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Lou Reed — Intro/Sweet Jane
Album: Rock N Roll Animal
Avg rating:
8.1

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2951









Released: 1974
Length: 7:47
Plays (last 30 days): 2
Standing on the corner
Suitcase in my hand
Jack's in his corset, Jane is in her vest
Me, honey, I'm in a rock 'n' roll band
Ridin' in a Stutz Bearcat, Jim
You know those were different times
All, all the poets they studied rules of verse
And those ladies they rolled their eyes

Sweet Jane
Sweet Jane
Sweet Jane

Jack, he is a banker
And Jane, she is a clerk
And Both of them save their money
When they come home from work
Sittin' down by the fire
Radio does play, look classical music there, kids
"The March Of The Wooden Soldiers"
You can hear Jack say

Sweet Jane
Sweet Jane
Sweet Jane

Some people like to go out dancing
And other people like us, we gotta work
And there's even some evil mothers
They're gonna tell you that everything is just dirt
And you know that women never really faint
And that villains always blink their eyes
That children are the only ones who blush
And that life is just to die

Anyone who ever had a heart
And wouldn't turn around and break it
Anyone who ever played a part
And wouldn't turn around and hate it

Sweet Jane
Sweet Jane
Sweet Jane

Sweet Jane, Sweet Jane
Sweet Jane, oh honey, Sweet Jane
Sweet Jane, oh, Sweet Jane
Sweet Jane, Sweet Jane
Comments (458)add comment
 bdwhitepm wrote:



There is a small cheer when Lou walks out and then a bigger cheer when they recognize the opening tune! or maybe the other way around? still the best version of this tune though!


 3Chords wrote:


You are correct!



There is a small cheer when lou walks out and then a bigger cheer when they recognize the opening tune!
 kingart wrote:

Charlie from New Hampshire, that woodsy know it all dweeb, blasted Sweet Jane and Rock and Roll Animal in our Boston dorm.  I thought I knew better and countered with ZZ Top and Bachman Turner Overdrive.  Now that 39 years have passed, Charlie, I have to admit that you had better taste than I. 



Well, ZZ Top is ZZ Top. Seen 'em about 12 times I guess. No need to compare them with anybody.
Stunning guitar work. This never gets old.
 horseplayer wrote:


I was always under the impression that this is the opening song of the show and Lou is not yet on stage while the band is playing the intro. As they transition into the song, Lou walks out and that's when the crowd cheers.

Am I wrong about that?


You are correct!
Damn - Rock and Roll at it's finest    
 xcranky_yankee wrote:

always cracks me up that halfway through the tune the audience seems to wake up and say "hey, I know this song!" and start to cheer...as if the intro never happened!



I was always under the impression that this is the opening song of the show and Lou is not yet on stage while the band is playing the intro. As they transition into the song, Lou walks out and that's when the crowd cheers.

Am I wrong about that?
Some of the finest guitar playing I have heard. Hunter and Wagner just crush it.

Wow.
the greatest live album of all time
When people ask me what my favorite song is, this is the one.  The intro and the ending have to be cranked up.

always cracks me up that halfway through the tune the audience seems to wake up and say "hey, I know this song!" and start to cheer...as if the intro never happened!
egads

he"s just an animal
Pink Panther theme, then this. Because RP reasons.
This is a stunningly good tune. Such amazing energy from a pretty laid-back riff. Lou Reed is one of a kind. 1-5-4-4-6-5-1-1. So good.
Eleventy-eleven
One of the best radio. Thanks for  perfectely chosen music. Greetings from Ukraine
Dammit, I need to go to lunch; but am stuck at my desk until this exceptional piece of music is through.
One of the best shows I've ever attended...this record played straight through, pure professional artistry and front row seats to boot. Not bragging, just a fantastic memory.
Ah, Yes, Lou in his ROCK STAR era, complete with makeup, glam outfits and competent musicians. Who knew he could pull it off
 che_cavolo wrote:
The 'Intro' is probably one of the best instrumental rock guitar tunes ever, was written by Steve Hunter who played lead on the fantastic Mitch Ryder 'Detroit' album and did stints with Alice Cooper.  The guy influenced a lot of rock music in the 70's from behind the scenes as a session player.

As for the song itself, Mott's version rules...

