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God is an Astronaut — A Deafening Distance
Album: All is Violent, All is Bright
Avg rating:
7.4

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2327









Released: 2006
Length: 3:40
Plays (last 30 days): 2
(instrumental)
Comments (290)add comment
 arserocket wrote:

I've put on around 200lbs and haven't changed my trousers in two years now... I need to learn from you
 
Elastic waistband, I assume?  Kudos for thinking ahead.
As someone  brought up in Bray,Co Wicklow, it's pleasing that these guys hail from there.
Too bad, i donĀ“t hear more from them on RP.

4 titles only...
For RP listeners the right side of 40, the band name is a direct reference to the 70s 'ancient astronauts' cult started by the writer (and convicted fraudster) Erich von Daniken with his book "Chariots of the Gods?". The cult claimed that prehistoric and ancient humans had been regularly visited by advanced extraterrestrial beings, the 'evidence' being reinterpreted monuments and even the Old Testament (famously the Book of Ezekiel, from which the Chariots of the Gods phrase was taken). The ETs helped humans to build spectacular structures (eg Stonehenge, Pyramids, Moai, Nazca Lines). The cult flourished as a secular religion (I write as an ex-believer) during the 70s, in an era when the Cold War was at its hottest and the threat of nuclear annihilation seemed very real and immediate. Many people prayed for enlightened and advanced ETs to revisit us and rescue humanity from its self-destructive madness. The cult faded in the 80s, partly because von Daniken's claims had been throughly trashed by scientists, archaeologist and others, but perhaps mainly because the threat of war receded (relatively) as the US and USSR engaged in nuclear arms talks. The ideas persist as a 'meme' and can be seen in films and literature, such as the 'monolith and apes' scene in Kubrick's 2001, and many SF novels.
 
Why the band chose this as their name is open to speculation, but sardonic irony comes to mind as so many of their tracks are dark and sombre reflections on civilisation, or lack thereof. The photo on the album is of the remains of a gas chamber, I've read.
oh lord, this is hurting my ears.  
I think this song is stuck.
 arserocket wrote:

I've put on around 200lbs and haven't changed my trousers in two years now... I need to learn from you
 
maybe the 200 lbs weight increase is directly linked to your inability to change your trousers - you need to learn from Dr. Bruce Banner
 che_cavolo wrote:

This time I said, Explosions in the Mogwai....
 

Reminds me a bit of Ambulance Ltd....
 Kaisersosay wrote:
I can't believe it was 2 years ago I added that comment. At least I changed my desk and lost weight in all that time..... 

 
I've put on around 200lbs and haven't changed my trousers in two years now... I need to learn from you
{#Hearteyes}
{#Hearteyes}
 Springbok84 wrote:
7 —> 8

 
Ditto
 che_cavolo wrote:
Wife says what's that, I said Mogwai...

 
This time I said, Explosions in the Mogwai....
I can't believe it was 2 years ago I added that comment. At least I changed my desk and lost weight in all that time..... 
Hey...Wishbone Ash wants their riffs back!
 che_cavolo wrote:
Wife says what's that, I said Mogwai...

 
Then she said: Tarzan?
7 —> 8
Wife says what's that, I said Mogwai...
 Screature wrote:
Definitely a hint of Genesis in this...

 
Yes it has a Prog flavor....I like it!
Definitely a hint of Genesis in this...

There's a song on this album that sounds very much like this song....It makes me remember back to many years back..... 
Dayum!  Had no clue anyone would respond in detail.  (Although the "clever clogs" seems a bit harsh for those of us that don't sit home watching TV all evening.)
 
Nice to know (or think) that NASA agrees about non-carbon life forms.  Maybe they have jobs available for folks like me.
 
=== Egregiously egotistical response below ===
 
As for escaping the UAE, let me assure you that the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is definitely NOT part of the United Arab Republic.  It is a Kingdom organized after WW2 through violent tribal assimilations by the Saud family, and adamantly adheres to Muslim law.
 
Women must be covered head-to-foot and may not be in public unless accompanied by an adult male.  (Non-Muslim women must also abide by this -- it's law.)  Men are not allowed to wear shorts above the knee.  Alcohol is illegal.  So are movies and all pork products. (Bacon, ham, sausage, BBQ ribs, chitterlings, pulled pork sandwiches, all outlawed!)  The internet is so censored that I had to spoof my IP address to watch Georgia Tech football.  And we were adjacent to the Red Sea, so there was none of that "It's a dry heat" nonsense.
 
