this is why this is why we will forgive but never forgot we will forgive but never forgot ...

Mogo te monin kiere djin mogo te monin la kiere djin ou mossi kana monin kiere djin mogo te monin la kiere djin ikana monin ikana monin ikana monin ikana monin massa tele ntele dounougnan ba ikana monin loundjan djan sebari teaaak mon

They forgot Assabou prison ... forgot
They forgot the plantation court .... forgot
They forgot the hell of Guébié .... forgot
They forgot Krabwé Gnabwé ... forgot
But the sorcerer always forgets the parents of the victim never forget this is why this is why we can forgive but never forget we will forgive but never forget

Mogo te monin kiere djin mogo te monin la kiere djin or mossi kana monin kiere djin ikana monin ikana
Monin ikana kiere djin massa tele ntele dounougnan ban ikana monin loundjandjan sebarri te ikana monin
Faaaakoly

They forgot na na na na na ....

Obviously not a complete translation, but it helps me to appreciate the reality expressed in this remarkable song.  (8)


{#Daisy}
 SquiddlyDiddly wrote:
Hurrah for this great track. All you haters can click PSD. . . I shall be steppin' through and enjoying every drop of this. 

Go, and just LISTEN to that base. 
 
Neither here nor there really, but is there a Belgian reggae genre? Asking for a friend.  
Yaaaaa Monnnnn 
Hurrah for this great track. All you haters can click PSD. . . I shall be steppin' through and enjoying every drop of this. 

Go, and just LISTEN to that bass. 
gabbadar wrote:
Not on-top with the song, but that Radio Paradise blip was.. special. Frist.
I hope it was an anomaly. Cutsie station breaks belong on morning shock jock shows, not in the wonderful flow of RP. Unless, of course, Ken Nordine was to do some trippy wordjazz abstraction of a station break.

romeotuma wrote:


French reggae- now, that's eclectic...


 
Welly wrote:

Not so weird. Half of the African continent speaks French.
 

True, but I normally associate reggae with Jamaica rather than Africa.  Of course, there's French-speaking places in the Caribbean, but Jamaica isn't one of them.

It sure sounds cool, though.  Nothing like a little cross-cultural pollination to liven things up.


It's about time a proper tribute was written about that kid in "The Point".
Rockers!
Love it!{#Bananajam}
 romeotuma wrote:


French reggae— now, that's eclectic...
 
Not so weird. Half of the African continent speaks French.
Oh please.  As if your idea of boring carries any weight at all.  
 heeb wrote:
Just a shame that the music itself is so repetitive and boring... If he has a message, why not package it more attractively, like the late great Bob M. did so ingeniously with many of his songs?
 


Read his wiki entry. Seems like a pretty cool guy.
heeb wrote:
Just a shame that the music itself is so repetitive and boring... If he has a message, why not package it more attractively, like the late great Bob M. did so ingeniously with many of his songs?


Yeah who's his agent anyway?!? And that album cover. No chicks!?!? This bumpkin will never make it.

Chumbawamba-1984 wrote:
Tiken Jah Fakoly is one of the most articulate African reggae singer. He uses French for lyrics as he has been raised in CÃŽte d'Ivoire, one of the former French colonies. IMHO he also uses French to reach the conscience and audience of other African fellows in the West and East Africa areas where France has a heavy colonial past, and also to reach the Africans of the diaspora worldwide to include but not limited to Belgium, France, UK, US, and the Caribbean Islands. If you were to understand the lyrics, you would find the reggae music to be the most universal vehicle for them.
Just a shame that the music itself is so repetitive and boring... If he has a message, why not package it more attractively, like the late great Bob M. did so ingeniously with many of his songs?
tinybubbles wrote:
You can say/post the word "fuck" on Radio Paradise?! Who knew!
I think one may be forced to use if he/she doesn't have any other word more educated in mind.
Tiken Jah Fakoly is one of the most articulate African reggae singer. He uses French for lyrics as he has been raised in CÃŽte d'Ivoire, one of the former French colonies. IMHO he also uses French to reach the conscience and audience of other African fellows in the West and East Africa areas where France has a heavy colonial past, and also to reach the Africans of the diaspora worldwide to include but not limited to Belgium, France, UK, US, and the Caribbean Islands. If you were to understand the lyrics, you would find the reggae music to be the most universal vehicle for them.
You can say/post the word "fuck" on Radio Paradise?! Who knew!
meloman wrote:
Q. What's worse than your run-of-the-mill reggae? A. Fucking French run-of-the-mill reggae. Actually all reggae sounds the same, so language isn't really an issue. Christ this is boring.
Ah yes, and for that comment I had to move my vote from 7 to 8, because I like it because it is French Reggae.
I actually like this quite a bit, of course it helps that it reminds me of the French islands in the Carribean
Africa is a continent to watch for the next decade. There is too much potential there for nothing to come of it.
mojoman wrote:
Africa does not cry, it speaks. Powerful stuff.
"Africa does not cry anymore, she speaks"
Like molto. Meditative repetition.
Africa does not cry, it speaks. Powerful stuff.
Not on-top with the song, but that Radio Paradise blip was.. special. Frist.