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Emerson, Lake & Palmer — Lucky Man
Album: Emerson, Lake & Palmer
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Released: 0
Length: 4:33
Plays (last 30 days): 2
He had white horses
And ladies by the score
All dressed in satin
And waiting by the door

Ooooh, what a lucky man he was
Ooooh, what a lucky man he was

White lace and feathers
They made up his bed
A gold covered mattress
On which he was led

Ooooh, what a lucky man he was
Ooooh, what a lucky man he was

He went to fight wars
For his country and his king
Of his honor and his glory
The people would sing

Ooooh, what a lucky man he was
Ooooh, what a lucky man he was

A bullet had found him
His blood ran as he cried
No money could save him
So he laid down and he died

Ooooh, what a lucky man he was
Ooooh, what a lucky man he was
Comments (318)add comment
Please play more ELP tunes!!   Thank You!
read Greg Lake’s autobiography - it’s a good read
This start out quietly and then keeps getting louder!  At the end my house is shaking.
Oh.  That was me doing that.
You had me at horses dressed in satin...
Looking at the RP catalog of ELP, I'm surprised there are so few songs. And this one is so over played.
I actually have been listening to one of their albums from the 90's, Black Moon. It is pretty different from their other late 70's and 80's albums.
Greg Lake's vocals are really good on a lot of the Black Moon songs.
I am always in the "Moog" for this song!!!!
 tkosh wrote:

So, when I was in high school you couldn't just go to the store and buy a plug-in timer (or maybe I just didn't have the cash), but I fashioned one from something I found somewhere.  I hooked it up to my parents' console stereo player in the living room with the needle on the end of this song and the volume all the way up.  It was my alarm clock.  As soon as I heard it click on I knew I had just milliseconds to get out there and turn it down or I was in big trouble.  It was very effective.  After a while I got my own record player and moved the contraption into my bedroom with a 300 watt light bulb I got somewhere also plugged into it.  I used other songs too (there was a Blood Sweat and Tears Al Kooper guitar solo, but I can't remember which), but this was one, and it's always fun to hear it again and think of my homemade alarm clock.



Funny.  Reminds me of my memory living at my parents' home as a teenager when you built things rather than bought things.  Mine was a friend's parents' console stereo which I took apart and put in my own shelving unit at the end of my bed.  Then I took the clock out of an old clock radio to control the power.  I would use the timer knob to play music for an hour while I fell asleep.  Loved falling asleep that way.  I'd do it now but my wife says it keeps her awake :-(
 xray38 wrote:

Pretty good song for a twelve year old to write. (Greg Lake)




Takes one to know one!  Your mommy wants you to clean up your room, or she'll take her laptop back!
Pretty good song for a twelve year old to write. (Greg Lake)
Ever need to hear a song real bad but you didn't know it until you heard it?
 pinto wrote:

Many comments on here about the Moog and the drums.  If you're not familiar with this album, give a listen to the song Tank for more great Moog work from Keith and excellent drumming skills by Mr. Palmer.



GODLIKE!!! ICONIC!!!
 tomcool wrote:

So we were in the 1969  Chevy Impala, stopped at the red light at the base of the hill, about to go to school at Chartiers Valley HS. My older brother, Bill, had upgraded the rear deck speakers. They probably had five inch woofers.

AM radio.

Lucky Man. Sounds cool.

Then those Moog sounds hit. Sounds never before heard in the existence of the known Universe.

We were stunned. The light turned green. People honked, then drove around.

Stunned.

For me, and for Bill, too, I think, that is the context to think about and to evaluate this amazing song.



Yeah the first time I heard that moog was stunning....everytime that song was on the radio I would just wait and wait for the end I didn't even care about the rest of it 
I much prefer Greg Lake with king Crimson,  to me there's no comparison.
 tomcool wrote:

So we were in the 1969  Chevy Impala, stopped at the red light at the base of the hill, about to go to school at Chartiers Valley HS. My older brother, Bill, had upgraded the rear deck speakers. They probably had five inch woofers.

my brother and I bought a 65 Impala in 75 - fun but when you used the defroster you got smoke from the dashboard...was hysterical and maybe we just had a built in smoke machine? those were the days, for sure

 justin4kick wrote:


Angry_Old_Man wrote:
Classic song with a bit too much synth sauce.



 
haresfur wrote:

Beethoven's 5th is a classic but there's too much violin
 

Michelangelo's Last Supper is not bad either except that there's too much paint in it.

understand teh point and agree, but Michelangelo did not paint The Last Supper. It is by da Vinci.
 

 justin4kick wrote:
The Moog solo at the end once inspired me to buy my own synthesizer. A bit smaller than the one Mr. Emerson used.