Would I change things?  No.  It was an incredible experience; I didn't die; and -- all humor aside -- the connection to Radio Paradise and its frequent poster-children kept a little light glowing throughout those 5 months.  (Thank you, Bill & Rebecca!)
Post Rock? Art Rock?
Listenable.
 kcar wrote:

Why unclehud, you clever clogs (Have you escaped the UAE?). Check out some stuff from NOVA, y'all, between the dotted lines: 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Alien Earths: Expert Q&A
https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/space/marcy-extrasolar.html

On July 13, 2009, astrophysicist Geoff Marcy of U.C. Berkeley answered questions about the hunt for planets and life beyond our solar system.


Q: In the past, I have heard of life forms based upon some other substance than water, e.g., methane, silicon, etc. What's the latest thinking on this? Is it merely science fiction? Could it apply to a revised definition of "life?"Jack Harvanek, Chelmsford, Massachusetts

Marcy: There is certainly a chance that some life form exists that is not based on carbon and doesn't need water. A silicon-based life form at high temperatures is one example. The silicon-oxygen chemical bonds might be breakable at temperatures of thousands of degrees, allowing different combinations of molecules to form, similar to the permutations of carbon-based organic chemistry. No one knows for sure if there are such life forms based on something other than carbon and water.

Q: Have there been any recent refinements to the Drake Equation? If so, what are they? Also, do we have a reliable estimate of the number of stars in our galaxy? I've heard anywhere from 100 billion to 400 billion.Ross Meyer, Monument, Colorado

Q: What is the current estimate of the probability of Earth-like planets in the universe?Anonymous

 

Geoff Marcy: The Drake Equation is alive and well! And now we have news. The discovery of jupiters, saturns, and neptunes, along with protoplanetary disks around young stars, provides convincing evidence that Earth-sized planets are probably common. The Kepler mission will tell us the exact frequency of such planets.

Taking all of the evidence in hand, probably 30-50 percent of all stars have Earth-sized planets. Surely about a fourth are in the habitable zone where the water would be liquid. So, probably at least one out of every 10 stars has a habitable Earth-like planet. In our Milky Way Galaxy, with its 200 billions stars, this means that there are 20 billion Earth-like planets in our galaxy alone. Each of these 20 billion planets offers a separate throw of the biological dice in the cosmic chances for life.

Drake's Equation now allows us to fill in one number! The remaining question is how many Earth-like planets spawn technological life. For that, the planet must have both water and continents, because you can't build computers, clarinets, or spacecraft in the ocean. We don't know how many Earth-like planets have just the right environment to support technological life, nor how long that life will survive against the foibles brought by its own technology.

 


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Another link to work of a NASA artist, trying to imagine what alien life forms on other planets might look like: 

https://www.pbs.org/exploringspace/aliens/designs/index.html 


One final thought: according to Wikipedia, galaxies can hold as few as ten million and as many as 100 trillion stars. "There are probably more than 170 billion galaxies in the observable universe." 


 

If you want to know about life on other planets, ask the CIA, the NASA and the dark forces behind your official political establishment. The chain of ("hidden" in the open) academic evidence is overwhelming!

I personally expect us to hear very soon from the "little green men" - in their grey outfits.

"Soon" is before 2020!


AN INCREDIBLE SONG!

All 10 from the German judge!


 unclehud wrote:

With all respect, sir, I was talking about intelligent life developing on other planets; planets with characteristics very different from Earth, and planets far from our solar system.  If life forms developed on a planet with an ammonia atmosphere, significant solar radiation from their multiple suns, and gravity 4 times the strength of Earth's, they would be starkly different from us.  My hypothesis is: there is a possibility that life could form on those planets; if so, it certainly wouldn't follow any of our commonly-held assumptions about essential traits for life on Earth.  In fact, if life has formed under those crazy-ass conditions, us humans may have a hard time actually identifying it as a life form.

 
Why unclehud, you clever clogs (Have you escaped the UAE?). Check out some stuff from NOVA, y'all, between the dotted lines: 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Alien Earths: Expert Q&A
https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/space/marcy-extrasolar.html

On July 13, 2009, astrophysicist Geoff Marcy of U.C. Berkeley answered questions about the hunt for planets and life beyond our solar system.


Q: In the past, I have heard of life forms based upon some other substance than water, e.g., methane, silicon, etc. What's the latest thinking on this? Is it merely science fiction? Could it apply to a revised definition of "life?"Jack Harvanek, Chelmsford, Massachusetts

Marcy: There is certainly a chance that some life form exists that is not based on carbon and doesn't need water. A silicon-based life form at high temperatures is one example. The silicon-oxygen chemical bonds might be breakable at temperatures of thousands of degrees, allowing different combinations of molecules to form, similar to the permutations of carbon-based organic chemistry. No one knows for sure if there are such life forms based on something other than carbon and water.

