[ ]   [ ]   [ ]                        [ ]      [ ]   [ ]

The Obituary Page - kurtster - Mar 6, 2021 - 9:37pm
 
Vision Thing - UPDATE - Coaxial - Mar 6, 2021 - 8:54pm
 
Talk Behind Their Backs Forum - KurtfromLaQuinta - Mar 6, 2021 - 8:50pm
 
Classical Music - R_P - Mar 6, 2021 - 8:16pm
 
• • • The Once-a-Day • • •  - haresfur - Mar 6, 2021 - 4:43pm
 
Trump Lies - hayduke2 - Mar 6, 2021 - 4:43pm
 
Name My Band - haresfur - Mar 6, 2021 - 4:39pm
 
What did you have for dinner? - Manbird - Mar 6, 2021 - 4:34pm
 
Those Lovable Policemen - haresfur - Mar 6, 2021 - 4:29pm
 
Republican Party - westslope - Mar 6, 2021 - 1:56pm
 
Tech & Science - R_P - Mar 6, 2021 - 1:40pm
 
Biden's Lies - KarmaKarma - Mar 6, 2021 - 1:26pm
 
Into the Future - KurtfromLaQuinta - Mar 6, 2021 - 1:25pm
 
Guns - westslope - Mar 6, 2021 - 12:36pm
 
260,000 Posts in one thread? - NoEnzLefttoSplit - Mar 6, 2021 - 12:11pm
 
Play the Blues - Ohmsen - Mar 6, 2021 - 10:59am
 
World Music - Ohmsen - Mar 6, 2021 - 10:57am
 
Baseball, anyone? - GeneP59 - Mar 6, 2021 - 10:37am
 
Why are Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds censored? - KarmaKarma - Mar 6, 2021 - 10:32am
 
Latest Addition to the Songs Rotation??? - Ohmsen - Mar 6, 2021 - 10:30am
 
how do you feel right now? - GeneP59 - Mar 6, 2021 - 10:27am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - GeneP59 - Mar 6, 2021 - 10:22am
 
COVID-19 - Ohmsen - Mar 6, 2021 - 10:13am
 
Out the window - Antigone - Mar 6, 2021 - 7:13am
 
Favourite stream in IOS App - yeshetarchin - Mar 6, 2021 - 6:54am
 
Iphone app "my favourites" - yeshetarchin - Mar 6, 2021 - 6:39am
 
Today in History - Red_Dragon - Mar 6, 2021 - 6:25am
 
Back to the 60's - sirdroseph - Mar 6, 2021 - 5:04am
 
Back To The 50's - sirdroseph - Mar 6, 2021 - 5:02am
 
Philosophy (Meaty Metaphysical Munchables!) - sirdroseph - Mar 6, 2021 - 4:23am
 
Counting with Pictures - ScottN - Mar 5, 2021 - 4:40pm
 
Mixtape Culture Club - KurtfromLaQuinta - Mar 5, 2021 - 4:01pm
 
Annoying stuff. not things that piss you off, just annoyi... - haresfur - Mar 5, 2021 - 3:42pm
 
What is the meaning of this? - LudicrousMaximus - Mar 5, 2021 - 2:34pm
 
songs that ROCK! - rhahl - Mar 5, 2021 - 2:15pm
 
Yukon dreaming - westslope - Mar 5, 2021 - 2:07pm
 
Live Music - R_P - Mar 5, 2021 - 12:53pm
 
Immigration - haresfur - Mar 5, 2021 - 12:47pm
 
Race in America - R_P - Mar 5, 2021 - 12:38pm
 
Lyrics that are stuck in your head today... - Proclivities - Mar 5, 2021 - 12:12pm
 