 
 

 Laptopdog wrote:
I remember buying this song on a 45 single when it came out (yes, I am that old). I had only heard it a couple of times on the radio and loved the sound of that synthesizer. The first time I listened to the single, the 45 started skipping in the middle of the synth part. I might have been a little high at the time and probably sat there listening to the part skipping and playing over and over for several minutes before I realized what was happening. Good times.
 
First time I heard "Message in a Bottle" the record skipped on an infinite "Sending out an S.O.S" perfectly in rhythm. It was great!
The ending with the Moog spaz-outs and all still gives me chills.
An electric battlefield death.
ICONIC!!!!!!
 haresfur wrote:

Beethoven's 5th is a classic but there's too much violin
 
ELP vs Beethoven, ancient Latin would have said "si parva licet componere magnis".
Many comments on here about the Moog and the drums.  If you're not familiar with this album, give a listen to the song Tank for more great Moog work from Keith and excellent drumming skills by Mr. Palmer.
I have always thought the last word in the 2nd verse should be "lead" as in the base metal, in contract to the "gold covered mattress".
 nicknt wrote:
Great musicians but overall a very worn and dated sound. 
 

I'm a bit worn and dated myself, so it's sounds great to me.
 justin4kick wrote:
The Moog solo at the end once inspired me to buy my own synthesizer.
A bit smaller than the one Mr. Emerson used.

 
 
Yes, but of course Keith's doubled as the telephone switchboard for Mayberry.
Too soon?
For whatever reason LOML has become an ELP fanatic.  I couldn't be happier. Now to dust off all the LP's and put them on constant rotation.

There are a couple of what I consider to be God-like bands, and this one is at the top of the list.

They broke so much uncharted ground.

Rest in Peace Greg and Keith, you are definitely missed.
Great musicians but overall a very worn and dated sound. 
 tomcool wrote:
So we were in the 1969  Chevy Impala, stopped at the red light at the base of the hill, about to go to school at Chartiers Valley HS. My older brother, Bill, had upgraded the rear deck speakers. They probably had five inch woofers.

AM radio.

Lucky Man. Sounds cool.

Then those Moog sounds hit. Sounds never before heard in the existence of the known Universe.

We were stunned. The light turned green. People honked, then drove around.

Stunned.

For me, and for Bill, too, I think, that is the context to think about and to evaluate this amazing song.
 
I love this whole comment. But this part is - "Sounds never before heard in the existence of the known Universe." - Exactly.
So we were in the 1969  Chevy Impala, stopped at the red light at the base of the hill, about to go to school at Chartiers Valley HS. My older brother, Bill, had upgraded the rear deck speakers. They probably had five inch woofers.

AM radio.

Lucky Man. Sounds cool.

Then those Moog sounds hit. Sounds never before heard in the existence of the known Universe.

We were stunned. The light turned green. People honked, then drove around.

Stunned.

For me, and for Bill, too, I think, that is the context to think about and to evaluate this amazing song.
clever !  tkosh wrote:
So, when I was in high school you couldn't just go to the store and buy a plug-in timer (or maybe I just didn't have the cash), but I fashioned one from something I found somewhere.  I hooked it up to my parents' console stereo player in the living room with the needle on the end of this song and the volume all the way up.  It was my alarm clock.  As soon as I heard it click on I knew I had just milliseconds to get out there and turn it down or I was in big trouble.  It was very effective.  After a while I got my own record player and moved the contraption into my bedroom with a 300 watt light bulb I got somewhere also plugged into it.  I used other songs too (there was a Blood Sweat and Tears Al Kooper guitar solo, but I can't remember which), but this was one, and it's always fun to hear it again and think of my homemade alarm clock.
 

 justin4kick wrote:


Angry_Old_Man wrote:
Classic song with a bit too much synth sauce.



 
haresfur wrote:

Beethoven's 5th is a classic but there's too much violin
 

Michelangelo's Last Supper is not bad either except that there's too much paint in it.
 And now there is a hole in the bottom of it so that the nuns have easier access to the kitchen!!!!