Q: Have there been any recent refinements to the Drake Equation? If so, what are they? Also, do we have a reliable estimate of the number of stars in our galaxy? I've heard anywhere from 100 billion to 400 billion.Ross Meyer, Monument, Colorado

Q: What is the current estimate of the probability of Earth-like planets in the universe?Anonymous

Geoff Marcy: The Drake Equation is alive and well! And now we have news. The discovery of jupiters, saturns, and neptunes, along with protoplanetary disks around young stars, provides convincing evidence that Earth-sized planets are probably common. The Kepler mission will tell us the exact frequency of such planets.

Taking all of the evidence in hand, probably 30-50 percent of all stars have Earth-sized planets. Surely about a fourth are in the habitable zone where the water would be liquid. So, probably at least one out of every 10 stars has a habitable Earth-like planet. In our Milky Way Galaxy, with its 200 billions stars, this means that there are 20 billion Earth-like planets in our galaxy alone. Each of these 20 billion planets offers a separate throw of the biological dice in the cosmic chances for life.

Drake's Equation now allows us to fill in one number! The remaining question is how many Earth-like planets spawn technological life. For that, the planet must have both water and continents, because you can't build computers, clarinets, or spacecraft in the ocean. We don't know how many Earth-like planets have just the right environment to support technological life, nor how long that life will survive against the foibles brought by its own technology.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Another link to work of a NASA artist, trying to imagine what alien life forms on other planets might look like: 

https://www.pbs.org/exploringspace/aliens/designs/index.html 


One final thought: according to Wikipedia, galaxies can hold as few as ten million and as many as 100 trillion stars. "There are probably more than 170 billion galaxies in the observable universe." 

 Byronape wrote:
 unclehud wrote:
What's to say there aren't living beings that require an ammonia atmosphere, use sulfur for metabolic energy, communicate through touch or telepathy, and would explode in gravitational fields less than 4G?  (Cell phone pun for those not paying close attention.)  It's quite plausible that they would absolutely assume a form completely "alien" to Earthlings.  Why, oh why, must it possess general human characterisitics?

While I agree 100% with your arguement, there are some reasons why "intelligent" life would generally be considered to have a humanoid form.  

Think about the traits that make humans (argueably) superior to other life on this planet.  
 
With all respect, sir, I was talking about intelligent life developing on other planets; planets with characteristics very different from Earth, and planets far from our solar system.  If life forms developed on a planet with an ammonia atmosphere, significant solar radiation from their multiple suns, and gravity 4 times the strength of Earth's, they would be starkly different from us.  My hypothesis is: there is a possibility that life could form on those planets; if so, it certainly wouldn't follow any of our commonly-held assumptions about essential traits for life on Earth.  In fact, if life has formed under those crazy-ass conditions, us humans may have a hard time actually identifying it as a life form.
Is this from Twilight? Blecch. Faux art rock sux.
 Markcaudill wrote:
Listening on the beach. Drinking vodka. Smoking a cigar. Very enjoyable. 
 

And here I am at work!
Listening on the beach. Drinking vodka. Smoking a cigar. Very enjoyable. 
 Rofi wrote:
If God would make this kind of music, I would listen to him 

 
God is a God of Thunder and Rock 'n' Roll....{#Fire}
If God would make this kind of music, I would listen to him 
Love it!
It makes me think if there would be a chance that RP would Play "young blood" by Russian Circles!
wow..!!!

Probably there would be a chance. Event though its quite -  louder! :-)
 palad1 wrote:


Actually... 

*pushes nerd glasses back-on*

Douglas Addams mentions that the engineers that built it ran a test question by it but did not wait for the answer. The question was what is 6*9. Later-on it is revealed that this race had 13 fingers in total, making their numeric system base-13.

42 in base 13 = 54 base 10

Douglas Adams wowed never to make any more math jokes after that.

 
 
And to think, you'll never get that time back.

heroin much? 


 
Blastcat900 wrote:

The number 42 is, in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, "The Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything", and is calculated by an enormous supercomputer over a period of 7.5 million years to be 42. Unfortunately no one knows what the question is. Thus, to calculate the Ultimate Question, a special computer the size of a small planet and using organic components was created and named "Earth".
 

Actually... 

*pushes nerd glasses back-on*

Douglas Addams mentions that the engineers that built it ran a test question by it but did not wait for the answer. The question was what is 6*9. Later-on it is revealed that this race had 13 fingers in total, making their numeric system base-13.