Future of Human Race (in 500 years) - KurtfromLaQuinta - Mar 5, 2021 - 11:43am
 
the Todd Rundgren topic - Steely_D - Mar 5, 2021 - 8:26am
 
Things You Thought Today - oldviolin - Mar 5, 2021 - 7:54am
 
Buddy's Haven - miamizsun - Mar 5, 2021 - 7:26am
 
You really put butter on the hot dog? - islander - Mar 5, 2021 - 6:43am
 
Democratic Party - KarmaKarma - Mar 4, 2021 - 11:56pm
 
Steven Wilson - kurtster - Mar 4, 2021 - 10:06pm
 
New Music - R_P - Mar 4, 2021 - 7:54pm
 
New Zealand - haresfur - Mar 4, 2021 - 1:06pm
 
Messages in a bottle. - GeneP59 - Mar 4, 2021 - 10:34am
 
Poetry Forum - Antigone - Mar 4, 2021 - 10:32am
 
Climate Change - westslope - Mar 4, 2021 - 9:22am
 
Minimum rating for favorites - rwyatt - Mar 4, 2021 - 7:16am
 
What Did You Do Today? - Coaxial - Mar 4, 2021 - 5:04am
 
volcano! - NoEnzLefttoSplit - Mar 4, 2021 - 12:53am
 
YouTube: Music-Videos - oppositelock - Mar 3, 2021 - 9:03pm
 
The Future is here! - R_P - Mar 3, 2021 - 4:58pm
 
Terrorist Watch! - Red_Dragon - Mar 3, 2021 - 4:11pm
 
RP in a Tesla EV - BillG - Mar 3, 2021 - 10:23am
 
Ukraine - sirdroseph - Mar 3, 2021 - 3:30am
 
Small-town news - kcar - Mar 3, 2021 - 12:40am
 
Surfing! - haresfur - Mar 2, 2021 - 11:04pm
 
Share a Website you love or hate… - whatshisname - Mar 2, 2021 - 6:36pm
 
Show us your NEW _______________!!!! - haresfur - Mar 2, 2021 - 5:24pm
 
Learn something every day - Antigone - Mar 2, 2021 - 4:50pm
 
Propaganda - R_P - Mar 2, 2021 - 2:29pm
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - R_P - Mar 2, 2021 - 1:02pm
 
Derplahoma! - Red_Dragon - Mar 2, 2021 - 9:46am
 
What are you listening to now? - davidharper - Mar 2, 2021 - 8:10am
 
Museum Of Bad Album Covers - ScottFromWyoming - Mar 2, 2021 - 7:42am
 
RP Daily Trivia Challenge - NoEnzLefttoSplit - Mar 2, 2021 - 7:23am
 
Where would you like to live? - westslope - Mar 2, 2021 - 7:02am
 
That's good advice - rhahl - Mar 2, 2021 - 4:52am
 
Music documentaries - miamizsun - Mar 2, 2021 - 4:50am
 
The war on funk is over! - Ohmsen - Mar 1, 2021 - 6:23pm
 
Index » Regional/Local » USA/Canada » Those lovable acronym guys & gals Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 25, 26, 27  Next
Post to this Topic
R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Jan 1, 2021 - 2:00pm

The Man Who Refused to Spy
The F.B.I. tried to recruit an Iranian scientist as an informant. When he balked, the payback was brutal.
Iranians visiting or residing in the U.S. routinely hear from the Bureau. Half a dozen Iranian nationals and Iranian-Americans have described such approaches to me, and they have typically done so with trepidation, because the Iranian government sees any returning national who has had dealings with a U.S. intelligence agency as a potential spy. Some Iranians told me of polite conversations with federal agents, cards exchanged, refusals accepted. Others described repeated demands, veiled threats, and legal trouble lasting years. The Bureau recruits counterintelligence assets in much the same way it turns witnesses in domestic racketeering cases: agents look for vulnerabilities to use as leverage in pressuring people to become informants. They find discrepancies in immigration paperwork or identify petty sanctions violations, sometimes threatening an indictment to bolster their demands.

(...)