I like Gregorian cover so much better


Angry_Old_Man wrote:
Classic song with a bit too much synth sauce.



 
haresfur wrote:

Beethoven's 5th is a classic but there's too much violin
 

Michelangelo's Last Supper is not bad either except that there's too much paint in it.
In high school band in the 80's my teacher was cool enough to have an Arp synth. It was a dinosaur compared to what Roland was putting out, but fun.
The first time I realized that a musical instrument could rake me on an amazing ride. Still gives me chills! 
I don't mean to be a blasphemer, I love these guys, but I just now had the thought that I'd like to hear William Shatner's version of this! I think it would be great!
 Kaisersosay wrote:


Genius , I used to do stuff like that as well. 
 

I did similar (with a plug in timer) when I had an early morning paper-round.
Desk lamp pointing at my face (just enough to wake me up), and the stereo (other side of the room) primed at full volume to play the opening of Diamond Dogs. 

This always got me out of bed *very* quickly before the rest of the household was subjected to the blood-curdling cacophony!
Drumming makes this one.   Just fantastic. 
 Angry_Old_Man wrote:
Classic song with a bit too much synth sauce. 
 
Beethoven's 5th is a classic but there's too much violin
Bumped this up to 9
Oooooo, what a dodgy chorus, this was.

Emerson Lake and Powell. At least they kept the same initials. 
Groundbreaking musical concept.
Big 10. Keep playing this one
 Kaisersosay wrote:


Genius , I used to do stuff like that as well. 

(Caution - contains obligatory PF  reference) - in the 70s we similarly set up a hifi in a boarding school dormitory of 26 boys using 'Time' from DSOTM,  to go off just before the rising bell...
Fond memory of this song.  My father, and old WW2 Vet was so entralled by the moog.  He asked me to play it over and over again.  When his friends would come over he would make me play it for them.  Still makes me smile thinking about it.  
 mdnlsn wrote:
This.is.bad.
 
Are. You. On. Cheap. Hallucinogens?

I'm rewatching the Blackadder series right now and this could almost be its theme song.
 tkosh wrote:
So, when I was in high school you couldn't just go to the store and buy a plug-in timer (or maybe I just didn't have the cash), but I fashioned one from something I found somewhere.  I hooked it up to my parents' console stereo player in the living room with the needle on the end of this song and the volume all the way up.  It was my alarm clock.  As soon as I heard it click on I knew I had just milliseconds to get out there and turn it down or I was in big trouble.  It was very effective.  After a while I got my own record player and moved the contraption into my bedroom with a 300 watt light bulb I got somewhere also plugged into it.  I used other songs too (there was a Blood Sweat and Tears Al Kooper guitar solo, but I can't remember which), but this was one, and it's always fun to hear it again and think of my homemade alarm clock.
 

Genius , I used to do stuff like that as well. 
Never forget my older brother using this track to show off the families new
stereo system. A big step up from the old console. 
 dflee wrote:
Monster in it's day. Still quite enjoyable.
Greg and Ian Anderson performing his Father Christmas (youtube) is awesome.
Have always enjoyed Greg's work.
 
Thank you for mentioning the Youtube link - I hadn't seen or heard that version, it is quite incredible.
 skdenfeld wrote:
My local classic rock station always morphs this into 'Tom Sawyer' by Rush. It works magnificently.
 
That synth at the end is a dead ringer for the one at the beginning of Tom Sawyer.
Moog baby.
 Steely_D wrote:

Here's how big they were...Headlining over Black Sabbath, EWF, and the fuckin' Eagles, man.

 
Wow!  I'd love to hear Earth, Wind & Fire at 10 o'clock in the morning!

 Steely_D wrote:

Here's how big they were...Headlining over Black Sabbath, EWF, and the fuckin' Eagles, man.