42 in base 13 = 54 base 10

Douglas Adams wowed never to make any more math jokes after that.

 
 ottovonb wrote:
Ah....nothing like a dreamy interlude in the middle of a crappy work day. Nice!
 
yeah but had a 'droner' on just prior
it's not so far, really...
 justsomeone wrote:
If God is an astronaut, who built the spaceship?
 
Some guy named Kevin...or maybe it was Jerry - you know, the guy from the mail room.
...this is cool, I'm watching the live NASA feed on the landing of the Mars rover and in the background this is playing. Maybe God is an astronaut.
Never thought RP would play God is an astronaut... terrific stuff.
Ah....nothing like a dreamy interlude in the middle of a crappy work day. Nice!
 justsomeone wrote:
If God is an astronaut, who built the spaceship?
 


My God wouldn't need one but ironically does wear a helmet
If God is an astronaut, who built the spaceship?
 unclehud wrote:
What's to say there aren't living beings that require an ammonia atmosphere, use sulfur for metabolic energy, communicate through touch or telepathy, and would explode in gravitational fields less than 4G?  (Cell phone pun for those not paying close attention.)  It's quite plausible that they would absolutely assume a form completely "alien" to Earthlings.  Why, oh why, must it possess general human characterisitics?

While I agree 100% with your arguement, there are some reasons why "intelligent" life would generally be considered to have a humanoid form.  

Think about the traits that make humans (argueably) superior to other life on this planet.  

1) Brains as far from the ground as possible.
2) Front facing eyes with short optic nerves.
3) Multiple communication methods that frequently combine to add context (ie, "Sure honey, you can go out drinking all night..." while her toe is tapping and eyebrow up.)
4) Limbs with multiple points of articulation.
5) Digits with multiple points of articulation.
6) Thumbs.  They speak for themselves.
7) Walking upright, freeing upper limbs for object manipulation.

There are many others, but I think you get the drift.

Now, I think the assumption that intelligent life on "Earth-like" planets (liquid water, O2 and carbon-dioxide, hard non-liquid surfaces) would generally have humanish characteristics due to the thought that all life needs liquid water to form.  

That being said, there is no reason that I can think of that other forms wouldn't evolve on their own.  It would all depend on what was needed to thrive in their environment.
 Byronape wrote:

It just so happens that 42 is the answer to Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything.  I don't think that's a coincidence...
 
The number 42 is, in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, "The Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything", and is calculated by an enormous supercomputer over a period of 7.5 million years to be 42. Unfortunately no one knows what the question is. Thus, to calculate the Ultimate Question, a special computer the size of a small planet and using organic components was created and named "Earth".


 unclehud wrote:
To revisit an previous topic on this thread ...
 
Someone suggested earlier, and I paraphrase here, that there is a negligible chance of livable conditions on another planet in the Milky Way.  That comment went on to list a few items required to sustain life: "(liquid water, energy, and organic material) ".
 
That someone was wrong, going by the increasing number of extrasolar planets being discovered by astronomers, a few of which look to be 'goldilocks planets'. With over 400 billion stars in our galaxy, and millions of galaxies in the universe, there must be countless billions of planets. Even if the conditions for carbon-based life are unlikely, say 1 in 10 million for arguments' sake, then you've still got millions of planets in the universe that are suitable for life.  IMO the probability of there not being extraterrestrial life is vanishingly small.

Not that that's what this band's name is about. I think it's an ironic comment on the Von Daniken pseudo-religion of the 70s (as mentioned in an earlier comment of mine) which in essence saw extraterrestrials as gods guiding humanity to progress and watching over us over the millennia.
 ozzie1313 wrote:
If God is an astronaut, then he is too many light years away for us to really know anything about him with any accuracy.  We can only be enthralled with the myth like earlier mankind used oral history to not lose track of and to perpetuate their identity. 
 
Awesome! 


If God is an astronaut, then he is too many light years away for us to really know anything about him with any accuracy.  We can only be enthralled with the myth like earlier mankind used oral history to not lose track of and to perpetuate their identity. 
 unclehud wrote:
To revisit an previous topic on this thread ...
 
Someone suggested earlier, and I paraphrase here, that there is a negligible chance of livable conditions on another planet in the Milky Way.  That comment went on to list a few items required to sustain life: "(liquid water, energy, and organic material) ".
 
Years ago under the stimulus of powerful chemicals, my friends and I used to critique "the Star Trek view of cosmology".  Why must we assume that other sentient beings use carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen for metabolism?  Why must they always be assumed to inhabit axially symmetrical bodies, with, let's be serious here, a head, thorax, two arms and two legs?  Star Trek and LOTS of other science fiction vehicles also portrayed aliens using vocalizations or other noises for communication — a characteristic at which we chuckled for hours.  (Damned chemicals.)
 