If there was ever a force equal to Asgari’s will, it was the bureaucratic inertia of ICE. The immigration attorneys he consulted were largely stymied by the agency’s impenetrable structure. One said, “I’m just throwing shit at a wall, and every once in a while the wall throws something back.” Another fruitlessly chased Asgari’s paperwork from one office to another: ICE’s Enforcement and Removal Operations, the F.B.I., Customs and Border Protection, the ICE regional headquarters in Detroit, the local headquarters in Cleveland. At one point, Asgari urged me to call ICE officials in Detroit and Cleveland who had signed documents addressed to him. None of them ever answered their phones.

ICE occasionally sent representatives to meet with detainees and discuss their cases. They were just following procedures, they told Asgari, and had no authority to evaluate the logic or the justice of the measures they enforced. Asgari answered the representatives by telling them an Iranian joke. A man sees two groups of workers, one digging a trench along the road and the other following behind to fill it up and cover it. The bystander, confounded, asks the workers what they are doing. They say that the government hired three contractors: one to dig, one to install a pipeline, and the third to cover it. The second contractor never showed up, a worker says, adding, “So we are doing our job.” Such, Asgari concluded, was ICE.

(...)

Asgari still viewed America with affection. He marvelled that, in every prison, he could pick up a phone and talk to journalists, and that journalists could publish what they wanted without fear of being censored. But what he appreciated most was the independence of the American judiciary.

“I appeared as an Iranian in front of an American judge,” he reflected. “This American judge ruled against an F.B.I. agent in my favor. I was privileged to witness the way he handled the trial, from jury selection to the end, the way he advocated impartiality and fairness. I believe these are global values that should be respected by all governments, including my own.” He added, “My attorneys, who put their heart into this thing—they were employees of the same government that was on the other side of this case.”

(...)

Prison was a crucible of human relations, and for the most part Asgari’s faith in them had emerged stronger from the experience. In a pod, you couldn’t hide behind an avatar, a bank account, or an accomplishment—not even behind the self-importance of a busy schedule. Governments might seek to dominate or obliterate one another, but human beings, forced into intimacy and the roughest equality, tended to be coöperative, Asgari had found. He had always been a scholar of microstructures, and now he understood that the atoms of a society—from which all its properties emanated—were people in their elemental state. The bonds among them were the structure’s deepest source of strength.

R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Jul 16, 2020 - 2:05pm

Homeland Security Worries Covid-19 Masks Are Breaking Facial Recognition, Leaked Document Shows
R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Jul 15, 2020 - 12:07pm

Secret Trump order gives CIA more powers to launch cyberattacks
The secret authorization, known as a presidential finding, gives the spy agency more freedom in both the kinds of operations it conducts and who it targets, undoing many restrictions that had been in place under prior administrations. The finding allows the CIA to more easily authorize its own covert cyber operations, rather than requiring the agency to get approval from the White House.

Unlike previous presidential findings that have focused on a specific foreign policy objective or outcome — such as preventing Iran from becoming a nuclear power — this directive, driven by the National Security Council and crafted by the CIA, focuses more broadly on a capability: covert action in cyberspace.

The “very aggressive” finding “gave the agency very specific authorities to really take the fight offensively to a handful of adversarial countries,” said a former U.S. government official. These countries include Russia, China, Iran and North Korea — which are mentioned directly in the document — but the finding potentially applies to others as well, according to another former official. “The White House wanted a vehicle to strike back,” said the second former official. “And this was the way to do it.”

The finding has made it easier for the CIA to damage adversaries’ critical infrastructure, such as petrochemical plants, and to engage in the kind of hack-and-dump operations that Russian hackers and WikiLeaks popularized, in which tranches of stolen documents or data are leaked to journalists or posted on the internet. It has also freed the agency to conduct disruptive operations against organizations that were largely off limits previously, such as banks and other financial institutions.

R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Jun 14, 2020 - 11:38am

Barr also directed the JTTF to “identify criminal organizers and instigators,” even though antifa has no organizational structure and the FBI’s own internal assessments don’t support the claim that antifa is somehow weaponizing protests

(...)