 
Wow, what a line up. My 14 year old self would have come up with the ten bucks for that, if I was in the area. Which I assuredly was not.
 tkosh wrote:
So, when I was in high school you couldn't just go to the store and buy a plug-in timer (or maybe I just didn't have the cash), but I fashioned one from something I found somewhere.  I hooked it up to my parents' console stereo player in the living room with the needle on the end of this song and the volume all the way up.  It was my alarm clock.  As soon as I heard it click on I knew I had just milliseconds to get out there and turn it down or I was in big trouble.  It was very effective.  After a while I got my own record player and moved the contraption into my bedroom with a 300 watt light bulb I got somewhere also plugged into it.  I used other songs too (there was a Blood Sweat and Tears Al Kooper guitar solo, but I can't remember which), but this was one, and it's always fun to hear it again and think of my homemade alarm clock.
 
Great story and memory, tkosh!  I love the ingenuity of us music loving high schoolers!!  And just another example of what the "cell phone" has denied the new generation of....no more separate alarm clocks...let alone analog hands.  Long Live RP!!
 Proclivities wrote:

[The analog moog is] just not mixed loud enough; you can barely hear it at the end.
 
Hilarious!  Not a big fan of ELP but do enjoy this song including the bombastic moog synth bit. 
 Piranga wrote:
Almost impossible to convey how huge this song was at the time.

 
Here's how big they were...Headlining over Black Sabbath, EWF, and the fuckin' Eagles, man.

This.is.bad.
So, when I was in high school you couldn't just go to the store and buy a plug-in timer (or maybe I just didn't have the cash), but I fashioned one from something I found somewhere.  I hooked it up to my parents' console stereo player in the living room with the needle on the end of this song and the volume all the way up.  It was my alarm clock.  As soon as I heard it click on I knew I had just milliseconds to get out there and turn it down or I was in big trouble.  It was very effective.  After a while I got my own record player and moved the contraption into my bedroom with a 300 watt light bulb I got somewhere also plugged into it.  I used other songs too (there was a Blood Sweat and Tears Al Kooper guitar solo, but I can't remember which), but this was one, and it's always fun to hear it again and think of my homemade alarm clock.
enough is enough..... there is a much deeper source of music to dig into with ELP

Love this photo.
RIP Keith and Greg.
(sorry about the gigantic pic but luckily the new RP software seems to scale it to fit)
 Laptopdog wrote:
I remember buying this song on a 45 single when it came out (yes, I am that old). I had only heard it a couple of times on the radio and loved the sound of that synthesizer. The first time I listened to the single, the 45 started skipping in the middle of the synth part. I might have been a little high at the time and probably sat there listening to the part skipping and playing over and over for several minutes before I realized what was happening. Good times.

 
THAT is HI-Larious!!  The closest thing one gets to that nowadays is accidently turning 'repeat track' on and being too stoned (if that exists :-~ ) to care and listen to a song over-n-over. 

I remember buying this song on a 45 single when it came out (yes, I am that old). I had only heard it a couple of times on the radio and loved the sound of that synthesizer. The first time I listened to the single, the 45 started skipping in the middle of the synth part. I might have been a little high at the time and probably sat there listening to the part skipping and playing over and over for several minutes before I realized what was happening. Good times.
1971 and this song playing at a record store through the largest speakers I'd ever heard.
The smell of popcorn wafting onto the sidewalk.
Zap comix for sale, including the infamous #4.
Approximately this location: Coventry Road, Cleveland Heights

Who says that your brain doesn't get programmed permanently at age 17?

//Of course this record is permanently on my list of tippy-top-rated songs!
 Stefen wrote:
In case you didn't know, that's an analog Moog synthesizer.
 
Yeah, it's just not mixed loud enough; you can barely hear it at the end.  ;s
 sunflowerbee wrote:
{#Notworthy}     {#Notworthy}    {#Notworthy}

  This album was my foray beyond top 40 as a teen. Hugely influential going forward into greater realms of audio, and time spent alone with albums on repeat. Add a little gangha and new worlds were discovered within and without!


This might be my least favorite song off this album. Maybe because it was played so much on the Radio. But I like most of the other songs much better than this one.
 treatment_bound wrote:
Image result for crawdaddy magazine covers

Did ELP spend an afternoon with the Ramones at some point?

 
They wore it first!

Thanks for playing the song, Bill. Every time.