 
 
Nothing beats an original of a song.  It's merely another version.
Excellent! Click thru!
As much as I appreciate this, I have to complain.
RP plays 10 Lou Reed songs and 36 Counting Crows songs.
That is f--ked up!
Irresistible air guitar.
I've been listening to RP for years. But hearing this song made me finally pony up and pay for this station. That was a couple of years ago. Always great music.
TIL Lou Reed was not a Brit.. huh.. I always thought he was..
Masterful intro.  Lou was a lucky man to have a band of this caliber.  Saw them live once in Portland, OR.  Front of house guy didn't have a clue.  Waay too loud even with quality earplugs.  When the band is that good the mix is more important than volume.  Otherwise amazing performance.   
Just saw the Documentary called Bowie, Iggy and Lou.  Fascinating the relationship between the 3 at a critical time in their careers.  Highly suggest it if you are a fan of any of them.

I think of this version with the Intro as the best recording of this song
Elton John...Psych Furs...Blind Boys...Henry Mancini...Lou Reed...awesomely, insanely great mix. It takes a human..RP forever
Iconic song! ...Thanx Bill!
Test
 Shaggy27 wrote:
Lou was not a nice human. But he could write some catchy tunes.
 I think lots of artists, in any medium, are not particularly nice people. Maybe their demons drive their art?
c.

Amazing intro!
 jpfueler wrote:


A lot of the "Greats" really couldn't/can't sing, but they use their limited instrument well with their music. To paraphrase Doctor John, "He's at least as bad as a lot of these others, so why not?"
Lou works alright for me.  He was telling stories. He told them well.
 

Tom Waits. But oh, can he phrase.
 bam23 wrote:
What a mellifluous voice. Well, not really. People can complain all they want about the singing voice of Jerry Garcia (sure, he wandered off key more than a few times and at times should have let his voice rest for an extended vacation), but Lou Reed could not sing. Period. I understand that there are those who love this, but at times it seems pretty clear that he was scarcely even trying. Oh well. 
 

A lot of the "Greats" really couldn't/can't sing, but they use their limited instrument well with their music. To paraphrase Doctor John, "He's at least as bad as a lot of these others, so why not?"
Lou works alright for me.  He was telling stories. He told them well.
great times.  Some of them not high as a kite.
 slates13 wrote:
Just upped my rating to a 10.  I only give 10s to those classic songs that are not only great musically, but also great influencers for future rockers!
 
Yeah...I get that methodology....and I'm not sure how I have a 6 rating on this one....+3 to 9.  
And funny story about mixing up Lou's, my wife has for years told people that Lou Rawls was one of my favorites though she meant Lou Reed...wasn't until this Lou's death in 2013 that she finally understood (Lou Rawls is good too lol) LLRP!!
What a mellifluous voice. Well, not really. People can complain all they want about the singing voice of Jerry Garcia (sure, he wandered off key more than a few times and at times should have let his voice rest for an extended vacation), but Lou Reed could not sing. Period. I understand that there are those who love this, but at times it seems pretty clear that he was scarcely even trying. Oh well. 
Just upped my rating to a 10.  I only give 10s to those classic songs that are not only great musically, but also great influencers for future rockers!
This song could have done without Lou Reed.
My band has played this version of Sweet Jane a few times. It is a blast!
Holy Cow!  The bass player ROCKS!

(... while other people like us gotta work ...)
Hooks?

Who said hooks? 

Hasn't aged well.
Great memories hanging out 😎Ah the memories of a wasted youth...
 che_cavolo wrote:
The 'Intro' is probably one of the best instrumental rock guitar tunes ever, was written by Steve Hunter who played lead on the fantastic Mitch Ryder 'Detroit' album and did stints with Alice Cooper.  The guy influenced a lot of rock music in the 70's from behind the scenes as a session player.

As for the song itself, Mott's version rules...

 
 
Agree with the first half of this post.  

However, this IS Lou's (and the Velvet Underground's) song and this version is live.  Ain't nobodies version ruling over this.  How explosive it must have been to be in the building for this, as live recordings (especially from this era) always lose a little something.

Mott's version hews closer to this live version in style than the original Velvet Underground version, which is slower and more sultry, BUT Ian Hunter Patterson's vocals are not nearly as beautiful as Lou's on that studio version.  

For apples-to-apples compare these:

Velvet:  https://youtu.be/nkumhBVPGdg          

Mott:  https://youtu.be/79m8FXz7GEE
 Akazungu wrote:
I must admit I still prefer the Cowboy Junkie's version, but this is still a solid 10.
 

The Junkies are doing the Live in 69 version. That Live in 69 Velvet Underground album is mind blowing in its greatness.
 Shaggy27 wrote:
Lou was not a nice human. But he could write some catchy tunes.
 