What's to say there aren't living beings that require an ammonia atmosphere, use sulfur for metabolic energy, communicate through touch or telepathy, and would explode in gravitational fields less than 4G?  (Cell phone pun for those not paying close attention.)  It's quite plausible that they would absolutely assume a form completely "alien" to Earthlings.  Why, oh why, must it possess general human characterisitics?
 
That's like, just my opinion, man.  No disrespect aimed at anyone.
 
I am most definitely with you on this.  "Life" could have many forms!

 unclehud wrote:
To revisit an previous topic on this thread ...
 
Someone suggested earlier, and I paraphrase here, that there is a negligible chance of livable conditions on another planet in the Milky Way.  That comment went on to list a few items required to sustain life: "(liquid water, energy, and organic material) ".
 
Years ago under the stimulus of powerful chemicals, my friends and I used to critique "the Star Trek view of cosmology".  Why must we assume that other sentient beings use carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen for metabolism?  Why must they always be assumed to inhabit axially symmetrical bodies, with, let's be serious here, a head, thorax, two arms and two legs?  Star Trek and LOTS of other science fiction vehicles also portrayed aliens using vocalizations or other noises for communication — a characteristic at which we chuckled for hours.  (Damned chemicals.)
 
What's to say there aren't living beings that require an ammonia atmosphere, use sulfur for metabolic energy, communicate through touch or telepathy, and would explode in gravitational fields less than 4G?  (Cell phone pun for those not paying close attention.)  It's quite plausible that they would absolutely assume a form completely "alien" to Earthlings.  Why, oh why, must it possess general human characterisitics?
 
That's like, just my opinion, man.  No disrespect aimed at anyone.
 
I love this post, as I have always been stumped by the assumption that "living" means "needs the elements as humans to exist."

Also, I love this song. Solid 10!

To revisit an previous topic on this thread ...
 
Someone suggested earlier, and I paraphrase here, that there is a negligible chance of livable conditions on another planet in the Milky Way.  That comment went on to list a few items required to sustain life: "(liquid water, energy, and organic material) ".
 
Years ago under the stimulus of powerful chemicals, my friends and I used to critique "the Star Trek view of cosmology".  Why must we assume that other sentient beings use carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen for metabolism?  Why must they always be assumed to inhabit axially symmetrical bodies, with, let's be serious here, a head, thorax, two arms and two legs?  Star Trek and LOTS of other science fiction vehicles also portrayed aliens using vocalizations or other noises for communication — a characteristic at which we chuckled for hours.  (Damned chemicals.)
 
What's to say there aren't living beings that require an ammonia atmosphere, use sulfur for metabolic energy, communicate through touch or telepathy, and would explode in gravitational fields less than 4G?  (Cell phone pun for those not paying close attention.)  It's quite plausible that they would absolutely assume a form completely "alien" to Earthlings.  Why, oh why, must it possess general human characterisitics?
 
That's like, just my opinion, man.  No disrespect aimed at anyone.


this is bad, this sucks
Goldfrapp - Utopia > God is an Astronaut - A Deafening Distance = Nice segue!
What a wonderful transition to this from Utopia. Nice, Bill. Very nice!

 Byronape wrote:
It just so happens that 42 is the answer to Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything.  I don't think that's a coincidence...
 
I'm not a "Hitchhikers" pundit, but I'm glad you picked up the (intentional) reference.


 On_The_Beach wrote:

Well, I've done the counting. As it turns out there are 42 more grains of sand on Earth than there are stars in the universe. So take THAT, universe!! (The universe thinks it's so great.)

 
It just so happens that 42 is the answer to Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything.  I don't think that's a coincidence...


I don't mind this song, but I don't really understand why it's being played to death... There is so much other music out there!
 fabduchi wrote:
I really like this song! The album is great too.

 
 
Yeah. I just adore these guys... They are incredible.

 Proclivities wrote:
Despite what Carl Sagan asserted, it's quite possible (or probable) that there are more grains of sand on the Earth's beaches than there are stars in the Universe - but I haven't counted lately.
 
Well, I've done the counting. As it turns out there are 42 more grains of sand on Earth than there are stars in the universe. So take THAT, universe!! (The universe thinks it's so great.)

This sounds like something right out of the Porcupine Tree music book.
I like that one!

 coy wrote:

50,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 stars
are you sure ?

 
I checked his math...he's right!