Eli Anderson, a 19-year-old college student on summer break back home in Cookeville, decided to organize an impromptu Black Lives Matter rally in the Cookeville public square on Tuesday, June 2. A little after 3 p.m., Anderson and his friends announced on their Instagram stories that there would be a peaceful protest in the city square at 5 p.m. A friend picked Anderson up at 4:30 p.m. to head to the rally when he got a call from his mother saying, “The FBI is here and I don’t know what is happening.”Anderson rushed home. By the time he got there, the two agents were gone and his mother was in a state of panic. She told Eli they had flashed FBI credentials.

“The agents told her they had been monitoring my social media and believed that I might have information about antifa coming to town,” Anderson said. “I’m like, ‘What the fuck is antifa?’ I had never even heard of it before.”

R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: May 27, 2020 - 5:19pm

System Update with Glenn Greenwald - The Murderous History and Deceitful Function of the CIA

R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: May 14, 2020 - 12:16pm

McConnell’s PATRIOT Act Expansion Would Hand Barr Unprecedented Spy Powers
R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Feb 11, 2020 - 5:43pm

The CIA's ‘Minerva’ Secret
The U.S. intelligence community actively monitored for decades the diplomatic and military communications of numerous Latin American nations through encryption machines supplied by a Swiss company that was secretly owned by the CIA and the German intelligence agency, BND, according to reports today by the German public television channel, ZDF and the Washington Post.
Proclivities

Proclivities Avatar

Location: Paris of the Piedmont
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 12, 2019 - 11:11am


R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Jan 22, 2019 - 6:42pm

Cooking with FOIA: The Soviet Army’s 1948 borscht recipe
The CIA kept this translation of the “Manual for the cook instructor of the ground troops in peacetime” classified for over 50 years

R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Jan 6, 2019 - 1:10pm

A Tough Time to Be a Spy, NPR Reports
R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Nov 13, 2018 - 2:29pm

Secret CIA Document Shows Plan to Test Drugs on Prisoners
Perhaps the most striking element of the document is the CIA doctors’ willful blindness to the truth of what they were doing. CIA doctors decided that waterboarding actually “provided periodic relief” to a  prisoner because it was a break from days of standing sleep deprivation. Similarly, CIA doctors decided that when a different prisoner was stuffed into a coffin-sized box, this provided a “relatively benign sanctuary” from other torture methods. CIA doctors described yet another prisoner — who cried, begged, pleaded, vomited, and required medical resuscitation after being waterboarded — as “amazingly resistant to the waterboard.” Incredibly, CIA doctors concluded that the torture program  was “reassuringly free of enduring physical or psychological effects.”

The truth is that CIA torture left a legacy of broken bodies and traumatized minds. Today, with a president who has vocally supported torture and a new CIA director who was deeply complicit in torturing prisoners, it’s more important than ever to expose the crimes of the past. Recognizing the roles played by the lawyers, doctors, and psychologists who enabled torture is critical to making sure it never happens again.

R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Nov 9, 2018 - 9:54am

CIA’s secret online network unravelled with a Google search
ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: May 25, 2018 - 9:10pm

 R_P wrote:


 
Well, you can tell by the way I use my walk
I'm a Hoover man, no time to talk
R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: May 25, 2018 - 6:17pm


R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: May 17, 2018 - 8:47pm

Bipartisan scumbaggery
Gina Haspel confirmed as CIA director after key Democrats vote in favor
(...) Haspel received robust backing from former intelligence, diplomatic, military and national security officials. Among those who supported her nomination were six former CIA directors and three former national intelligence directors.

On the opposing side are groups such as the American Civil Liberties Union, which says she should have stood up against the interrogation practices then. More than 100 former US ambassadors who served both Republican and Democratic presidents sent the Senate a letter opposing Haspel, saying that despite her credentials, confirming her would give authoritarian leaders around the world the license to say US behavior is “no different from ours”.