So fucking what Lou played great music
Lou was not a nice human. But he could write some catchy tunes.
one of the greatest intros ever...and love the canned applause effect
18 years old hanging out out in a hippie farm house snow drift road, listening to this song for the first time before walking to the QUEEN VICTORIA HOTEL to watch JOHNNY'S DANCE BAND, a memorable old Victorian hotel located in the countryside South of Allentown, PA. GOD those were the days...
ELEVENTY ELEVEN!
Bumped it to a 10 because of the memories this songs invokes......plus it's just a damn good kickass song especially with that Intro. Cannot imagine what it would have been like to have seen this live.

Wish I had better speaker system connected to computer.
 danthebeachman wrote:
In my opinion the best version of "Sweet Jane" was done by the Cowboy Junkies"

 

 che_cavolo wrote:
The 'Intro' is probably one of the best instrumental rock guitar tunes ever, was written by Steve Hunter who played lead on the fantastic Mitch Ryder 'Detroit' album and did stints with Alice Cooper.  The guy influenced a lot of rock music in the 70's from behind the scenes as a session player.

As for the song itself, Mott's version rules...

 
 

put the headphones back on and I got this Gem.

deliciously wonderful

rock and roll

Thanks
{#Heartkiss} Today - a very good program - until now
Never fails to cause a shiver. Don't think I'll ever tire of hearing this - superb playing throughout the band.  VERY high on my all-time favourites list.
{#Arrowd} A regrettable look. (The music, of course, rocks.)
  
 gjeeg wrote:
Little Help..... Who is the MONSTER lineup in the astonishing recording??

(The applause bursts when Lou appears on stage.... Haven't you ever been to a live show?!!)

 

The musicians were:
Pentti Glan (drums),  Prakash John (bass), Ray Colcord (keyboards), and Dick Wagner and Steve Hunter on guitars.
Have only seen Lou live on video, and many of the performances that were the start of the show, include a build-up
that doesn't include Mr. Reed, who eventually appears to roaring applause.
The Epic cut on this Album is 'Heroin.'
.
.
.
.

Little Help..... Who is the MONSTER lineup in the astonishing recording??

(The applause bursts when Lou appears on stage.... Haven't you ever been to a live show?!!)
Bill is on fire tonight... Loving RP 
{#Cool}
 treatment_bound wrote:
 
Awesome!  Were you at the B.L. during the dates of May 17-21, 1978 when "Take No Prisoners" was recorded?  According to Wiki, Springsteen showed for at least one of 'em:

CD One:

"Sweet Jane" – 10:44"I Wanna Be Black" – 6:27"Satellite of Love" – 7:06"Pale Blue Eyes" – 7:36"Berlin" – 6:13"I'm Waiting for the Man" – 13:59

CD Two:

"Coney Island Baby" – 8:37"Street Hassle" – 13:15"Walk on the Wild Side" – 16:54"Leave Me Alone" – 7:29

 
I went one of those nights - I'll have to see if I still have the ticket stub to see which night it was.  I think the version of "Sweet Jane" from "Take No Prisoners" (where he goes off on rants about Randy Newman and Barbra Streisand) was recorded the night we were there.  I didn't see Bruce Springsteen there but Martin Scorcese and Brian DePalma were sitting near us.  It was a night where Lou cursed out Clive Davis, who was also in the house.
 Proclivities wrote:
I didn't see Lou Reed until about 1977 or '78, at The Bottom Line; I had to use an older friend's driver's license (pre-photo days fortunately) to get in. 
  
Awesome!  Were you at the B.L. during the dates of May 17-21, 1978 when "Take No Prisoners" was recorded?  According to Wiki, Springsteen showed for at least one of 'em:


CD One:

"Sweet Jane" – 10:44"I Wanna Be Black" – 6:27"Satellite of Love" – 7:06"Pale Blue Eyes" – 7:36"Berlin" – 6:13"I'm Waiting for the Man" – 13:59

CD Two:

"Coney Island Baby" – 8:37"Street Hassle" – 13:15"Walk on the Wild Side" – 16:54"Leave Me Alone" – 7:29
{#Bananajam}
Gee, I miss Lou.
you didn't go to 42nd St and buy a cheesey fake ID at one of those tourist t-shirt stores Proclivities?

thats what me and my pals used  : P

 treatment_bound wrote:

Thanks for solving a mystery I've had for over 40 years.