All bright


1wolfy
(Mission Viejo California)
Posted: Apr 22, 2009 - 10:27 < Reply >

..if God were an invention, all living things  came to be by some wild ass cosmic mistake..seems ignorant to my minds eye..it requires a whole lot of faith in man made science to believe that, but to each his own. SweTex wrote:
I like this!...but I have to disagree. God is not an astrounat, God is the invention of the only animal who knows it's going to die. 
 

SweTex
(Swede living in Texas)
Posted: Mar 26, 2009 - 10:58 < Reply >

 healyf52 wrote:


You have it backwards, humanity is the invention of the only being that knows that it's not going to die.
 

I guess one of us has got it backwards....And I'm SURE you're convinced its me.


 themotion wrote:

There are 100,000,000,000 stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. 
There are 500,000,000,000 galaxies in the Universe.
That's 5.0 × 1022 stars in the known universe ... or:

50,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 stars

To put that in perspective, that's more stars in the universe than grains of sand on all of earth's beaches.

To say that just one of those stars, by some "wild ass cosmic mistake," has a planet containing the ingredients for life (liquid water, energy and organic material) goes against logic and probability. In fact, it has been found that several of Jupiter's and Saturn's moons contain liquid water, organic material and tidal energy created by the gravitational forces of the planet's they orbit. 

Life may not be as precious or unique as we once imagined. 

 
50,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 stars
are you sure ?

Yes! ...and, god is an astronaut!
I really like this song! The album is great too.

 
Trying to write a detailed technical report and this song is just the what I need to keep going.

Love the song.
A pleasant surprise to me is that this band are from Wicklow, Ireland, just up the road from where I grew up in Bray. Not that there's any trace of Irish in their music, mind. This is a fine and disturbing album which the Nottingham jury heartily recommends.
I Like !   {#Music}
 themotion wrote:

There are 100,000,000,000 stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. 
There are 500,000,000,000 galaxies in the Universe.
That's 5.0 × 1022 stars in the known universe ... or:

50,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 stars

To put that in perspective, that's more stars in the universe than grains of sand on all of earth's beaches.

To say that just one of those stars, by some "wild ass cosmic mistake," has a planet containing the ingredients for life (liquid water, energy and organic material) goes against logic and probability. In fact, it has been found that several of Jupiter's and Saturn's moons contain liquid water, organic material and tidal energy created by the gravitational forces of the planet's they orbit. 

Life may not be as precious or unique as we once imagined. 

 
Despite what Carl Sagan asserted, it's quite possible (or probable) that there are more grains of sand on the Earth's beaches than there are stars in the Universe - but I haven't counted lately.
 

 4merdj wrote:
Nice smooth transition as a segue to Goldfrapp's Utopia ... {#Meditate}
 
Ditto ... today ... {#Whisper}
This song gets better every time I hear it!!
 Felix_The_Cat wrote:

God is a bit monotone...{#Ask}


 
I mean.. monotonous {#Mrgreen}

 roulleau wrote:

Why listen to this when Explosions in the Sky does it so much better?


 
{#Curtain}  How about listening to one right after the other?  9 {#Arrowu} 10 ... as it began streaming my body went, "Ahhhhhh, I love this song." {#Cheers}
 Felix_The_Cat wrote:

God is a bit monotone...{#Ask}


He can also appear a bit petty.  {#Wink}


{#Dancingbanana}

Why listen to this when Explosions in the Sky does it so much better?


God is a bit monotone...{#Ask}


Nice smooth transition as a segue to Goldfrapp's Utopia ... {#Meditate}
I'm impressed.  This song manages to be both beautiful and kick ass at the same time.
Ambient music with muscle (and intelligence) {#Music}
{#Good-vibes}{#Notworthy}{#Good-vibes}
POWERFUL LIKE A DREAM!

 Stefen wrote:
What's the photo?
 
Looks like the remains of a burnt down home to me...
This is growing on me. Very good tune while I grade homework.
What's the photo?
This one is going down one point every time I hear it.Now #8
                                                                                            #7

sooo simple - soooo good!!
One after another, good music!  Good job Bill!

Powerful, introspective, moving. . .

 schitfitz wrote:

They do sound similar but I really do enjoy all of it so I'll not complain. Hey, if we all liked the same music we would be living in the marketers pocket. "Send in the Clones". Besides, this band has the remarkable ability to switch my darling wife from "meaner'an a wet cat" to "purring in my lap" except for Remembrance Day which makes her cry for her granddad. Any band that can do that is doing something right.

 

It's good to have a band/song that can turn your mood around like a shot of happy juice...mine is "Jessica" by the Allman Brothers.  It is impossible for me to be grouchy while listening to that!
 slartibart_O wrote:
As far as I can recall, proof of humans building any of the above mentioned sites, without "assistance" hasn't been proven either.
I've also seen modern scientists fail miserably at figuring out how these places came to be. Anything can be debunked.