Image result for crawdaddy magazine covers

Did ELP spend an afternoon with the Ramones at some point?
Always happy to hear these guys. Say what you will about prog, you have to be a real musician to play it well — even the "simpler" songs like this one.
Monster in it's day. Still quite enjoyable.
Greg and Ian Anderson performing his Father Christmas (youtube) is awesome.
Have always enjoyed Greg's work.
As noted by the Fred of the Nottingham Jury below, in 1970 synths were new and extremely big & heavy and unbelievably expensive. This was cutting-edge stuff in its day and still sounds great! 

Angry_Old_Man wrote:
Classic song with a bit too much synth sauce. 

 


 Angry_Old_Man wrote:
Classic song with a bit too much synth sauce. 

 
Yup, it does date the song somewhat. -hehe-

Interestingly enough in later years, bands would imitate an electronic kazoo sound with electric guitars.
Classic song with a bit too much synth sauce. 
Oh what a lucky man I am.
 1wolfy wrote:
I was just a young teen when this song came to be.  I could see the lyrics come to life in my minds eye.  I'm a lucky man to have experienced this song in such a profound way !

 

The song has a strong if incomplete story; it feels like a ballad. It had the same impact on me when I was a teen. Interestingly, Greg Lake wrote it when he was only 12. 
From the height of the Vietnam War........
I have no reverence for this, but I like it regardless.
 On_The_Beach wrote:
2016, what a brutal year.
I echo greenbuilding's thoughts below.
R.I.P. Greg Lake.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/content/dam/music/2016/12/08/GregLake-large_trans++KQ5Yvlf_tS7m85BSV1LmKmJnyL1UUg_iqbqpa-6GlE4.jpg

 
Omg! I didn't know {#Sad}
Interesting that Bill has never played a single track from any of Greg Lake's solo albums. I clicked on the Music/Artists tab above and entered Greg Lake's name and nothing comes up. I Believe in Father Christmas would have been one to hear this time of year or at anytime really but nope.
Perfect, a masterpiece, right up until the very end when curiously it just runs out of steam. Should have faded it out just a wee bit earlier, just before that lil Scottish thing on the Moogy
Indeed it was a sad year for all ELP fans.
Thanks for the song, farewell Mister Lake
{#Notworthy}     {#Notworthy}    {#Notworthy}
2016, what a brutal year.
I echo greenbuilding's thoughts below.
R.I.P. Greg Lake.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/content/dam/music/2016/12/08/GregLake-large_trans++KQ5Yvlf_tS7m85BSV1LmKmJnyL1UUg_iqbqpa-6GlE4.jpg
I'm just beside myself. How bad can 2016 be?
Greg we will miss you. I will miss you.
I was fortunate to see ELP twice, front row. The Spectrum in Philly. I remember vividly feeling my internal organs vibrating inside my body from the power of Greg's bass. (Procol Harum opened).
Where ever Keith and Greg are, I hope they're jamming.
Greg and Keith were both lucky men.


BIG 10.  Always has been.
{#Notworthy}
Thanks Bill.

We'll miss Greg Lake.
Nice job Bill.  Couple of great tunes to honor Greg and Keith.

Can't tell you how much I loved this tune back in the day... 
In case you didn't know, that's an analog Moog synthesizer.


So sad about Keith.
Good read here,,, interview with Greg Lake.
 https://hiresaudiocentral.com/greg-lake-on-emerson-lake-palmer-in-surround-sound-king-crimson-and-his-earliest-influences/
 
It sounds like it was made in the '70s, as it should - because it was.
Image result for lucky man emerson lake and palmer
 fredriley wrote:

Quite. The keyboards player was Keith Emerson, who was a classically-trained pianist and knew his stuff. The sounds sound pretty dated these days when you get synthesisers for peanuts, but back in the 70s synths were very new, very expensive and very, very big (ELP at one point needed three articulated lorries to cart their stuff around), so this was pioneering stuff.

It's nice that Greg Lake's songs remain in circulation. The ELP stuff (and I write as a die-hard fan at the time) has dated terribly and makes me wince to listen to it, but Lake's songs and singing were simple and still haven't reached their 'play by' date.

 
Interesting.  I agree to the extent that I find most of ELP's stuff 'dated'.  Tremendously influential no doubt.
Almost impossible to convey how huge this song was at the time.
 Zeekei wrote:
S#@$!*t ... I am getting old. Teenage memories {#Dancingbanana}

 
Indeed!  :-)
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Plus I had an amplifier the size of a Buick back in the day.