I guess I'm more impressed you actually know some people who witnessed a Lou Reed show at Howard Stein's Academy of Music (later called The Palladium) on 12/21/73, the night they recorded "Rock 'n' Roll Animal". 

 
I had some older friends who went to that show - some of whom introduced me to the music of the lesser-known, "underground" artists in the mid-1970s.  I think my older sister went as well. I didn't see Lou Reed until about 1977 or '78, at The Bottom Line; I had to use an older friend's driver's license (pre-photo days fortunately) to get in.  I saw a lot of shows at The Palladium, but none when it was called "The Academy".
 Proclivities wrote:

Yes, as far as I had been told by a few different people who were at that show: he was off-stage throughout that intro and the increase in applause did occur when he walked out onto the stage.

 
Thanks for solving a mystery I've had for over 40 years.

I guess I'm more impressed you actually know some people who witnessed a Lou Reed show at Howard Stein's Academy of Music (later called The Palladium) on 12/21/73, the night they recorded "Rock 'n' Roll Animal". 
 On_The_Beach wrote:
No vocals prior to the applause.
Perhaps they were applauding Lou appearing on stage?
If the applause was dubbed in don't you think they would have put it in at the more obvious spot?
Just speculating, of course.
 
Yes, as far as I had been told by a few different people who were at that show: he was off-stage throughout that intro and the increase in applause did occur when he walked out onto the stage.
Good old rock n roll!
 treatment_bound wrote:
Is it wrong to be slightly irked all these years later that the applause is obviously dubbed in?  

Why would the entire audience all start clapping at least 10 seconds AFTER the famous riff kicks in at 3:20?  It couldn't have colectively taken everyone in attendence that long to figure it out which song was playing.
 
No vocals prior to the applause.
Perhaps they were applauding Lou appearing on stage?
If the applause was dubbed in don't you think they would have put it in at the more obvious spot?
Just speculating, of course.
Is it wrong to be slightly irked all these years later that the applause is obviously dubbed in?  

Why would the entire audience all start clapping at least 10 seconds AFTER the famous riff kicks in at 3:20?  It couldn't have collectively taken everyone in attendance that long to figure it out which song was playing.  
 thewiseking wrote:

That's like preferring Pat Boone to Little Richard

 
THEY'RE BOTH STILL WITH US, SO YOU COULD CONCEIVABLY CATCH THEM IN THE SAME CONCERT.

BUT WHO WOULD YOU PREFER OPEN?

Image result for PICTURE OF PAT BOONE

 Akazungu wrote:
I must admit I still prefer the Cowboy Junkie's version, but this is still a solid 10.

 
That's like preferring Pat Boone to Little Richard
 Akazungu wrote:
I must admit I still prefer the Cowboy Junkie's version, but this is still a solid 10.

 
The numbers don't go to 11, so you must really be splitting some mighty fine hairs.

For my part, the 2 versions are not comparable.
 kylieh wrote:
Clearly one of the best intros in rock and roll. It does seem to take the audience a while to clue in though.

 
What? That was The Academy of Music on 14th Street, pre-gentrification. Those were Lou's Peeps. They were holding their applause for Lou to emerge after Rock N Roll's greatest intro.
Brilliant stuff.  Not sure who influenced whom, but I'm hearing Rush and Yes in here. 
One of the greatest rock and roll albums of all time!

 Akazungu wrote:
I must admit I still prefer the Cowboy Junkie's version, but this is still a solid 10.

 
I second that...
 kylieh wrote:
Clearly one of the best intros in rock and roll. It does seem to take the audience a while to clue in though.

 
Yep.  Used to air guitar the shit out of this back in the day...
In an era of lots of really good music, I find that I often lose track of the REALLY good music that has influenced my life. 

Thanks to Bill for reminding me of said music. 
wow right after Ziggy Stardust live, aaaaa love it !!!

{#Hearteyes} 
 kylieh wrote:
Clearly one of the best intros in rock and roll. It does seem to take the audience a while to clue in though.

 
Jeeeeezis what a hook!! Yowsa...If Reed had done nothing but that intro his whole frikin life, he'd be remembered eternally. 
I must admit I still prefer the Cowboy Junkie's version, but this is still a solid 10.
takes me back. Oh Hell, rock us oh sweet; rock us oh sweet.
Clearly one of the best intros in rock and roll. It does seem to take the audience a while to clue in though.
 coloradojohn wrote:
Memories of my place '86-'88 with 3rd Floor balcony along Boulder Creek, the arm-chairs raised up on cinderblocks so we could rest our feet on the railing-top and see the foothills of The Front Range marching to the north and the mouth of Boulder Canyon to the west, my rocking stereo, our massive, pooled vinyl collection, my tall red Time & Space Bong, my Siamese cat, Syd, my room-mates Pat and Mary... We'd slap this on, fire up the bong, contemplate and discuss The State of Things... Ahh, but those were different times!