R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: May 9, 2018 - 10:19am

Gina Haspel, Trump’s pick to lead CIA, pledges she won’t restart interrogation program

R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Mar 20, 2018 - 11:56am

The NSA Worked to “Track Down” Bitcoin Users, Snowden Documents Reveal

Internet paranoiacs drawn to Bitcoin have long indulged fantasies of American spies subverting the booming, controversial digital currency. Increasingly popular among get-rich-quick speculators, Bitcoin started out as a high-minded project to make financial transactions public and mathematically verifiable — while also offering discretion. Governments, with a vested interest in controlling how money moves, would, some of Bitcoin’s fierce advocates believed, naturally try and thwart the coming techno-libertarian financial order.

It turns out the conspiracy theorists were onto something. Classified documents provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden show that the National Security Agency indeed worked urgently to target Bitcoin users around the world — and wielded at least one mysterious source of information to “help track down senders and receivers of Bitcoins,” according to a top-secret passage in an internal NSA report dating to March 2013. The data source appears to have leveraged the NSA’s ability to harvest and analyze raw, global internet traffic while also exploiting an unnamed software program that purported to offer anonymity to users, according to other documents.

Although the agency was interested in surveilling some competing cryptocurrencies, “Bitcoin is #1 priority,” a March 15, 2013 internal NSA report stated. (...)

R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Mar 16, 2018 - 10:27pm

Caveat Emptor: MSNBC and CNN Use ClA Apologists for False Commentary
R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Mar 1, 2018 - 9:29pm

The Powerful Global Spy Alliance You Never Knew Existed
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 25, 2018 - 5:07am

a couple of things

NSA DELETES “HONESTY” AND “OPENNESS” FROM CORE VALUES

THE NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY maintains a page on its website that outlines its mission statement. But earlier this month, the agency made a discreet change: It removed “honesty” as its top priority.

Since at least May 2016, the surveillance agency had featured honesty as the first of four “core values” listed on NSA.gov, alongside “respect for the law,” “integrity,” and “transparency.” The agency vowed on the site to “be truthful with each other.”

On January 12, however, the NSA removed the mission statement page – which can still be viewed through the Internet Archive – and replaced it with a new version. Now, the parts about honesty and the pledge to be truthful have been deleted. The agency’s new top value is “commitment to service,” which it says means “excellence in the pursuit of our critical mission.”

TOP REPUBLICAN WARNS THAT UNDER NEW SPENDING BILL “THE INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY COULD EXPEND FUNDS AS IT SEES FIT”

IN A DRAMATIC moment on the Senate floor Monday afternoon, as the upper chamber rushed a spending bill through to end the government shutdown, the top Republican and Democrat on the Intelligence Committee warned that the bill contains language that would kneecap Congress’s ability to oversee secret covert actions and surveillance programs. Their effort to amend the language was rebuffed.

The intelligence community, in its latest grasp, has gone too far even for Richard Burr. The Republican chair of the Senate Intelligence committee has long been one of the Senate’s staunchest advocates for the intelligence agencies, leading the fight to reauthorize surveillance programs and fighting to bury the results of the Senate’s five-year investigation into CIA torture. But he took to the Senate floor Monday to warn that it would compromise Congress’s ability to oversee secret intelligence programs.

“This language could erode the powers of the authorizing committee,” Burr said. “Effectively, the intelligence community could expend funds as it sees fit without an authorization bill in place and with no statutory direction indicating that an authorization bill for 2018 is forthcoming.”

The provision, first reported by The Intercept, appeared in the House version of the spending bill last week and modified the 70–year-old-law that first chartered the CIA. It removed language that requiring intelligence agencies to spend money according to Congress’s instructions, and replaced it with a provision that allows the agencies to move money around freely and without Congress’s knowledge. Blackwater founder Erik Prince has recently pitched the administrationon a private intelligence force that would report directly to President Donald Trump and CIA Director Mike Pompeo.




Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 25, 26, 27  Next