 
A lot of Buick-sized amps still sound good though. Well they're the size of SUVs now. {#Smile}
 I still have an old McIntosh amp from the early 1980s. Sounds wonderful.  weighs nearly 80lbs On_The_Beach wrote:

Plus I had an amplifier the size of a Buick back in the day.

 

 Paralistener wrote:
Forever one of my favorites!  
 
Always felt that Emerson hammered the moog a bit too heavily at the end of the song though.   
 


 
What? You suggest that Keith Emerson overdid anything?! It is indeed possible. 
Forever one of my favorites!  
 
Always felt that Emerson hammered the moog a bit too heavily at the end of the song though.   
 

S#@$!*t ... I am getting old. Teenage memories {#Dancingbanana}
I remember seeing them in Winterland and Keith Emerson with his Hammond B, sat up on a large pedestal that spun around. It was most excellent.{#Clap}
 LowPhreak wrote:
Maybe you guys have different speakers and rooms now, that can't do the 40Hz and lower range as well? Acoustics are a funny thing, sometimes where the speakers are placed is in a null or node area that boosts or cuts some frequencies in the bass range.
 
Plus I had an amplifier the size of a Buick back in the day.
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Agreed!
Used to be able to make the house shake with the vinyl; not so with the ones and zeros.

 
Maybe you guys have different speakers and rooms now, that can't do the 40Hz and lower range as well? Acoustics are a funny thing, sometimes where the speakers are placed is in a null or node area that boosts or cuts some frequencies in the bass range.
I was just a young teen when this song came to be.  I could see the lyrics come to life in my minds eye.  I'm a lucky man to have experienced this song in such a profound way !
 Jelani wrote:
The digital versions, to my disappointment, fail on those deep down low tones. they just don't get to the bottom.
 
Agreed!
Used to be able to make the house shake with the vinyl; not so with the ones and zeros.
RIP Keith Emerson..I was listening to their first 4 albums this weekend in his honor (FLAC files cranked up to 11), but this is the obvious radio-friendly single off their debut :-)
 number7 wrote:
This song has been my "test" song for every time I got a new piece of audio equipment.

I do however prefer to listen to at least the last half of Tank. (the track just before)

Loud, Loud loud!!!!

Wonderful in concert.

The lyrics are somewhat lame but powerful never the less.

Sold many pairs of L100's & 4311's. Great speakers.
Using an old pair of Klipsch Heresy's now.

 
The digital versions ,to my disappointment, fail on those deep down low tones. they just don't get to the bottom.
This song has been my "test" song for every time I got a new piece of audio equipment.

I do however prefer to listen to at least the last half of Tank. (the track just before)

Loud, Loud loud!!!!

Wonderful in concert.

The lyrics are somewhat lame but powerful never the less.

Sold many pairs of L100's & 4311's. Great speakers.
Using an old pair of Klipsch Heresy's now.
That is one awkwardly sung chorus.
cool story Axor!  awesome music played loud brings joy!!!
This needs to be listened to loud!!!! 
Always blown me away since heard it when was about 8.
Something really powerful about song and as for  ending WOW!!  Just amazing keyboard!!
my dad used to try shake the house apart running this through some his pa equipment testing it out and bass bins practically shaking windows out frames
 jagdriver wrote:
I had a pair of those, and then moved on to L200s on a lark. THOSE were speakers! (excerpt)
 
The amazing thing is, I still have those L100s and use them daily!
40 years and counting!
I imagine JBLs are being churned out in factories in China and Mexico these days, like everything else; alas.
Great song of course, but I also get a kick out of the selected imagery for the songs, that flow by on my Android RP app, when the display is tilted the long way. However it's done, it's pretty cool.
 justin4kick wrote:
The Moog solo at the end inspired me to buy my own synthesizer. A bit smaller than the one Mr. Emerson used.

 

Thanks for sharing a photo of that colossal "instrument".  It looks like it required its own truck to get to a gig.
 Further proof why the punks of the late-70's slagged off the pomposity of the prog-rockers from the first half of that decade.


I wonder if the lucky man is Barry Lyndon?
Thanks, Bill, for a blast from my childhood.