 
Nice!
bass solo 👍
Wow !!!
The 'Intro' is probably one of the best instrumental rock guitar tunes ever, was written by Steve Hunter who played lead on the fantastic Mitch Ryder 'Detroit' album and did stints with Alice Cooper.  The guy influenced a lot of rock music in the 70's from behind the scenes as a session player.

As for the song itself, Mott's version rules...

 
This would sound good with some singing or something like that
From Roy Orbison, through David Bowie, to Lou Reed; all exceptional live recordings of iconic tracks...

What are you trying to do to me today, Bill?  :,-) 
{#Bananajam}{#Bananajam}
Never ever gets old.
God, I played the sh*t out of this album; haven't heard this track in years. Many thanks for the memories.{#Music}
 Dazzerb wrote:
clicked PSD and got this.  Off to buy a lotto ticket now!
 

Thanks for making me laugh Dazzerb. I hope you’re a millionaire!


Memories of my place '86-'88 with 3rd Floor balcony along Boulder Creek, the arm-chairs raised up on cinderblocks so we could rest our feet on the railing-top and see the foothills of The Front Range marching to the north and the mouth of Boulder Canyon to the west, my rocking stereo, our massive, pooled vinyl collection, my tall red Time & Space Bong, my Siamese cat, Syd, my room-mates Pat and Mary... We'd slap this on, fire up the bong, contemplate and discuss The State of Things... Ahh, but those were different times!
Like others be sayin'....damn fine prelude, intro, to this tune.  Clean, high and mighty fine.

Now excuse me while I go {#Bananajam}and {#Bananasplit} all around the office.  Hey, I've a reputation to maintain!  Heh!

Highlow
American Net'Zen
 BrainBanana wrote:
My first listen to this version of this song. {#Bananajam}Most Excellent, super intro, dam fine Lou

 
Glad you heard it.

My ?1000 time and it is still great!   {#Bananajam} 
You leaned on me, and   I blowedl your mind

Jack, he is a banker And Jane, she is a sutz
And and stutz Jane
and and and stutz jane
Radio does play, look stutz music there, kids

and and And Both of them save even money
Love this version—wakes me right up!
Splendid intro to a great song.  I've loved this album since the first time I heard it.  In my opinion, his best.
 
 A well deserved, long overdue 10!
I really like this live version of "Sweet Jane."  The instrumental intro is just fantastic!  {#Yes} 
One of the five greatest introductions/preludes to a rock song of all time. STELLAR!{#Bananajam}{#Bananapiano}{#Guitarist}{#Bananajam}{#Drummer}
My first listen to this version of this song. {#Bananajam}Most Excellent, super intro, dam fine Lou
{#Guitarist} Love Sweet Jane. Superb.
Still sends chills down my spine when I hear that intro{#Guitarist}
A real American poet, putting it out there.  Thanks Lou.

 
Who doesn't love Sweet Jane.  :)
Ahhhhhhhhh

Great stuff there

Washes over me in waves

What an era - a veritable crucible of talent - energy - genius - tragedy - drugs - vision
thrown into a cultural miasma without a recipe and this is some of the sweet pleasure that came about 
I'm grateful to have been alive through it 
 Yes, but are you referring to way back, or more or less now.  All three were once better vocalists. You try singing and aging and smoking cigarettes and/or belting scalding booze and/or breathing air for 50+ years and see if you remain mellifluous.  Doubt it. 

joempie wrote:
Huey wrote:
 

Westslope wrote:

Hear!  Hear!

 

Let me see who else cannot "sing":

-  Leonard Cohen

-  Neil Young

-  Bob Dylan

That's a partial list of greats who "cannot sing".  So far two Americans, and two Canadians.  Apologies to the greats who cannot sing and feel left out.

Huey wrote:


Jimi? 

 
 Wayne Coyne

 

Always loved it
Top choon.
Ah, Sweet Lou......
Even us Detroit folks loved this, great record
psd'ed from Cake Crap to Lou's real music, rock n roll as it's meant to be : )
 Dazzerb wrote:
clicked PSD and got this.  Off to buy a lotto ticket now!

 

 
{#Cheers}

Made me laugh spontaneousely.