Idiot. People seem unwilling to ever admit that ancient cultures knew a hell of a lot more than we ever give them credit for. So much essential common knowledge of building, nature, mathematics, craft and astronomy has been supplanted with wasted energy devoted to twitter, reality TV, and celebrity worship, etc. The only reasonable explanation is that aliens helped our ancestors stack up rocks really well. We can't even lace together a complete sentence anymore.  

 

Or stop an oil leak. (leak sound so , well, meek and weak)
 AngieOrwell wrote:
A little bit TOO REPETITIVE, isn't it?      {#Beat}
Doo doo doo doo Doo doo doo doo Tweedle dee Tweedle dum.

Too much of a snoozer for a "watching-the-clock" kind of Friday afternoon. I might fall asleep and miss quittin' time!


 Loreweaver wrote:
btw, the other commenter pretty much was right, all the CDs pretty much sound alike, which isn't really bad, since I really really like this music, but a few tracks stand out, such as this one, great tunes {#Music}




 
They do sound similar but I really do enjoy all of it so I'll not complain. Hey, if we all liked the same music we would be living in the marketers pocket. "Send in the Clones". Besides, this band has the remarkable ability to switch my darling wife from "meaner'an a wet cat" to "purring in my lap" except for Remembrance Day which makes her cry for her granddad. Any band that can do that is doing something right.

love that track.. but once every third day would suffice for a powerplay..

will someone please get on with it and build the first time-machine, so we finally have proof of how it all happened, so everyone can get on with their lives?  </sarcasm>

btw, the other commenter pretty much was right, all the CDs pretty much sound alike, which isn't really bad, since I really really like this music, but a few tracks stand out, such as this one, great tunes {#Music}


 slartibart_O wrote:

As far as I can recall, proof of humans building any of the above mentioned sites, without "assistance" hasn't been proven either.
I've also seen modern scientists fail miserably at figuring out how these places came to be. Anything can be debunked.

Idiot. People seem unwilling to ever admit that ancient cultures knew a hell of a lot more than we ever give them credit for. So much essential common knowledge of building, nature, mathematics, craft and astronomy has been supplanted with wasted energy devoted to twitter, reality TV, and celebrity worship, etc. The only reasonable explanation is that aliens helped our ancestors stack up rocks really well. We can't even lace together a complete sentence anymore.  

 


 dggeek wrote:
 If you didn't know it was made up and thought it was Icelandic (which it sounds like), would you still hate it?

kilroyjoe3 wrote:
Sigue Ros without the stupid baby babble or elvish that they sing.  Me gusta.
 
 
I actually thought it was Icelandic, and still didn't like it.

 1wolfy wrote:
..if God were an invention, all living things  came to be by some wild ass cosmic mistake..seems ignorant to my minds eye..it requires a whole lot of faith in man made science to believe that, but to each his own. SweTex wrote:
I like this!...but I have to disagree. God is not an astrounat, God is the invention of the only animal who knows it's going to die. 
 
 
There are 100,000,000,000 stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. 
There are 500,000,000,000 galaxies in the Universe.
That's 5.0 × 1022 stars in the known universe ... or:

50,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 stars

To put that in perspective, that's more stars in the universe than grains of sand on all of earth's beaches.

To say that just one of those stars, by some "wild ass cosmic mistake," has a planet containing the ingredients for life (liquid water, energy and organic material) goes against logic and probability. In fact, it has been found that several of Jupiter's and Saturn's moons contain liquid water, organic material and tidal energy created by the gravitational forces of the planet's they orbit. 

Life may not be as precious or unique as we once imagined. 

 If you didn't know it was made up and thought it was Icelandic (which it sounds like), would you still hate it?

kilroyjoe3 wrote:
Sigue Ros without the stupid baby babble or elvish that they sing.  Me gusta.
 


Sigue Ros without the stupid baby babble or elvish that they sing.  Me gusta.
Nice Bill:

God is an Astronaut - A Deafening Distance
Radiohead - Sail To The Moon

{#Clap}

This is very good,I like it a lot ! #9
How have i not heard this before....
W      O      W

9
 Bosami wrote:
An excellent track. Love it.

Fans of this sort of material may also like Godspeed You Black Emperor.

Apocalyptic instrumentals that build into crushing crescendos.
 

{#High-five}

God is blue and his name is Dr Manhattan, you didn't know? He is busy on another galaxy and his son will be a watchmaker

Thank you to  peter_james_bond(The Burg), fredriley (Nottingham, UK), SweTex (Swede living in Texas), slartibart_O (N29°57'-W97°34'), MrCaps, Jelani (Home of the freak, land of the vague)... for the good laugh and the intelligent comments.

Love this song

Happy Blue Moon New Year's Eve (in one word)


 j7 wrote:

Idiot...nice.....OK professor.......prove how these things were accomplished, and don't even bother with the slave labor shit. "Assistance" could apply to a plethora of options. Use your imagination if your left brain hasn't taken complete control.
Throw down some facts, regardless of the reality that some ancient cultures possessed superior knowledge, but how?? As soon as you and fredriley come up with the explanation to end all the speculation, as you both seem to be the most all knowing of the RP lot, could you let the rest of us know how the pyramids, etc. were built? We, the uneducated await at your feet.
By the by.......have never been to twitter............haven't had TV for a decade..........and find most celebrities acidic.
You're so amazingly brilliant with altered and questionable scientific facts to back your yap. Prove how the stuff was built or shut up.
Idiot.
 
The air up on that large mountain is apparently too thin for you - you might consider coming down to "think" about your questions and possibly "find" the answers.
As did some others in our history. 
I thank Bill and RP for alerting me to this band and this album. I listen to the CD all the time.
 j7 wrote:

Idiot...nice.....OK professor.......prove how these things were accomplished, and don't even bother with the slave labor shit. "Assistance" could apply to a plethora of options. Use your imagination if your left brain hasn't taken complete control.
Throw down some facts, regardless of the reality that some ancient cultures possessed superior knowledge, but how?? As soon as you and fredriley come up with the explanation to end all the speculation, as you both seem to be the most all knowing of the RP lot, could you let the rest of us know how the pyramids, etc. were built? We, the uneducated await at your feet.
By the by.......have never been to twitter............haven't had TV for a decade..........and find most celebrities acidic.
You're so amazingly brilliant with altered and questionable scientific facts to back your yap. Prove how the stuff was built or shut up.
Idiot.
 
Ancient peoples were smarter than many believe and they created many engineering wonders; the Pyramids, the Parthenon, the Roman Colosseum, the Great Wall of China, etc. They did it on their own, without alien help. All it takes is a little research on the internet to find the answers you are looking for. Of course, if you begin with the bias that the science is 'altered' and 'questionable' then your mind isn't open to the truth. Here are some links:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080328104302.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesoamerican_architecture

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Pyramid_of_Tenochtitlan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nazca_Lines

 RedGuitar wrote:
I like this tune - is the rest of the CD like it?
 
Yes,
Actually if you've heard one track you've heard them all. Not that that is bad per se, but you have been warned.
Fantastic Mix!
Plays well with Radiohead... Nice!
 fredriley wrote:

LOL! "Thank you for your call. Please hold as your prayer is very important to us, and will be answered by the next available angel." ;)

For the younger listeners, the band name is a reference to the (in)famous Erich von Daniken and his followers/imitators who published a series of books in the 70s claiming that aliens had built all sorts of ancient marvels, including the pyramids, Stonehenge and the Easter Island statues. Daniken et al made good use of the rhetorical question, such as "Could ancient humans really have created such a technically exacting work as the pyramids with their primitive technology?". To which the answer is an emphatic "yes", as has been shown by many experimental archaeologists. Daniken has been widely debunked and ridiculed and has deservedly dropped into the dustbin of history, and is now just a cultural curio illustrating the depth of secular religious fervour prevalent in the 70s (to which I can testify, as I too was a strong atheist yet a fervent believer in the 'God is an Astronaut' theory).

 
Wow, somebody with something intelligent to say for a change. I'm impressed.

{#Sleep}
As far as I can recall, proof of humans building any of the above mentioned sites, without "assistance" hasn't been proven either.
I've also seen modern scientists fail miserably at figuring out how these places came to be. Anything can be debunked.

Idiot. People seem unwilling to ever admit that ancient cultures knew a hell of a lot more than we ever give them credit for. So much essential common knowledge of building, nature, mathematics, craft and astronomy has been supplanted with wasted energy devoted to twitter, reality TV, and celebrity worship, etc. The only reasonable explanation is that aliens helped our ancestors stack up rocks really well. We can't even lace together a complete sentence anymore.  

An excellent track. Love it.

Fans of this sort of material may also like Godspeed You Black Emperor.

Apocalyptic instrumentals that build into crushing crescendos.


 AngieOrwell wrote:
A little bit TOO REPETITIVE, isn't it?
 
Au contraire! It's just the right amount of repetitiveness! {#Wink}
I always reach for the headphones when this one comes on.

A little bit TOO REPETITIVE, isn't it?      {#Beat}